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User at a healthcare company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Frees employee time, reduces human error, and offers great training
Pros and Cons
  • "The product has freed up employee time - and it's not just the employee time. We do have some triggers that run. Some jobs are run that people use to manually do at night and weekends. We also don't have to hire additional people just to learn 80 different types of things in a claim and identify correctness manually. The robots will go through and then they can identify if there are specific things that are wrong. That part will go to our experts and they'll review those exact issues."
  • "I'm a developer and I'll move things around and they'll change order, or I'll try to save something and it won't save the first time. I'll have to open something twice, open something three times. I've got a list. I'm working out quirks with UiPath."

What is our primary use case?

Since we are a healthcare organization with HIPAA rules, we're on-prem. Our use cases boil down to claims testing and membership testing. It'd be institutional professional dental claims and making sure our membership is loaded correctly.

How has it helped my organization?

We have to configure our software to pay claims and pay providers. What we're realizing is that, the more claims that we can run through the system, the more accurate we can get, the faster the payment on the claims, and the faster the payment to our providers.

What is most valuable?

The only features we're actually using are the orchestrator and 32 unattended bots.

The value of that is the power to be able to run our thousands and thousands of claims and membership to make sure that everything looks correct.

The solution has saved costs for our organization. I know it's over a million, however, I haven't done the exact numbers.

UiPath has reduced human error. We’re finding out that what we've built for configuration in the past, we're finding mistakes that we did a year ago. Now, the bots are proving that and we've been able to correct those past mistakes. This way, we don't have inaccurate payments or recaptures.

The product has freed up employee time - and it's not just the employee time. We do have some triggers that run. Some jobs are run that people use to manually do at night and weekends. We also don't have to hire additional people just to learn 80 different types of things in a claim and identify correctness manually. The robots will go through and then they can identify if there are specific things that are wrong. That part will go to our experts and they'll review those exact issues.

This use of bots allows for employees to do higher-value work. We also have been able to up-skill some of those people to sometimes a leadership role or a different role they would normally never get due to the fact that they were always manually looking at the claims and membership. This has definitely affected their level of satisfaction at work.

I don't know if we have an accurate estimate of how much time we are saving. I just know we do volume and we do thousands and thousands of claims a day, and therefore, it really helps.

We use UiPath’s Academy. That's how we learned the system. We actually learned it in six weeks and then started the development after that. It's very powerful and I continue to use it today.

It’s helped employees get up to speed with the product. This is especially useful when we get newer versions or we onboard other people. That's part of our syllabus. The first thing a new user has to do is go to the Academy and take some of the classes that we recommend. Then we identify, “okay, did you like it? Is this for you? Is it not for you?” et cetera. It’s a quick win where we don't have to take our time as we've got other work that we have to get completed. It acts as a filtering system for us. Both us and the employee can see if it’s a good fit very quickly. We can find out at an early stage instead of a year later.

The biggest value of the Academy is just knowing that we can do so much more volume and get in some more accurately without human error, or having people working nights and weekends. That has always been a really big push and we've been able to slowly work away from that.

Obviously, we’re not in a perfect world yet, however, getting rid of the manual aspect has been great. People just get burnt out. You can only look at things manually for so many hours. If you've been doing this for 10 years, it's got to be frustrating for those people who are always afraid they’ll get their job taken away. At the same time, for them, it’s so much easier as they don’t have to look at 80 things. They can look at five things that failed and then enjoy time with family and have a work-life balance. That’s big.

What needs improvement?

We've coded up to like 80% of what's possible. We really cut our pain points and said "this gives us our value, our bang for our buck." What we're doing now is saying, "okay, well, how do we improve it?" We've got another area or we've got another part of the software that we use our application that UiPath interacts with. Right now, our main concern is what else we can do to make it even more accurate or get more information or test more information to make it a solid pro program.

