2020-05-27T16:23:00Z
Miriam Tover - PeerSpot reviewer
Service Delivery Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
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What advice do you have for others considering Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)?

If you were talking to someone whose organization is considering Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), what would you say?

How would you rate it and why? Any other tips or advice?

24
PeerSpot user
24 Answers
ShanAhmed - PeerSpot reviewer
Virtualization Specialist with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 10
2022-11-06T23:37:00Z
Nov 6, 2022

To anyone interested in using Red Hat for the first time, I would definitely advise starting with the GUI because now, the GUI option is quite good, and you can do all the things. After that, you can slowly start moving to CMD. For learning, there are a lot of resources available online, such as YouTube and LinkedIn Learning, whereas Red Hat Academy is quite expensive. The biggest lesson I have learned from using this solution is that when you're using the command line, you need to be extra careful. That's because when using the command line, a single slash can make a huge difference. That's what I learned at the start of my career. I started with Red Hat Version 5. Now they have version 9, which I haven't used, but if I just consider the evolution from version 5 to 8, 8.2, or 8.4, there has been a huge difference because, at that time, people were scared of using Linux, but now, things are different. There has been a revolution in terms of OS. A lot of things are being changed, but in terms of the things that we do, for us, it is the same because we are doing system administration. As a system admin, there is nothing different for us. We are doing the same things again and again because the applications require the addition of storage. There is also a change in terms of security features. If I compare the old versions with the new versions, in old versions, adding any exception in the host firewall was a real task, but now, things have either become smooth, or we have gotten used to it. Overall, for me, things have become easier. They are getting more and more secure, but with the vulnerabilities and the assessments that have been done, we need to keep updating. Now, everything has caught up with the latest security required in the market. In our environment, we're using virtual servers. There are no physical ones. We are shifting to containers in my current organization. Most of the applications we are using are containerized, and it has been easy for us to manage those applications. However, we also require some in-built applications, and for that, a change in people's mindset is required. It's not about the OS; it's about the people who do the development. It is becoming a bit hard for them because they were using a different platform previously, and now, they need to move to the Linux platform. It is a little bit different for them. Overall, I would rate it an eight out of ten. When comparing it with AIX, AIX is a bit easier in terms of use and it also has the Smitty tool.

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Nicolae - PeerSpot reviewer
System and Solutions Architect at a computer software company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 10
2022-10-24T11:13:00Z
Oct 24, 2022

Compare the documentation and the answers that are published by Red Hat. Review these aspects and that should help you decide. I strongly recommend RHEL as it fits well in on-premises or cloud development, whether for a small or a large company, and it's a professional product. It's very integrated with container technology, including with Podman and Docker, although we recommend Podman for containers. RHEL fits well in a lot of situations and container environments. It's a good product.

Allan E Cano - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr IT Solution Architect at a wholesaler/distributor with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
2022-10-11T08:21:00Z
Oct 11, 2022

I rate Red Hat Enterprise Linux nine out of 10. I've been pretty happy with RHEL over the years. That's 20 years of Unix right there. I tell anybody coming into Linux or Unix to learn the program. Scripting is your best friend, and you can't understand automation if you don't understand basic scripting. If you've never seen Unix or RHEL before, go to a class and learn how to do it in a lab so you don't have to screw up your job. Once you're comfortable with that, start learning containers because I firmly believe containers will replace how we do most of what we do today.

Sherwin Lee - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior System Engineer at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 10
2022-10-09T22:43:00Z
Oct 9, 2022

I rate Red Hat Enterprise Linux a nine out of ten overall. I don't think RHEL is exactly perfect, but it's a trusted, easy and well-supported solution. They are constantly improving and trying to make it easier.

Md.Jasim Uddin - PeerSpot reviewer
Assistant Manager at Cosmopolitan Communications Limited
Real User
Top 5
2022-09-01T16:46:23Z
Sep 1, 2022

I rate this solution eight out of 10.

ER
CTO at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Reseller
Top 20
2022-08-24T22:55:00Z
Aug 24, 2022

I would advise paying for the enterprise-level support at least for the first year. For sure, it is expensive, but it would be helpful. With experience, you can downgrade to the second level. We have had some issues with container compression that broke everything. So, I don't recommend using it if you don't know how to fix everything. The biggest lesson that I've learned from using this solution is to read before starting the implementation. I would rate it a 9 out of 10 because there is nothing perfect.

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Mostafa Atrash - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Enterprise Solutions Engineer at Palpay
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
2022-08-01T12:00:00Z
Aug 1, 2022

I rate Red Hat Enterprise Linux nine out of ten. It's an excellent solution. Go for Red Hat If you want stability at a reasonable cost. It's the best.

