Buyer's Guide
Single Sign-On (SSO)
January 2023
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Technical Solutions Lead at a insurance company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Stable and reliable solution but the application updates are lacking
Pros and Cons
  • "A solution that's easy to use, stable, and reliable."
  • "Application updates are lacking. Customer support needs to be improved."

What is our primary use case?

We've been using this solution for SSO and consolidation of IDs.

How has it helped my organization?

This solution brought us the SSO perspective, and this is the main reason we're using it.

What is most valuable?

The only thing I like about Okta Workforce Identity compared to other solutions in the market is that it's an easy resource that you can get, even if you're working with many users, but there is a lot to learn about it.

What needs improvement?

There are many things that Okta has to improve on. I understand that Okta has a lot of apps, like any other provider, e.g. Microsoft apps, IDP apps, or cloud identity apps.

The problem with Okta is that they create the app and they never update. In this fast-paced industry where versions keep getting updated, Okta is really slow at times.

None of the Okta applications that they create, for example, in my case: I have used the cloud identity of Microsoft apps and now I'm using the off tabs. What I found is none of the single Okta apps that we have worked and did not create an issue. They are not fully mature. So it's that aspect that can be improved, which Okta is investigating. Their application support and not having updates for those applications also need to be improved. These are the things that surprised me and I was not able to understand from Okta.

Okta's customer support should be improved.

Okta should work with certain providers, e.g. the Google cloud, the AWS cloud, the Microsoft cloud, and they should evaluate the integration point because what happens is if your organization has SSO which relies on Okta, all of these three clouds and the Okta app are far from perfect. You are not able to get the right setup based on how your security is trying to define it vs what the application can support. You'll end up using the default interface Okta provides with those apps.

I understand Okta could say that if they shouldn't worry about it because if AWS wanted to support Okta, then AWS should be the one providing us the app and support, but Okta should try to understand the users, do surveys from the different automation using Okta, and use different apps because those apps are very critical. They are far from perfect, so Okta has the worst implementation.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used this solution in the last 12 months. We've been using it for six years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This solution is stable and reliable. We didn't find the solution itself hard to use.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability of this solution is bad. Scalability has two or three different meanings to it.

Is it scalable from the infrastructure side of it? The answer is yes.

Is this scalable from the business perspective? The answer is no. For example, the B2B and the B2C solutions that others provide, those aspects in Okta are completely lacking.

For example, if I have the Microsoft Azure Active Directory, I have the B2C, B2B, and the phase rate, so I have a way to not only support my enterprise but my end customers in a very fast manner. In the case of Okta, that whole path is a nightmare to work with.

How are customer service and support?

I didn't like Okta's support. They say they have very good support, but the moment you create a ticket, they will tell you that they provide the app, but they cannot provide support because we connected the app to another environment, or to another side of the spectrum. This seemed very odd to me.

First, we are using the application you specified, then you say you cannot support this application just because the value provided is outside of this application, so you cannot troubleshoot or help us to troubleshoot if we open a ticket. Every single time it's a chicken and egg type of situation. From that perspective, Okta's support is horrible.

How was the initial setup?

The setup was straightforward. Nowadays, all the other IDPs are the same way, too. I didn't find a single IDP that had no experience at the level, and all of them can stand up at the same time, within the same time frame.

With Okta, on the other hand, the requirement to have the ID server in between, whether it's the cloud-based ID server specified, or the on-prem base, like ours: It's on-prem, but what I found was that we were not able to do it even after following all the guidance unless we had a dedicated Okta person to help us do it. It was a different situation with Microsoft and cloud IDP which were easy to set up, as we were able to do it ourselves just by following the documentation.

What about the implementation team?

We implemented the solution through an integrator consultant. They are fine. They are doing the job on a daily basis.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

This solution is costly.

With Microsoft, you get the exact same information that Okta gives out of the box: free, because that's what Microsoft does, and even if I compare to other cloud IDPs, with Okta, access may offer free access for startups, and if you have fewer users, it's okay. Pricing is decent. The moment you talk about the enterprise level, for example, we were talking about implementing Okta across the US with multiple customers, and the cost they gave us was two million dollars. The cost is not justified for the single assets of this solution, so Okta is bad in those terms.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We've been evaluating Microsoft Azure Active Directory. It's still in the POC phase, and it's been three or four months. We have very particular requirements, e.g. a mix of multiple IDPs with Okta, and Azure Active Directory is one of them, but that is the only one where we don't have the solution. We are trying to do the POCs first to ensure that they are able to meet our needs.

