We changed our name from IT Central Station: Here's why
Get our free report covering SolarWinds, Paessler AG, Zabbix, and other competitors of WhatsUp Gold. Updated: January 2022.
565,689 professionals have used our research since 2012.

Read reviews of WhatsUp Gold alternatives and competitors

System Engineer at IFM Efector, Inc.
Real User
Top 10
Provides extensive out-of-the-box monitoring and gives us the ability to tweak everything to get meaningful alerts, reduce false positives
Pros and Cons
  • "One of the things that I really like about the LogicMonitor solution is that it has a whole bunch of things, data points, that it can monitor. They're called DataSources, and it has an amazing amount of devices it can monitor that are pre-built into the system You can customize them if you need to. You can change the thresholds and a whole bunch of different things with them. You can even create brand new ones if you need to, if the built-in data sources don't satisfy your requirements for the technology that you want to monitor."
  • "The solution also has a variety of dashboards... They actually have a repository of a whole bunch of different ones, which is really nice... what's really cool is that you can grant somebody access to a dashboard without giving them full access to the rest of the system. You can provide a really nice, high-level dashboard to your executive team, so they can see what is, red, green, or yellow, without having to really get into the nitty-gritty of the technology..."
  • "We explored a couple of other products as well. None of the other products had a customer engagement team like LogicMonitor does."
  • "With the email alerts that we get, it would be nice if the subject line were a little bit smaller, and if it showed the system that is out as the first thing. Sometimes you have to open the email to see what that is."

What is our primary use case?

We have a network that comprises a bunch of Windows Servers, Linux servers, CentOS, and a variety of network devices, such as Cisco routers, Cisco switches, Riverbeds, and some VeloCloud. We use the service to monitor and alert us to any potential issues that we may be having. We also use it to do some pink tests and to monitor the availability of some websites as well.

The whole purpose is to give the IT team a heads-up, before the user base is aware of an issue. There are different levels in the system from "warning" up to "critical" that can let us see that a situation might be developing, that we might be having a problem with a system. We can proactively take care of it before it transitions to a level where it might affect our users and prevent them from doing their daily work.

How has it helped my organization?

It gives us a really good, high-level window into what's working and what might not be working — if anything's building up or having recurring issues. The nice thing about it is that the more you use it, and the more that you get alerted on various things, and thus, the more it allows you to proactively fix things, the more reliable your network and the devices that you're monitoring become. You're taking care of problems ahead of time versus after the fact.

We started out having it alerting on a lot of stuff. We were just watching the alerts to see what they were. Then, we would fine tune them to bring down the threshold of some that were just chatty, or that were just normal and that might have been a little bit too sensitive. After a couple months, we got the solution really finely tuned, and we also fixed a bunch of issues in our environment. Now, when something pops up in LogicMonitor, it's definitely something that we have to take a look at and start working on. And that has made our infrastructure, on a daily basis, extremely reliable. A reliable infrastructure means that our employees can do their jobs without having to worry about the technology that they're using to do them.

In addition, the solution reduced the number of false positives compared to other monitoring platforms. It's the configuration of the tool that allows you to do that. You can really tweak the thresholds in any data point. Companies may be using the same technology, but what might be acceptable for us, in terms of the level of errors that we're getting, and that we know aren't going to cause an issue, might be at a higher threshold than they would at a different company. You can customize those things based on your actual environment. That can rule out the false positives. You'll only get an email when it's an outage and you will only get a warning when it's gone past a certain level that you have determined.

A lot of the built-in things are pretty dead-on and you don't have to tweak them. But there are certain things, like monitoring disk space, where you will have a different level for a warning threshold that you think is important. Or it could depend on the size of the hard drive. Sometimes, doing a disk warning by percentage doesn't help you as much and the actual amount of gigabytes left might be more appropriate. You can tweak those settings to be more precise for what you do. That really significantly reduces false positives, which means you're only being alerted for stuff you need to work on, versus trying to go through a whole bunch of stuff that is information and that is not an issue. We're at the point where everything that's in our system is relevant. I would estimate there has been a 25 percent decrease in false positives, compared to some of the other solutions out there. 

The flip side of that is that, with the other solutions, we were missing stuff that was important.

