TeamViewer OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

TeamViewer is the #1 ranked solution in top Virtual Meetings tools and top Remote Access tools. PeerSpot users give TeamViewer an average rating of 8.6 out of 10. TeamViewer is most commonly compared to TeamViewer Tensor: TeamViewer vs TeamViewer Tensor. TeamViewer is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 53% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 17% of all views.
TeamViewer Buyer's Guide

Download the TeamViewer Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2022

What is TeamViewer?

TeamViewer lets you connect to any PC or server around the world within a few seconds. Remote control a partners PC as if you were sitting in front of it. Available in over 30 languages, TeamViewer is one of the world's most popular providers of remote control and online meeting software. airbackup, a powerful cloud-based backup solution, and ITbrain, a valuable remote monitoring and IT asset tracking solution, complement TeamViewer's product portfolio.

TeamViewer Customers

Porsche Informatik, Philips, DHL, Intel, Motorola, Microsoft, IBM, Siemens, Fujitsu, American Red Cross

TeamViewer Video

Archived TeamViewer Reviews (more than two years old)

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StephenDay - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Director at a healthcare company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Convenient, easy to use, and can connect using the Internet
Pros and Cons
  • "It's very beneficial and time effective on how we are able to provide quick support. We've quadrupled our effectiveness as an IT support because we have cut down all that unnecessary travel time, even between floors."
  • "Some of the additional features, like the meeting stuff, is making it too cluttered."

What is our primary use case?

The use case is mainly PC and laptop support for our internal staff, where TeamViewer is distributed locally through Group Policy.  Occasionally, we will use it to assist clients having trouble with our services, and in those cases, we will send them a customized linked invitation through TeamViewer.

How has it helped my organization?

I have used it as a troubleshooting measure with remote people. With a quick glance at TeamViewer, we can say, "Hey, your machine is not reporting as being online or available. Therefore, check your Internet connection. Make sure you are connected to WiFi or Ethernet." Probably nine times out of ten, that's instantly what it is. We can instantly tell if computers are online or offline, then help in the troubleshooting process. We have set it up in such a way that IT will be on the call prior to the connection and that the person on the other end has to accept the connection. We want people to scrutinize and make sure that, "Okay, do I know this person? Why are they connecting?" and, they have to approve it. This is so they can recognize and be familiar with who we are . Also, the background changes to black, so they know when we are on their PC. Furthermore, we utilize two-factor authentication and other features for stricter security on the management side of TeamViewer.

What is most valuable?

We have some people who are on the road. TeamViewer is very convenient for us if they have problems. We are able to hop on their computer and help resolve those problems remotely. In those situations, it's good to get in there and be able to push files directly to the machine and work remotely that way. 

As far as searching, using the console installed on your computer and seeing the list of all your computers, we break them down by department. Therefore, we categorize each computer by department so we can do a search and pull up the name of the computer along with the username and user’s phone extension. It streamlines the connection and remote support to somebody. 

Occasionally, we have used the meeting and presentation capabilities from a support perspective. For instance, if we have a client that we work with and one of our end users is having difficulty with their software, then I would set up a presentation on my computer. I could also simultaneously TeamViewer into our staff computer, which I could then show through presentation and the remote connection to our client. They can see what's going on and how things are happening. It also gives them the ability to switch control over to them. We didn't want something large running in the background all the time. The fact that it has a relatively small footprint was attractive to us.

What needs improvement?

We don't really use the chat feature. Some of the additional features, like the meeting stuff, is making it too cluttered. Also, we don't need TeamViewer to be a competitor to our video conferencing service, although that basic service might be nice for people who don't want to go through the extra expense. We are basically satisfied with TeamViewer for doing remote support.

We use InvGate, which is a help desk and asset management tool that we are currently using. They announced about six to seven months ago that they will be integrating TeamViewer into their help desk system. We haven't heard any recent developments yet, but we know that is on their horizon.

Buyer's Guide
TeamViewer
November 2022
Learn what your peers think about TeamViewer. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
654,658 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using them for about eight years. We originally worked with them directly out of Germany. Later on, they got a Florida presence, and we started working through their onshore office.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is pretty stable for the most part. On rare occasions where the remote machine that we're trying to connect to is not responding, the simple fix is to terminate the process, kick off a new one, and everything is good to go. It's really low maintenance. Once deployed, it's almost a set and forget type thing. 

There are only four IT staff in our organization who need TeamViewer seats. That's why it's pretty cost-effective for us.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Each of my IT staff has that ability to hop on and do things at any time. We can assist not only from our machine, but from our iPad. If I needed to hop on somebody else's computer, I can do support from my PC, iPad, or even my smartphone. It's very portable as to how I can work. I like the fact that I can do support on different platforms.

With the small IT group that I have, I do want to be able to quickly support our entire organization without having to run my staff to death.

How are customer service and support?

Their support has always been good. Over the years, there have been things where I had a question come up or deployments. Their support has been spot on. With TeamViewer, we don't get the lag time with responses from their support. They have support in our time zone. Their sales office is in Florida now. For two years, the support has had pretty good turnaround times. They're very friendly, supportive, and responsive. They do a great job.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

At a previous place that a colleague worked, they used Dameware. This was their remote solution, but it required a local network connection. So, if they were remote users, they had to connect to the VPN before actually remote connecting to their machine. So, switching to TeamViewer from Dameware was a big change for him because it didn't require VPN. Eventually, someone turned us (my current company) onto TeamViewer. We have been pleased with them ever since.

How was the initial setup?

We did the installation through Group Policy. Initially, we looked at doing QuickSupport capability, but now with the new way of doing it, it's so much better. QuickSupport was quick and pretty streamlined. At the same time, it required the end user to first initialize, know about the QuickSupport link, provide a password, and provide the session ID, which is a bit more cumbersome to use than being integrated through the cloud and our management portal. Now, we can just add their computers as they are connected and all the user needs to do is hit "Accept" to share their screen. They don't have to search on their desktop for an icon or open anything. The prep work and testing probably took the longest. Once it was streamlined out and deployed through Group Policies, the deployment was quick. 

Recently, TeamViewer started supporting iOS devices. We do have corporate iPads and probably need to install TeamViewer on them. That is something on our to-do list, but have not done it yet.

What was our ROI?

We did some rough ROI estimates years ago. The solution has proven itself. We would not want to do the job without it. When I first started the organization, I had to drive out for an hour to a remote office and do some support. It was very time-consuming. You just wasted time doing that kind of stuff. Now, you can just connect and help them. They are happier because you can give them quick turnaround resolution. They don't have to wait for you to schedule time to come out there. So, it's very beneficial and time effective on how we are able to provide quick support. We've quadrupled our effectiveness as an IT support because we have cut down on unnecessary travel time, even between floors.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have an annual subscription that is just under $1,900 with no additional costs. We get these promotions about upgrades and stuff like that, but we haven't had a need to add more seats. Users can also use TeamViewer for home use with a non-commercial free license.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have looked at several other options in the past (e.g., VNC, Webex, and GoToMeeting) before taking on TeamViewer. A lot of them were just way too expensive. We are a small nonprofit organization, so pricey was not something we could look at. The fact that TeamViewer was cost-effective was a big sell for us. The fact that it supports many platforms was also attractive.

What other advice do I have?

Originally, the initial knee jerk reaction is if there is trouble, you run over there to help. That was almost an expectation of the users too. You have to change the culture a little. Once you have the hang of it, you realize how much more quickly and effective you are in providing support than the way you used to do it. Breaking old habits to become more effective was something that many of us had to learn in the very beginning because we were not used to being remote. Now, it's still personal, but in a different way. 

Set up your platforms where you have it all deployed completely, so people know that it's there and accessible. Give them a heads up that you have the capability. Sell it as a benefit: This is the way we can help you quickly, no matter where you are at. Then, they will realize that they are the winners. Sometimes, you may have to assure them that you are not there to spy on them. Sometimes, people think that if you get on their computers, you're poking at their personal stuff, which isn’t the case. Finally, we train our folks that they need to realize that they should be protective of who can get on their computer. They are in control of their device, but when they need our help, we can be there. They just have to click "Accept" to let us in. Their screen going dark is an indicator/flag to them for when we were on and when we're not. People just want to have that extra edge of privacy, which is important as well.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Maintenance Supervisor at Atlanta Metropolitan State College
Real User
One of the easiest solutions to pick up: easy to use, deploy, and adopt
Pros and Cons
  • "TeamViewer has been one of the easiest, right off the bat products, that we have employed at the college. We have had no issues. It's been one of the easiest solutions to pick up."
  • "Sometimes, the app can be a little cumbersome when accessing certain aspects of the program."

What is our primary use case?

We're using TeamViewer at the college to be able to remote in. My boss and I are the two main users. We've used it to remote into our desktops so we can monitor the HVAC program at the college, access control, etc. Plus, if we need to grab files, or something, off of our personal computers at work, we can.

My boss and I both have TeamVeamer installed on PCs at the campus. We have the app on our mobile phones. I have it on my personal laptop at home along with my tablet at home.

We remote into PCs at the campus, and one of those PCs is used as a server.

We are using the latest version. We are using TeamViewer 15. I think we started on version 13.

How has it helped my organization?

When I'm offsite and there is an HVAC problem, I can remote in and check out what's going on from anywhere. I don't have to be at the college to do it. It saves me driving time and the hassle of having to leave from wherever I'm at. I have actually accessed it while being on vacation and was several hundred miles away from the college.

What is most valuable?

  • It's easy to remote in.
  • It is reliable and stable. The program is not constantly interrupting, dropping, or hanging up.
  • It has been very easy to use.

What needs improvement?

Sometimes, the app can be a little cumbersome when accessing certain aspects of the program. I don't know if that's a TeamViewer thing or the application I'm trying to use on the actual PC.

As far as the connection, there has been no issues with the connection. It's just once I'm in the app and using it, I haven't been able to decide if I can do all functions with the app, like I can if I'm sitting actually at the computer. I don't know if that's a TeamViewer thing or a computer issue. I'm still on a Windows 7 based, six-year computer which is due for an upgrade. It's a minor issue, and some of the minor issues I have may go away once my desktop computer at work is upgraded.

For how long have I used the solution?

Approximately six months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I am very happy with the solution's stability. 

So far, we have had no issues with security's success because you need to know the passwords and machine IDs in order to get into the system. TeamViewer identifies each device with a unique identifier, then each device has a separate password. Once you have closed TeamViewer, the password will change periodically. It's not a constant password.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Most of the stuff resides between my computer and my boss's computer. My boss is the director of facilities and I'm the maintenance supervisor.

Eventually, when we're done (hopefully not soon after the first of the year), we're going to be able to go to every building on campus and deploy what we need to look at. That way we don't have to worry about whether we have lost a phone signal, the wireless on campus is working right, etc. Eventually, we'll have a machine on campus that we can just go to and access what we need.

How are customer service and technical support?

We called the support only one time. That was just to make sure we were doing something right, and we were.

On a scale of one to 10, with 10 being the highest, the technical support was easily a 10. This is based on their responsiveness and helpfulness. We were on hold with them for just a couple of minutes, then the technician that we talked to was very helpful. We didn't have to go back and forth, checking on him a bunch. He was able to answer all our questions. He called my boss back the next day to make sure there were not other issues and everything was working.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

LogMeIn and ShareConnect were the only two solutions that we have previously used. Then, somebody told us about TeamViewer. We looked at it. We did a trial run with TeamViewer. We liked it, so we started engaging with them about the cost and everything else. 

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very straightforward. You go to TeamViewer or the link that they send you. You click on the link to download and install all the information right off the Internet. It's fairly self-explanatory. 

My boss and I set up all four of our devices, the mobile app on both our phones and both our computers, in less than five minutes.

What about the implementation team?

We had a webinar with TeamViewer to go over some basic, simple things. We only needed 15 to 20 minutes. It was pretty much understanding the basics. 

If we had any other questions, we could call in. I haven't personally had any issues where I've had to call support.

What was our ROI?

Over the past six months, we have probably saved several thousand dollars just in the cost of either my boss or me having to go up there. We can make sure stuff is turned off and on where somebody might have left something on or off, saving on the utility cost for the college.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

TeamViewer was willing to give us a one-year package. Whereas, a lot of the other companies that we explored were paid by the month or quarter. It's just easier for our finance people at the college if we can make a one-time yearly payment.

TeamViewer has multiple licensing options. 

The price was cheaper than what we were previously paying. At the time that we went with TeamViewer, we were using ShareConnect. The TeamViewer package was about half the cost and able to have a bigger number of users.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

The remote connection process has been one of the easiest of all the different programs that we have used. We have used LogMeIn and ShareConnect. There was another one back in the very early days. This solution has been the easiest process to connect into. Comparatively, TeamViewer is much easier to deploy, easier to use, and adopt than LogMeIn or ShareConnect.

What other advice do I have?

The solution is definitely a 10 (out of a 10). TeamViewer has been one of the easiest, right off the bat products, that we have employed at the college. We have had no issues. It's been one of the easiest solutions to pick up.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
TeamViewer
November 2022
Learn what your peers think about TeamViewer. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
654,658 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Felician (Felix)Farcutiu - PeerSpot reviewer
Technical Support for Commercial Theater Division at a media company with 51-200 employees
Real User
We save dozens of hours a week utilizing this solution
Pros and Cons
  • "With an image, you can see immediately what's going on. You can run some tests. Without the solution, you need to do everything by telephone. It's not even thinkable."
  • "A feature that they could add is chat with sound to talk."

What is our primary use case?

We are in the commercial cinema theater business, like movies. We have things like simulators, advertising in commercial theaters all over the world. They sometimes have technical issues. So, we connect to see what is going on.

We use TeamViewer on computers, like laptops and servers. We also have tablets, but only one or two. Whereas, we have like 1,000 Windows Servers.

How has it helped my organization?

The sound and data transfer have improved the way our organization functions. For example, you can leave a TeamViewer application open and hear if a movie is playing with sound.

With an image, you can see immediately what's going on. You can run some tests. Without the solution, you need to do everything by telephone. It's not even thinkable. You would need to have VPNs with a lot of connections and virtual servers. This is so much more complicated. Weekly, we are saving dozens of hours using TeamViewer.

The remote connection process is pretty straightforward. Every new computer has a TeamViewer ID and password. 

What is most valuable?

The biggest advantage of TeamViewer is the way you can send files. For example, if you need to program something or exchange pictures, it's not that easy to to send a document to a secure network, like Boeing or a military company. Sometimes, sites even block all the Internet and you need to do everything by telephone. With TeamViewer, the main advantage is you can send files and documents easily. 

Another thing is you have sound, in the sense, you can hear. For example, we are playing short trailers, and you can hear it on the distant computer. This is useful to see if the sound is working. We will play trailers and see the image, but the customer will sometimes complain, "Hey, everything is good, but I don't have sound." With TeamViewer, I can hear the sound, not from my computer, but from his computer. This is super cool.

The chat function is handy, especially when we are dealing with people who don't have telephones in their projection rooms, or it's super noisy. Then, the chat is very useful.

Another feature that I like very much is the option where you can save the username and password. Once this is done, all you need to do is double click on the computer. It will connect directly. You don't need to type the password every time. This saves time because you cannot remember a dozen of passwords. You need to go somewhere and find them. But with this feature, you put them in once. Then, every time you are connected to particular sites, you just double click. There is almost no need for a repository for those passwords.

You can reboot remote computers with a feature called "Wait for Partner", so you don't need to monitor it. TeamViewer will pop up a little window when the client is back, saying, "Hey, I'm back online." You can work on something else, and if you need to reboot a computer, TeamViewer will notify you that the customer is back online. This is a nice feature.

What needs improvement?

You are limited with the regular TeamViewer. You have don't have sound. You cannot transfer things. It has been a long time (years) since I used the regular version.