What other advice do I have?

The reports I downloaded were very informative. The things that we were trying to do is generally the One ID and software entitlement. Our customers find them more useful than the Microsoft Azure side of it. They know that the functionality exists and they are able to use that functionality, but the intuitive nature of managing the entitlement was not there. We also had a requirement where we wanted to mix the Okta in between, for the SSO, so I was trying to collect as much information as I can get and that information was helpful.

Whenever you search for the Okta documentation, for example, if we search for cloud IDP and Microsoft-related documentation, it's only on Microsoft's site we get the help we need, including help from the community. Okta's community, when you Google it, is lacking because it only contains help or information about Okta products because Okta users are only able to use the product in a standard way.

This surprised me especially because Okta has such a good name, but the bottom line is, if you ask me as a decision-maker or the one who influences decisions in our organization, if I was going to choose Okta as our SSO provider, my answer will be flat NO.

The initial implementation of this solution took three months. It's a very simple and standard implementation, so that's never been a problem.

A hundred users are currently using this solution in our organization. It doesn't require heavy maintenance.

Working with Okta can be restrictive, and this is where Okta doesn't shine.

This solution is being used extensively in our organization. Increasing its usage will depend on whether they are able to convince the Infotech folks, and that's what's happening.

The advice I would give to others looking into implementing this solution is for them to first try to understand it. They should not confine themselves to selecting Okta, thinking that it's the end solution. They should look at their future needs too because once they implement Okta without considering their future needs, they will have to do a lot of hacks and tricks. Before they even delve into Okta, they have to first think about their future and how much this solution will cost in the long run.

This solution meets the need, but that's all, so I'm rating it a six out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
ManojNair4 - PeerSpot reviewer
Founder/Director at Augesys Solutions Pvt Ltd
Real User
Top 20
Replaces third-party products and is easy to deploy a configuration or policy to a system
Pros and Cons
  • "It's easy to deploy a configuration or policy to a system, especially when you don't have Azure AD. Now we are talking to all these small and medium-sized customers who don't necessarily have an on-premise Windows Active Directory. If they have invested in Office 365 Premium, this functionality becomes available to them."
  • "Reporting in Microsoft solutions is pathetic. With Intune, I'm getting a free inventory tool, but I don't get a reporting tool. When I go to Intune, I can see one machine's entire data in terms of the hardware and the software running on it, but I cannot generate a report for all the machines in the organization. The reporting is the only feature holding back the functionality that is already there."

What is our primary use case?

I'm an IT manager contracting with a European company. We had to onboard Windows machines to the Azure AD, but they did not have an on-prem AD. I prepped the Azure AD on the cloud, and I started to migrate the laptops to Azure AD. 

Once that is done, we need to apply policies, but group policies will not run from Azure AD because there's no on-prem AD to derive the policy from. Intune comes in handy there. It has multiple capabilities. You can create your configuration profiles in Intune that apply to Windows and Mac. You can create security profiles and configuration profiles, and you can apply browser settings to some extent. It isn't a small tool in terms of size or breadth of capabilities. It's very capable. Anybody who has used SCCM will see a lot of similarities.

How has it helped my organization?

Intune has many components that replace third-party products. For example, Intune creates an inventory of each machine. Otherwise, I'd need a third-party asset management tool. Intune can also tell me which users are accessing a given machine because it's integrated with Azure AD.

It's easy to deploy a configuration or policy to a system, especially when you don't have Azure AD. Now we are talking to all these small and medium-sized customers who don't necessarily have an on-premise Windows Active Directory. If they have invested in Office 365 Premium, this functionality becomes available to them.

That's considerable savings because you get Intune with Office, and you're getting slightly more advanced Azure AD capabilities. They also get MS Defender, which is there on the Windows client. This March, Microsoft introduced Defender for Business. They activated the business subscription with the Office 365 Business Premium subscription. If a customer is looking for an antivirus solution with a centralized capability, the product is already there. 

