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Buyer's Guide
Backup and Recovery Software
September 2022
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Mohd Hisyamudin Hamid - PeerSpot reviewer
System Engineer at Netwitz
Real User
Top 20
Reliable and fast, easy to use, good alerting, and backups can be mounted for use as drives
Pros and Cons
  • "The compression and deduplication features have helped to save on storage costs."
  • "It is quite surprising to me that the configuration cannot be backed up automatically, and I think that Rapid Recovery should have an option for scheduled configuration backup."

What is our primary use case?

Our primary use is backup and restore, which we use to protect our customers' data centers.

How has it helped my organization?

From an operations standpoint, the email notifications have helped me a lot.

The mount function has helped us because it is a straightforward process that we can explain to a customer over the phone. When they need to restore a file or a folder, there are only a few steps involved.

Many times, we have been able to recover data with little disruption to our customer's work environment. In a few cases, it helped me to recover all of the data for a customer, which was a big help.

In cases where we have had to restore a failed server, the process has been quite fast. The timeframe depends on the size of the data but it is faster than other products we have worked with.

There are multiple choices for restoring data. For example, first, you can create a virtual standby, and then restore data while it is being used. Alternatively, you can bring up another server and then restore data to it. I have not yet used virtual standby in production.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the ability to mount a backup as a drive, where you can access the data.

Quest Rapid Recovery has good speed and reliability.

Rapid Recovery has a feature that will archive backups.

This product is straightforward and easy to use.

I'm quite impressed with the usability, and I am comparing this with other backup and data protection software that I have used, such as NetVault. Rapid Recovery is easier to use because of its user-friendly interface.

An example of another product that I use currently, that is different from Quest products, is Veeam. I prefer to use Rapid Recovery because the number of steps required in the process is minimal. With fewer steps required to complete my tasks, compared to other products, Rapid Recovery is the easiest one to use.

This product has absolutely reduced the admin time involved in my backup and recovery operations. The amount of time it saves depends on each customer's environment. At the most basic level, before using this product, I had to log in every day to check on the stability of the backup and sometimes act based upon it. For example, if there was a failed backup then I had to set a new one.

With Rapid Recovery, after creating alerts, I no longer need to check on each client. I used to have to go to each client, one by one, and check several pages to see whether a backup had failed. Now, I simply wait for an email notification to inform me of the status. Basically, half of my day is saved because of the email notification and alerts. When I don't receive an alert then I don't even need to check.

The compression and deduplication features have helped to save on storage costs. We have quite a number of clients, and there is a lot of data. I am quite impressed because we started with an 18 TB capacity license, and we managed to back up almost 126 clients. This was possible because of the deduplication and compression features. There are other solutions that only support compression, and they require that customers allocate more storage. For example, my customers that are using NetVault require more capacity.

Incremental Backup is another feature that saves storage space because this type of backup only records the changes since the last one. If there are few changes then it does not affect the storage very much.

I really like the replication features. Rapid Recovery has different mounting options and you can do a fast restoration. For example, you can mount a virtual hard disk and it doesn't impact your environment. My customers have been quite impressed with the speed of replication.

What needs improvement?

One of the features that I like is the Rapid Recovery Core portal. Basically, you can access the customer's site using a website URL. However, what I notice is that the information sometimes differs from what is in the Rapid Recovery Core. I think that more should be done to ensure that this is synchronized.

When backing up the configuration it has to be done manually, which is something that should be improved. It is quite surprising to me that the configuration cannot be backed up automatically, and I think that Rapid Recovery should have an option for scheduled configuration backup.

I had an experience with one customer where the backup storage was corrupted, and as a result, the repository was corrupt. In that situation, with the repo gone, we were unable to retrieve the backup. To handle situations like this, it would be great if Rapid Recovery offered a second-tier of backup. What I am doing now is archiving the repository, which gives me a secondary backup for my clients.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been working with Quest Rapid Recovery for almost three years, since 2019. I began working with it as soon as I joined my current company.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I would rate the stability at 95%.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

This product is quite scalable. I'm quite impressed with the way Rapid Recovery handles scale and the ability to expand it. As our customers migrate from NetVaule to Rapid Recovery, we increase our own total storage space and it's easy to do.