In the beginning, you will need a bit of adaptation to use the solution. This is normal. For example, if you are switching to a car with the wheel on the left to a car with the wheel on the right, you will need a bit of adaptation.

Even now, we have customers who will not allow us to connect to them because of security sensitivity, e.g., military departments for clients. They will send us pictures or we can talk with somebody onsite, then we need to ask them questions. However, this process is long. It's costly also because of the time spent. Instead of spending 30 minutes, we will spend two to three hours for the same thing.

A feature that they could add is chat with sound to talk.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using TeamViewer Business edition for six to seven years. I have been using the regular version for more than 10 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The product has been stable for many years; no glitches.

In the beginning, security was an issue because you could be hacked. Anybody could transfer data from your computer. Right now, from what I have seen and heard, they have put a lot of security in TeamViewer. It's very secure right now. Though, it is hard to be sure 100 percent all the time, especially in the movie industry. For anti-piracy and things like that, studios are very tricky and pushy to have tight security. The fact that they accept TeamViewer means they did tests trying to find security breaches, and everything has been good until now. 

There is not much maintenance need on our end as it is a lightweight program. The program upgrades itself.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have a limited business license. We can have 10 people on it at the same time. We are doing support all over the world. With the version that we have, we are allowed to have 10 people using it at the same time. For example, because we are working with engineering of other groups, if we go over 10 users, the eleventh person who wants to use TeamViewer cannot.

We have about 1,000 clients. Our support team is six or seven guys, plus engineering. Though we are not all connected at the same time. For example, if five of us are support 1,000 clients, then individually, we are supporting 200 clients each.

We are sending out computers every day. So, we will probably double the solution in a couple of years. Right now, it's okay. There are some days when we need to ask somebody, "Close your session because we need another guy from engineering to connect." So, we will probably need more licenses in the future.

How are customer service and technical support?

We never need tech support. We needed it once three years ago. We sent an email and had an answer almost immediately.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used other solutions in the past, i.e., LogMeIn. At a certain point, we switched from LogMeIn to TeamViewer because LogMeIn was limited at 500 users.

How was the initial setup?

It was a bit tricky because we had so many computers. We needed to generate IDs, passwords, and administrate passwords. We needed to have a machine to generate these, as this was sort of an additional software. We had thousands of computers, so we needed to have an ID, a password, and administrator password for each of them. So, we needed to have software to manually input this information in TeamViewer every time. Once we did that, it was perfect. 

We aren't launching all the computers at the same time. We are launching them one at a time. Today, we are doing a server. Then, tomorrow, we may put TeamViewer in two or three servers. It's not a single shot. It's gradual. To install TeamViewer takes five minutes on each device, maybe more time.

What about the implementation team?

We contacted TeamViewer directly in Germany. We discussed the price and things like that. With TeamViewer, you go to the Internet. Everybody can do it. I can do it. My son can do it. You download the program. Then, if you switch from a normal to business license, all you need to do is just put your credentials in and the program will upgrade itself. It is very simple. All you need is the Internet.

What was our ROI?

We have solved a lot using TeamViewer. While I cannot quantify this in money, without TeamViewer, we would need to call everybody and work with 1,000 clients blindly. 

It is worth the money that you pay for it.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have a corporate license. The maximum amount number of users changes based on the amount you pay. E.g., with our license, there is a maximum amount of users who can use the solution at the same time (10 users). 

The cost is in the thousands of dollars per year.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have some sites with LogMeIn because it's a matter of politics. Some companies will not allow you to install TeamViewer. They will only allow you to install LogMeIn. Some others will not allow you to install any software like TeamViewer, LogMeIn, or others. Therefore, you need to go buy a remote desktop (RDP).

For sites that do not allow us to install TeamViewer, LogMeIn, or other software, we use Cisco VPN. This requires a lot of software to install. It needs to run a program through it. You need some administrative passwords that need to be typed every time. It's a lot of security. In the beginning, you don't have sound from the other computer, and it's hard to transport files.

While we use LogMeIn and remote desktop, in 99 percent of the cases, we are using TeamViewer. TeamViewer is very easy to deploy when you have a corporate license. It's easy to install. It's upgrading all the time. Everything is perfect, as long as you pay.

Screen resolution is a huge advantage of TeamViewer over LogMeIn. We have clients with multiple screens. For example, if the client has three screens, when you are connected, you will be on one screen and don't know which one. With TeamViewer, you have a selection. You can select moving from screen number one to two or screen two to three. You can also put all the screens into an all in one or see the best fit.

It is easy to use, but LogMeIn is also easy to use.

What other advice do I have?

It is a great, amazing tool. All companies needs to have it. It's secure, fast, and reliable. 

In the beginning, you need to understand the features, e.g., what a button does. Once you get all of that, it's very easy to use. I'm a heavy consumer of TeamViewer, a sort of professional of it, so I know all the features. But, even for somebody seeing it for the first time, it is very easy to use.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Windows Server Administrator
Real User
Significantly increased our productivity, making it easy to access and troubleshoot remote sites
Pros and Cons
  • "We also use it a lot for remote site assistance. We've set up our internal authentication for unattended access to our remote sites. That makes it very easy and convenient to remotely connect with our users and our client machines whenever we need to. It's set as a direct, secure connection. As long as the station has internet access, we can see it and it makes remote support very simple."
  • "It's not the program itself that's an issue, but there is a need for some better documentation on how to use the web portal Management Console. That seems to be a bit lacking in directions, if you aren't paying attention and you don't know what to do. Better documentation would make it a little bit easier to set things up in different groups and share groups between people."

What is our primary use case?

It allows us to access some of our remote sites, especially if we're having internal issues such as a VPN tunnel dropped from site-to-site. We can still connect to the local machines at the different offices as long as we still have an internet connection, and we can log in and troubleshoot networking issues remotely.

TeamViewer is installed specifically on our desktop machines. We do also use some laptops that are on Windows 10, and there are a couple of Mac OS X machines we've used to remotely connect.

How has it helped my organization?

It allows for quick, easy access to our remote sites. It increases our ability to troubleshoot, as needed, at critical times.

In addition, some department managers have people split between sites. For example, part of operations is out here in Olathe, Kansas, and the other part is in Oklahoma. They're able to hold team meetings and present through the TeamViewer meeting sessions. The HR department is also able to hold meetings with the people here and those in other offices.

What is most valuable?

We've been using the team meetings, the collaboration portion. It's pretty simple to share and presents screens during team meetings.

We also use it a lot for remote site assistance. We've set up our internal authentication for unattended access to our remote sites. That makes it very easy and convenient to remotely connect with our users and our client machines whenever we need to. It's set as a direct, secure connection. As long as the station has internet access, we can see it and it makes remote support very simple. 

As far as the security goes, we've decided that it does set up a pretty good, secure tunnel from point to point.

Overall, it's pretty simple. It does the jobs that we need it to do.

What needs improvement?

It's not the program itself that's an issue, but there is a need for some better documentation on how to use the web portal Management Console. That seems to be a bit lacking in directions, if you aren't paying attention and you don't know what to do. Better documentation would make it a little bit easier to set things up in different groups and share groups between people.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using it for 14 to 15 months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's a very stable program. We haven't noticed any issues with it dropping in and out of service.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It scales. Since we have the corporate license, we're not limited to any number of machines. We install it on all our devices. The scalability is fine.

Between people who have a laptop or a desktop, and some of them have both, about 100 people utilize it. It's the company standard.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have not used their technical support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were only utilizing internal RDP, for the most part. TeamViewer is about five times faster for remote assistance.

How was the initial setup?

The setup is pretty simple. It is a small install-MSI. You can either install it through group policy or push it out through your normal deployment methods onto Windows machines. You set up the services during the deployment for it to connect to the main account, and you can share different computer groups, for the different site locations, from the main account to any of the other admin accounts. You can show who has default access and what groups are already tied into it. It's pretty straightforward.

Our deployment took a couple of hours for 120 machines. We deployed the MSI out through normal deployment processes.

What was our ROI?

It has been useful and it has increased our productivity by some 400 percent. It's helped us a lot.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have the corporate license. It's extremely cheap.

For what we utilize it for it's not a super-expensive license. It was about the same or a little bit cheaper than LogMeIn but it's more stable and a better program for what we need in our company.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked into VNC and LogMeIn. TeamViewer was a much simpler, easier way to connect up. It's a fast and simple setup and it just works.

What other advice do I have?

The product is simple to set up and install and use.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
JeffreyUrdan - PeerSpot reviewer
CFO/COO at swyMed Incorporated
Real User
Allows us to access our devices on somebody else's network under their supervision, allaying security concerns
Pros and Cons
  • "The TeamViewer system has some built-in security. The TeamViewer client connects to the TeamViewer host securely. Only a certain number of authorized users on our side have access to the system. Even within that, an individual endpoint can be assigned to a group, where not everybody has access but, rather, just one or two people who are part of a support team might have access to that particular device. So TeamViewer has given us tools to be able to segregate who has access to different things."
  • "Sometimes we'll have a device in the field, and I'll click on remote control and it says "Can't authenticate." I'll double click in a different part of the TeamViewer interface and it'll say "Can't authenticate." Then I'll do it a third time and it connects. It's possible that it's just bad luck. It's also very possible that it's some bug within TeamViewer..."

What is our primary use case?

We use TeamViewer's infrastructure. We have TeamViewer host clients running on devices, some wired in offices, some connected to WiFi or even cellular, and we use it to get quick access to the devices for technical support.

The other use case, which is a little bit weird, is that all of our clients are in healthcare so they are very particular about who gets into their network and who has access to their network. What we've found is that when a client has our company's software on one of the servers in their network, sometimes they don't want to give us access to their network to maintain our software. So whenever they have a problem with our software, we open a TeamViewer session from a desktop inside their network to our tech support group, and that person gives us access to the server so that we can maintain our software.

Again, that use case is a technical-support-type application, but it's a little bit different than us managing our own devices in the field. It is a tool that allows us to access our devices on somebody else's network under their supervision, without needing our own unfettered access. It makes it easier for IT security to approve us and it makes it easier for the client to get us in, particularly in circumstances where there's some urgency around that.

The vast majority of our users use TeamViewer on Windows machines. Some are desktops, some are tablets, and the latter range from a Surface Pro to a more substantial, military-ruggedized type of tablet.

How has it helped my organization?

The big benefit is that we can do things pretty quickly and easily, remotely. In many cases, we save a service visit to the field, which would otherwise require us to have a very large field service force or we would need to pay for and train somebody else's field service force. Quite literally, without TeamViewer's capabilities, we wouldn't be able to run our business.

What is most valuable?

Remote desktop control is what we use in TeamViewer for 99.999 percent of what we do. 

We occasionally use the integrated text chat. There are circumstances we've seen where certain applications don't respond because they've got some sort of security built into them so that a remote user isn't able to control them. We can log in with TeamViewer, view the screen, and then leave instructions in the text chat that say, "Okay, please do this. Now, please do this. Now, please do that." We can actually guide the client through what they need to do, even for applications that don't allow a remote-control user to modify them.

The other thing that we're beginning to use more is the feature where, at the end of each session, you can type a quick note as to why you were logging in to that device. We've started putting in notes saying things like, "I went in to update Windows software," or, "I went in to fix a bug," or, "I went in to update our own software." We have not gone to the next step of reporting on, analyzing, reviewing, or using those comments as a way to drive additional follow-up. But it does at least give us the first step so that if somebody says, "Hey, why were you in my machine?" we can produce documentation that says why.

The TeamViewer system has some built-in security. The TeamViewer client connects to the TeamViewer host securely. Only a certain number of authorized users on our side have access to the system. Even within that, an individual endpoint can be assigned to a group, where not everybody has access but, rather, just one or two people who are part of a support team might have access to that particular device. So TeamViewer has given us tools to be able to segregate who has access to different things. That's been pretty helpful in dealing with some of our clients who have more "buttoned-up" security. They're able to say: "These two people have access to the devices." We have designated support people for that client who can go into their device and nobody else can even see that the device exists. That's really helpful.

The remote connection process is totally simple. It's as easy as it comes. We do install the software on field devices, but we also have TeamViewer's widget on our website. So, if you go to the support page on our website, you can click a link and download a white-labeled TeamViewer app that pops up and gives you a service key that you can fill in. That's an interesting tool. It makes it easier for customers who are not one of our owned assets to quickly download and light up a TeamViewer session so that we can help them with software configuration updates. Sometimes it's not even things that are our problem, but they don't know who else to call, so they call us.

What needs improvement?

I find it pretty easy to use. They redesigned the interface a while ago, and, honestly, when I first looked at it, it seemed sort of clumsy, but, now that I've gotten used to it, it's pretty darn easy. At first, everything was totally different. Doing simple things that I used to do, like connecting to a certain device, went from being obvious to a situation where there were just so many more features available that I had to click through to find the simple thing that I was trying to do.

In addition, and I don't know if it's TeamViewer's problem or not, I do find that sometimes we'll have a device in the field, and I'll click on remote control and it says "Can't authenticate." I'll double click in a different part of the TeamViewer interface and it'll say "Can't authenticate." Then I'll do it a third time and it connects. It's possible that it's just bad luck. It's also very possible that it's some bug within TeamViewer so that with the first click I'm waking up the TeamViewer connection, and with the second click I'm starting the connection but it's taking a long time because it's in a bad cell zone. Then, the third time, it's working because finally the thing is awake and recognized and is passing everything through. It may have nothing to do with TeamViewer, or it may be a TeamViewer issue. I don't know. That's the only thing I've really noticed that is problematic from our perspective. We'll see a device, we'll see it's online and that it should be available, but when we try to connect it doesn't connect. So that's a challenge.

In terms of additional features, the more TeamViewer can work with, and on, different devices, that would be helpful. We're doing some R&D with Cisco for some modems that have an IOx, which is a Unix-based compute area. If we could control that device using TeamViewer, that would be cool because, otherwise, we have to buy a Cisco cloud management software system to monitor those devices; similar to the Cradle Point. I'm not aware of any sort of onboard storage where we could install TeamViewer on a Cradlepoint, but if that is the case, then they should let people know about it because that would be a useful tool.

One of the things that would be a cool feature, and I'm not sure how TeamViewer could make it happen, would be to take an ad hoc TeamViewer session from our support website and, in the course of that, install the TeamViewer host, so that a client device would then become part of our network of machines we can get to relatively easily. That would be a huge time and energy saver. One of the things we find is that there will be a device and the users of that device have to use our software from time to time, but they don't use it often enough to really be good at it. So each time they use it, they go back through the learning-curve process. If we were able to quickly jump on their machine and walk them through what to do and how to do it, that would make it easier for them and easier for us.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using TeamViewer for four or five years. We started out on version 8 and we're up to 15 now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability has been very good with the possible exception, as I mentioned earlier, of that three-clicks-to-connect issue, which seems to come and go. My guess is that it's something related to our devices being on cellular connections in areas with really bad cell service. But I've noticed it typically occurs when there's either a Windows update or a TeamViewer update, so it makes me wonder if maybe Microsoft introduces some sort of incompatibility that screws up TeamViewer and then there's a TeamViewer update that fixes it. We just have to remember to keep TeamViewer up to date on all of our clients in the field.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We only manage 30 devices. I could see, if we had a thousand devices, that the management part might become a little more complicated. Given that you can separate different devices into groups, and you can give different people access to different groups, it might be relatively straightforward. Huge scalability isn't something that we've had to deal with yet.

The monitoring, asset management, and endpoint protection are things we just haven't had the time or the mental energy to test. If they work as advertised, those seem like they'd be great features for simplifying remote management. In terms of expanding use of TeamViewer, those are next on the list. 