Intune allows you to control the policy if you want to control hard drive encryption. We have third-party tools in the market that we used to invest in. Today, we have Windows-native BitLocker, and I can use Intune to manage that BitLocker encryption.

What is most valuable?

Intune can set policies on each machine. I can create rules and apply them to individual machines. It's much easier than using the Azure AD system.

What needs improvement?

Reporting in Microsoft solutions is pathetic. With Intune, I'm getting a free inventory tool, but I don't get a reporting tool. When I go to Intune, I can see one machine's entire data in terms of the hardware and the software running on it, but I cannot generate a report for all the machines in the organization. The reporting is the only feature holding back the functionality that is already there. 

All the other third-party tools are doing the same thing, whether Atlassian, ManageEngine, or Ivanti. They all install an agent on your system. Intune also has an agent on your system collecting inventory details and sending them across the central console, but Microsoft doesn't have the reporting capability there. That is the only drawback I see.

For how long have I used the solution?

I started using Intune last year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Intune is perfectly stable. We've had zero downtime.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Intune will scale because it's a cloud system. We are not installing anything. It's a Microsoft service. I have it running on around 200 machines.

How are customer service and support?

I rate Microsoft support nine out of 10. In the past year, I've made 20 or 30 support requests on the Intune platform. Each time, it has been smooth. Usually, they sort the problem out on the first try. Once, the ticket was open for about two weeks because they had to do some backend testing on their side. 

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used ManageEngine from a company called Zoho Corporation to do inventories and patching. Microsoft Intune lacks capabilities to patch Windows, Office 365, Acrobat Reader, etc. There is no way for me to apply and manage patches. I can create a patch configuration, but I cannot control when it has to be deployed and on which machines. If Intune adds patching, I don't need to invest in another patching tool.

How was the initial setup?

Setting up Intune is pretty straightforward. There may be a few bumps in the road, but you shouldn't have much trouble if you're a system administrator or a pure IT guy. I did it by myself, and it took about two hours. You have to do the basic configuration. 

For that, you need a bit of reading to understand how your configuration is working within your overall setup. Once you do the necessary tweaking, Intune is up and running. After that, you create policies and do a test run on one or two machines. Once you verify that everything is working fine, you deploy it all. 

If you're not a techie, I could guide you step by step. It's as simple as that. After deployment, Intune doesn't require maintenance because it's a cloud product. 

What was our ROI?

We've seen a significant return on the investment. Otherwise, I would have to invest in a regular Windows Active Directory. If I were running Office Standard, which lacks this feature, I would have to buy something like Intune and pay for it annually.

Plus, I have to manage another product on the desktop. For example, if you're using a VPN client, the VPN client has to be installed and requires maintenance if something goes wrong. I don't have that maintenance cost because it's part of the Windows operating system.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We don't pay for Intune because it is bundled with the premium subscription to Office 365. It includes Intune and Defender. I don't have to buy two extra products to manage my enterprise.

What other advice do I have?

I rate Microsoft Intune eight out of 10. Some functionality needs to be improved, but I believe Microsoft is working on it. They're developing the tool, and those features will be added, but I will give it an eight today.

If you're thinking about implementing Intune, you should look at what you already have in place. For example, if I wanted to bring my laptops onto Azure AD, Azure AD will do the job for me, so I don't need to invest in a regular Active Directory server.

Either I buy the server and run it on the cloud or I upgrade Office and Business Premium gives me all of the features. Business Premium is the top license. You have Business Basic, Standard, and Premium. The Enterprise equivalent is E3 and E5. 

The Business Premium is equivalent to E3. There is a limit on the number of machines. Per Microsoft's licensing model, you can do up to 300 machines on Business Premium. At 301, you have to switch to an Enterprise agreement.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Dan Reeve - PeerSpot reviewer
Manager, Information Technology at a hospitality company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
Easy to use, maintenance-free, and helps us to provide a better user experience
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable feature is the ease with which we can manage the sign-on feature."
  • "This product doesn't necessarily provide us with all of the functionality that we need, such as being able to share passwords with external users."

What is our primary use case?

We use this solution predominantly as our authentication provider for most or all SAML single sign-on services. We also use it as a tool to share passwords between users that need to have a centralized password database.