We use the solution's ability to alert if the cloud loses contact with the on-prem collectors. We get a text message every 30 minutes if that connection is broken. On top of that, we have collectors at two physically distinct locations. If for some reason the main location loses connection to the internet, but our internal networking is okay, everything will failover to the other physical site and it will continue to upload the polling information to the LogicMonitor cloud. We'll know that we have an internet issue at the main site, but that everything internally, and all of our stuff, is actually working. But if we lose both, or if a collector goes down, we do get a text message every 30 minutes saying that we're having an outage. We can look into whether it's a LogicMonitor issue or if it's something that's a bigger issue on our side.

I'm not always sitting in front of a computer screen and looking at the dashboards. For critical stuff I can get an alert in the middle of the night if a system goes down. It will wake me up and then I can take a look at it and I can fix it. Fortunately, for the majority of our sites we're not a 24/7 shop. If there has been a problem off-hours, the alerting has allowed us to see it and know about it when we haven't been sitting at our computers. We can get it fixed and when our employees come in, first thing in the morning, they have no idea that we had an outage the night before because of it. It's a huge advantage.

What is most valuable?

It's an alerting system, so one of the most valuable features is the ability to get meaningful data from our stuff, quickly. It lets us know when we're having a situation. 

One of the things that I really like about the LogicMonitor solution is that it has a whole bunch of things, data points, that it can monitor. They're called DataSources, and it has an amazing amount of devices it can monitor that are pre-built into the system  You can customize them if you need to. You can change the thresholds and a whole bunch of different things with them. You can even create brand new ones if you need to, if the built-in data sources don't satisfy your requirements for the technology that you want to monitor.

There's a lot of custom work that you can do with the solution, but if you're not a programmer, you don't need to. You can just input the type of devices that you want to monitor and make sure you provide the system with the proper authentication to be able to monitor them. And it is read-only monitoring, so that you don't have to worry about it making a change. Then you can set up and group your infrastructure very well to get a bunch of meaningful alerts and you can have reports set up. It's a very in-depth solution.

The solution also has a variety of dashboards. I just attended a training webinar they had in which they went over some customizations on the dashboards. They actually have a repository of a whole bunch of different ones, which is really nice. I'm going to download some of them and add in the proper stuff that I need for them to monitor devices. 

Right now, we're primarily using a couple of dashboards that separate our devices out by server or network infrastructure. We also have a dashboard that separates out the equipment based on the location: if they're in our main data centers or they're in a smaller office. And we have a really nice dashboard for our Microsoft Exchange environment as well. I'm going to add in some more dashboards, since we're a big VMware shop. They have a couple of dashboards for VMware, and there are some others that I'm looking into bringing in as well. 

Overall, the dashboard capabilities are really nice. You can set up reports and email alerts from them. Normally, I have one window open that has two dashboards open all day long so I can see if anything's going on. At the moment, I have a big responsibility for Exchange, so that's my favorite dashboard. In addition to that one, we just created our own overview for all of our stuff. So those are the two that I use most. They give me a really good pane of glass, a quick look at anything I might need to jump onto and take care of.

And what's really cool is that you can grant somebody access to a dashboard without giving them full access to the rest of the system. You can provide a really nice, high-level dashboard to your executive team, so they can see what is, red, green, or yellow, without having to really get into the nitty-gritty of the technology behind how everything works or what the actual situation is. But they can always click on it and see what is actually alerting.

In addition, the overall reporting capabilities are very good. It has a variety of reports that are built into the system and they're very easy to customize. You can take an existing report and modify it to pull in a whole bunch of other stuff. The other thing that is very nice is that you can set up report groups. You can have a bunch of reports grouped and you can send that group of reports to a certain set of people. Our company isn't as report-centric as some other companies are. In other companies, middle management and upper management really like to get reports on a regular basis to see how everything that they're spending money on is running. LogicMonitor is very customizable. You can do a lot through just configuring stuff, without having to be a full-on programmer. But if you want to do some flat-out programming, there is endless customization through that.

The email alerting is very good. It has a link that can take you directly to the alert. From that, you can either acknowledge it or put something into service downtime, if you know it's going to take awhile. And you can forward it to somebody else. 

The mobile app for phones is also very nice. You can use that or you can just go to the webpage, using whatever web browser you have on your mobile phone.