DW
IT Systems Engineer
Real User
Top 20
2022-04-05T18:20:00Z
Apr 5, 2022

Times have changed from when I first started using it. Back then it was just a matter of putting a CD in and installing it. One of the companies I worked for did a lot of homegrown stuff and I used their tools that were like Kickstart. Now it is all automation with infrastructure-as-code. The complexity of deployment is about the same. Some of what we're doing to deploy stuff is outside of Red Hat and it's a matter of finding what tools are available. We're in the process of deploying something right now where we have different versions of Python. That's the only use case we have with multiple versions on the same server. I don't expect any issues, but it's still early in that deployment. We have three people dedicated to maintaining the infrastructure environment that we work in. That includes managing Linux servers, the applications that go with them, and dealing with day-to-day tasks like patching. It's the typical life cycle maintenance functions: break/fix, dealing with hardware issues, deploying new applications, and maintaining a VMware environment. The reason we're using it is because it's stable and we know we can get support. I know there are other versions of Linux, ones that I've used, but I've never experienced the kind of support with those versions that Red Hat has provided. Red Hat is a stable Linux solution provider.

Thomas H Jones II - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Cloud Engineer at a consultancy with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Top 10
2022-03-22T14:58:00Z
Mar 22, 2022

Some of my customers use OpenShift, many of my customers use Ansible, and a lot of them use a local Docker and Podman. The ones that actually run within Red Hat integrate just fine. The ones that Red Hat runs on top of, those are a little more difficult to speak to. Running Docker inside of RHEL is easy. It is much better on EL8 than it is on EL7. I like it enough that I use it as my own operating system for my personal web and mail server. So, I would rate it as eight or nine out of 10. The primary hits against it are that if you want to do anything bleeding edge, the pursuit of stability works counter to that.

AH
Sr. Designer Data at a comms service provider with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-18T23:24:00Z
Mar 18, 2022

The biggest lesson I have learned with RHEL is don't complicate your design. You can always find an easier way to do things. Sometimes you'll think, "Oh, we can do this," and you start thinking about very complicated processes. It's better to think and start simple. With RHEL, we have patching in place, automation in place, and we already know the support. We are very satisfied. We have done a lot of work on it and now it's easy to deploy VMs immediately. We are not looking to implement any other version of Linux.

Dan Shaver - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Automation Architect at a healthcare company
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-17T14:55:00Z
Mar 17, 2022

My biggest advice would be to read the documentation and reach out to Red Hat, or even just search the internet, so that you understand what you're getting into and what you're implementing. I can't think of very much that needs to be improved with RHEL. The model that they have for maintaining patching, and their cadence on Zero-day attacks is fantastic, and their support is really good. I don't see any issues.

TR
Cloud and Infrastructure Architecture at CommScope
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-17T00:29:00Z
Mar 17, 2022

One of the new features in RHEL version 8 is AppStream. We're still doing our RHEL 8 deployments and although we've started using AppStream, we haven't gotten very deep into it. Its use is on a very limited scope. RHEL 8 is about halfway through its lifecycle and we're still trying to see how it works. When it comes to the deployment of cloud-based workloads, this solution helps to automate activities. We are just starting our cloud journey and as such, we currently don't have any cloud-based workloads. However, we plan to, and my understanding is that it will be much easier using Red Hat Gold images for Azure, AWS, etc. My advice to anybody who is implementing this solution is to automate as much as possible. Overall, I think that this is a good product. I'm a pretty big proponent of Red Hat and in fact, as we speak, I'm wearing a Red Hat RHEL 8 shirt. I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Joerg Kastning - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Administrator at a educational organization with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-15T13:02:00Z
Mar 15, 2022

We have plans to increase usage. Every new application that supports running on Solaris or Linux is going to be deployed on RHEL these days. I hope it will be our major operating system in the data center. So, in the foreseeable future, there would only be two operating systems: RHEL and Microsoft Windows. I would rate this solution as nine out of 10.

Jude Cadet - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Systems Engineer at Fiserv
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-14T22:18:00Z
Mar 14, 2022

They are a great company overall. It is hard to say where they could improve. They have user groups. They put out a lot of messaging and information. The solution is easy to learn and get to know their products and what they do. From a personal standpoint, I have everything that I need. If I wanted to run multiple versions of Node.js, there are ways to do that without using AppStream. More recently, I have been working with different versions of Node.js, having it in different versions on one machine. It works well. Just the fact that I have the capability is great. Among the other distributions of Linux out there, I would rate it as 10 out of 10. If I have to compare this solution against everything else out there, this solution is at the top of the list.