We'll be looking at endpoint protection; the patch-management and device health monitoring. Those are things we're very interested in. We want to do them to see how much, if any, additional CPU load and communication load is put on the device. We are a little concerned that we're going to clog up these fairly lightweight devices out in the field with a lot of administrative overhead instead of leaving them to do what they're supposed to do. We would probably do one or two as a test, just to see how it goes, and then start to crank it up. We have about 30 devices in the field that we monitor with TeamViewer; it's not like we've got tens of thousands.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have used technical support very sparingly, but when we've used it they've been great. They are very responsive, very knowledgeable, and they typically resolve our issue with one or two calls.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We actually initially started using it because we're based on the east coast in Boston and Washington, D.C. and we had a client in Chicago who had our software on a number of devices. He wanted those computers to be someone else's problem, namely our problem. He asked us to have some sort of solution in place so that we could quickly visit the computer, check that everything was working, upload Windows updates, upload software updates for our software — whatever was needed to make sure that they were happy and healthy, including rebooting them from time to time. That's how we started with TeamViewer. Since then, more and more machines have been added to the list; some with this client and some with other clients. We found it so easy with that first client that we wondered why in the world we weren't using it with everybody else.

How was the initial setup?

We find the initial setup of TeamViewer very straightforward, but not everybody finds it as straightforward as we do. It takes minutes. Deploying TeamViewer is incredibly easy.

What was our ROI?

I don't really have a firm answer for how many end-users can now be supported with one support person, versus how many could be supported in the past. We didn't really have a pre-existing field support organization. But it's very clear that by using TeamViewer and not needing to go do field views visits, that we're a million times more productive. The eight hours of travel that might've been part of a field visit to go help one customer now become eight productive hours that you can be helping other customers or doing other things.

A lot of the TeamViewer stuff is done by people who do technical support for sales or technical support for core development. If they can quickly pop into a user's computer, check something out, fix something for them, and go back to their work, they get a lot more development work done than if they have to get in a car and drive somewhere or get on a plane and fly somewhere to do that same look at the client's setup and what needs to be fixed.

If you take a $100,000-a-year employee and enable him to spend 20 minutes per service call instead of eight hours per service call, that's a pretty darn impressive return.

TeamViewer is a great value. We obviously wish it was less expensive because we want everything to be free all the time. But we do recognize that sometimes you have to pay for things, just like we try to convince our clients that they should pay for our software. 

TeamViewer is $600 or $700 per port per year, which we find that to be just fine. If we paid $100 per port per year we'd be happier, but we're very happy with the quality of the service and the capabilities that gives us. So it's been a great value for us.

I could go look up how many TeamViewer sessions we do per year, how many where we couldn't get the information through some other method, but that's where it becomes complicated to say specifically what the ROI is. 

It's clear that it's a valuable product. 

It's probably not valuable for everyone because there might be people who've got devices or systems where they have to hear it or smell it running to be able to diagnose what's going on. That's not really TeamViewer's strength. Its strength is getting visibility into a remote desktop, at least as far as we know, so that you can diagnose and treat a computer issue.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We've used a LogMeIn and there was something else that we've used, a solution that a partner of ours used which we tried for a while. TeamViewer seems to be a much more complete, stable, and reliable solution.

It's hard to make comparisons because it's been so long since I used LogMeIn. Longer ago than that, I used to use a VNC product that conceptually did the same stuff: gave me remote access to desktops. That was clunky, but it was probably as good as could be expected given the tools at the time. 

As a user who has been given remote support access via LogMeIn, what people have done with LogMeIn's help function seems easier than what we do with TeamViewer. That may be entirely because we're not organized well enough in our TeamViewer implementation to be doing it the right way. I certainly don't want to bash TeamViewer's capabilities, because I think it's more likely that we just don't know all the things we could do.

With LogMeIn Rescue, the technician gives you an ID number. You put the ID number in and they're in your computer. And TeamViewer can probably do the same thing. I just haven't gone through the process of learning how to make that happen. The way we do it via our website is that you click a link, you download something, it pops open, it gives you an ID, the person then tells you the ID, then you're in. It's a couple of extra steps, rather than just being a web browser access.

What other advice do I have?

If somebody asks me what I recommend for remote support, I always recommend TeamViewer. If they say, "I use LogMeIn, and I love it," I wouldn't be surprised. I've been a user of LogMeIn's remote support, and it seems like a pretty effective and easy-to-use tool. I'm sure the market is big enough for more than two players, but we're pretty comfortably ensconced with TeamViewer as our solution.

Do it. It's outstanding. It's very simple. We love it.

TeamViewer has a lot of additional features. They do audio and even video chat through TeamViewer. They do patch management, asset control, and all sorts of other things and we've actually thought about some of those other services, but we haven't taken the plunge yet.

We have not integrated TeamViewer with a single sign-on application. We actually use the TeamViewer host as often as we can on our remote devices. The device in the field is always on and always connected, and the people on our side who need to log in and access those devices will use the standard TeamViewer authentication process, which is pretty thorough. It's a username and password and it has a visual Captcha and then, when you register a device, it also emails and says, "Hey, we saw that you just signed in on this device from this location. Is that you?" They know what they're doing.

The idea of using TeamViewer for 5G deployments and smart poles with IoT devices is potentially interesting because we have a lot of Cradlepoint modems out in the field and Cradlepoint has a cloud management console. If it would be possible for us to use TeamViewer to access and manage those devices, that would be interesting because we pay $80 a year per device for the license in the Cradlepoint console.

In terms of end-users of TeamViewer in our company, we only have three ports and we have five or six usernames. There are three or four guys who do most of the work, remoting into various devices and rooting around to see if they can fix something or if there are things that need to be fixed.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
GIS Developer at a transportation company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Excels when I want to take control of a remote computer
Pros and Cons
  • "The best feature is the remote access and being able to control another person's computer when you're showing them something, or teaching them how to do something during training, or fixing a problem they're having."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use it for interacting with other employees. They'll have TeamViewer, but they're working from home in another state. We link up our computers and, that way, it's almost like we're sitting next to each other. We can see what the other is doing on his computer.

    We do use the technical support mode sometimes, which is the same thing as collaboration. You just log in to somebody's computer and fix that computer remotely.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It's smoother. It's faster. It stays on. It seems to have a really good connection and it's consistent.

    Once we got it for the company, the IT manager deployed it and started using it for technical support. He doesn't use it a whole lot, but when he does need it, it really helps him. He can get in there and see what problem another computer is having.

    What is most valuable?

    The best feature is the remote access and being able to control another person's computer when you're showing them something, or teaching them how to do something during training, or fixing a problem they're having. Also, if I'm at home or even on the other side of the country like I am right now, I can log in to my computer at work.

    On slow internet connections, TeamViewer works much better than other products. It seems to deal with slow internet connections better. If we are in a remote location and we want to access our computers at work, or a server, we can just log in to TeamViewer and it seems to connect.

    There's a lot more you can do with it as far as collaboration and team co-operation go. You can get a lot of people on it. We're not utilizing it for that. For example, if the boss wants to hold a meeting, and have everybody join the meeting, he can do so and have different people do presentations. They can do their presentations and interact on one computer. If the boss is showing something and he says, "Well, take over and you show me what you think," that person can take over the cursor and start running it as if he's sitting right there in the meeting. I don't see other products doing that very well. 

    With the other products that we're currently using, somebody has to say, "Well, let me share my screen and then they have to start sharing their screen and they have to turn it over to somebody else. Everybody has to load the program and get on the same page on their own computers, rather than just switching the control of the presentation to somebody, wherever that person happens to. With TeamViewer, they can take over the presentation right on the same computer that the presenter was using and give their presentation without having to switch screens. I love that part.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using TeamViewer for a couple of years, but we just got the licenses in June.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability has great potential. We could be using this for a lot more people in our company.

    Our company has free products in use, like Microsoft Teams. The problem with Teams is that it's not as clear. It locks up and sometimes just doesn't work as well. But it's free, and everybody's using it, so it's hard to get people to move to something that's not free.

    Although TeamViewer is a little more dependable and works much better, the cost is high. I can have a meeting online and have 35 people on it, as long as they have installed TeamViewer or log in to the website. They can all get on and they don't have to pay. But since everybody is using another product, and they've been using it for years, it's hard to scale up and get them convinced to use something different.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've used the vendor's technical support a few times. They're responsive and they took care of my concerns. They showed me how to do things correctly. They were really good, easy to work with.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup is fairly easy. The basic connection is easy. When I started using the different services, I didn't know how to go in and start up a meeting. It seems to have a lot of features that have a little bit of a learning curve. I don't have time to learn all those features, so I just use the basic stuff.

    On average, deployment takes 30 minutes.

    I deployed it myself, as did my co-worker who is also a developer.

    What was our ROI?

    We haven't seen ROI. We're using it strictly for IT and technical, internal use.

    I do use it a lot for remote accessing of my computer at work. I don't have to do anything, such as turn my work computer on. It just logs right in and I can start using it. I can also log in to other peoples' computers. All you have to do is hit a button and say, "Yes, allow me in." It makes it so simple to connect. It's worth the money, even though it's a little bit expensive.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It does what I need it to do but I think it's expensive. It wasn't easy for me to get approval from the company to get it. Not a whole lot of people in our company use it, but the five or six of us who do use it get a lot out of it.

    It's costing us about $700 a year, per license. For the company it was $2,000, and that was on a deal. I think it would have been $2,200 or $2,300. 

    I also got it for a friend who was working remotely. At the end of his year's subscription to TeamViewer, he wasn't using it much anymore. He was using something else. He called them to tell them that he did not want to continue with it for another year, but they said, "No, you didn't give us the 30-day buffer at the end of the year which is required to cancel for the coming year, so there's no way you can cancel now." They wouldn't let him out of the contract. He didn't read the fine print. We then read the fine print it did say that you have to give that number of days' prior notice before you cancel at the end of the year. If you don't give them that prior notice, you're stuck. I didn't like that.

    I've looked at other companies that provide the same type of thing and their pricing is about the same.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I tried using WebEx and another product as well. They didn't work as smoothly as TeamViewer. We've tried using Microsoft Teams. Using that, you can take over and control the other person's cursor, but it's really cumbersome. When I use TeamViewer and get it up and going, it's almost like I'm just sitting in front of that computer. Aside from the couple of icons and menus that are off to the side, you can't even tell that you're not using the actual computer.

    WebEx is great for doing meetings. TeamViewer may be doing great for doing that but I haven't really used it for that.

    TeamViewer is much better for doing remote access than WebEx. For the stuff that I use every day, TeamViewer works better than other products, especially when I want to take over control of another computer. The other products that I've tried are not nearly as good when I do that. TeamViewer is the best.

    What other advice do I have?

    The biggest thing I've learned from using TeamViewer is that you shouldn't spend a whole lot of time trying to find other products to save a little bit of money, when you already have a product that you know is working great. Don't waste your time. Get the product you know is working well, one you have confidence in and a little bit of experience in. Don't try to cut corners. I spend a lot of time trying to find other products because the company doesn't want to spend a few thousand dollars for just me and one other person, but when the IT person got on, then he was able to get them to use it.

    In my opinion, it's the best remote access product on the market. The service is great. The product is great.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    PeerSpot user
    ROV Technical Superintendent at a energy/utilities company with 1-10 employees
    Real User
    Provides easy-to-use and very capable remote meeting functionality
    Pros and Cons
    • "It's pretty easy to use. Just key in an ID and password and connect. For meetings, just enter the meeting ID and connect."
    • "If were to I put myself in the seat of a small business owner, I would prefer TeamViewer to be more of a pay-once-and-own-it solution, rather than paying via a subscription model (although I am using the free version). Only annual subscriptions are available. It makes paying for it the first time seem a little daunting."

    What is our primary use case?

    I am using it more for meetings with my colleagues who happen to be at another worksite. I am using the meeting functionality more often now, compared to the remote-control functionality which I used more often previously.

    I use it on a Windows PC.

    What is most valuable?

    It's pretty easy to use. Just key in an ID and password and connect. For meetings, just enter the meeting ID and connect.

    What needs improvement?

    If were to I put myself in the seat of a small business owner, I would prefer TeamViewer to be more of a pay-once-and-own-it solution, rather than paying via a subscription model (although I am using the free version). Only annual subscriptions are available. It makes paying for it the first time seem a little daunting.

    It also renews automatically, annually, and you are only allowed to cancel it by applying for the cancellation 28 days in advance through a support ticket. They should really tend to that.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using TeamViewer for a very long time. Previously, I used it as a personal tool to log in to my parents' or friends' computers to help them troubleshoot issues. About a year ago, I started looking for an alternative to using Skype for video meetings. In the end, I found TeamViewer’s meeting solution to be pretty smooth and suitable for use in China. I have been using that functionality, occasionally, for about a year.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable. 

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't used technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We were previously trying to use Skype for Business for meetings. It did not work very well in China so we had to find something else.

    How was the initial setup?

    In my opinion, the setup was not that complicated. I found it more difficult setting up the local Chinese version of Skype for Business. When I got the company to install TeamViewer instead, they found it much easier to register and connect.

    It took just a few minutes of downloading, installation, and registration on the site and it was good to go.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The price is reasonable. However, it doesn't seem that anybody in my company wants
    to spend.

    What other advice do I have?

    My advice is to try it for free first.

    For security reasons, we do not have an IT department that connects to the main IT infrastructure in our parent companies. So we have to come up with our own solutions at minimal costs.

    At the moment, I only have three close colleagues using it in my organization. They are all on the technical side. We discuss engineering solutions and procedures during our meetings.

    I have always felt that TeamViewer is extremely capable software and, in my many years of using its remote connection service, it has never let me down.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    PeerSpot user
    Rich Mayo - PeerSpot reviewer
    Owner at Sensible Solutions Inc.
    Real User
    Automatically prompts me for session details when done, which can be automatically turned into invoices
    Pros and Cons
    • "Ease of use was the number-one thing. It's an industry leader for ease of use, specifically on the client-side, which is the absolutely critical thing. If I want to connect to somebody, how easily can I — without seeing their computer — walk them through the steps to install it to a point where I can key in the code and help them resolve their situation?... TeamViewer is just a dead-solid, easy answer."
    • "Every now and then you'll get a silent crash and you relaunch the application. But it happens no more than with anything else in the Windows environment."

    What is our primary use case?

    My primary use case for TeamViewer is all of my remote support. I use it throughout the organization for remotely supporting my accounting customers. I have a number of clients who use different ERP systems that I support and I use TeamViewer to connect to their computers, resolve issues, do work after hours, and provide remote training, etc. 

    I don't use a lot of any of their managed alerts or any of that kind of thing cause I'm on the intersection between IT and finance. But I'm definitely using it quite frequently, and I'm using it to generate billing as well through the TeamViewer logs.

    I don't deviate a lot from the very standard usage. It's along the lines of, "Oh, a client is phoning." I answer the phone, connect to them remotely, resolve their issue, document what I did, and on I go. We don't use a lot of the sophisticated features of TeamViewer. We do programming, data repair, development, and troubleshooting, but as far as TeamViewer goes, we don't get fancy with it. We just want to make sure that we serve the client and then get paid for it.

    How has it helped my organization?

    With billing, when I initially started with TeamViewer, there was no automatic prompt for logging the details of the connection. Now, it has streamlined my process because every time I close a connection, there's an automatic window that pops up asking me what I've done. So immediately Joanne, who does the billing, is able to take that information and turn it into an invoice automatically, unless she has a question about it. It ensures that I'm capturing more of my work, so things don't get missed. It does that for me quite well.

    That feature is saving me one or two hours on a weekly basis, but it's also ensuring that I'm not missing any connections. If I had two hours of missed connections, I would miss $250, so it's ensuring that I'm billing that $250 a week that might otherwise get missed.

    What is most valuable?

    Every now and then I will do remote training with it. Those features are quite good.

