2020-05-27T16:23:00Z
it_user434868 - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Director of Delivery at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
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What needs improvement with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)?

Please share with the community what you think needs improvement with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

What are its weaknesses? What would you like to see changed in a future version?

24
PeerSpot user
24 Answers
ShanAhmed - PeerSpot reviewer
Virtualization Specialist with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
2022-11-06T23:37:00Z
Nov 6, 2022

Windows operating system is used everywhere. You will find it everywhere, and every user is able to use Windows. If a user is using an operating system from the start, it becomes easier for them to use it when they come to a professional environment. That's an area in which I believe they need to put in extra effort, especially for the students. Currently, for their final projects, most students use Windows, and this is an area where Red Hat needs to put in an effort. They need to give some training to the students so that when they come to the professional environment, they're already used to it. It would then become easier for them to use it in a professional environment. I'm also using IBM AIX, which supports a tool called Smitty. You just put Smitty, and you can do anything. At the backend, the command will run automatically. It is not exactly like a GUI, but you just give the input and it will give you the output. That is something that Red Hat should work on. That would be an added advantage with Red Hat.

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Nicolae - PeerSpot reviewer
System and Solutions Architect at a computer software company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 20
2022-10-24T11:13:00Z
Oct 24, 2022

The Cockpit interface needs improvement with more features. The information for implementing Red Hat Cluster could be also improved. And there could also be better performance monitoring.

Allan E Cano - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr IT Solution Architect at a wholesaler/distributor with 10,001+ employees
Real User
2022-10-11T08:21:00Z
Oct 11, 2022

The cost could be lowered. We don't use RHEL in the cloud because Ubuntu is cheaper. Ubuntu factors support costs into the license when you're running it in the cloud, and it's a fraction of the cost of what RHEL is. I'm also not sure if RHEL supports open-source products. If they do, they don't advertise it. Adding stuff like Apache and other open-source tools like Tomcat to their support portfolio would help.

Sherwin Lee - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior System Engineer at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Real User
2022-10-09T22:43:00Z
Oct 9, 2022

I would like Insight to include some features from OpenSCAP, which they offer for compliance services. I played with it a little bit, but haven't gotten the updated setup to get that. It creates excellent documentation.

Md.Jasim Uddin - PeerSpot reviewer
Assistant Manager at Cosmopolitan Communications Limited
Real User
Top 5
2022-09-01T16:46:23Z
Sep 1, 2022

Although the security features are good, I'd like to see more added in the security sphere.

ER
CTO at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Reseller
Top 20
2022-08-24T22:55:00Z
Aug 24, 2022

Network virtualization resources could be better. When you have any kind of trouble with network virtualization, such as with OVS, which is like a switch in a virtual environment, it takes many hours to find what is happening. Other vendors, such as VMware, and even other Linux implementations for network virtualization have better resources. It is much easier to escalate, and there is better documentation. I don't use Ceph, which is their software-defined storage, because they don't have the best price. It doesn't make sense when you compare it in terms of the hardware cost, better performance, and better capabilities. That's my main complaint at any meeting with Red Hat. I want to use Red Hat Ceph, but it costs so much money.

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Paul Monroe - PeerSpot reviewer
CTO at Standard Bank International
Real User
2022-08-09T12:49:00Z
Aug 9, 2022

There needs to be a broader understanding of the RHEL suite's nuances like how the versioning works and implementing it on various kinds of infrastructure in use across the development landscape. There needs to be more training and education. It's difficult when you have a roadmap to deal with, but it is possible. Large application vendors may not have certified RHEL, or they have certified an older version. Most of the large application vendors are unfamiliar with the versioning that RHEL introduced, which I strongly support. They will support a given sub-version up to a point, not realizing that the sub-versions are essentially additive. This can be a real frustration when you try to deploy modern infrastructure. It allows tremendous flexibility because we can try things out across the cloud, virtual, and physical, but that's not always where the issue is. It's a matter of educating the engineers and developers on our side or enterprise vendors on the other. The licensing could also be simplified. While it makes sense from a theoretical perspective, it's a challenge to explain to the procurement team. Those with some technical expertise can understand how our licensing model works. However, it's still tricky because Red Hat is so different from traditional operating systems. It's another barrier when I'm trying to deploy it in an enterprise environment. In terms of feature requests, I would point out that our company tends not to operate on the bleeding edge for obvious reasons. We look at what has already been released to define our roadmaps. There's nothing in particular that I would say needs to be included. However, I would like to see Arm playing a more prominent role in the cloud infrastructure and enterprise physical data center spaces. Red Hat supports this, but I haven't seen a clear roadmap for how that support should evolve within the Red Hat operating system environment.