They are the authentication provider but we use it for multifactor authentication as well.

The service we use is where the users are on-premise with the network, then they bypass any single sign-on features. It just logs in.

We have six locations that are all connected by WAN VPN tunnels. Active Directory is being used to replicate the user accounts, and that replicates up to both Mircosoft, which is our primary single sign-on solution, and then to OneLogin. We use Microsoft for email, SharePoint, etc., and we use OneLogin as the authentication provider currently for that.

How has it helped my organization?

This product has removed barriers for users to log into multiple services, so it provides a better user experience.

Although this solution hasn't meant a reduction in the number of IT staff, it's provided easier management capabilities for them.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the ease with which we can manage the sign-on feature.

We use the SmartFactor Authentication to adjust authentication workflows in real-time, and we haven't had any major issues with the experience that it provides. Users like the fact that they're not prompted all of the time, however, if they are prompted when there is some kind of concern then it makes them happier from that perspective. Some of our users forget they even have multifactor authentication because they don't necessarily get prompted for it often. That can be a challenge sometimes but overall, it's a good solution.

Using OneLogin has improved our user experience for employees working remotely. It provides a more streamlined approach to securing those features.

What needs improvement?

This product doesn't necessarily provide us with all of the functionality that we need, such as being able to share passwords with external users. It does with regards to single sign-on solutions but there are other non-single sign-on tools that we utilize. For example, we use LastPass for some of our services because it allows us to share passwords with external vendors.

This solution needs to offer better management of non-single sign-on applications. It should offer the ability to provide secure password management, with either an external party and/or better sharing.

In that same bracket, it would be nice to have password management where the websites or the tool requires two-factor authentication. In LastPass, you can support the one-time password if it's embedded into the LastPass profile for that application, which means that multiple users can use that from within LastPass. Having that feature and being able to do that in OneLogin would be huge.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using OneLogin by One Identity for at least six years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's been very stable up until recently. During the last three months, there's been a couple of pretty big outages that have affected my user base pretty heavily. This is because everything we do is through Microsoft, and people couldn't log into anything.

Also, not just our Microsoft solution but our financial package, et cetera is all done through single sign-on, so I had pretty much a dead workforce for a day, which is pretty significant. But other than those two times, I haven't had any other outages.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

This product is highly utilized in our environment. Adoption of this solution is forced in our organization, so the users don't get a decision on the matter. 

How are customer service and support?

The technical support team is responsive. They are good.

I would rate the technical support and eight out of ten.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to OneLogin, we used AD FS.

One problem with AD FS is that it's very costly. We had to spin up virtual servers to accommodate it, and it wasn't as flexible in creating new applications with single sign-on.

Also, OneLogin lets you provide other features whereby you can manage all of the applications that aren't single sign-on, and SAML-specific. It's a bit of a different tool. It provides me with all of the things that AD FS produced or utilized, but it added on other features which have helped with single sign-on, multifactor authentication, and access to other password tools.

We use several tools including LastPass and Microsoft Azure Single Sign On.

The reason that we use LastPass is that it allows us to share passwords with external users. We use Microsoft Azure for some services because it's more of an automated stream and flow, for the way that our Active Directory is set up.

We have multiple tools but OneLogin is our primary one.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is pretty straightforward for people that understand single sign-on and how to set that up. There isn't anything that's particularly complex.

It is a SaaS solution and it replicates from an on-premises Active Directory.

What about the implementation team?

I handled the deployment myself, so only one person is required.

What was our ROI?

I haven't specifically calculated ROI for this product. Although I would say that we need to have a tool that does this, whether OneLogin is the best for us now, I don't know, based on Azure and Microsoft upping their service solutions.

There is time being saved by not having multiple accounts, and as such, I expect that this solution has helped us to save money by either optimizing time-intensive processes or increasing productivity, but I don't have the data to quantify it or tell you exactly what it looks like.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The price of the licensing is fine.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We initially began looking at it because we wanted to have a streamlined login process for multiple services, we didn't want to have people with multiple credentials everywhere.

At the time, Microsoft didn't have a very good single sign-on solution; they were using local on-premise servers and I wanted something that was cloud-based. I wanted it to have high availability and be easy to manage.

What other advice do I have?