    Overall, it's pretty simple and pretty straightforward, and that's one of the things that I like about it. It's also fairly light on the client's end because, most of the time, when I'm phoning a client, they're not technically strong at all. They need something that's just absolutely dead-simple to install.

    That's one of the reasons why I went with TeamViewer over some of the other technologies I was looking at. Ease of use was the number-one thing. It's an industry leader for ease of use, specifically on the client-side, which is the absolutely critical thing. If I want to connect to somebody, how easily can I — without seeing their computer — walk them through the steps to install it to a point where I can key in the code and help them resolve their situation? People are phoning because they're already panicked about something to do with technology. If I have something else that's technologically challenging that they have to do before I can help them, that exacerbates the situation rather than helping it. TeamViewer is just a dead-solid, easy answer.

    TeamViewer also has great support for multi-monitor. I can have a whack of connections open at the same time.

    What needs improvement?

    Speed and performance have been addressed. I know there was a security blip a few years ago and they now do the extra authentication, which I appreciate and clients appreciate.

    I haven't had the contact TeamViewer in so long. When I originally started with TeamViewer, they didn't prompt the user to log the details of the connection. You'd have to manually go back into the TeamViewer Manager and log your comment, after you had closed it. Then you'd go back into TeamViewer, go to that connection and assign a comment to it, which I would sometimes forget to do, especially if I was jumping from call to call to call. I sent in a feature request asking them to add the prompts and I'm sure other people sent in the same feature request. They did that many years ago.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using TeamViewer since version 5, so it would have been the first month or week that I started my business, which would be seven or eight years ago.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability has been very good to excellent. Every now and then you'll get a silent crash and you relaunch the application. But it happens no more than with anything else in the Windows environment.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It has organizational tools and it's nicely scalable. If I grew the business to 30 or 50 people, consultants, it would still be an excellent solution.

    The only time I'd need to expand the technology is if I hire. If I hire another person, I likely wouldn't even increase the channel usage right away because it's based on concurrent usage. Joanne is an intermittent user, so we're not looking for anything extra right now.

    There is TeamViewer's ITbrain that we could look into more but, again, it's not really something that we do. I stay in my lane with the accounting software. I'm not looking to manage my clients' IT infrastructure or to manage their PCs. If I see something that's out of the ordinary, 90 percent of my clients are going to have an IT person who handles that side of things. I handle anything that has to do with inventory and accounts receivable, and general ledgers, and debits and credits, and accounting software. Anything that touches on those things, then I'm in. But if they're having problems with their computers running slowly, I refer that out.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The few times I've had to use technical support, it's been fine.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Very briefly, in the first three weeks of the business, there was another tool that I used. Then I used TeamViewer and I've never stopped. I can't remember what that other tool was called. It was more of a standalone kind of product. It was cheaper than TeamViewer.

    I switched because TeamViewer was robust. I also felt safer. I was going to be installing the program at clients' places and I didn't want to introduce anything that might be difficult. It is easy to use for clients. Although I've got it installed on my network of eight or nine machines, I have connections to hundreds and hundreds of other computers — some 500 other computers at my clients. I wanted to make sure I was installing something that was not taking up too much memory on their machines, that was stable and secure. I didn't want something that was at all suspect. I wanted solid and robust.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was quite straightforward. It just needed to be installed on five or six machines inside the domain, and on a couple of machines at home. I then continued to roll it out to clients and through links to it in my email signature. Deploying TeamViewer across the various environments was really straight forward and easy. There was no implementation strategy required. 

    The only thing I had to watch for was if my clients were already using TeamViewer or if they had another company that does not have a certain version of TeamViewer. Suppose I have a client which uses an IT company to handle their network infrastructure and computers, and that company has TeamViewer 11 or 12, while I have TeamViewer 14. I have to be careful to make sure that the client is always installing TeamViewer 11 or 12 — whatever version they have. One of the things I find that is really easy about it is that, with TeamViewer 14, I can connect to any older version. But you can't connect to a newer version from an older license. If somebody is using TeamViewer 12 and, for whatever reason, they haven't renewed their license, they can't connect to TeamViewer 14 installations. I have to remember to play nice if somebody has a limitation like that.

    But for me, it's just dead-simple. The client installs the most current version and I'm off to the races. That's one of the reasons why I pay them money every year. Deployment takes ten minutes per machine. I call them "gravity installs." Next, next, next, next, next.

    And I'm the only one who maintains it.

    What was our ROI?

    It's inefficient to travel. Without any remote support solution, if I drive out to a client, do some work, and drive back, I have the prep time and the clean-up time. I have to get gas in the car. There are all those overhead things. I go out, do three hours of billing, and charge for an hour of travel time. But it really takes most of the day. But with some kind of remote support solution, I can be concurrently overlapping my billing. If I've got a busy day on TeamViewer, for example, I can end an eight-hour day with 12 hours of billing, easily. Comparing those cases — no solution versus having a remote support solution — the ROI could be $50,000.

    But compared to if I had a different remote solution in place, the efficiencies I've seen in TeamViewer, and the way that it traps things, would be saving me closer to $3,000.

    If we're talking about a strict ROI, I would use the $50,000 number because there'd be ROI with that competing product as well. It allows me to be 20 percent more efficient.

    Before implementing TeamViewer, I could support one person at a time over the telephone. After implementing TeamViewer, the most I've ever had were about ten connections at once. For practical purposes, it depends on your level of attention. You can be doing as many things as you want concurrently, and multiple billing if it's appropriate. But you're limited by your own attention span. I run with four large monitors on my desktop, so I've got the real estate. I can have little TeamViewer windows all over the place.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Every now and then, I hear people complain, "Oh, it's pretty expensive," because it will cost you $1,500 to $1,600 a year, but when I think of how much work I do through TeamViewer...

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I looked at LogMeIn Rescue and PC Anywhere in addition to TeamViewer.

    At the time, TeamViewer was a version license, whereas LogMeIn was a subscription. But one of the big things that really drove me to TeamViewer was seeing how much of the resources it was using on a computer. I installed both solutions and looked at them from the point of view of the client. I looked at the resource usage when they were running and the performance. That's what sold me: the interface and the performance.

    What other advice do I have?

    The biggest lesson that I've learned from using TeamViewer is probably the ROI lesson. I used to work for another company and I ended up buying the client list from them. There was not a lot of remote support happening at the time. In fact, I helped them usher in the remote support era, but they were still very much on a drive-out-to-the-client paradigm. It used to drive the boss crazy when he'd see me sitting in the office a lot. He always thought sitting in the office was a bad thing. Then he looked at the billings and found my billings were way higher than anybody else's. He would ask, "Why are you in the office so much?" The biggest thing is I learned that sometimes there are better paradigms for work. It's more efficient. It's better for the client and it's better for me. If I have a client who has an issue, I could drive out there, answer three questions, drive back, and send them a bill for a minimum one hour on-site and a minimum for travel charges. Or I can remote-in, connect, solve a problem, log off, and they know that they're getting a bill for 15 minutes. It's way better. There are ways to be efficient. Work smarter, not harder.

    If you're looking to implement TeamViewer, just point to the website and go download it.

    I install it all on-premise. When I'm working with a client, if they don't have TeamViewer installed, I'll just walk them through very quickly installing TeamViewer on their session and then remotely connect to them, attach, and help them with whatever their problem-du-jour is.

    My users use it almost exclusively on Windows PCs. I have connected to a Mac probably one or two times in about eight years, and I have connected from my phone to a client twice. Because I'm working on ERP systems that work in the Windows environment, I don't have much cause to jump on to anything other than a Windows PC. The times that I have had to jump onto a Linux machine or a Mac, I found that the interface is consistent and it doesn't present any problems.

    We have three people using it in the organization. We're a small company. Their roles are report developer, administration, and tech support. I'm the support team. The company is me, my wife, and my sister. My wife does the administration and the billings. She uses TeamViewer to view the connection logs and see what she should be charging. My sister uses it, as our Crystal Reports developer, to upload reports to the client, making sure that things are configured correctly and adjusting reports. She's remotely attaching with no intervention from the client's side. I do everything in between. I will phone the client, connect, do training remotely, remote support. I'll upload programs or do troubleshooting. I also do a blend of "guided," where the client is on the other end and is watching what I'm doing. I also use it after-hours where the client's not involved. It solves both of those things. We're a small organization, but it definitely serves our needs.

    TeamViewer has matured nicely over the seven or eight upgrades. Now, I just expect them to be doing performance and security. It's got the full feature set that I'm looking for. But computers are complicated ecosystems with tons of challenges, so I just expect that they're going to continue paddling beneath the surface. I don't care if I don't see a lot of extra bells and whistles, I just want to know that it's still secure and fast and doing things the right way.

    It's feature-rich and easy to use. It's an excellent product. It's a product that is really deeply integrated into our daily workflow.

    Realistically, is there anything more that I would want from it? It does what it's supposed to do and it does it reliably. It would be unfair not to give it a ten out of ten.

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    PeerSpot user
    Jason Miller - PeerSpot reviewer
    Application Engineer at AirTies
    Real User
    Can provide access anywhere and remotely show what is on the desktop of a target machine
    Pros and Cons
    • "There have been a couple of times with the handy remote access feature, where I have been asked for something at eight o'clock on a Thursday evening and it is on my desk machine, but I am driving back to my office. With TeamViewer, I can just stay at my home machine, connect to my work machine, and get the data needed without having to drive back across town."
    • "On occasion, when remote connection process can't connect to a machine, the error messages aren't always helpful to tell you why you can't connect, as the message doesn't help troubleshoot whether it is too slow, too much interference, etc. I usually have to run to another computer and figure out what is going on, then restart it. The diagnostics could be improved."

    What is our primary use case?

    The primary use case is getting access to various test machines from one location.

    AirTies makes smart WiFi technology which end up in people's homes. I set it up in a house with WiFi devices. We test our Extenders and gateways with a bunch of clients using TeamViewer. I can access the clients to view the data being collected or what's connecting to wired ports. I do this locally, and sometimes, I access the home office in Istanbul.

    It is used on a mix of Mac and Windows machines. Even though we have Android and iOS devices to test for WiFi devices, we haven't put TeamViewer on them yet.

    We have a lot of IOT devices, but we haven't used TeamViewer that much manage them or get to them. While I'm open to it, I'm not sure of the roadmap for the rest of the QA team.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We can get machines logged off and check statuses of what's going on a lot easier. Otherwise, you need to track things in the office or wait for someone to be online in Istanbul, which is a bit tough because Istanbul is eight hours ahead of us. 

    I've had coworkers who have done remote debugging. So, they ask a client to install TeamViewer so they can access their network from our office and help them troubleshoot problems in the field. In these cases, it is more of a support type role offered.

    What is most valuable?

    TeamViewer shows you what is on the desktop of the target machine.

    The two features that I use the most are getting onto a desktop, so I can access it, and File Transfer. Quite often, we need put new firmware out there across the network or I need to get logs from a device. So, I log into different PC and just use File Transfer to move stuff back and forth.

    There have been a couple of times with the handy remote access feature, where I have been asked for something at eight o'clock on a Thursday evening and it is on my desk machine, but I am driving back to my office. With TeamViewer, I can just stay at my home machine, connect to my work machine, and get the data needed without having to drive back across town.

    It does have screen recording, which is a cool feature that I have only used twice.

    It has been pretty easy to use. It probably does more things than I know that it can do, so it's probably even more robust than I think. What I do use it for, it is a piece of cake to use. They changed a couple of menu options between versions 13 and 14.

    What needs improvement?

    The remote connection process is reliable, good, and fast. On occasion, when it can't connect to a machine, the error messages aren't always helpful to tell you why you can't connect, as the message doesn't help troubleshoot whether it is too slow, too much interference, etc. I usually have to run to another computer and figure out what is going on, then restart it. The diagnostics could be improved.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using TeamViewer for a year and a half at AirTies at this location. It now is required with the job. I have a bunch of different PCs spread around the house which I need access to., but don't want to chase down. My previous experience before AirTies was hit or miss. I didn't use it too often, only if I needed to set up remote access for something.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It has been really stable. It has only locked up once, and I believe this was because I got confused over a network issue since I was changing networks. It is nice that the product is stable. So if I can't connect, it's probably a computer or network problem, not a software problem.

    For everything that I use it, it has been rock solid.

    I am the only official tester. So, I maintain all the systems. I don't know how many people are on the QA test teams in Istanbul. It might be around 30 people and need an IT team of about 8. However, I am not sure how much they do get called up to test and maintain TeamViewer. Usually, I'm doing all the IT functions.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It scales pretty well. Every time that we get a new machine, we install TeamViewer on it. However, we only buy a new machine every 14 months or so.

    There are no obvious limitation to how many end users that we can support. E.g., our home office has six test locations with an entire development team and QA team where have 50 to 60 people.

    Our development, QA, and IT teams have access to TeamViewer. Our development team uses it the most. The IT team, which is about eight people, uses it a little. The QA team use it as needed, but not daily. On and off, 20 people use it, but 60 people have access to it.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't had a chance to use their tech support. I've only searched a couple times on forums.

    How was the initial setup?

    For our client, we just download, install it, install another one internally, and generate the unique ID. Then, you're good to go. The only thing that we do change is the password. It's a lot easier to type it in than the computer generated one.

    The install process takes 5 to ten minutes. This includes time to record the ID for look up later on.

    What was our ROI?

    It saves me a lot of trouble. Time-wise, it is probably saving me several hours because I don't have to travel anywhere. I just wait for the time difference. With the time difference, it is really hard to talk to people halfway around the planet sometimes.

    It has probably saved us several thousands of dollars because we have quick access anywhere. We don't have to worry about finding people onsite or arranging conference calls. We also save time and money with it because we don't have to send somebody onsite to troubleshoot.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    TeamViewer offers a free version to try. Download and give it a shot. See what it's like and if you like it, then buy the license for it.

    We tell people not to license TeamViewer internally, but they can download it. The product is not quite organized for distribution.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I've used VNC in the past at another company. I like TeamViewer a bit better, as it has more tools built-in. The File Transfer thing is awesome, and it also runs faster than VNC. VNC is free and easy to set up, but it's not user-friendly nor does it have as many options as TeamViewer. VNC doesn't have the powerful UI that TeamViewer has nor does VNC echo the screen like TeamViewer does.

    There is also pcAnywhere, which is more PC-centric (not sure if it will work on a Mac). TeamViewer has a lot less overhead versus pcAnywhere. Also, I know that TeamViewer can anywhere and on a Mac.

    What other advice do I have?

    Test it out and see if it meets your needs. 

    It's awesome. Nothing else compares to it at the same level.

    Biggest lesson learnt: There are tools available which don't cost too much and can improve productivity. They can make it so you don't have to travel so much.

    We haven't done any 5G stuff yet. All our stuff is done WiFi locally.

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    PeerSpot user
    Network Administrator at Parksite
    Real User
    The time savings is substantial as I can quickly jump on a device and fix something
    Pros and Cons
    • "It was worth the investment. You can do file transfers and video calls with it. You can do a lot of copy paste stuff. E.g., if I have a file and want to place it on somebody's machine, I can just copy it off of mine and paste it right on their machine. I don't have to put it in a Dropbox account and have them log into it to pull it off. I can do all that right through TeamViewer. When you're looking at the TeamViewer screen, you think you are working on your own machine."
    • "If they could figure out a little better solution for the iOS stuff other than just a screen share, even though it's an Apple thing, and Apple doesn't like to give up control of their devices. If they ever got to that point, and I could manipulate an iPad or iPhone, that would be awesome. Since we have a bunch of iPad users who are struggling with doing different things, it would be nice to be able to just jump on and actually show them, "Here, do this, this, and this." Similar to what we do with the laptops, e.g. for training."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use it for remote access to other machines. That was the main reason why we bought it. It is for our help desk and support guys to access remote users' machines.