I'm a developer and I'll move things around and they'll change order, or I'll try to save something and it won't save the first time. I'll have to open something twice, open something three times. I've got a list. I'm working out quirks with UiPath. There are just UX things where if I copy this and put it here, it should look the same as it was, and I don't know why it doesn't. It could be my machine. It could be my local machine and it might just be that conversation with the premium plus to say, "why is this doing this?" Or maybe there could just be a setting, where we didn't check that box when we set it up. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used the solution for two years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We actually had to spend about four months of maintenance to make sure that we got the solution to how we wanted it. We brought in a contracting firm and they didn't know the company and they just kind of said, "here's what bots can do." 

What we did is we did an assessment program for two months. During those two months, we looked at what they built, which was great. This got us up and running and showed us what's possible. 

Then, we took those two months to identify, for example, if the database maybe should have been set up a little better to interact with our other databases. Or if the coding should have had different paths of risk that they didn't know about. If you don't know the business, you don't know the risks, and therefore, you don't know how to set it up. That's why we did all of that assessment and then we spent four months fixing it to adjust to what we thought was a better path or a more stable path in order to support the robots.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability potential is astronomical. We've got so many areas in the company, including finance and pharmacy, and there are all kinds of different areas and authorizations that you can actually go down and say, okay, now we have time. Let's put it on our calendar. 

The next piece we're looking into is the citizen developer angle. We know that has some power potential, however, we have to have regulations and audits. We want to be careful if we do start moving in that direction to really understand if it is right for the company and is helping people versus if we build something wrong what that would mean to manually have to correct that. That's time nobody has.

How are customer service and support?

Technical support has been great. We usually get answers within hours of a request. I thought we were on the premium support plan and now we're going to go to the premium plus, I believe they call it. That starts up here for us in November.

We've had some challenging solutions where it has taken us several weeks to work through it. They tell us "here's what we recommended". That said, we know our system. It's just like any other contracting firm. They don't know your system and your solutions, however, they give you the recommendations. At this point, we've been able to work through everything that we've had technical issues with. We decide to do some of them a different way. Technical support has been supportive of this approach. It's like a partnership, and that really makes a big difference.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We started with Rational Robot in 2005. I actually developed that. I've been with the company for over 20 years. I started with Rational Robot and then we moved to some C Sharp and some coded UI.

We tried Test Architect for a little while. We've used different RPA methodologies and UiPath seemed to fit a little better with where we are and the robustness we wanted.

We switched when we moved over to new healthcare software. The old one was just COBOL and green screens, and it was hard to automate it. We did, however, it was very difficult. When we moved to this new application, we needed to make everything more quality controlled, and the only way to do that was with the robots.

How was the initial setup?

I was not a part of the implementation process. 

The deployment process took about eight or nine months via our vendor. 

What about the implementation team?

We brought on some contractors to do our initial setup, including a proof of concept, and they built part of the system and after that, we took it over. They were what we called a vendor tracking firm.

What was our ROI?

We have definitely seen an ROI.

The biggest ROI was in the configuration. We're realizing we may be setting some things up wrong and that's not how the customer should have been set up. When we see things fail, we ask why is this failing? And then we go upstream and find out that we didn't even build a specific thing and realize that it was a mistake, a key entry, a mistype, et cetera, and the bots catch that on the backend.

We're able to do that quicker. It's manual labor and it's tedious. Now, manual labor's fine if you want to go in and manually check this, that, and the other thing, however, when that's your day job and you're checking the same 80 fields compared to a spreadsheet over and over, it's just got to be frustrating and employees feel it. You hear it on the call.

With UiPath, we can ask the question "what can we do to support you?" We're not going to replace people; we want to get them to a better place. Our employees understand that. It took them a while, however, they do understand that now and think the solution is really cool and are thankful for the support. It's a tool, not a human being's replacement. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I don't write the checks. I don't know what the actual cost is. That's always on leadership. My understanding is it's a reasonable price for the value that we're getting out of it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did look at the Power Automate desktop. It doesn't have the orchestrator to control things, and it has some other limits. When we do formulas and try to validate what the value should be, they are very difficult or impossible to set up on the Power Automate. At some point in time, I'm sure we'll be able to do that. In today's world, what we need right now is UiPath.