In the first two years, we subscribed to 13 TB of data. Now in our third year, it has been increased to 18 TB. Because the product is profitable and working well, the company is planning to increase usage. Eventually, all of the servers will be put into Rapid Recovery and additional licensing will be purchased.

In our environment, there are two administrators for this solution. One handles the customers and the other is internal. Between them, we have full visibility.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is quite fast. My interactions with them are quick because I have memorized the steps, which start with sending them the logs. Once I send the log to support, they can begin.

Overall, they are quite fast and quite helpful.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I use a variety of Quest products, including NetVault. Based on my observations, when a customer allocates 50 TB with NetVault, you can do the same with less storage using Rapid Recovery. It only requires about 20 TB to restore 120 clients, which results in a lower overall storage cost.

Many of my customers began with NetVault, and we proposed Rapid Recovery to them. In general, they have been quite happy with the switch. They like the way it connects with the core and that they do not have to install agents. One of the problems with installing an agent is that you often have to reboot that machine, and they no longer have to do this.

Most of the servers are migrating to Rapid Recovery because they trust it. From a maintenance perspective, the majority of the issues that I had found previously were related to agents. After migrating, these problems are no longer there.

Performing maintenance on Rapid Recovery involves more steps than it does with NetVault, although not very many. I just want to ensure that everything with Rapid Recovery is stable.

I also use products from other vendors including Veeam.

How was the initial setup?

Both installing and upgrading are simple and straightforward to do. It is not a complex process to set it up. The complete deployment takes less than 15 minutes.

Based on the customers that I have now, my implementation strategy focuses on VMware. VMware connects to Rapid Recovery using vCenter. It is set up so that customers retain their data for one month.

Because Rapid Recovery doesn't have a secondary backup, I also have the archiving solution as part of this. 

What about the implementation team?

We have an in-house team for deployment.

Minimal staff is needed for deployment and maintenance.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Licensing fees are based on the amount of data that you want to store, which is related to how many customers you want to cover. I recommend that before purchasing a license, you identify how many clients will be protected. You then need to estimate the total amount of storage based on each client's size.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Evaluation of other options is the responsibility of the customer. My company handles multiple data products but this is the only option we offer for data recovery.

What other advice do I have?

The Synthetic Incremental Backup feature is a new one that I haven't set up yet. Instead, I use the normal incremental backup.

When replication is being used, when it first starts, it will be slow. The reason for this is that you have to start with a base. Then, once you have the base, the replication is very fast.

It is important to my clients that features such as deduplication and replication are included at no extra charge. They understand these features, as well as compression, and understand the costs involved. As they switch from other products, they know that implementing Rapid Recovery and adding storage will not cost very much.

The biggest lesson that I have learned from using this product is to not trust the storage hardware. Similarly, don't trust the connection between your customer and the backup storage site. When corruption occurs then it is quite troublesome and requires a lot of troubleshooting. Moreover, some data may be lost permanently. To deal with this, we have started creating multiple repositories and back up accordingly. This gives us insurance that data is not lost in the event of a disaster.

My advice for anybody who is looking into this product is to first know what they have in their environment. For example, if they are using a tape backup system then this product is not applicable. However, if they have a supported storage system then this is a good choice. Similarly, if replication is being used at branch offices then this product is very good because of the speed. I really like how the replication capability works.

I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Mukesh Maithani - PeerSpot reviewer
Technical manager at Optimistic Technology Solutions Pvt Ltd
Reseller
Top 20
Reliable and has useful VM standby and replication features, with a five-minute RPO and fifteen-minute RTO, and good technical support
Pros and Cons
  • "One feature I found that's the most valuable in Quest Rapid Recovery is the VM standby feature which is very useful for my current customer. The solution also has a great replication feature. The third most valuable feature in Quest Rapid Recovery is the five-minute RPO and the fifteen-minute RTO. The solution is also very user-friendly."
  • "In terms of what needs improvement in Quest Rapid Recovery, though the solution is seamless, right now, they are just giving the software which means we'll need to arrange the hardware. If they can combine the appliance and software, that would be a great approach. In the next release of Quest Rapid Recovery, it would be great if they'd add a folder backup feature because only a snapshot backup feature is available at the moment."