I also really like LogicMonitor's automated and agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration. That was another big selling point for us. I really like how they use a collector and how the collector is a server that's inside our environment. It pulls all the information from our machines, based on credentials or SNMP, and it sends it up to their website, so it's a one-way push. There's nothing from the cloud pulling things out of our environment. The collector is behind our firewall and it's completely secure. I really like the fact that you can add a server, for example a Windows Server, and give it the proper credentials so it can read the data it needs to pull from it without having to install an agent on that server. The same is true with routers and switches, doing everything over SNMP and the OIDs that it can pull. It's very powerful because it allows you to deploy much faster. 

You can also use the solution's discovery tool to discover and make sure you didn't miss anything. When you have to use an agent, that requires a lot of manual time and input. And if you didn't install an agent on something, then that device isn't being monitored. The way LogicMonitor works, with its agentless setup and with its discovery, really helps make sure you're not missing anything. It helps you deploy and get everything into the system very quickly and effectively.

What needs improvement?

With the email alerts that we get, it would be nice if the subject line were a little bit smaller, and if it showed the system that is out as the first thing. Sometimes you have to open the email to see what that is.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using it since 2018, so we're going on three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability has been very good. No issues. I can't recall, in the entire time I've used it, where it has had an outage. They give us a good heads-up and an amount of time when they're going to perform an update on the system. With the redundancy and high-availability that they have on the back-end, none of their upgrades has affected our system or kept it from working.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Depending on how many devices you're monitoring, all you have to do is add more collectors. If you start seeing that you're having performance issues with the collecting of the statistics from the one collector, it's very easy to go into your web portal and download a new collector and deploy it. You can immediately start spreading the load between them. Anytime you add a new collector, you can also set up failover statistics for. If, for some reason, when you split the load between them, one of them has an issue and goes down, you can have everything transfer over to the second one. It won't run as well because the reason you deployed two in the first place was because you were trying to spread out the load, but it will handle it for a short period of time. And when the first one comes back up, it will divide all the tasks back out.

It's very easy to do. There's a section in the portal for you to go to your account settings and then go to collector settings. That's where you can pull one down. You click on the "add" button and you can add a new collector. You can also add collector groups, which is nice. You can have multiple collectors in a collector group monitoring the same stuff to help do your load. And you can actually have failover between collector groups. If one collector group is unavailable, everything can switch over to the second collector group.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

LogicMonitor hasn't really consolidated the monitoring tools we need, but we were having issues with the brand we were using, WhatUp Gold. Their latest updates really broke the system and it wasn't functioning well. The whole purpose was that we were very dissatisfied with WhatsUp Gold and we were looking for a solution to replace it. We used LogicMonitor to do so.

I've used some other monitoring tools in the past and I've found that LogicMonitor is far superior. We weren't using multiple tools beforehand but we did 100-percent replace the single tool we were using with LogicMonitor because it was just incredibly superior.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was pretty straightforward. We went through a bunch of meetings and they helped us get into the system and do everything that we needed to do. Deploying a collector is in the documentation they have and, for somebody who has been in the industry for a while, it's very easy to do. And built into the top of the webpage are two links: support and training. They have a lot of really good self-serve documentation for the system as well.

The deployment took about two months, but that was because we were doing a proof of concept. During that proof of concept we were vetting the system and making a decision about whether we were going to spend the money on it. The amount of actual time spent was about an hour, once a week for a period of time, but not all of that hour was spent on the technological requirements of what we were doing. Some of it was just meetings with the team and their team meeting with us and asking us questions about other stuff we might want to monitor, and what we thought so far about what we were currently doing.

Something that is really nice with the LogicMonitor is that when you first engage with them, they will set up a proof of concept for you and build out your environment during the proof of concept. In our case, when we decided to go live with LogicMonitor and engage in a contract with them, the environment was about 80 percent done. That was really nice. The proof of concept became the majority of our actual solution that we use every day now.

That's something that a lot of the other companies don't do. SolarWinds, for example, is a nightmare. They let you download the product and then you have to figure out how to set it up and configure everything. They don't have any type of deployment team. They tell you, "Well, if you have any issues, just go to our forum and/or call tech support." You can spend months trying to get SolarWinds working, whereas LogicMonitor has a really good engagement team and they partner with you to make sure that the product is doing everything that you want it to do.