What other advice do I have?

We're just a customer and an end-user.

We do not use the solution’s AI functionality in our automation program. We just do some checks and then just make sure via verification that everything matches in the configuration to the actual claims from the inbound files to the outbound.

There's an automation hub, test, capture, process, mining, all of these other features we haven't been able to purchase yet, due to the fact that we want to make sure that our bread and butter, the claims of membership, is solid. Once we have that in a good place, which we're hoping will be in 2022, we've already talked to our sales rep about the next steps. They've talked about the other features and offered recommendations. We'll go down that path next year and it'll be really exciting to see what else we can do to bring on the other areas of the company.

I'd advise potential new users that they definitely want to do some kind of proof of concept against other systems. I have heard other companies here that have said, okay, we're going up against four other automation tools. That's great. However, do your homework. You need to go and present everything to your leadership and showcase the solutions. 

As we get some of the demos of software, we can kind of compare them to what our system's needs are. A new user can say, well, maybe these are our top two. When you get to your top two, that's your time to bring somebody in, an expert to discuss what you're trying to do.  

If you do choose to go with UiPath, that UiPath academy is so valuable. That's a big asset. If you do the premium plus care, they will support you through and help you get things set up and running or make it better. We've been up and running for two years. Their goal and my goal is to see how to make things better to continuously improve the system and make everyone happy.

I'd rate the solution at a nine out of ten. There are just a few system quirks I'm trying to work through. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Vijay Moorthy
Senior Business Analyst and Consultant at a computer software company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Consultant
Top 20
A valuable enterprise-level tool with the highest level of security, good scalability, and an option to code separately and write a script
Pros and Cons
  • "The entire tool is valuable because it is an enterprise tool. It is on par with other tools like Automation Anywhere or UiPath with the OCR/ICR facilities, analytics, and the entire package for enterprise-level security. It has the highest level of security as compared to any other tool."
  • "There are a lot of things coming up, such as Discovery Bot and Process Discovery. A lot of other aspects are also maturing. We have definitely started using it for our clients, and it is maturing as a solution, but it is all about how you integrate the enterprise with all the automation projects, such as your chatbot, Conversational AI, and robotics. How they are integrated and talk to each other creates a very good business case with all three aspects. The next level should be about integrating it with other automation tools as well. It can have integration with other tools or automation projects, such as your chatbot, Conversational AI, and robotics."

What is our primary use case?

Our use cases are account receivables and account payable. In insurance, our use cases are for vetting beneficiaries, upgrading client portfolios, and updating customer's policies.

What is most valuable?

The entire tool is valuable because it is an enterprise tool. It is on par with other tools like Automation Anywhere or UiPath with the OCR/ICR facilities, analytics, and the entire package for enterprise-level security. It has the highest level of security as compared to any other tool. 

What needs improvement?

There are a lot of things coming up, such as Discovery Bot and Process Discovery. A lot of other aspects are also maturing. We have definitely started using it for our clients, and it is maturing as a solution, but it is all about how you integrate the enterprise with all the automation projects, such as your chatbot, Conversational AI, and robotics. How they are integrated and talk to each other creates a very good business case with all three aspects. The next level should be about integrating it with other automation tools as well. It can have integration with other tools or automation projects, such as your chatbot, Conversational AI, and robotics.

For how long have I used the solution?

I am in robotics for the last seven to eight years, and I have been using Blue Prism for about three to four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Stability-wise, it is a good tool. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is definitely scalable. The whole market of RPA is definitely scalable, but it again depends on your feasibility and complexity when you study a particular environment and process. It also depends on whether you want to scale in the whole organization or different departments or you want to scale up into different areas. All RPA solutions are on par in terms of scalability. There is no difference between them.

How are customer service and technical support?