What is our primary use case?

In terms of my use case for Quest Rapid Recovery, for one customer, I'm doing a case study, so there's a backup requirement for sixteen to twenty VMs and some physical machines, and there's a need to replicate that backup to the DR site. My company then uses Quest Rapid Recovery for backing up the VMs and replicating them on the websites, so whenever and wherever that is required, the VMs can be restored on the DR site.

What is most valuable?

One feature I found that's the most valuable in Quest Rapid Recovery is the VM standby feature which is very useful for my current customer. The solution also has a great replication feature. The third most valuable feature in Quest Rapid Recovery is the five-minute RPO and the fifteen-minute RTO. The solution is also very user-friendly.

What needs improvement?

In terms of what needs improvement in Quest Rapid Recovery, though the solution is seamless, right now, they are just giving the software which means we'll need to arrange the hardware. If they can combine the appliance and software, that would be a great approach.

In the next release of Quest Rapid Recovery, it would be great if they'd add a folder backup feature because only a snapshot backup feature is available at the moment.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been working with Quest Rapid Recovery for the last six or seven years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Quest Rapid Recovery is a stable solution. It is very reliable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Quest Rapid Recovery is a scalable solution, but it's not as scalable as NetVault.

How are customer service and support?

The technical support for Quest Rapid Recovery is quite good. You just need to raise a ticket then within two hours, the support team will have a remote session with you and resolve your issues. On a scale of one to five, I would rate support a four.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup for Quest Rapid Recovery was straightforward. Deployment only takes thirty minutes if you do an OS patch, otherwise, it'll only take fifteen to twenty minutes maximum.

On a scale of one to five, with one being very complex and five being very easy, I'd give the initial setup of Quest Rapid Recovery a score of five.

What about the implementation team?

We implement Quest Rapid Recovery for our customers in-house.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I'm not aware of the exact cost of Quest Rapid Recovery because I'm from the technical team, but in general, the solution is quite competitive cost-wise.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated Veeam and Nutanix against Quest Rapid Recovery. In terms of RPO, Quest Rapid Recovery has a five-minute RPO and that's a good point, while Veeam takes longer: fifteen minutes. Quest Rapid Recovery has VM standby as a native feature, while Veeam has replication on VMware. If you have VMware on both the DC and DR sides, you can replicate VMs from the Veeam console.

As for Nutanix, it has the native inbuilt plugin for Veeam that isn't present in Quest Rapid Recovery, but is in another Quest product: NetVault.

What other advice do I have?

My company is a reseller and system integrator that sells backup solutions to customers, for example, Quest Rapid Recovery.

My company works on different releases of the solution, old and new, depending on the customer environment.

Quest Rapid Recovery doesn't require any maintenance unless there's a new patch release.

I would recommend Quest Rapid Recovery, but my recommendation would be on a case-by-case basis. The solution is most suitable for SMB customers, but it won't be suitable for all enterprise clients because it is not suitable for online databases such as SQL and Postgre, particularly because Quest Rapid Recovery has a snapshot-based backup. For databases, the vendor has a different solution called NetVault. If the client needs a physical machine backup, Quest Rapid Recovery is suitable, but if the client is using SQL or SAP HANA, then NetVault is the best tool.

What I'd recommend if you're looking into implementing Quest Rapid Recovery is to look at the feature list first and compare that against what you want and what's available in the solution.

My rating for Quest Rapid Recovery is nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner/Reseller
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Buyer's Guide
Backup and Recovery Software
September 2022
Get our free report covering Veeam Software, Zerto, Quest Software, and other competitors of Quest Rapid Recovery. Updated: September 2022.
635,987 professionals have used our research since 2012.