That was a huge selling point for us. We explored a couple of other products as well. None of the other products had a customer engagement team like LogicMonitor does.

In addition, the solution monitors many devices out-of-the-box. It was able to monitor 

  • Windows Servers
  • VMware and vCenter for all of our virtual infrastructure
  • the actual ESXi physical hosts
  • all of the virtual machines that are on our VMware servers. 
  • our firewall
  • our wireless access points
  • routers
  • switches
  • LAN optimization devices — Riverbeds

Believe it or not, we actually monitor our Liebert Air Conditioning system with it. It can do that via SNMP. That was a big surprise, that it could do it out-of-the-box. And that is something that it helped us centralize. We stopped using the Liebert system to monitor the Liebert and we now use LogicMonitor for that. We get the data pulled from it and we just look in LogicMonitor, and/or get an email, if there's an issue with humidity, temperature, moisture, etc. It helped us consolidate down from using that as an external device into LogicMonitor.

What was our ROI?

We have absolutely seen return on investment with LogicMonitor. We have a very good, stable environment as a result of LogicMonitor, and the information that it provides us keeps us on top of our game, making sure that our environment is operating at peak capacity.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Pricing seems to be on par with other solutions. For what we get, I think it's a very fair price. They do it based on devices and they have certain levels of the types of monitoring inside those. I haven't gone back and really looked at the differences there, since what we're subscribed to is working well for us at this point.

What other advice do I have?

I can't think of anything at the moment that I would like to monitor that I can't. Because of the flexibility of what you can monitor with LogicMonitor, it has everything covered that my company uses. I literally don't have a feature request, something that I would like them to add. I have other products where I've definitely been asking them to add some stuff into the roadmap. But I haven't needed to ask LogicMonitor to add anything to the product.

I would give it a 10 out of 10. I've used a bunch of products in my IT career and the overall daily use of this product is fantastic. The customizability of it, and the ability to tweak everything so you're getting meaningful alerts and removing false positives, are absolutely incredible. The things you can monitor out-of-the-box are pretty extensive and, for most places, will probably cover what they have. But if you have anything customized that's outside of that, you can add it. It has a programming language where you can add your own data sources. The ability to group everything is really good. 

The one thing that I really would like to harp on is that the way they do a proof of concept, and given the engagement with the customer, the solution is really ready to go by the time you commit to giving them money. A lot of other solutions for this just don't have a good deployment team involved in it, and if you have a moderate solution that isn't deployed properly, it's not going to be a good solution for you.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Manager at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Feature rich, scalable and user-friendly, but open-source products are free and do the same thing
Pros and Cons
  • "It is a user-friendly product that requires almost no maintenance."
  • "It would be a much better product if Microsoft provided management packs with the product."

What is our primary use case?

We are using SCOM for service monitoring integrated with some third-party dashboard. It is our end-to-end service monitoring solution.  

What is most valuable?

The feature I like most about SCOM is that it is easy-to-use. I find it very user-friendly. I also like the knowledge base which it has. You can find the resolution to questions or issues directly within the SCOM itself. It will alert you with a recommendation of what you need to do at the same time. This sort of self-diagnosis or prompting is one of the great values you get from SCOM compared to other solutions.  

What needs improvement?

The dashboard is one place where the product can be improved. We finally needed to get a customized dashboard from the NOC (Network Operation Center) team. The dashboard that was included with the product just did not do what we wanted it to do.  

I am not sure, exactly, what should be included with future releases. There are already a lot of features there in the product. The main thing I can suggest is that Microsoft also provides management packs for monitoring third-party products with the product. If that were included with SCOM, that would make the product even greater. For example, to monitor an Oracle database, you need to look around to get a management pack separately. It could just be included instead.  

You can monitor any non-Microsoft product with Microsoft SCOM if you have the management pack for that product. You need to purchase that management pack. You can get them sometimes from Microsoft and other times from the third-party vendor.  

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) from Microsoft for almost five years.  

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

From the time we did the configuration, the product has been stable. It may be different in other cases. It really depends on the design you implement. If you want to add functionality, you can add it. It depends on the business. If you want Apache or you want a singular-server implementation you configure it as you need to. If it is configured correctly it should remain stable.  

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

SCOM is scalable. We do not have an issue with the number of users or with the number of machines and the devices we are monitoring. It does not have any issues in that respect.  