I don't have any direct experience with them. My solution architect used to handle that. I haven't seen many technical issues because if you are going to deploy the solution and if you've studied enough about the organization and the architecture, then something major is not going to come up. Anything minor, such as securities, passwords, or anything else, can be easily managed.

It is completely run by the solution architects, which is the support team from the RPA side. All technical issues definitely involve the IT team, which is your internal architecture support team and the application support team. You need the support team from the architecture and the IT perspective to manage the technical follow-ups.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have also used UiPath and Automation Anywhere. All these three solutions stand out because they are at the enterprise level. As compared to UiPath and Automation Anywhere, to use Blue Prism, you need developers who have hardcore development experience. It requires quite a bit on the development side. In Blue Prism, you can also code separately and write a script, which adds more value to it.

Blue Prism came too late into the market with its analytics and process discovery features, whereas Automation Anywhere and UiPath were the first ones in the market. Blue Prism is catching up, and it is in the Gartner quadrant, Forrester, etc. It is not lagging far behind.

In Europe, Blue Prism has captured a lot of markets. In the US and Asia, you will see Automation Anywhere and UiPath in the front race. Microsoft, WorkFusion, and Pega are also catching up now.

How was the initial setup?

It is not that complex. It is about how you study an organization and how an organization's architecture runs through. If it is a big organization or an enterprise, then you have to have solution architects from the customer side and also from our side. Solution architects will go and study the customer's architecture. Based on that, we can select which tools are going to be used and how complex it is going to be. It is very much dependent on how the architecture of an organization is because you are going to place the automation tool into that particular organization. Therefore, the initial feasibility and study play a major role in defining the complexity of your design and the entire format or automation.

Initially, the deployment used to take quite long. Now, it is not client-based; it is web-based, and the installation process has been reduced. You just download, and there is no starting a client and all that kind of stuff. It is much easier now than it was before.

What about the implementation team?

In terms of the staff required for the deployment and maintenance of Blue Prism, it depends on what kind of process you're managing. It is not about the tools; it is about the processes. You need to know:

  • How complex they are?
  • What is the risk factor for these processes?
  • How do they impact the entire automation in terms of cost? That is a very important aspect of support because it is in production, and it is going to have a straight impact on the client's revenue.

Generally, one person can easily support around five processes if they fall into the simple category. If the processes fall into the complex category, then you need at least two people managing five processes. By complex, I mean when you have applications that are lengthy and the number of steps of the process are more than 500 or so, and you have to monitor the bots very closely. When the bot or the process breaks, the support team needs to take over and act accordingly. 

The roles and responsibilities and the kind of people needed for maintaining the solution vary based on whether you have agile project management or a lot of projects going on. Typically, you will need a solution architect. You would require an analyst only in the first two or three months or whatever is the period for taking care of the process you want to deploy. After that, you don't require the analysts because it only needs to be overseen from the business side, which will begin with SMEs and the production support team.

Any changes or optimization after 90 days, six months, or a year, due to multiple factors such as legislation changes or anything else, have to be done in the process that is robotized. At this stage, the SMEs and the support team play a very vital role. There should definitely be a very good support function because a lot of follow-ups happen in the process and the production in robotics. To manage them, there should be a very good ticketing system in place. The Agile methodology works perfectly fine, and it adds great value to run your process effectively and having an efficient process, but you definitely need the solution architect, application owner, project management team, and the COE team to manage the entire workflow, work items, or backlog items coming into the support function.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It is a bit higher in cost as compared to Automation Anywhere and UiPath. The rate also differs from client to client. Margins are also important when it comes to costing and licensing. There are some additional costs involved besides the standard licensing costs. You have the development team cost, which includes the project manager, development team, analyst, and testers. You also need a team manager. You also have the tools cost, architecture cost, platform cost, and the licensing cost of each bot.

What other advice do I have?

You should suggest a tool only after you study the architecture of an enterprise. Every tool has its own features, upside, and downside. It is not about necessarily going for Blue Prism, Automation Anywhere, or UiPath. For implementing a solution, you definitely need to look in the market to find out what suits you. You can then go for it.  