    Our users have it on their laptops. We can also do a bit of remote support for Apple devices, but it is basically a screen share. You can just see their screen. You can't manipulate anything, but you can see what they are looking at on their screens. Therefore, it's mostly for laptops, desktop machines, and the PC environment.

    It is mostly for the regular support, for anybody who is having issues with a machine.

    I use the solution quite a bit. I love it.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It provides efficiency, even if it is something as simple as just maintenance, something that is broken, adding something, a walk-through, or doing training. It is a great tool.

    The remote connect process is super simple. As long as the user has an Internet connection and can get on the Internet somewhere, whether they are at home (on their WiFi), using portable Internet (Jetpack), or if they stop in a Starbucks to get on the Internet, I can connect to them. That is what is really convenient.

    It was worth the investment. You can do file transfers and video calls with it. You can do a lot of copy paste stuff. E.g., if I have a file and want to place it on somebody's machine, I can just copy it off of mine and paste it right on their machine. I don't have to put it in a Dropbox account and have them log into it to pull it off. I can do all that right through TeamViewer. When you are looking at the TeamViewer screen, you think you are working on your own machine.

    What is most valuable?

    It is really easy to use. If I can get a machine on the Internet, I can get on it and fix whatever is wrong with it. I keep an individual list of all of our machines that TeamViewer is installed on. So, I have all the IDs, etc. This makes it easy for me to get to their machines.

    This saves a ton of time. A guy can call me, who is out on the road, and say, “Hey, I left my machine on, and it is at home. Can you go in and..." either install software or fix something, because something is not working right, etc. Then, I can remote into his machine and fix stuff, before he even gets home. This rather than try to walk him through fixing something, which isn't always the easiest. So, I can jump on and fix something in five minutes, which would probably take an hour normally.

    You don't need to be an IT professional to use it.

    What needs improvement?

    If they could figure out a little better solution for the iOS stuff other than just a screen share, even though it's an Apple thing, and Apple doesn't like to give up control of their devices. If they ever got to that point, and I could manipulate an iPad or iPhone, that would be awesome. Since we have a bunch of iPad users who are struggling with doing different things, it would be nice to be able to just jump on and actually show them, "Here, do this, this, and this." Similar to what we do with the laptops, e.g. for training.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have probably had it three to four years. It has been quite a while.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability has been really good. I can probably count on one hand how many times that it wasn't available or that they had some sort of an outage, which has been pretty brief. I don't ever think it's ever been longer than an hour, and that has been rare. It is really stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    You could add as many users on here as you want. We probably access around 500 devices.

    We have eight licenses now. Therefore, we have eight users who can remote access machines.

    I have three monitors that I use. While it's not real common, there are times when I'm on three to four people's machines at one time trying to fix different things. I imagine if I had more monitors that could be organized enough to make sure I am using the right stuff on the right machines, I could probably do whatever our Internet could handle. I could probably do 20 people at a time.

    As we add more PCs (or whatever devices), TeamViewer gets added onto them. I use TeamViewer all day long, like it is my right arm. I haven't run a report in quite awhile, but I spend probably half of my day using the software on somebody else's machine.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The technical support has been great. The couple of times that I have ever needed anything, I will send an email. I receive a reply back pretty quickly, then a follow up. They will let me know, "Hey, somebody is either going to call you, or you will get an email follow up." It depends on what the question is, but I get something back very quickly. If I needed to get another license, I could send an email right now and have a license in probably 15 minutes.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We had another software that we used for a while called Virtual Network Connection (VNC), which allowed us to access machines. The problem with that solution was that it had to be on a VPN connection. They had to be connected to our network, so it was a lot more difficult to be able to get on their machines. For those machines, we added TeamViewer. Now, every time that they boot up the users' machines, it launches if they are on the Internet. It connects, and I can see whose machines are on and whose aren't.

    The VPN solution was through Bell Labs at one time and has been around a long long time. It was a free solution that you just download off the Internet, if you want to. While it works okay, it's not the greatest. The problem with it is that you still need a VPN connection to our network for it to work. Because it is point-to-point, it won't go through the Internet. With TeamViewer, if the machine is on the Internet, it doesn't matter where on the globe the device is, it works. With the VNC software, you have to connect back to our network on a private connection, otherwise it wouldn't work.

    The VNC solution was cumbersome to use. TeamViewer is so much easier.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is real easy. We have the software loaded on all the machines that we send out. You just click on the icon to let it load. We put a username in it, then we set up an access password, and it's done. That is it.

    It literally takes probably about two to three minutes from start to finish.

    What about the implementation team?

    We did everything ourselves.

    What was our ROI?

    The tool cuts my time in half. If it's a 40 hour week, I would say that I am saving 20 hours a week. It is really that good. The time savings are substantial. That is not including if there are issues where I would needed to have had somebody send something into me, or when you tell somebody, “Well, click on the start button," and the response is, “I can't see the start button.”

    I spend half of my day using it to access somebody else's machines. If I couldn't do that, and I had to have them send the equipment to me, the shipping, hours, and lost productivity would be a huge cost.

    From just a cost perspective, it pays for itself within the first month, or probably less than that. Within a few weeks, it would pay for an annual licensing fee by what you would save in time and everything else per person.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The cost of the licenses depends on how you buy them. They just had a buy one get one free deal going, and they do that every once in a while. Where you buy one license, and they will give you the second one free, or you can try to get discounts. Most of our licenses that we have we tried to do something like that just to save some money. 

    A rough estimate of our user cost is $500 per user annually. It is very cheap.

    About a year ago today, an add-on channel was $232 dollars, but that was pro-rated because it was at the end of the month.

    The only issue that I ever did have with it, and this was quite awhile back, was we were trying to get one of our licenses applied to a user. Because it was a user who had a license and we had previously removed it, then we wanted to give it back to them, and for some reason TeamViewer kept saying that the user already existed. We were like, "Well, no, that person left, and now, they are back again. " However, we threw them an email, and they fixed it. They said, “Try it now,” and it worked.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    There were a couple of other vendors that we looked at, but we just liked TeamViewer. One of the guys that I work with had used this solution before, so it was sort of his suggestion. He had tried it at his place that he had worked before. and said, “We ought to try this, because we'll really liked it." So, we got its demo and had it for a couple of days. Then, I said, “I'm sold. This stuff is awesome.”

    I haven't found anything else nor has anybody has pointed me in another direction saying, "Oh, you should use this instead, as this is way better." 

    What other advice do I have?

    It is easy to use. It is a no-brainer.

    The only access is from the IT department to the machines. Users don't utilize anything to remote control their own machines. That's typically an IT function.

    We really don't need any type of tracking.

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    PeerSpot user
    John DeMillion - PeerSpot reviewer
    Director of IT at Chester County Intermediate Unit
    Real User
    Solid cross-platform remote control, but with kludgy central management and some serious feature issues on macOS
    Pros and Cons
    • "TeamViewer allows us to do multiple controllers on a Host, which is great. We have a lot of Macs in our organization, and TeamViewer being cross-platform is a good thing."
    • "TeamViewer has a lot of options for deploying the Hosts, where you can mass deploy them very easily, and you can pre-configure them."
    • "You can't configure multiple, unattended control passwords on the Mac. On the Mac, there's only one. On Windows, there are multiple unattended control passwords. I have people in different departments. My infrastructure people need to control a server and my developers may need to go into that same server. But I don't want them to have the same password... on the Mac, it can be done but it's extremely clunky and problematic."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use TeamViewer for support, controlling our ~2,500 end-user computers and our ~60 servers.  Our environment is primarily macOS, with about 95% of end-users on Macs, but our servers split between Windows and macOS.  We also have some digital signage devices that run Linux, and we use TeamViewer to control them as well.

    We ran TeamViewer concurrently with LogMeIn for about year as we evaluated TeamViewer as a replacement.  TeamViewer's superior remote quality (especially in low-bandwidth situations) and ease of mass deployment, combined with LogMeIn's serious and longstanding bugs led us to recently discontinue LogMeIn in favor of TeamViewer.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Coming from LogMeIn, TeamViewer's remote control quality, Host reliability, file-transfer capabilities and ability to support multiple simultaneous controllers on a Host have been a great improvement.

    TeamViewer's simultaneous-controller/tech licensing is better for us than LogMeIn's device-based licensing, because we don't have to worry as much about maintaining devices in the list as a driver of licensing costs.

    What is most valuable?

    TeamViewer's cross-platform nature is important to us, as we are about 95% macOS, and our IT organization is all-Mac, so we often use our Macs to control Windows machines.

    TeamViewer is very fast, with very high fidelity and visual quality, in both high- and low-bandwidth situations, far better than our experience with LogMeIn.

    TeamViewer's support for multiple Controllers on a Host is very convenient, allowing multiple techs to collaborate to help an end-user or to look at a server.  With LogMeIn, additional techs attempting to control a Host would either just mysteriously not be able to connect (there was no message or other indicator that the Host was already being controlled by someone else), or they would accidentally kick off the first Controller on the Host, which was inefficient and confusing.

    Mass-deployment options for Hosts are excellent, making it easy to mass deploy on both macOS and Windows, and you can pre-configure the Hosts with settings and custom branding as needed.  Having said that, the experience with individual installations is nowhere as slick as LogMeIn, however: installing TeamViewer manually and getting everything configured is much more annoying and time-consuming than LogMeIn.

    TeamViewer's file-transfer features are useful and comprehensive, with two options:  1) a drag-and-drop transfer mechanism for small files, and 2) a full-fledged file-transfer dialog that allows file tree browsing on both the Host and Controller.

    TeamViewer is also free to try for personal use; as a result of that, myself and many of my staff were already familiar with the product from our experience supporting friends and family. That feature directly led to us being able to test TeamViewer extensively in everyday use, and as we looked for alternatives to LogMeIn, our familiarity with TeamViewer from personal use helped. LogMeIn previously offered the same free personal-use license but they discontinued that offering, which in my opinion was a very shortsighted move...and one that made me appreciate TeamViewer even more.

    What needs improvement?

    While TeamViewer has some great benefits, there are also some significant challenges and bugs. The biggest problem in our environment is that it's difficult, or sometimes even impossible, to properly manage granular access to a Host. It's a huge problem that mostly affects the Mac platform, but even with Windows Hosts the entire concept of how access to Hosts is configured centrally is a bit of a mess, especially compared to the true elegance of how LogMeIn worked.

    With LogMeIn, we could centrally assign techs to a Group of Hosts, and those Techs could control that entire group of Hosts.  Even a one-off contractor could be temporarily or permanently given access to a Host, just using their email address. In addition to Group-based assignments, you could assign additional Hosts individually to a tech, so that they could control a single additional Host in addition to the main Host Group(s) that they had access to. It was extremely elegant, easy ton configure, made instant sense, and worked perfectly.  For example, I could have a group called "Servers" in LogMeIn, and I could give my infrastructure staff access to all of those servers. If I also wanted one of my Developers to be able to access a couple of those servers, I just gave them access to those individual Hosts in LogMeIn Central.

    By comparison, TeamViewer is a complete mess. The way they do it is a total nightmare, and it does not work well. In TeamViewer, Techs can be given access to Host Groups...but a TeamViewer Host can't be in more than one Group...and Groups is the only way that you can give access to a user.  So the kind of granular control, giving access to Group(s) but also being able to give access to individual Hosts, is completely missing.  The workarounds for this are messy:  you can either split off any Hosts that may need individual control by other users into separate Groups, or you can have the Techs that need individual access manually add the Hosts to their "My Computers (Local)" Group in their own client, having to know the Host ID, etc.

    In addition, the administration of Groups and access to Hosts in general is fragmented and confusing, with strange limitations. For example, let's say one of my departments needs to create a Group of Hosts. Only the individual tech who created the Group can control it: no one else can change the name or make other changes...only that tech that created it and  therefore "owns" it can. TeamViewer's "best practice" recommendation is to use a generic "Master" account to create and manage all Groups, having to login with that Master account rather than your own individual account, which is bad for many reasons, including making MFA more difficult and it has serious security and management implications.  

    By contrast in LogMeIn, when a privileged administrator creates a Group, it just belongs to the organization, other similarly-privileged administrators can manage the Group, other techs can see it, and it all makes total, elegant sense.  Hosts can be assigned to multiple Groups or individual Techs, etc: it's extremely flexible and straightforward.


    TeamViewer's macOS Host is unfortunately not up to scratch with the Windows Host: it's missing some extremely important features. I sincerely hope that the TeamViewer macOS development team is going to address the problems in the near future.

    For example, you can't configure multiple "unattended control" passwords on the macOS Host, to give Host access to different departments or individual users but using different passwords. The Windows Host, by contrast, allows multiple unattended control passwords. Another way to accomplish this on the Windows Host is via Windows OS authentication, allowing users with either Windows local or central Active Directory (AD) credentials to authenticate to TeamViewer. This feature is also missing on the macOS Host:  there's no way to authenticate using local macOS accounts (which LogMeIn allowed), nor can you authenticate using AD credentials, even if the Mac is bound to AD.  So on the macOS Host, there's exactly one unattended-control password to control that Host, which is a big problem in my environment with giving granular control to server Hosts.

    There is a workaround, but it's completely obnoxious: TeamViewer has an automatic Host-generated password, one that usually changes after every session. It's designed for the local user who's using the Host machine to be able to give a tech a one-time password for a single support session, and the password changes the next time. There is a Host setting, however, that instructs the Host to keep that random password the same after each session, so I can use that as a bad hack to allow individual techs to control Hosts where they shouldn't know the main unattended-control passsword (after they add the Host manually in their "My Computers (Local)" Group....sigh).  Unfortunately, this workaround breaks when you restart the Host or relaunch TeamVIewer on the Host, as even with the "Don't Change" setting for the random password, it still changes whenever TeamViewer Host launches.  So after every update or reboot, we have to distribute the new random password to some techs...time-consuming and messy.

    Another big issue with the macOS Host is that it does not have a method of avoiding locking the screen at the end of a session. The setting to lock the Host's screen after a control session seems fairly random, and if the controlling tech forgets to manually disable that "feature" during the session, the user (or server) gets the screen locked in their face when the tech finishes.  That causes a lot of problems, especially with some of our servers that need to remain unlocked and by annoying the heck out of users.  On the Windows Host, there is an Advanced setting to instruct the Host to never lock its screen after a remote session, but that setting is missing on the macOS Host.

    There are some miscellaneous features missing on the macOS Host, like auto-hiding the TeamViewer panel and preventing accidental quitting of TeamViewer. These features were deemed necessary (and they are) in the past and thus were implemented on the Windows Host: they should also be available on the macOS Host.

    Another issue concerns Windows virtual machines. Unfortunately, TeamViewer has historically depended on the Host's MAC address as part of generating the unique TeamViewer ID, because the MAC address was a fairly immutable thing back in the day. However modern virtual machines (VMs) have dynamic MAC addresses, which means that suddenly a Host gets a new TeamViewer ID, and you have no idea what it is, with no way to control the VM.  TeamViewer Tech Support tried to help with some workarounds to try to assign static TeamViewer IDs, but none were successful.  Their recommendation is to manually manage MAC addresses on VMs, which is a non-starter in clustered environments where dynamic MAC addressing is needed.  TeamViewer needs to stop depending on MAC addresses as a part of generating the TeamViewer ID:  LogMeIn figured it out and so TeamViewer should be able to.


    A final concern is the accidental renaming of Hosts with an unattended-control password.  As we've increased the use of TeamViewer, we've found that our techs accidentally rename Hosts in the background while they think they're entering the unattended password for that Host. The Host actually gets renamed with the unattended control password, which is obviously a huge security issue.  We're trying to be mindful of that bug to prevent it from happening, but it's extremely problematic.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    One to three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    TeamViewer is very reliable. Our major problem with LogMeIn was that it would just turn itself off randomly on Hosts, and LogMeIn Support could never explain for fix it... we literally tried for about two years with them. When we implemented TeamViewer, it was very  refreshing to regain a reliable solution that we can always count on working.