TS
Consultant at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Consultant
2022-08-09T11:50:00Z
Aug 9, 2022

Red Hat can be tricky at times, but all operating systems are. The moves to systemd and NetworkManager haven't made the product more user-friendly. The network management they had before was easier and somewhat more reliable than NetworkManager, which Red Hat forces us to use now. That may just be my personal preference because I've been working on Red Hat for so long. It's something new that doesn't do exactly what it used to do, so it's probably more of an old person's complaint. The firewall controls can also be somewhat challenging in terms of automation. An application may use a different setup, so you need to consider that if you want to automate installations. You can't easily port an application to another operating system unless it's CentOS or Fedora. It's not portable if you want to port it to something like Windows except for Java and containers. Unless it's another Red Hat, CentOS, or Fedora, the application itself isn't portable if it's installed on a thick virtual or physical machine even. It's not easily portable because you must recompile the application or make changes.

DW
IT Systems Engineer
Real User
Top 20
2022-04-05T18:20:00Z
Apr 5, 2022

My biggest issue right now is Red Hat Consulting and trying to use some of their services to help get us going. Technically, they're good, but we seem to have issues with scheduling. Also, we initially deployed it with Red Hat Satellite. We're now moving more to automation using Terraform within VMware, to automate the clone and then follow up with Ansible to configure. Red Hat's standard deployment is with Satellite and Kickstart, but we're looking at other options to help speed it along. We do have a mix of bare metal and virtualized servers and it's easier to spin up in the virtualized world versus bare metal. That's why we're looking at some options outside of Red Hat, for the bare metal. We'd like something that we can use to build a server a lot faster, as well as address network latency issues.

Thomas H Jones II - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Cloud Engineer at a consultancy with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Top 10
2022-03-22T14:58:00Z
Mar 22, 2022

It is great for the stuff that Red Hat either owns outright or is the lead on the upstream product. When it comes to third-party tools, it can be a little iffy. Some of the database solutions and data governance solutions that I have had to implement on Red Hat have not been fun. I would mostly like to see improvement around corporate messaging. When Red Hat 8 came out, and Red Hat decided to change, it inverted the relationship between Red Hat and CentOS. This caused my customers who had a CentOS to RHEL development to production workflow quite a bit of heartburn that several of them are still working out. A lot of that probably could have been avoided through better messaging.

AH
Sr. Designer Data at a comms service provider with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-18T23:24:00Z
Mar 18, 2022

An area for improvement in RHEL has to do with security policies. I know they are doing something about this in RHEL 9, but I haven't worked with that version yet. When it comes to security policies in RHEL 8, it is a bit behind. It would be better if we could just enforce a certain security policy such as CIS Level 1. That was not available, out-of-the-box, in RHEL 8.

Dan Shaver - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Automation Architect at a healthcare company
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-17T14:55:00Z
Mar 17, 2022

I don't see anything that needs improvement with RHEL itself, but there is room for improvement of the support infrastructure for it. The management and updates to Satellite, which is the support update, have been cumbersome at best, including releases and changes to a release. Communication on how that will work going forward has not been great.

TR
Cloud and Infrastructure Architecture at CommScope
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-17T00:29:00Z
Mar 17, 2022

I would like to see improvements made to the subscriptions and management of them.