Blue Prism, Automation Anywhere, or UiPath are on par. There is not much difference in those tools at an enterprise level. The early development cost and the cost of the platform differ in these three tools. There are some clients who say that "We want only Blue Prism. We don't want to look at anything else." In such a scenario, you can definitely go for Blue Prism because it is on par with other competitors. 

The biggest lesson that we have learned from using Blue Prism is that it is important to choose the right processes and the right complexity of the processes. You can't choose highly complex processes where you have around 800,000 steps or very volatile processes where the team is involved in the application layer or at the process level very frequently. These kinds of things could be avoided.

I would rate Blue Prism an eight out of ten because it is a very old tool. It has been around in the market for quite a while, and they have their own learnings. It is a complete package at an enterprise level, where you can have analytics and attended and unattended automation. You can run your scripts, and at an enterprise level, even security aspects are very strong as compared to what is generally required by a client. There is room for improvement. All the new features that are coming up are not being used by many clients, and a lot of learning has to happen.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
Samuel Kamau
Co-Founder at Beta Edge Technology Limited
Real User
Top 5
Saves time and works reliably with Excel, but it's resource-heavy and the support needs to be improved
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable features are the Excel activities. It has a number of Excel activities that are quite reliable."
  • "This is a Java-based application that takes up a lot of space and when it runs, consumes a lot of memory. This affects the reliability because it gets to a point where it hangs."

What is our primary use case?

I am a solution provider and I implement RPA products and automate processes for my clients.

In my recent deployment of this product, it is primarily used for financial processes, such as reconciliation in Excel. There are different Excel sheets that I reconcile using automation.

How has it helped my organization?

This product helps us by automating functions in finance. Users are able to have attended bots but can save time by handing processes to the bots to run.

The bots are deployed on our on-premises server, and users are able to assign work to them to run while they continue their own work. The processes that the bots are running do not interfere with the day-to-day business. The server simply gives them time for the processes that they are performing.

When a process is running in the background, it is consistent. In situations where processes are running and controlling the user interface, once in a while they might miss what's being clicked.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features are the Excel activities. It has a number of Excel activities that are quite reliable.

The Studio is used for development and the Control Tower is used for management.

What needs improvement?

This is a Java-based application that takes up a lot of space and when it runs, consumes a lot of memory. This affects the reliability because it gets to a point where it hangs.

There are some basic features missing in the Excel activities. For example, you cannot delete a row or a column, which are some of the things that I would like to be able to do.

An example of something that is difficult to do is get yesterday's date. There is a lot of scripting that has to be done. It's not direct because you can't simply use a date variable and then subtract one day. Instead, you have to do some coding to get it. That was a problem for our deployment because reconciliations are done for the previous day, and when you're naming files with yesterday's date or creating folders according to date, you have to do a lot of manipulation in the code.

For how long have I used the solution?

I worked with WorkFusion for approximately eight months between November 2020 and August 2021.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In terms of consistency, it's good. However, in terms of reliability, because it consumes a lot of memory, it gets to a point where it starts hanging. The fact that it needs a lot of memory is the only problem.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I would not recommend this product for large automation projects because it gave us problems in terms of space and the speed at which it was executing. Once it starts running a large process with loops, it hangs. So, the process takes longer to complete.

When I deployed this solution, it was for a financial institution that had a six-person team. We automated three processes that have to do with reconciliation and they run them every week or two. The six people share roles and the bots assist them.

The reason that we deployed bots for them is that they are limited in number and needed assistance. At this point, the usage is not expected to grow.

How are customer service and support?

I asked some questions on the forum and I tried to contact the support in South Africa, but I couldn't get the assistance I required. These people were not coming through, so I just had to do my own research.

Ultimately, technical support never got back to me on any of the queries that I raised. As such, I cannot give them any plusses. In fact, I still have pending questions in the forum.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I also work with UiPath and Microsoft Power Automate.