    TeamViewer seems very stable. It doesn't just crash or randomly turn itself off in our experience so far.

    The central TeamViewer service does have issues from time to time, but the longest we've seen it last is a few hours, and it seems to be mostly in the middle of the night, and they're all over it, including transparently showing the status of all services on the TeamViewer Status website.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    TeamViewer seems to scale well in one sense, being easily mass-deployable to thousands of Hosts.  

    But the badly-designed Groups and kludgy nature of the central management, combined with significant missing features on the macOS Host and lack of support for dynamic MAC addresses on VMs is a problem with scalability in a complex organization, and TeamViewer should address these major problems ASAP...right now they're just lucky that the other available cross-platform remote control solutions actually suck more than they do. ;-)

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is excellent; they do a nice job and have high-quality support techs. The times that I've submitted tickets or called in, it's always been somebody who knows what they're talking about, friendly and knowledgeable. They can't make up for some of the flaws in the product, but they do the best they can with the product that they have, trying workarounds and even testing things in their lab while we're on the phone with them.  It's a pretty impressive support group.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We came to TeamViewer from LogMeIn and, before that, we had an older product called Timbuktu. 

    LogMeIn's main issue that caused us to switch was that the Hosts would just randomly turn themselves off:  the icon would grey out and the LogMeIn Control Panel would show that the Host was off.  This of course disabled access to Hosts in a random and widespread manner, and troubleshooting with LogMeIn Support over the period of a year resulted in no fixes or workarounds, and it was causing enormous problems in our environment.

    LogMeIn also did not allow multiple controllers on a Host, had no file-transfer capabilities (in the affordable "LogMeIn Central" version that we licensed), was licensed based on the number of devices, and had annoyances with Control/Command-Tab mapping from Controller to Host.  These weren't showstoppers, but they helped to push us elsewhere.

    How was the initial setup?

    TeamViewer deployment is fairly straightforward:  knowledgeable techs can configure Host settings, brand the Host, and mass-deploy it pretty easily. Manual setup on individual Hosts is very clunky and time-consuming compared to LogMeIn, however.

    We deployed it very quickly. We had not made a final decision on LogMeIn until very close to when our LogMeIn's licenses were expiring. So very quickly, within a couple of days, they were able to push out the TeamViewer Host to all of our devices.

    Initial setup and ongoing management of Groups and other central management tasks is messy, time-consuming, inelegant and makes no sense.  TeamViewer needs to take a hard look at their hodgepodge and take a good long peek at how LogMeIn Central works and....be more like LogMeIn in central management.

    What about the implementation team?

    We evaluated and deployed completely in-house.

    What was our ROI?

    ROI-wise, the savings from licensing have more than been eaten up by the soft costs involved in dealing with and working around TeamViewer’s feature deficiencies on the macOS Host, the terrible central management design, and the lack of support for dynamic MAC addresses.  If the TeamViewer developers get their act together and improve the product in those areas, the ROI will improve significantly.

    Ultimately, however, even with all of its warts and problems, it's still the best, most reliable and most affordable remote control product, at least for our environment.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    TeamViewer pricing is reasonable. 

    It's licensed by simultaneous controlling tech, rather than by the device. I like that because previously it was always a struggle to keep the device list maintained. If we got rid of a device and we didn't remove LogMeIn properly, the device would remain in our LogMeIn Central account and use a license.

    That's not a problem with TeamViewer's licensing, plus you can have as many techs as you want, but it monitors their simultaneous remote control usage with Hosts.  It can be a little tricky in the sense that you have to plan for the maximum simultaneous usage during busy times, and initially I didn't purchase enough licenses, but when we started hitting the limit, TeamViewer detected that and sent emails notifying us, then our sales rep very quickly added another license (allowing us to pay later via purchase order) to get us back in business.

    In our environment, TeamViewer turns out to be less expensive than LogMeIn, at least so far.  We’re currently saving about 30 percent on licensing costs, and we don’t have to worry about maintaining/pruning the list of machines in the LogMeIn. TeamViewer's automatic emails telling us that we've hit the simultaneous limit includes stats on how many times it has happened recently, which helps in deciding whether to purchase an additional license.

    This type of licensing does have a downside:  with LogMeIn, my staff were accused to controlling a client or a server and staying connected as needed, sometimes for hours if they were doing maintenance on a server or assisting a user with an intermittent issue.  But with TeamViewer, that chews up a simultaneous-use license and drives additional licensing costs, so we all have to remember to disconnect from Hosts.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We tested a number of other remote control solutions hoping for one that would stand out, because of the problems we had seen during our testing with TeamViewer on macOS. Unfortunately, they were all actually worse than TeamViewer.

    In the end, before moving to TeamViewer, we evaluated LogMeIn, ConnectWise Control, Royal TSX, Devolutions, Dameware Remote, Goverlan Reach, and Radmin.

    What other advice do I have?

    Make sure that you're okay with the simultaneous tech licensing. In my environment that works out great but I'm not sure if that's appropriate for all environments. And, if you have macOS Hosts, just understand what you're getting into and carefully map out how you're going to give granular control for Hosts if you have techs that need to control the same Host from different departments/groups.

    In terms of how many end-users we can support with one tech,TeamViewer is about the same as LogMeIn. TeamViewer did increase efficiency in multiple ways, but at the cost of some significant management headaches because of the multiple issues mentioned above.  So it may be pretty much a wash, at least until they fix some of the issues.

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    PeerSpot user
    Real User
    I like the ability to add any TeamViewer ID

    What is our primary use case?

    I wanted something which I could use to control other computers over the internet, and then I found TeamViewer, and it worked great. I can control any customer's PC right from my computer with ease.

    How has it helped my organization?

    TeamViewer improved my business because I can help my customer directly from here in very less time.

    What is most valuable?

    • Ability to share any files among others
    • Easy to use, and has a clean user interface
    • Value for money
    • Ability to add any TeamViewer ID.

    What needs improvement?

    There is nothing to improve; TeamViewer already works perfectly. But still, I think the price factor for small business.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    One to three years.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Link Porterfield - PeerSpot reviewer
    Founding Member at epic.network
    Real User
    It saves trips to customer sites, which saves time
    Pros and Cons
    • "It saves trips to customer sites, which saves time. I am able to get in there remotely and fix things."
    • "The product and platform work well. That is why I have stay with them so long. The stability has typically been good."
    • "Support for mobile devices from Linux has been missing since the Native client was rolled out. This was a nice option, especially when trying to walk somebody who was struggling to understand something on their phone."

    What is our primary use case?

    The primary use case is remote support.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It saves trips to customer sites, which saves time. I am able to get in there remotely and fix things. Before having this tool, it involved having to touch the customer's PC, which required me to either talk to somebody on the phone through doing the process or go out to the customer's locations and install it myself.

    I can grant permission to my organization so a person must be signed into TeamViewer if they're a member of my organization in order to be able to access that machine. In the event that a customer needs access, I can go ahead and define a policy either at an individual machine level for an individual user that we create, or we could conversely say somebody in the company needs to access all machines, which is great. We can go ahead and add that user to the access policy for all machines, so it is definitely robust like that.

    What is most valuable?

    It works well on a Linux laptop or desktop. Linux support has been huge for me because that is what I use for my computer systems. To be able to have something which works properly on the operating system that I prefer is great. I like to use the remote file transfer on occasion, but the remote desktop access is my number one most used feature.

    It has good multi-tenant support. As an IT service provider, it has the configuration options required to make it work well across multiple customers, as it is highly configurable.

    Its branding has been valuable for me.

    What needs improvement?

    Since TeamViewer version 13 introduced a Native Linux rather than running the Windows version through an emulation layer, that has been great. However, certain features didn't make it into the initial two releases. So far, the Linux version no longer has support for meetings. It wasn't a feature, and very often a group that we put together recently was looking for a way to do online meetings. I thought, "I have a subscription to TeamViewer that includes that." I do, but that function no longer works in Linux version. I am sort of waiting for that to come back. 

    Support for mobile devices from Linux has been missing since the Native client was rolled out. This was a nice option, especially when trying to walk somebody who was struggling to understand something on their phone. I don't do a whole lot of support for mobile devices, but if I could just direct them to the Google Play Store to go grab the TeamViewer app, they could give me a number to connect to and I could see the screen with them.

    I'm very grateful that there is a Native Linux client. That is a step forward and in the right direction. It shows TeamViewer's commitment to the Linux platform. I am very pleased about it, but there are some things that I used to have when the Linux version was just the Windows version packaged with the necessary emulation layers to make it work. I miss some of those features which used to be there prior to the Native Linux version. Hopefully, they will make it back into the product in the not too distant future.

    It would be nice to see some of those other features that we used to have come back, using them on Windows and Mac.

    I can no longer connect via web links, which is not the end of the world, but it's a mild annoyance. I used to be able to click something from my browser, then boom, there you go. At the time, it was the old TeamViewer that was based on the Windows software. I had to take some initial steps to configure an environment where those links worked, but once Linux was up, it was no different than on Windows. I could be on the web or in a remote monitoring platform, and if I needed to connect with one of my client devices. I would select from there, and say, "Connect to TeamViewer," and it would jump right in. I can't do that anymore.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The product and platform work well. That is why I have stay with them so long. The stability has typically been good.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Scalability is hard to say, because I am the lowest scaled out degree of utilization. The clients that I use it on are relatively small. I am the only person using the tool at my company, as the founding member.

    I am using it fairly extensively. It is on almost every customer computer that I support. Anyone who has a maintenance agreement with me will have a copy of it. At this time, that is under 100 customers.

    I have done work for people who have used it in larger environments: Hundreds upon hundreds of teams running it. So, I have seen it perform well in a huge environment. I have seen it perform well in a large, multitenant environment. 

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I try to go to the TeamViewer forums before contacting their technical support. My interactions with the technical support has always positive.

    The improvements since the Native release of the Linux version have been great. They have been good about addressing the most critical issues first. There was one that left many of us that work on Linux and support Windows machines, particularly in enterprise environments, having to press Control-Alt-Delete to log into a system. When the Linux client first came out, there was no way to send Control-Alt-Delete. How do you miss something that important? They were actually very quick in getting that fixed and rolling out a version that supported that.

    They have been doing some support for ARM, which is sort of cool. That is the chip that runs the Raspberry Pi. While I don't know if it is all ARM devices, specifically Raspberry Pi support for Linux is something that you can get from TeamViewer, which is beneficial.

    With Raspberry Pi out there with TeamViewer on it, you are not having to kick somebody at the customer site off of their computer in order to get access to a desktop, then fire up a browser to look at somethings locally. Therefore, it is nice to see support for it out there.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I came to be familiar with TeamViewer when I was trying to find a way to access Take Control from Linux. Instead, I found out it could be done with TeamViewer. That is what made me aware of TeamViewer and made me discover firsthand that it was a great solution. 

    I didn't replace another service. While I have used other technologies in the past, like VNC, they don't do exactly what TeamViewer does. If you wanted to use VNC remotely, you'd need to get your traffic through the firewall and take care of securing or encrypting that traffic yourself. Thus, it is not really in the same league of software. You have to bring your own security. With TeamViewer, you are encrypted out-of-the-box.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was straightforward. I use the corporate plan now and have the installer pushed from my remote monitoring platform, so it's ridiculously simple these days.

    Nowadays, the installation happens automatically, so it doesn't take any time at all. Basically, when I put my remote monitoring and management tool on the customer machine, it takes care of pulling it down, setting it up, and joining it to my account all on its own.

    What about the implementation team?

    You can easily deploy a Raspberry Pi with Linux on it at a customer site with TeamViewer on it. Now, you have a machine at a customer site that you can get on it if you needed to use a web browser to look at things on the network, like a printer scanner, or multi function device interface. If your security policy was so you could only manage the firewall from inside of the LAN, then I tend to have some other methods for keeping the firewall secure. Still, this is something where there is a real value-add to it.

    What was our ROI?

    I don't have good numbers due to the small sample size.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The pricing and licensing are sort of high. Having been an early adopter of the subscription model, and primarily because version 11 was the last licensed version that I owned, when I was looking at 12, I was also looking at upgrading to corporate. I called TeamViewer sales and talked with them. At that point, subscription was a relatively new option. It was not even mentioned on the website at that time. However, it was pretty easy for me to look at my historical TeamViewer purchases in my accounting software and see that I was buying a new TeamViewer license every time a new version came out. So, switching to a subscription model wasn't going to be anything different than what I was already doing, so renewing the subscription every year was not any different than buying the upgraded version every year. There was good incentive to move from the middle tier to the corporate tier.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    LogMeIn started this rush to higher prices whenever they got bought out and chopping off lower-end tiers. A lot of people in my industry had been using them for a long time. I never cared for their solution. I always thought it felt clunky and didn't think it worked well, but plenty of people did like it. I don't know if it was the pricing that was the primary draw, or what, but there were many people in my industry who were leaving LogMeIn after their 400 percent price hikes.

    What other advice do I have?

    Take the time to learn what TeamViewer can do. Take advantage of some of the features that it offers. Learn some of the best ways to leverage its capabilities.

    I have some Linux test virtual machines that I do connect to using TeamViewer. In the past, I connected to Android devices, but that functionality is currently missing from Linux.

    TeamViewer had some negative press a few years back when some people had their accounts breached. TeamViewer was being used by bad actors to commit malicious acts on people's PCs, but that was not TeamViewer's fault. It was bad implementation by users. Despite the fact it wasn't TeamViewer's fault, TeamViewer still went above their obligation and helped make it easier for people to properly secure their accounts. I think they did a great job with that.

    Increased TeamViewer usage would be hand-in-hand with increasing our customer base, so I both want and need a bigger customer base. Part of my standard support software stack is TeamViewer, so every new customer PC device which is added to the support contract would be one more deployment of a TeamViewer Host. So, I definitely plan to increase TeamViewer deployment.

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    PeerSpot user
    Real User
    Unattended access with "single" login

    What is our primary use case?

    Accessing unattended servers, Mac, Linux, Windows, Raspberry.

    What is most valuable?

    Unattended access with "single" login.

    What needs improvement?

    The price is a killer for the amount I normally use it.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Tawanda Sibanda - PeerSpot reviewer
    Sponsorship at World Vision Zimbabwe
    Real User
    Has the ability to view the client screen remotely and have full control of controls

    What is our primary use case?

    We use this product primarily for remote technical support and software upgrades. We have quite a number of computers in the field which would be costly to facilitate transportation to a service location.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It's faster to connect remotely than to facilitate transportation of equipment for service. Besides, it saves the organization tons of money.

    What is most valuable?

    • Viewing the client screen remotely and having full control of controls.
    • Instant messaging is also good. 
    • Mobile device support is also great.

    What needs improvement?

    Wish it would support multiple support persons at the same time to assist a client for situations that need team collaboration.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    One to three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The pro version never hangs up as long as it is up to date. That said, it's a stable product.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It's one of the best in my opinion, especially the pro which even multinational companies could use.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Got support documentation and never needed to call customer service.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Yes, indeed Skype, but that was an improvisation, the alternative solution was not suited for the purpose.

    How was the initial setup?

    Quite easy to set up and straightforward.

    What about the implementation team?

    We implemented this solution internally.

    What was our ROI?

    It's worth every penny; I would recommend it any time.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    TeamViewer is affordable and also features a limited free version to test it out.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I have always known TeamViewer, but we tried some Microsoft solutions.

    What other advice do I have?

    In terms of performance, TeamViewer doesn't take much of your computer/device resources to run.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Executive Director at netCorps
    User
    Used for ad hoc remote support of individuals. The business interface is clunky.