My advice for anybody who is considering OneLogin is to ensure that it's the right product they're looking for. They should be utilizing single sign-on as a majority, and not looking to share passwords externally or with third parties.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Richard Hickson - PeerSpot reviewer
Founder & Managing Director at HelpFully IT
Real User
Top 20Leaderboard
A rock-solid product with fantastic device management and single sign-on capabilities
Pros and Cons
  • "The whole product is great. The device management is amazing. The fact that you can basically set up an entire machine without having the machine in front of you is most valuable."
  • "The capability to get alerts would be great when CPU or RAM is high on an endpoint, or when a disk is failing. It would be great to get an alert rather than having to go looking for it."

What is our primary use case?

I use JumpCloud across a whole bunch of different clients to manage their devices, to manage their users, and to manage their third-party applications through single sign-on.

It's a SaaS product.

How has it helped my organization?

In a remote world, it has made my life a lot easier. When people were in the office, you could use Active Directory, but we moved to JumpCloud just before COVID kicked in. It gave us the capability to continue managing machines without them having to check into the office.

I can set a machine up easily. I can send someone a new machine, and they boot it up. I give them a couple of instructions, and then it hands the machine over to me. I can configure the machine remotely by using policies and commands through JumpCloud.

What is most valuable?

The whole product is great. The device management is amazing. The fact that you can basically set up an entire machine without having the machine in front of you is most valuable.

The single sign-on capabilities are very helpful. If someone leaves the business, at the click of a button, you can literally disable their account for everything.

What needs improvement?

The capability to get alerts would be great when CPU or RAM is high on an endpoint, or when a disk is failing. It would be great to get an alert rather than having to go looking for it.

It would be handy to have an MDM for Windows devices. It seems to be on their roadmap. They support Windows devices on the platform, but we should be able to wipe the machine and do other similar things through MDM.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using JumpCloud for about six years. I use it every day.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has been rock solid for what I need it for. They had a few outages late last year, but they didn't affect my clients or me. So, as far as I'm concerned, it has been rock solid.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is easy to scale. You just enroll more machines and more users. You get billed monthly on a high point of the number of users that you've got. So, it's fairly flexible.

It is used by small, medium, and large companies. It is suitable for all of them.

How are customer service and support?

It has always been brilliant. Whenever I've had to contact JumpCloud for any reason, they've come back to me straight away. In six years, I've had to contact them three or four times, and each time, the issue was resolved relatively quickly and easily. There has not been too much difficulty with it.

How was the initial setup?

It depends on what you're using at the moment. From my point of view, when I deployed JumpCloud for one of my clients, it was a case of getting the users into the JumpCloud platform and then enrolling their machines and tying the two together. So, it was relatively straightforward, but I understand that some deployments can be more complicated, such as if you're using Azure AD, etc. They're not impossible, but they just need a bit more planning than if you're using standalone machines.

The number of people required for deployment depends on how many end users you're deploying it to. I've deployed it for a bunch of different companies. Some of the companies had 70 people, and I did it on my own.

It generally takes half an hour per machine. The duration depends on how many machines you've got, what state the machines are in, and whether the machines need updating or anything like that.

It's a SaaS product. It doesn't require any specific maintenance. The agent updates itself on all the machines, and it just keeps everything up to date on its own.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The pricing model changed about 18 months ago. It used to be that you got 10 users free, and then you paid for any user above 10 users. Now, when you go above 10 users, you pay for every user.

It has become a bit more expensive, but it's such a good product. When you take into account Microsoft licenses, if you were to run Active Directory, you'd need a server to put it on, or you would need a couple of servers, backup, etc. It's a no-brainer. JumpCloud is so much easier to manage from my perspective, regardless of the cost increase. It's just brilliant.

There are different tiers of this product, but the base product, called JumpCloud Core, is what I use with most of my clients. It suits us down to the ground.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

When we first started looking at JumpCloud, we took a demo on Okta. At the time, JumpCloud did a lot more than what Okta did, which was why we went with JumpCloud.

Device management was one of the reasons for going for JumpCloud. Okta was very much for the cloud and single sign-on, and you couldn't manage the devices, whereas JumpCloud actually managed the end-user devices. You could enforce encryption and other similar things, which Okta didn't let you do at the time. It probably does that now because we're six years on, but back then, it didn't.