How was the initial setup?

Setting up the server and the desktop versions are quite straightforward, both for the studio and for the control tower. As long as you have the required access, the setup process is straightforward. You just have to press the Next button on a series of screens.

We had a deployment on IIS and I built a web application on top of the bot. In total, the deployment took about a week because there were some functionalities that were not being picked up properly. Once those were completed, everything worked properly.

Post-setup, the deployment was a little bit difficult.

In terms of maintenance, one or two people are sufficient. You need a developer, and then somebody to support the infrastructure.

What about the implementation team?

I implemented this product alone. It was a bit difficult so I used the online forum and also tried to contact technical support in South Africa.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

My client is using RPA Express, which is available for them to use free of charge. Their parent company is in another country, so they're not paying for anything locally.

The Studio comes standard and is available at no charge but the Control Tower requires a license. The orchestration platform, where you manage your bots and users, is also available with a separate license.

As a developer, you cannot download the developer studio for free unless you are working for your clients. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

My client had chosen and acquired WorkFusion in advance of hiring me. They were looking for a consultant to assist them with development and deployment.

What other advice do I have?

My advice for anybody who is implementing WorkFusion is to use it for small desktop processes, such as sending out a report via email, or small amounts of Excel reconciliation. However, once you have more than 1,000 or 2,000 data rows, it's going to be a bit hectic to consume that much data. That said, for small desktop applications, it's going to work.

When it comes to deploying to the server, it's going to be a bit complicated for enterprise solutions, especially because of the space. When they want to deploy it, they should have at least 16 GB of RAM and at least four CPU cores. Otherwise, anything below that will be too slow.

In summary, this is a good product for small desktop-level automation, but I do not recommend it for large-scale automation because it consumes too much memory and the processes run slowly or hang as a result. There is a lot of work to be done and considering the support does not get back to you, you might struggle with an issue for a long time. Also, there is very little content available online.

I would rate this solution a six out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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reviewer1464705
Manager, Robotic Process Automation at Celerity
Real User
Top 20
Good support, improves process efficiency, and the ROI is significant
Pros and Cons
  • "I'd say the most impactful and heavily or commonly used ability of v11 and A2019 has been the ability to integrate other code types and operations within the process."
  • "Having fewer connection instances would make it more secure, more simple to troubleshoot, and possibly more flexible with the type of applications in use."

What is our primary use case?

We have used AA for telecom industry repetitive processes, public retirement firms processes, and financial bank processes. The development has been with local developer desktops, remote VDIs, EC2s, as well as RDP clients of sorts for the individual company preferences.

We are currently building an Azure environment for our A2019 solution internally, with a VDI as our developer/UAT environment. Production will be a separate VDI operating from our main control room instance, as we create Bot Runner agents out of those VDIs for production.

I also deal with many federated lines of business, as they often develop locally and use attended automation as their source of RPA for their lines of business. Others utilize EC2s as their developer and UAT environments and have a separate production import process that keeps the separation of duties intact. Though this is not as productive as that team expected, they use it temporarily until their control room can be migrated and upgraded into A2019 instance as part of another line of business currently building out a sandbox environment for the remainder of 2020.

How has it helped my organization?

I am a consultant and our RPA practice on a personal level has improved the efficiency of the payroll, PTO, and timecard submission process within our company. It has taken time-consuming daily mundane tasks off the plates of our talented finance teams and allowed them to dedicate more productive time to working with more thought-heavy and human-centric activities.

Outside of our company, as we work with clientele, several improvement instances have been evident for those. One company had a very tedious process of monitoring an email inbox for several business units to send emails notifying that their daily database update process was completed. This took many hours of monitoring after hours, but in place of that, the RPA bot was able to perform the monitoring for them of that inbox, perform the necessary follow-up or escalation emails needed, and finalize the process once all was complete. This was unattended automation, saving them precious time, improving morale, and accurately informing everyone of the completion. 