Joerg Kastning - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Administrator at a educational organization with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-15T13:02:00Z
Mar 15, 2022

RHEL's feature for managing multiple versions of packages is getting better. In earlier versions, when I think about the Red Hat software collections, it was sometimes pretty hard to set them up and use them on a daily basis. With AppStreams, it got easier. What could still be improved is the lifecycle information about AppStream versions. Usually, when doing a major release, I have 10 years of support divided in different support phases, but a lot of applications from the AppStream repository have a completely different lifecycle so you need to check it separately. For example, a certain node.js version will be at the end of support in 10 months. I must make a note to update to a new version before it reaches the end of support. It would be awesome if the end of support date of the application streams would follow a stricter lifecycle with aligning end dates. The Authselect tool needs improvement. This tool is used to connect your system to an identity provider or directory service, e.g., openLDAP. There is documentation and descriptions. While there are a few use cases and examples described, it is sometimes hard to use these tools to set up the configuration that we need for our specific environment. I would like it if there was more general information about the tool, not just describing a use case. For example, here is how to do it and how to connect to some kind of openLDAP service as well as more information about when you need to configure certificate services and mutual authentication. There is room for improvement, but it is more room for improvement in the documentation area than the RHEL system itself.

Jude Cadet - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Systems Engineer at Fiserv
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-14T22:18:00Z
Mar 14, 2022

In the past and with older versions, you couldn't expand the root file system without rebooting the server or restarting the operating system. That is something that they have actually corrected now, which is great. They corrected that issue somewhere around RHEL 7.

John Lemay - PeerSpot reviewer
Principal Systems Engineer at Greenway Health
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-14T15:51:00Z
Mar 14, 2022

There is potential for improvement when it comes to ease of use. It has become easier to use over the years but could be better still. Linux, in general, has never been a simple solution. It's usually a more complex solution than something like Windows. If there is a downside, it's that it is more complex than some of the other solutions.

RicardoURQUIDI - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-12-14T00:35:00Z
Dec 14, 2021

I would like training to be added to the subscription. It would be useful for when you have to train yourself or get a certification. There are many things that we are not using because we don't know how to use them. Having training included in the subscription would help us in learning more things and utilizing the full power of the solution.

Dinesh  Jaisankar - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Information Technology System Analyst at National center of meterology
Real User
Top 10
2021-09-05T14:09:00Z
Sep 5, 2021

Their support service can be improved. They are able to help us, but in some cases, there is a delay in getting a root cause analysis from their side for Severity One cases. The vulnerability assessment part should also be improved. We do a lot of patching regularly. They try to fix an issue very quickly, and we also end up facing bugs that are not properly documented. When releasing the general availability for a particular solution, they need to do a lot more work on their side.

Don Beyer - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Administrator at Ithaca College
Real User
Top 10
2021-08-18T14:55:00Z
Aug 18, 2021

The biggest thing that is crushing RHEL is documentation. Their documentation is haphazard at best. The man pages that you can use locally are pretty good, they've been fleshed out pretty well, but the documentation from Red Hat itself really needs somebody to go through it and review it. The only real negative that I have with Red Hat is that you can tell that when you look at the documentation, they cut and paste documentation from the previous version. Because they update it that way, what happens is that there's nobody doing Q&A. For example, in Red Hat 7 and Red Hat 8, they changed the way they do deployments. Instead of using YUM, you use DNF but when you read the documentation for Red Hat 8, they intermix the two. This means that if you're a new Linux user, it's very difficult to distinguish between the two commands. The fact of the matter is that one is built on top of the other. DNF is backward compatible on top of YUM, and that can cause confusion with users and system administrators. However, it wouldn't be an issue if there was good documentation. My job is pretty easy, but the documentation would really help me be able to communicate the things that I do to the rest of my team. They're all Windows people and when I go to the Red Hat documentation and tell them that we're migrating to this and we're using this tool, but the documentation is horrible, I get laughed at. By comparison, Microsoft has its own problems with documentation, but it's a little bit more organized and it's definitely fleshed out a lot better. I commend Microsoft for its documentation. Red Hat may be the better product for the things that we do in our environment, but Microsoft has better documentation.

CL
IT Manager at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-05-18T09:48:43Z
May 18, 2021

It could be a bit more user-friendly. It could also be cheaper.

LM
Analyste principal - AIX et Linux at a hospitality company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-02-09T15:01:00Z
Feb 9, 2021

Linux overall needs improvement. They cannot go much beyond what Linus Torvalds's kernel implementation can do. I come from AIX, and there were very cool things in AIX that I am missing dearly, e.g., being able to support not only adding, but also reducing memory and number of processors. That is not supported on Linux right now, and it is the same for the mainstream file systems supported by Red Hat. There is no way of reducing a file system or logical volume. Whereas, in AIX, it was a shoo-in. These are the little things where we can say, "Ah, we are missing AIX for that." We are not loving our servers anymore. If we need them, we create them. When we don't need them, we delete them. That is what they are. They are just commodities. They are just a transient product.