    What is our primary use case?

    IT help desk support for nonprofit organization of 200 computers. We purchased the product pre-installed with the TV in unattended access mode. We also use it for ad hoc remote support of individuals, primarily using TeamViewer QS.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Our computers are spread amongst six physical locations. TeamViewer reduces the need to travel to those offices to help staff.

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable feature is you do not need to know the Windows username and password to connect and see the staff screen.

    What needs improvement?

    • The business interface is clunky and not well-documented. 
    • It should have ability to display notes in the computer list.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user723996 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Associate General Counsel at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    ​Very easy to setup. Computer novices can install it.

    What is our primary use case?

    I use it to train remote employees on the database and to troubleshoot their computer for them

    How has it helped my organization?

    Before TeamViewer, our remote personnel had to rely on taped video training, but now they get one-on-one training as I walk them through things on their computers.

    What is most valuable?

    The ease in which it operates. I have been able to get complete computer novices in different time zones to download and install the program with ease so that I could troubleshoot their computer issues.

    What needs improvement?

    Only the paid version allows for file transfer. Also, it is annoying that I have to upgrade every time they release a new version because I can't use an older version to access a new one even if my version is paid and their version is a trial.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    One to three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Only stability issues were due to Internet speed or instability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    No, it is easily scalable.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Satisfactory

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Yes, we used LogMeIn. A colleague turned me onto this as a cheaper alternative that works even better.

    How was the initial setup?

    Very easy to setup. I have gotten computer novices to install and run the program with just a few word of instruction.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    There is a free version. Try it out. You will like it. Then, at the end of the trial, make the purchase at the tier that fits your needs. You can always scale up.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Yes, LogMeIn. I preferred TeamViewer though.

    What other advice do I have?

    Try the free version to evaluate. I am sure you will be satisfied.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user560283 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Engineering Aide at a government with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    The most important feature is remote access.

    What is most valuable?

    I only use TeamViewer for troubleshooting methods when the students or staff members are unable to come to the IT desk.

    • The most important aspect of the software is remote access
    • Helps alleviate confusion with directions over the phone
    • Security: The user can input their credentials, personal information such as usernames, passwords, and secure payment methods without the risk of the IT personnel using it maliciously.

    How has it helped my organization?

    This software is a lifesaver for distant and commuter students who cannot physically be on campus. As a school's main IT support center, we use this software constantly. Many students keep the program on their desktops so it is easy to remotely connect to their devices.

    What needs improvement?

    Unfortunately, the software is hit or miss when it comes to iOS devices, especially Macs. It seems that the new updates may have included better iOS supported drivers. However, when we used the software, it only worked a handful of times.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this software from September-May of the 2015-2016 school year at Stevens. We still use the software to remotely connect into domain computers and laptops on our wireless network.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Overall, we did not encounter stability issues. For the most part, TeamViewer is a headache reliever. Even though the connection between the two devices may drop every once and a while, it is primarily successful.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There have been no issues with scalability.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was very simple to set up on both the IT and the student side. We have a link to the main TeamViewer website in our university portal that gives straightforward instructions on how to install the software properly.

    What other advice do I have?

    Use this product. It is so easy to use and it makes students and staff happy. Older staff and professors are amazed that I can control their machines remotely, almost like a wizard.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user560280 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Technical Support Specialist at a tech company with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    I can gain remote access and help customers. I had an issue where my mouse clicks weren’t being registered.

    What is most valuable?

    • The ability to remotely access a customer’s computer, especially with unattended access granted.
    • I have time to dig through configuration files and logs to analyze issues customers don’t always want to stand by and watch.
    • The product can transfer patches and firmware upgrades through the connection, since some of them are too big for email attachments.

    How has it helped my organization?

    I use it all the time so I can see the customer issues and interact with them live. This is opposed to being sent screenshots and having to describe to someone how to gain super user access and execute the system level commands that need to be run after a file has been edited. 

    This prevents having to expose curious people to a world of fragility, that most don’t understand. They could potentially break inside their appliance and void their warranty.

    What needs improvement?

    I had an issue recently where my mouse clicks weren’t being registered. I had to ask the customer to click on the things I needed.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used TeamViewer for 3 to 4 years personally for access to my personal computers. I have used it for a year professionally as a technical support specialist.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I have not yet encountered any stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I have not encountered any scalability issues.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was simple.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated GoToMeeting, GoToAssist, and RealVNC.

    What other advice do I have?

    It’s pretty dependable and very easy to use. I would recommend it to any IT professional who needs remote access to customer computers.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user550149 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Application Support Engineer at a computer software company with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    Enables me to connect to the machine of another user and see what that person sees.

    What is most valuable?

    • Ability to connect to the machine of another user and see what that person sees
    • Closes many communication gaps that confront customer support departments
    • Chat functionality: Enables you to communicate in real-time with the user while monitoring their screen

    How has it helped my organization?

    Working with TeamViewer has made customer support work more efficient. It aids in the communication between support and remote customers.

    What needs improvement?

    The voice chat could be better.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I’ve been sporadically using this software for over 10 years, both for personal and work purposes.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I encountered no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I encountered no scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I’ve never been in touch with TeamViewer’s technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have not used a different solution before.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was easy via the installation wizard.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I wouldn’t be able to judge this, as I use the free version for personal purposes. My manager has arranged the professional version for business purposes.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I did not evaluate other options.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Evrard Armel N'chott - PeerSpot reviewer
    Co-founder & Digital Transformation Officer at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Allows us to support users remotely.

    What is most valuable?

    • No configuration required; it starts quickly and is easy to use.
    • High security.
    • International (more than 30 languages).
    • Multi-platform (PC, mobile phones, etc.).

    How has it helped my organization?

    Users can be easily supported remotely.

    What needs improvement?

    It would be nice to see TeamViewer load screens faster.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this product since 2009.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I would rate technical support as 8/10.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I’m using two solutions due to company policies.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial configuration is very simple. There is no need to be computer literate to do it.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated RemotePC, Windows Remote Desktop and Microsoft Lync.

    What other advice do I have?

    Go ahead, it’s the best of all the remote access software products.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    IT Support and Development at a local government with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    Remote access software enabling troubleshooting regardless of location.

    What is most valuable?

    It is easy to use. We enjoy being able to save remote computer information for quick access.

    How has it helped my organization?

    I can effectively remotely troubleshoot personnel issues no matter where they are!

    What needs improvement?

    The only thing I can think of is a quick-deploy / auto-installer for the end users.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have used the solution for two years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We have not yet encountered any stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We have not encountered any scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We haven't yet contacted technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used Chrome Remote Desktop. CRD was unstable and lost connectivity often.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup was straightforward. Just install and run at host and remote computers.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The pricing structure under which I purchased has been great because as long as the remote and host computers are running the same version, there is no need to upgrade.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated LogMeIn.

    What other advice do I have?

    From a cost perspective, it's a great buy.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Director at Morpheus Technologies Ltd
    Real User
    Two of us use it to manage about 500 machines.

    What is most valuable?

    • Unattended Remote Access
    • Collaboration with partners with all communication channels available at the same time

    How has it helped my organization?

    There are only two of us in the core of the company and we manage about 500 machines based in the UK, mainland Europe, US, Hong Kong, China and South Africa.

    What needs improvement?

    ITBrain should be embedded in the product and not an expensive add-on.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have possibly been using it since TeamViewer 1.x; most certainly, since version 2.x.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We have only rarely encountered stability issues, and when it does happen, it can often be attributed to the state of the remote machine.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Once again, we have only occasionally encountered scalability issues; not often enough to worry us.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We hardly have to use technical support. When I have in the past, they have been very good: prompt, professional and usually accurate.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We previously used many solutions, such as VNC Viewer, and had so many issues, as the software was never designed to be so dynamic and was resource hungry.

    How was the initial setup?

    For IT professionals… installation is a doddle!

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I think it’s a top product, but due to our company size, we find the pricing heavy… Nevertheless, as long as it remains number one, we have to grumble and get on with it.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Once we tested it and used it ‘in anger’, there was no need to look elsewhere. We started on the free versions that were available at the time. As we became more and more reliant on the product, with increased collaboration, the need to up the level of the product became apparent. Which product version to buy was the only option under consideration.

    What other advice do I have?

    Test it first and determine whether it’s the right technical product for your company, then evaluate your cost options and if they agree, go for it.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    CEO with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    It does not require firewall or port configuration. I'd like an easier way to share and combine contact lists.

    What is most valuable?

    • Quick support option
    • File transfer
    • No firewall or port configuration

    How has it helped my organization?

    - Quicker and easier to connect to our customers’ PCs to resolve software issues

    What needs improvement?

    - An easier way to share and combine contact lists

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used it for over four years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I have not encountered any stability issues so far.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I have not encountered any scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I have not had to use technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I previously used VNC and pcAnywhere. They are obsolete; had to configure firewalls and ports.

    How was the initial setup?

    Initial setup was simple. It was easy to install; add a license key and set up a contacts list.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Our customers use the free version, as they rarely need to use it.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Before choosing this product, we also evaluated LogMeIn.

    What other advice do I have?

    Get the license that suits your needs and causes the least conflict with their clients when new versions are released.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Network Technician at a maritime company with 10,001+ employees
    Vendor
    ITBrain monitoring lets me track hard disk space, processor usage and lots more.

    What is most valuable?

    • The new two-factor authentication is a very good addition to security.
    • ITBrain monitoring, which lets me track hard disk space, processor usage and lots more.
    • Adding custom logos is a nice feature too, especially for IT companies that provide services to customers.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We don't use it in my current workplace. However, I proposed it for consideration in the budget, because of the highly centralised way it works.

    What needs improvement?

    They really need an AMT client and/or iLO client for business use. Big companies would love it.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used it for almost five years (personal use).

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I have not encountered any stability issues at all. It’s by far the most stable remote software I’ve tested, except for RDP.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I’ve seen it run and connect to a small 500-1000 end-devices company without a problem. At a higher level, I’m not sure, but it’s promising. I’m sure they have some big names in their portfolio.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I’ve never had the chance to talk to technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    It’s the other way around now: We have a different solution and we want to switch to TeamViewer.

    How was the initial setup?

    All the installers are easy to use and also not too hard to deploy silently.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The licensing is pretty straightforward: number of devices and number of remote administrators.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I also looked at Bomgar, LogMeIn, Radmin and DameWare; also at open-source options like VNC and RDC.

    What other advice do I have?

    Talk to the sales person and ask all the questions you have. Make sure it is the right solution for you before you strike a deal.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Web Administrator at a sports company with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    It’s primary function of RDP is the product’s most valuable feature.

    What is most valuable?

    It’s primary function of RDP is the product’s most valuable feature.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It has been a great way of allowing multiple users both registered and unregistered to use RDP, from both system management and use points of view - as well as using it to support remote users.

    What needs improvement?

    Clipboard management could be better. As could the drag-and-drop file upload/download function (especially when multiple monitors are involved).

    For the clipboard management aspect of improvement it would be nice to have some sort of user isolation in regards to the clipboard. You’re already logged in to an account for TeamViewer, but if multiple people are connected (even if not actively on the same remote machine), the clipboard is shared for everyone. So it’s very possible to copy a block of text and when pasting you end up pasting a completely different block of text. Even a clipboard viewer would be nice – maybe show the last 3 or 4 copies so if someone else did copy as well you could at least see it.

    For the drag and drop issue, if dragging from a remote TeamViewer window you have to drag and drop on to the same monitor. And there can’t be any other windows in the background you are moving over; otherwise the transfer won’t work. Often times we have multiple remote machines open on one monitor that often overlap. Having to shuffle screens around on the desktop is tedious just to be able to drag and drop. So we end up using the file transfer window process instead. So it’s a “neat feature” to have drag and drop, but implementation has a few pitfalls.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used it for four years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There have been a few times when TeamViewer has been down globally, so that’s definitely an issue for consideration.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I have not had any scalability issues. It’s worked really well for one-machine access for home use, as well with 30+ servers and multiple open connections.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is usually prompt and helpful. Following their Twitter feed helps with monitoring for external issues and outages.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have used several different variations of RDP from pcAnywhere to straight Windows RDP. TeamViewer is very easy to set up, use, and instruct others to get running, which is great for support. Very little if any fiddling with firewall rules is needed, so that’s a real plus.

    How was the initial setup?

    Initial setup was very straightforward. There are multiple installs depending on what you need (host, client, etc.), and it’s easy to switch from one to another or just disable the features that aren’t needed.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The free version is great to get started with and for a lot of people, it might be all that is needed. If you are going to be using multiple machines with multiple connections, you’ll need to consider the enterprise version.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I did not evaluate any software prior to starting to use TeamViewer. The company was already using it when I was hired. But it’s definitely better than a lot of the other RDP clients out there.

    What other advice do I have?

    Depending on usage, one thing to watch for is the shared clipboard feature. It is nice to have the ability to share the clipboard between machines. However, it also shares it among all the users connected to the same machines. So, in our case, we’d have 4-8 different users connected randomly to different machines. And the clipboards would sometime transfer from user to another. So something that was copied from one user was pasted into another user’s work (can be both frustrating and comical at times).

    It is possible to lose connectivity due to external issues, so that might be something to consider.

    As with all RDP clients and the functions that they provide, pay close attention to application security parameters, as well as security on the machines themselves. You are opening a direct line of communication to your machines, so tread carefully.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user494088 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Server and Applications Specialist at a comms service provider with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    You can save remote machines to your account. Once logged in to the product, all saved machines are just a double-click away. It times out; I would like it to not time out at all.

    Valuable Features:

    Easy-to-save access to remote machines: TeamViewer allows you to save machines to your account, which allows you to remote into a machine with ease. Once logged into TeamViewer, all of the machines that are saved to your account are on the right side and you are able to remote into them by double-clicking on them. 

    Simple connection method.

    Ability to transfer files from and to remote machines.

    Improvements to My Organization:

    It allows for easier after-hour server updates/upgrades without requiring to go on site.

    Room for Improvement:

    I would like it to have the ability to stay connected for longer times. Current and previous releases seem to time out after long periods of remote access. I am not sure what the timeout is set to. I would like it to not time out at all. I sometimes need to stay remoted into machines for a few hours to diagnose problems and I have been kicked out when the current timeout period expires.

    Use of Solution:

    I have been using it for over six years.

    Deployment Issues:

    I have only run into issues on a few machines while installing the software, but it was never because of the software.

    Customer Service:

    I have only called to add a user license and it was a quick call.

    Implementation Team:

    We implemented it in-house.

    Cost and Licensing Advice:

    Pricing is on par with competitors, but still a bit high for what the service actually is.

    Other Solutions Considered:

    I currently have to use LogMeIn and GoToAssist for certain machines. Both of these pieces of software fall short in many ways compared to TeamViewer.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Computer Repair at a non-profit with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    It has a chat module, so you don’t have to use an external chat facility.

    What is most valuable?

    • Personal users can use this app for free.
    • External cursor view.
    • Terminal Services-like services such as use of USB on remote desktop.
    • Chat module, to instruct/inform the user on the remote desktop. We don’t have to use an external chat facility such as Skype.
    • File transfer for exchanging files
    • Scalability. Being able to use it at full screen makes it easier to work in and with
    • Remote booting. TeamViewer has a nice utility to remotely reboot a system. So to do that, it's not needed to have someone physically do that at the remote location. During a remote desktop session, you don't want switch back and forth from and to the TeamViewer window. Instead, while you're working, you want to inform, guide or direct someone on the other side to carry out some physical actions you can't do yourself, as you're not there at the remote location, such as shut a system down or pull the power cord out to reset the power supply.

    How has it helped my organization?

    In a Windows environment, you would have to use Terminal Services Server for this.

    What needs improvement?