What other advice do I have?

Don't hesitate. Just do it. It is just fantastic.

I would rate it a nine out of 10. It does everything I need it to. It is a great product. It is not missing too much.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
System Architect at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Great integration and end user experience
Pros and Cons
  • "One of the features that I enjoyed most was the integration with Azure AD because I could use VMware Identity Manager to standardize the User Principal Name coming from Active Directory. You have Azure AD Connect to do that. In between, if you have vIDM handling it, you can easily get the synchronization of users into your VM and standardize the User Principal Name. If you require quality assurance for handling it, you can actually count on the vIDM to do so. That was one of the main things I enjoyed about the product."
  • "vIDM could be improved with the multi-tenant capabilities that VMware tends to offer—features like customization branding and the integration of the app catalog based on the branding. Since the integration has been at top-level OGs, you were not able to then do rebranding if you were required to use specific user groups to highlight specific applications. At the time, I was personally opening feature requests for these things. I haven't worked with the latest release, so I don't know if these features were already deployed or not."

What is our primary use case?

At the time, our primary use case was for the purpose of having single authentication around endpoints. Every single endpoint was managed by Workspace ONE: iOS, Android devices, and Windows standard devices. We were provisioning payloads. We had a trust relationship between Workspace ONE and the vIDM console, and we were handling certificates around those, to provide seamless certification. In the end, a user with specific applications wouldn't be required to type in any username, password, etc. 

vIDM was a SaaS-based solution, at the time, where you had the vIDM connectors in case you were required to have LDAP Synchronization. It was completely on a dedicated cloud from VMware. 

How has it helped my organization?

One of the main benefits was end user experience. Imagine that your business apps on your mobile device, for instance, no longer require you to type in your username, password, or second factor of authentication—as long as you're handling a managed and trustworthy device, you can seamlessly log in to applications. In the past, I personally integrated it with applications like SAT and Salesforce. As long as the application offered integration, we could easily do this. 

What is most valuable?

One of the features that I enjoyed most was the integration with Azure AD because I could use VMware Identity Manager to standardize the User Principal Name coming from Active Directory. You have Azure AD Connect to do that. In between, if you have vIDM handling it, you can easily get the synchronization of users into your VM and standardize the User Principal Name. If you require quality assurance for handling it, you can actually count on the vIDM to do so. That was one of the main things I enjoyed about the product. 

What needs improvement?

vIDM could be improved with the multi-tenant capabilities that VMware tends to offer—features like customization branding and the integration of the app catalog based on the branding. Since the integration has been at top-level OGs, you were not able to then do rebranding if you were required to use specific user groups to highlight specific applications. At the time, I was personally opening feature requests for these things. I haven't worked with the latest release, so I don't know if these features were already deployed or not. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I used vIDM for about four years, though the last time I worked with it was about a year ago. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I can't recall having any problems with stability or performance. 

The maintenance, regarding the core system, was provided by VMware directly. For the connectors hosted on our on-prem infrastructure, maintenance was handled by the team responsible for the product. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's easy to scale, since it's in the cloud. We never had to worry about scalability. 

At the time, there were about 120,000 people in the company using this solution. 

How are customer service and support?

VMware has the standard support, and then they have enterprise support or special contracts for enterprise support with dedicated teams. We never had to deal with the default, but nonetheless, there will always be glitches around tech support. We were quite knowledgeable about the products, so if we actually raised a ticket, it was because something was definitely not working and there was a bug on the product itself. It was mostly the case that it would be dropped at the product management team directly. 

How was the initial setup?

The deployment was complex, considering the infrastructure. Our organization has more than 400,000 users, so the complexity of the in-house infrastructure is quite high, which implies some complexity during the deployment process as well. You need to interact with several teams regarding identity management or identity access management. On a small-sized company, it may be quite straightforward. 

We first collected the requirements, which was straightforward. Then—this will depend on the size of the organization—we had five or six people around the required services. They came from Active Directory, the main identity provider, the application owners for service provider integration, and it took them a few days. 

What about the implementation team?

We implemented this solution through an in-house team. 

What other advice do I have?

I rate vIDM a nine out of ten. During the time I worked with it, it was a really nice product, and it was straightforward and reliable. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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