What is most valuable?

Both v11 and A2019 have their strengths but the cloud-based forms with Excel, Microsoft applications, scripts integration, and functionality of A2019 have really stood out above the way v11 can do those things.

It takes far less code to work with A2019 than v11 for the tasks we have in place. In v11, the Metabot features have proven a tremendous help to work with smaller tasks such as file and folder operations, datetime operations, as well as credential management operations.

I'd say the most impactful and heavily or commonly used ability of v11 and A2019 has been the ability to integrate other code types and operations within the process. For example, if someone needed a heavy data comparison process to take place, utilizing AA could work but often takes a good bit of time to work through a large Excel or CSV file. Instead, activating a pre-developed or partner-developed Python script would be my choice because of the speed and efficiency of that language. I currently use this method and it's a major time saver.

What needs improvement?

In terms of improvement, usually, I have found is not as general as people think. Specifically, as a use case, I am excited to see improvements in having an A2019 cloud control room working and improved on the Lenox environments. A good bit of our finance infrastructure for web-based applications is built in that environment.

There is a good bit of dashboard-type development going on in this type of environment already, so the ability to integrate some of the functionality, as well as keep the synchronicity of everything within it, would be a major benefit.

Having fewer connection instances would make it more secure, more simple to troubleshoot, and possibly more flexible with the type of applications in use.  

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using the AA desktop application versions since 2014 (v09-v11), approximately six years, and A2019 for about four months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've not had any instability issues but only environmental stability issues that come down to the company that created the environment. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I find it very scalable, especially with smaller automations, as they can often grow once proven to businesses that the processes work. 

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support was very knowledgeable, very easy to understand mostly, their ability to work with us to meet the needs and being patient was a huge help. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I did not previously use different versions but currently use both. I do know that going forward with v11 sunsetting in 2021, we are migrating and going through a learning phase of A2019 to fully adapt to that application. 

How was the initial setup?

The A2019 setup was straightforward for the applications themselves. The environments in which they are set up is a different story but, that again is on a per-company basis and often lends itself to the expertise of the DevOps teams. Sometimes, those folks are not familiar with RPA or A2019.  

What about the implementation team?

We implemented through AA directly. The availability of their support was very good. Several meetings and work with their folks went well. 

What was our ROI?

Our ROI has ranged from thousands to hundreds of thousands, depending on the type of process being automated.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I really enjoy the pricing options with Automation Anywhere, as they are able to flex their ability to adapt to the needs of the customer really well. I am sure the specifics for some pricing are on a partner-by-partner basis but providing the ability to scale the licenses, setup, and pricing to the customer is a huge benefit with Automation Anywhere.

Their technical support system and response times directly to a partner are really good.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did review UiPath, Blue Prism, and Power Automate. 

What other advice do I have?

I'd say, fully go headfirst into learning the A2019 platform and all it can do for a business. There is something for everyone in that platform. Large or small scale automations, migration processes from v11 is already in place and tested, and there is no more need for Metabots because they are now "packages" that can be made or modified by a seasoned developer, and a plethora of other benefits are evident. Just jump in!! 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Microsoft Azure
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Not only do I run the RPA practice and communicate as a partner with Automation Anywhere, I am an RPA developer as well utilizing the product within our company and building out solutions and automations directly for and with our clients as a developer.
Vijay_S
Practice Leader at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 20
Reliable and strong, but cloud presence should be expanded to other regions
Pros and Cons
  • "They are leaders in the same industry."
  • "The handwritten structured and semi-structured data recognition accuracy is much lower and is an area that definitely needs to improve."

What is our primary use case?

We are not resellers. We implement Pega Robotic Process Automation.

What is most valuable?

Definitely, we are satisfied. It's a pretty strong product.

They are leaders in the same industry.

What needs improvement?

As part of the digital transformation, most organizations are looking for the cloud option, and Pega's cloud presence is pretty much restricted to North America and Europe. There is no cloud presence in the Middle East, India, and other regions. 