We support the product with a system admin team which is the only group that deals with SCOM directly for maintenance issues. Right now, the team is only five people. Even there, these five people do not use the product on a daily basis. The configuration is something that you do one time if you do it correctly. There is monitoring, which is done by the NOC team and that is ongoing. 

In case some maintenance is required like a change in business requirements or addition of services, then the SCOM team will do it. This does not happen all the time. But monitoring is done by another team separate from the maintenance.  

How are customer service and technical support?

We have not had to use the Microsoft support since maybe four or five years ago. It was during the time we were doing the implementation. We had a few calls with them — maybe two or three calls — for some configuration-related questions. That was all. It was handled efficiently and we got the answers we needed. But we have not had to use the support team since.  

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have had the opportunity to use other products in this category. Not at the current organization, but in other organizations before this. One was WhatsUp Gold. If I were to compare these two solutions, SCOM has more advantages and is really the better product.  

How was the initial setup?

It is actually pretty simple to do the setup. I think it really can be implemented on the same day that you get it. You can do the complete installation and configuration in one day.  

But adding services, that takes time. It depends on the business and your scope, what you need to add, what you need to configure when it is added. I consider that as a separate part because it is not the fault of the product that you have additional requirements. The additions made for service monitoring depends on the customer, the requirements that they have, and what they need to add.  

What about the implementation team?

The installation was done by our company with an in-house team. We did not need help from the vendor or an integrator except for some basic questions.  

We do maintenance as required also in-house and we handle the upgrades from one version to another version. All those maintenance details are managed by the system admin team.  

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

If you compare the pricing of SCOM to some solutions now available — like ManageEngine — I think it is a bit more expensive. But at that price, you get more in Microsoft System Center. SCOM is a bundled product, it is not only SCOM. You get a complete suite of Microsoft System Center products. There are five products in the bundle. There are no additional costs for SCOM itself and everything is included in the license. The only additional costs that you may have is in getting management packs.  

On the other hand, open-source solutions are available that are mature or maturing and they are very good. They may pose a better solution because they are free.  

What other advice do I have?

My advice to people who are looking for a solution like SCOM would actually be to advise them to move from licensed software to open-source. You can go to Nagios or most other open-source products and they do the same thing as SCOM. There is no need to pay additional money to get the same services.  

On a scale from one to ten where one is the worst and ten is the best, I would rate SCOM as a seven-out-of-ten. It is a good product, but so are the free open-source products it competes with.  

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Windows Server Technology Team Lead at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 20
Open-source, easy to install, and stable
Pros and Cons
  • "It's a flexible solution."
  • "Outside of the normal standard monitoring, I would like to extend patching, importing patching, and supporting patching for Windows Servers."

What is our primary use case?

We are currently doing a POC. For now, it is our testing tool.

We use it mostly as a monitoring infrastructure for services and applications, and it also monitors the capacity.

What is most valuable?

As we are still in the test phase, we have not yet explored all of the features offered in this product.

It's a flexible solution.

What needs improvement?

My main intention is to support or use Zabbix to report patching for servers, or to somehow maintain the patching from Zabbix.

Outside of the normal standard monitoring, I would like to extend patching, importing patching, and supporting patching for Windows Servers.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Zabbix for one year.

We are using the newest version.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Zabbix is a stable solution.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have not yet tested the scalability of this solution. We tested it on a small group of devices, so it is difficult to say at this time.

We intentions to install more features on the device. During the testing, we don't have all of the resources to manage all installations.

We have approximately 40 users in our organization who are using Zabbix.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have contacted technical support from Zabbix, and have spoken with partners from Poland. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have more experience with the WhatsUp Gold Monitoring tool. I still have WhatsUp Gold but we are going to replace it.

We are testing other tools that are free.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. It was easy.

With the help of suppliers, it did not take much time to deploy. It was not complex.

What about the implementation team?

As we were using it for testing, we were using suppliers.

We will need a team of experts for this solution as well as some external support.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

There is no license but we need to pay for support.

Zabbix is an open-source solution.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend this solution to others who are interested in using it.

With my current experience, I would rate Zabbix an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Flag as inappropriate
Get our free report covering SolarWinds, Paessler AG, Zabbix, and other competitors of WhatsUp Gold. Updated: January 2022.
565,689 professionals have used our research since 2012.