Ifham Shahid - PeerSpot reviewer
Associate Engineer at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-01-14T12:42:54Z
Jan 14, 2021

Their pricing and documentation can be improved. They need to have developer variance that's more developer-friendly and less costly. They have a free developer version, but that's very limited in terms of features from RHEL. They also need to build their own open-source community.

FA
Linux Administrator at Cloudways
Consultant
Top 10
2020-12-21T11:04:57Z
Dec 21, 2020

It is mostly better than other solutions. However, it is sometimes difficult for disaster recovery, so we have to plan accordingly.

Fredrik Lehtonen - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Analyst at Intraservice/City of G̦teborg
Real User
2020-05-27T16:23:00Z
May 27, 2020

Sometimes they don't have new versions for applications like Apache or PHP. I understand it's because they have to have support for them, so they can't have the latest version all the time, but that's the main thing I see that could be improved. So when you use RHEL and you want to install, let's say, Apache or PHP, you do a "dnf install php" and you get a specific version that Red Hat releases. But that isn't the latest version that PHP has released, because Red Hat has to make sure that they can support it. The compatibility with the latest version of Apache or PHP lags because RHEL does not release updates of the latest versions. It's the same with the kernel. Sometimes they are a bit behind in the kernel version. That's the same issue. They have to test it and support it for so many years so that's why they are a bit behind on the kernel as well.

Related Questions
TN
User at Full Sail
Aug 10, 2022
Hi community members, What are some similarities that you see between recommendations in Windows 10 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux benchmarks?
See 2 answers
Thomas H Jones II - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Cloud Engineer at a consultancy with 51-200 employees
Aug 8, 2022
"Benchmarks" is an ambiguous term. Are you referring to security benchmarks or performance benchmarks? In either case, which specify type of benchmark are you looking for?
RicardoURQUIDI - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Aug 10, 2022
Doing any kind of benchmark between an OS developed exclusively for workstation (Windows10) and an OS developed mostly for Servers doesn’t make any sense.
Netanya Carmi - PeerSpot reviewer
Content Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
Dec 1, 2021
Why?
See 1 answer
Janet Staver - PeerSpot reviewer
Tech Blogger
Dec 1, 2021
Red Hat Enterprise Linux is fantastic. It is an inexpensive solution that has excellent security, performance, and stability, and also lots of features. I specifically like that the solution has features that simplify adoption for non-Linux users, which makes it easier for administrators too. RHEL also has good customer support. In addition, RHEL enables me to deploy current applications as well as emerging workloads across all virtualized hybrid cloud and multi-cloud environments, which I find to be very helpful. Besides the stability and reliability of the OS, it provides a great user experience. Moreso, the fact that it is open-source and leading the open-source market trends and technologies speaks for itself. Although RHEL has a lot to offer, sometimes it can be difficult during disaster recovery. But if you know that ahead of time, you can plan accordingly. And their documentation definitely has room for improvement. In the past I have used Centos. Generally it was good, but the reason why I switched was because it used to be very stable and now it is not. Its operating system used to be great but when the updates came out, something changed. Additionally, if you are new to using Centos, the initial setup is not that straightforward unless you have prior experience with Linux and know your way around. (In which case installation won’t be difficult.) I also found that CentOS didn’t scale as well as I expected it to. For my needs, I was also hoping it would have more options built into the wizard. Conclusion: Although CentOS is a very efficient product and is very powerful with a lot of capabilities, I would still recommend RHEL. On a scale of one to ten, I would rate RHEL an eight. As someone who has used other systems, I can say from experience that Red Hat is one of the best - specifically in terms of its ability and consistency of the operating system.
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Sharif Islam - PeerSpot reviewer
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@Netanya Carmi,This is an insightful article.  But in my opinion, Rocky Linux (as a potential successor) of CentOS, will be the next big thing in the open-source world, as already many solutions are supporting it though only the BETA version for now.  Still, your article is quite a heads up. Thanks!
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