John Lemay - PeerSpot reviewer
Principal Systems Engineer at Greenway Health
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-14T15:51:00Z
Mar 14, 2022

Make sure that you have well-trained engineers who are familiar with RHEL. If you are looking for a solution that runs in a mission-critical environment, you always want a supported solution. If you're looking for Linux, I don't think that there's a better-supported solution than RHEL. In our particular scenario, our underlying infrastructure is either VMware virtualized or bare metal, although the latter was mostly in the past. Rolling out to a virtualized solution or rolling out to bare metal with RHEL—with the exception of the bits that are unique to those platforms—the operating system installation and the like are going to be very similar. Overall, RHEL is a very solid solution.

RicardoURQUIDI - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-12-14T00:35:00Z
Dec 14, 2021

You cannot compare it with anything that is in the market because there is nothing that does the same. Amazon is doing something similar, but it is still a different service. Everything that they give us surprises us and changes the way we are doing things. It hasn't simplified adoption for non-Linux users because we have mostly deployed servers, and they are not visible to the users. Users are just using the applications, and they don't know what is going on in the background. They don't know if they are using Linux or something else. They are using Windows on the client, but on servers, they don't know what is running. We aren't using bare metal for servers. Everything is virtualized and working just fine. We have VMware, OpenShift, etc. Everything is deployed on our own cloud, and everything is on our server. We use the dashboard of OpenShift to monitor the whole infrastructure, but we also have two solutions that are not by Red Hat. One is Zabbix, and the other one is Pandora. Both of them are open source. The dashboard of OpenShift doesn't significantly affect the performance of existing applications, but it is helpful because it can send triggers. It has triggers to send alerts and things like that. It is not really resource-consuming. It is really good. I would rate Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) a 10 out of 10.

Dinesh  Jaisankar - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Information Technology System Analyst at National center of meterology
Real User
Top 10
2021-09-05T14:09:00Z
Sep 5, 2021

It is very stable, and you can easily run a lot of production workload on RHEL. Red Hat products are well established. They have been around for many years. Red Hat is dealing with multiple products and applications and is constantly doing research to develop new products according to industry trends. With RHEL, you can get an end-to-end solution with their multiple products, which is something not available through other vendors. Red Hat's open-source approach was a factor when choosing RHEL. We are utilizing a lot of open-source solutions in our Test and Dev environment before going into production. We are able to get a lot of information in the open-source community, and we also have local community support in our region. Its newer versions enable us to deploy current applications and emerging workloads across bare-metal, virtualized, hybrid cloud, and multi-cloud environments, but the older versions are not supporting these features. They have included more features in the newer versions to integrate and merge with other applications that are on-premises, in the cloud, or in a hybrid cloud setup. In the older versions, we faced some issues in moving some of the applications from on-premises to the cloud, but in the newer versions, it is very easy to move or merge to the cloud. The applications that we have deployed across these environments are very reliable, except for the bare-metal. They are not much reliable if we are using a bare-metal solution on-prem. For virtualization, we are not using the native RHEL virtualization. We have VMware for virtualization, and it is okay in terms of directly deploying some of the applications to the public cloud. It is quite reliable. It doesn't simplify adoption for non-Linux users. For non-Linux users, it is somewhat difficult to manage this solution or have this solution. However, as compared to other Unix platforms, RHEL is okay. We are not using RHEL to run multiple versions of the same application or database on a specific operating system. In a specific operating system, we are running an application according to our end-user features requirements. We go through a lot of documentation and do multiple PoCs for deploying an application on the RHEL platform. We have a lot of user acceptance test procedures for each application in terms of how we have to do benchmarking and what are our requirements. So, we are managing with an individual operating system and not using the whole centralized solution. We use automation tools to move to the cloud. When we are planning to move to the cloud, we do multiple cloud assessments for which we have third-party tools as well as in-built RHEL tools. Each vendor has a different way of migration and automation for moving the on-prem workload to the cloud workload. Each vendor gives you different tools, and we follow the best practices given by them while moving the on-premises workload to the cloud. I would rate RHEL an eight out of 10.