Financial customers in these regions are skeptical. They don't want to have their data outside of the geography for multiple reasons, mainly because of the government policies.

Pega should consider putting the focus on other regions such as India and the Middle East. They should also start to think about a data center that is hosted in that particular country.

It is not as easy, to implement bots in Pega with the features it carries as it is in UiPath. For example, implementing a chatbot or your email bot is not that straightforward in Pega.

When we consider OCR, the degree of accuracy is less with Pega when the data is structured or semi-structured. The accuracy of the OCR in UiPath or some other products is much high with structured and semi-structured data. The handwritten structured and semi-structured data recognition accuracy is much lower and is an area that definitely needs to improve.

For how long have I used the solution?

I manage the practice and have a team that has been working with Pega for 15 years. 

They are not only working with Pega RPA but the entire platform, the entire suite of products that are offered such as RPA, BPM, and CRM.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Pega Robotic Process Automation is a stable product. 

We had experienced performance issues at one point, but it had to do with the infrastructure that was procured by a particular customer. We are seeing larger implementations for financial customers.

Smaller customers have also had performance issues but again, it's because of the infrastructure.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Our customers vary in size. We have small business customers to enterprise customers as well as corporate customers, and customers on a medium scale.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Our experience is predominantly with ServiceNow and Pega.

We work with multiple products. Pega and Appian are two of the key products that we are working with. It is more in the RPA and BPM space.

We also have expertise in UiPath and Automation Anywhere. Our focus is on RPA, BPM with Pega, Appian, UiPath, and Automation Anywhere. 

We also work with other products such as Salesforce, Microsoft Dynamics, and ServiceNow.

What we would recommend would depend on the customer. If it is a high scale enterprise customer who is looking for a core platform implementation, such as card dispute or claims modernization, they should go with Pega.

If a customer is looking for safe automation and easy implementation, they can use Pega, but we would recommend SalesForce because it is pretty straightforward and easy to implement. 

With many customers, we see that they prefer Appian and UiPath to go along with having Pega and Salesforce already because Appian is a product that is straightforward and low-code. Anything that is implemented in Pega is a process that takes at least three to four months as a foundation. Any changes in Pega can take a lot of time, it is not low-code. Appian can be very easily implemented because of its model. If you have an operational implementation in finance operations, legal operations, HR operations, frequent changes, and for agility, we recommend Appian. 

For customers who already have an RPA in place and already have Salesforce and they don't want a CRM but want to process data then we suggest UiPath. UiPath is pretty strong and pure RPA but it does not have a processed platform. If there are tactical solutions required we recommend UiPath.

These are the four main products we recommend to the customers depending on their current needs.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I would like to see pricing for different geography sites. Pega is predominantly US-centric with its pricing. When we see customers in the Middle East, or the APAC region where they are is definitely looking for lower pricing, Pega still more costly because they are still in the US pricing model.

Pega is pretty costly. When you look at the competitors such as SalesForce, Newgen, and multiple other products, they have India-centric pricing, as well as pricing for the Middle East.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have many customers who are interested in a comparison with many different products. We are evaluating solutions such as Pega RPA, Power Automate, and ServiceNow to create points of view of the differences between the products.

We also want a better understanding of the differences, as we don't have a lot of experience with Power Automate.

What other advice do I have?

To use Pega RPA, you have to be mature. If you are interested in RPA, I would still rank UiPath first. Pega would be the second recommendation and the third would be Appian. 

Salesforce does not have a large RPA at this point. For pure RPA, there is no question that UiPath would be the suggested product.

Pega and Appian have to achieve a certain level of maturity. They are still a part of the product line and are still excellent products similar to OpenSpan, Jira, and also Appian. The integration is not as smooth as expected and it might take a year to get seamless integration.

If I were to rate Pega as a suite, I would rate it a nine out of ten. It has CRM, process implementations, customer experience, and has RPA.

I would rate Pega Robotic Process Automation a seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
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