    In the past, use in wireless environments caused buffering due to limited bandwidth.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I started to use TeamViewer in 2008.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I did not encounter any stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I have not encountered any scalability issues yet.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is 8/10.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used Terminal Services Server, which is obviously expensive.

    How was the initial setup?

    In both personal and commercial use, initial setup was straightforward.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    TeamViewer is a professional, flexible solution and platform independent, so it's worth it's price.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I evaluated Terminal Services, pcAnywhere, DameWare, VNC, Windows RDC (professional only).

    What other advice do I have?

    For both personal and commercial use, if you are looking for ease of use and flexibility, TeamViewer is a good choice.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Project Manager - IT Infrastructure team at a pharma/biotech company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Vendor
    It helps us assist non-native English speaking remote users. Someone can connect directly to their PC and help them, without having to translate on the phone or by email.

    What is most valuable?

    The ability to control a remote client or server from anywhere in the world and from lots of different devices. We have 100 remote users, some of which are non-English speaking. In the past, you had to try to help them over the phone and explain technical terms and procedures. Now, they simply send their TeamViewer user ID and password, and someone can connect directly to their PC and help them.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We have hundreds of remote key users, a lot of whom are non-native English speakers. Using TeamViewer allows my team & I to resolve any issue directly, without having to translate on the phone or by email.

    What needs improvement?

    I'd like to be able to have two simultaneous sessions open on two different screens; this would increase productivity.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I’ve been using it successfully for two years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I only encountered stability issues with the personal/free version, never with the corporate version.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I did not encounter any scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    In general, for the corporate version, it is excellent.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I had used other remote options such as WebEx, LogMeIn, RDP sessions, etc., but none of them offered the range of features and reliability of TeamViewer.

    How was the initial setup?

    It’s very easy. The application install is straightforward and registering the licence was also very easy.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Be sure you are compliant in licencing and choose the version which is suitable for your needs.

    What other advice do I have?

    Try it on your personal PC as a personal free licence first.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user494841 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Technical Service Analyst at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Vendor
    It provides easy access to large files than cannot be sent via email.

    What is most valuable?

    • Remote control function
    • Function to copy across data from source machine to destination

    These provide easy access to large files that cannot be sent via email.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It has helped me help users from different sides of the building.

    What needs improvement?

    I believe the graphical resolutions can be improved on the product, as apart from this, the product is very easy to use and easy on the eye.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using it for more than two years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    I have not encountered any deployment, stability or scalability issues at all.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I did not previously use a different solution.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Before choosing this product, I did not evaluate other options.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would happily recommend this product for both personal and commercial reasons because of its price and also because of its ease of use.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user493536 - PeerSpot reviewer
    IT Operations Manager at a real estate/law firm with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    Enables us to connect to and control remote PCs across various NAT and firewall barriers.

    What is most valuable?

    • The ability to connect to and control remote PCs across various NAT and firewall barriers.
    • The ability to interact with the computer prior to end-user login.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We have a lot of remote offices, and without the ability to remotely control the computers at these properties, my job would be much more difficult to perform. I'd otherwise have to jump on a plane to address any and every hardware or end-user situation that pops up. Other competing products, such as LogMeIn and VNC Server, don't offer the same mix of functionality and security.

    What needs improvement?

    Quick User Switching has a very nasty tendency to render the screen output unstable. If my remote work requires switching logins on the remote computer, TeamViewer's video output will cut out completely and I'd have to instruct the end user over the phone to either restart the computer, or end and then restart the session in order to restore video output. In cases where even this doesn't resolve the issue, I've had to resort to the built-in RDP application in Windows, which, of course, makes it impossible for the end user to interact with the computer for troubleshooting.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for two years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    TeamViewer apparently has compatibility issues with Dell's ImageAssist utility (which we use to author and deploy corporate Windows 10 images). Specifically, the way it interacts with a computer's video drivers isn't exactly supported, so I've had to install it post-imaging. That's likely a problem that Dell has to get straightened out.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I've used several flavors of VNC apps in the past. They were OK, but it took work to make them secure out of the box (insofar as a VNC solution can be secure). I've used LogMeIn before also, but it didn't provide the same level of functionality and versatility as TeamViewer. Plus, it had trouble traversing some firewall solutions.

    How was the initial setup?

    Initial setup was straightforward. Nothing complicated. Just kept clicking Next, basically.

    What about the implementation team?

    An in-house team implemented it. My advice would be to research how the program interacts with your imaging solution if you're baking it into your corporate image.

    What was our ROI?

    $3000+ for a corporate license was steep, I must say. But if your options are between remote support and hopping on a plane (such being the case in my company and industry), you'll make the money back in saved travel expenses alone.

    What other advice do I have?

    I'd say consider TeamViewer if your company has several geographically separate branch offices. If you're primarily supporting systems in a single building, I think more cost-effective solutions are available. But of course, go with what works best for your given network setup.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user493527 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Business Analyst at a tech company with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    It reconnects automatically when there are connection issues.

    Valuable Features:

    Just being able to dial in on a clients server is all I need, and it reconnects automatically when there are connection issues.

    Improvements to My Organization:

    We only use it when our default remote viewer is not working. So it serves as a backup.

    Room for Improvement:

    When clients have a newer version installed and we only have a license for version 8, there are issues. If they could allow older versions to connect to newer versions, that would be great. Right now, when you only have a license for version 8, for example, and a client has version 9+, you can't connect and the client actually has to downgrade to a lower version.

    What happens is that if we only have a license for TeamViewer 8 we can only connect to clients machines that have TeamViewer 8 on. Most clients download the latest version (0, 10, 11) and only after installing TeamViewer on their side and after trying to connect we need to inform the client that we only have a TeamViewer 8 license.

    Use of Solution:

    I have used the solution for five years.

    Deployment Issues:

    We have not had any deployment, stability or scalability issues beyond the above-mentioned issues on different versions.

    Initial Setup:

    Initial setup was straightforward.

    Implementation Team:

    An in-house team did the implementation.

    Other Solutions Considered:

    TeamViewer is our backup; we are currently using RDP and Radmin.

    Other Advice:

    It's a good product.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Analist / developer at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    You can have more than one active session to control a PC and a smart-phone of the same user at the same time.

    What is most valuable?

    I very much like the stability and speed of TeamViewer. Teamviewer has never crashed, connects for 99.99% without delays in only a few seconds. When connected, it's like you work on the remote machine like you would locally, no delays, no sluggishness, just perfect.

    It has a lot of features (of which I only use about half). There are a lot of features which can be configured as you like to work. However, there are two categories that I never use although they can be very handy.

    1. Communications: provides build in audio and video between parties. I personally use Skype for this because it is my preferred way of communication for years and most of my customers have it too. I guess for other users this may be a huge benefit because if the remote side has no communication software installed, you have one build in.
    2. Most of the files & share options: Remote print, VPN, screen-shot, session recording, share via ... are options I don't use because I have no need for them but I'm sure they have great benefits for people who do. For screen-shots I use Faststone Capture for everything so it's easier for me to use that in Teamviewer too.

    A major advantage is that it is available for almost all of the operating systems including Windows, Linux, Mac, Android, and so on. You can have more than one active session, so imagine that you can remotely control a PC and a smart-phone of the same user at the same time.

    When a customer want to connect his smart-phone with his PC and there are problems, you can take over the phone in one session and open a second session for the PC. You can very easy switch between them.
    When several users need some updates, you can open a session for each of them. Starting the updates on the first machine and while waiting, switch and start the update on the second machine, etc.

    What needs improvement?

    This sounds really strange but, at the moment, we can't think of any improvements in the scope of this product for our company. It already has everything we need and it works like a dream.

    In the years I have used TeamViewer, everything that I missed was already added. So, over the last year, there was never a time that I wished for something more or different that what I have now.

    For me, it is a perfect product and I really don't know anything that I can think of that would make the product easier or better.

    The only thing I wish for is a better price for small users.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for about 5 years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    Since we have been using TeamViewer, we have never experienced any issue. This sounds like paid sales text but it isn't.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    Customer service is very good. The people at TeamViewer are listening to what you want and try to help.

    Technical Support:

    Technical support is very good. Although we have had no problems, we had some questions about a few settings in TeamViewer and we got a no-nonsense response immediately.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have used/tried most of the existing remote access solutions. It was an ongoing search between software and services. After too many problem with a product, I searched for other solutions.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was the most simple setup I ever had with any software. Download, install with only a few settings to choose and start using it.

    What about the implementation team?

    I installed it myself; no team needed; everyone can do this. I have no advice for implementation. Just install it and use it. If you have a team that is going to use it, you have to buy a license accordingly; that's all.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Noncommercial use: Free.

    Commercial use with only a few (paying) customers: It depends on the amount of time you use TeamViewer and what the customer is willing to pay.

    Commercial use: Prices of the licenses are somewhat high but ROI can be achieved very quickly in many cases.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    TeamViewer was, from the first use, my favorite. After about five years of use, I never have had the need to look for other solutions.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Desktop Support Technician at a marketing services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Vendor
    Wide support of platforms allows for a single solution.

    Valuable Features:

    • Cross platform compatibility
    • File exchange
    • Remote control

    Improvements to My Organization:

    Saves travel time.  Wide support of platforms allows for a single solution.

    Room for Improvement:

    • Full integration of computer's user account system.  Be able to login using the local computer's credentials rather than setting up a unique Teamviewer account/password.
    • Multiple session support.   Be able to login into the same computer but have multiple sessions for each user. Concurrent login.
    • Speed
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user457899 - PeerSpot reviewer
    IT Admin at a healthcare company with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    The "actions" to send keyboard commands, remote reboot, chat, and the settings are the valuable features.

    What is most valuable?

    I think "actions" to send keyboard commands, remote reboot, chat, and the settings. They are the most valuable because many technicians will tell you how they've encountered problems finishing work on a system and can't complete it because they can't remote back in without assistance from someone physically onsite. The same goes for keyboard commands, as I can use "Ctrl+Alt+Del" and other commands which has helped me to save time and energy traveling to site.

    What needs improvement?

    The one area which needs improvement for both the standalone and enterprise versions would be "inter-operability" between versions. For all the features it offers why isn't it able to work with using backward compatibility. As if one system is using a newer version than mine, I cant connect. If I have a newer version, it may not allow me to connect. For the level of use this app has, this in my opinion shouldn't be an issue. It's possible the app has some inner workings and other advanced features I have not used or tried.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used TeamViewer independently via my own personal account starting circa 2009 and have on occasion used it in its enterprise form for nearly the same time.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    I've performed a deployment.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I have never had to contact customer support for any connection issues. I have been able to resolve the issues myself as it. Normally any issue simply requires someone to be onsite to restart the service and ensure TeamViewer was on and running correctly.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have previously worked with RescueMe, formerly LogMeIn and Bogmar. I believe that this is the only utility that allows chat, file transfer, "screenswapping", remoting in, and inviting attendees to a meeting.

    How was the initial setup?

    I assumed there was no way to setup without obtaining the 'users' approval. As I continued to learn it, I was able to delve into its features and taught myself, although I've still not tried nor completely worked out the "LAN-Wake Up" feature.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would note that if you're working for/from an enterprise standpoint, two imperatives would be to ensure all clients are running the same version. My other advice would be to assign an individual to maintain the "alias" names of all connected systems and/or groups. In the past I have frequently had to go into properties and modify the information. Similarly, I've had issue connecting to users as that information wasn't updated and it slowdowns work if you then have to resolve this first.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user457308 - PeerSpot reviewer
    IT Manager at a recruiting/HR firm with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    It has enable me to troubleshoot issues much quicker than trying to talk someone else through things.

    What is most valuable?

    I love the speed of the tool and I find the dashboard to be very user-friendly. I don’t need to peck and find what I’m looking for.

    How has it helped my organization?

    I use this almost daily to log into users computers across the nation. It has enable me to troubleshoot issues much quicker than trying to talk someone else through things. It allows for nearly instantaneous troubleshooting.

    What needs improvement?

    Oftentimes, the session window blocks view of the system tray. I’d like to be able to minimize it or move it.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used this solution for two years, including some time with previous versions.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    I have installed it on several devices without issue.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We had no issues with the performance.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It's been able to scale for our needs.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't ever needed to use it.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I used to use LogMeIn but it seemed cumbersome and slow.

    How was the initial setup?

    It's easy and I have had novices install it no problem.

    What about the implementation team?

    I personally did an individual implementation as needed on a gradual basis until we were all using it.

    What other advice do I have?

    Do it, but try the free basic version first.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user517392 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user517392DBA Manager at a media company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Vendor

    Logmein is a great tool for IT support. It help to address my problems remotely.

    PeerSpot user
    Regional IT at a maritime company with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    A Linux version would be good but you will never want to use another remote service product again.

    What is most valuable?

    One of the functional capabilities for TeamViewer is that it is able to bypass any corporate firewall (using the standard internet port 80, and port 443) that enables us to provide off-site IT service and support when our corporate travelers are out of the office/town, and when they need IT assistance. Whatever location they are in, as long as they have internet access, we are able to provide the necessary IT services and support by connecting remotely to their machines.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Once, our company president was unable to launch his email on his notebook during one of his business trips. When the IT help-desk received his call (in the middle of the night), the help-desk personnel were able to resolve the problem in less than two minutes through the use of the TeamViewer host being installed on his notebook in the first place. Our company president was very impressed by the immediate resolution and was very satisfied with it.

    What needs improvement?

    A Linux version would be great as well.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I started off evaluating TeamViewer 7 as a trial solution for the company, in order to resolve issues with the long distance remote IT service and support.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No issues encountered.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    No issues encountered.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    I have never ever had to call the TeamViewer customer service hotline because the product is a very simple piece of software to use.

    Technical Support:

    I have never ever had to call the TeamViewer technical hotline because the product is a very simple piece of software to use.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used VNC software for remote support within office premises, but as the business requirement changed, we had to make the change from VNC to TeamViewer.

    How was the initial setup?

    It's as simple as A-B-C as the full version and host version are very simple to install. Even a non IT person would be able to install it onto a computer through the simple user-interface screen guide.

    What about the implementation team?

    The implementation was done by an in-house team.

    What was our ROI?

    The costs of the licenses are huge. Therefore, for a small size business company with less than 250 users in Asia, the ROI will take a long time to recover.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We projected to purchase the licenses for the IT team to have the full-version while the rest of the users would only have the host version. In the end, we purchased five user licenses for the full version.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    No other options were evaluated.

    What other advice do I have?

    To date, I have seen the growth of TeamViewer grow from strength to strength for other capabilities such as Mac, mobile device support, whiteboard tools, on-line meetings session. Once you use it, you will never want to use another remote service product again.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user3957 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Head of IT with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    Free. Good for screen sharing and remote control. Limited video and web conferencing functionality.

    Pros:
    Free
    Good for screen sharing and remote control

    Cons:
    Small video display
    Requires a client (not very heavy)
    Basic web conferencing functionality

    For how long have you used this product?
    - Just evaluated it for a short period

    Which features of this product are most valuable to you?
    - Screenshare, remote control

    What areas of this product have room for improvement?
    - Option to view larger video displays, share specific apps, web access

    Did you encounter any issues with deployment, stability or scalability?
    - no

    Did you previously use a different solution and if so, why did you switch?
    - Used many other online meeting solutions. Will review more.

    Was the initial setup straightforward or complex? In what ways?
    - straightforward

    Did you implement through a vendor team or an in-house one? If through a vendor team, how would you rate their level of expertise?
    - self service

    What was your original setup cost for this product and what is your day-to-day cost of using this product?
    - Minimum cost for business is $749 one time perpetual license

    What advice would you give to others looking into implementing this product?
    - good tool for support but not for most online meeting use cases

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free TeamViewer Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
    Updated: November 2022
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free TeamViewer Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.