Bruce Young - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Systems Engineer at a university with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
2021-09-01T14:38:00Z
Sep 1, 2021

RHEL provides features that help to speed deployment, although we don't use their tools. We use tools from a third party. My advice for anybody who is looking into implementing RHEL is to make sure that it is going to work for you. Ensure that it supports all of the products that you need it to support once you've actually assessed all of those things. It is a quality product, there's no doubt about that. Once you have made that assessment, I would say, "Great, go for it." In summary, this is one of the products that works well and does what we need. I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Don Beyer - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Administrator at Ithaca College
Real User
Top 10
2021-08-18T14:55:00Z
Aug 18, 2021

We have approximately 14 servers running Red Hat 6 but we used Red Hat 6 all the way to Red Hat 8. The AppStream feature is something that we have tried but on a very limited scale. We have had mixed results with it, although it looks promising. At this point, I can't say whether it is a good feature or not. My advice for anybody considering Red Hat depends on the role of the person that is making the decision. If they're an end-user or their organization is using office productivity software, then they're probably not going to want to use it for the backend. This is because there are not a lot of users that are using Red Hat as their office productivity operating system. If on the other hand, you're somebody that's looking for servers that just need what they call five nines or high availability, Red Hat is your solution for that. That's what I would say to anybody, any technical person that I've talked to, if you can afford it, definitely get Red Hat for your web development. Your web servers should be either Apache, or NGINX, which is their web server stuff. Red Hat should also be used to host an Oracle database. We found that that works really well and is very competitive with Microsoft's SQL server. It's about the same cost; the Red Hat product is actually a little cheaper than Microsoft's SQL product. Considering the cost, ease of deployment, and ease of use, Red Hat is the better product for your main infrastructure. For things that just have to be up and running, Red Hat is the product that you want to use. I can't be strong enough in my opinion that Red Hat does what it does very well for the mundane tasks of infrastructure. For instance, when it comes to web servers, no other OS does a better job than Red Hat for web servers or databases. Similarly, it does a very good job for proxies. For things that just need to run and have very little human interaction, Red Hat's your solution. If you're looking for something that's for an office, such as for accounting, then Red Hat is not the solution to choose. I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

CL
IT Manager at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-05-18T09:48:43Z
May 18, 2021

I would recommend this solution to others. I would advise others to do their research before deploying it and make sure that they are up to speed with the OS and what it can do. It is fairly easy to use as long as you know what you're doing. I would rate Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) an eight out of ten.

LM
Analyste principal - AIX et Linux at a hospitality company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-02-09T15:01:00Z
Feb 9, 2021

We are a bunch of techies here. RHEL is not managed by end users. We don't really mind the GUIs, because the first thing that we do is stop using them. We are using Ansible, which is now part of RHEL, and that can automate the living heck out of everything. For now, we are not using the Power approach, but we may in the future. We are doing a business case for that, as it would be an easy sell for some communities and the use cases are not techie-to-techies. There is a cloud, but we have very little infrastructure as a service in the cloud right now. It delivers to the targeted audiences. Could Red Hat Enterprise Linux be used in all types of other scenarios? Most likely. They have an embedded version for microcontrollers, i.e., things that you put into your jewelry or light switches. However, this is not what they're aiming for. I would rate RHEL as a nine and a half (out of 10), but I will round that up to 10.

Ifham Shahid - PeerSpot reviewer
Associate Engineer at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-01-14T12:42:54Z
Jan 14, 2021

I would tell potential customers that they should go for the latest releases. If they want to buy it, they should get a developer account from RHEL first and use that dev account before buying it. They might have some hands-on experience before spending too much money on Red Hat. On a scale from one to ten, I would give Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) an eight.

FA
Linux Administrator at Cloudways
Consultant
Top 10
2020-12-21T11:04:57Z
Dec 21, 2020

I would definitely recommend this solution. It is my most preferred solution. I like using terminals, and with Red Hat, I get to work on terminals and shell commands. It has good security. I would rate Red Hat Linux (RHEL) an eight out of ten. I find it excellent, but no system can be 100% perfect.

Fredrik Lehtonen - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Analyst at Intraservice/City of G̦teborg
Real User
2020-05-27T16:23:00Z
May 27, 2020

Try the product out. If you decide to purchase a subscription, don't be afraid to submit a ticket or a support case to Red Hat, because that's why you pay for a subscription. It took us a long time before we started to open support cases, because we thought, "Ah, we can fix this ourselves." But now we use the support system quite often and it works quite well. One of the things I've learned from using RHEL is that there are applications that work so much better on Linux than they do on Windows.

Related Questions
TN
User at Full Sail
Aug 10, 2022
Hi community members, What are some similarities that you see between recommendations in Windows 10 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux benchmarks?
See 2 answers
Thomas H Jones II - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Cloud Engineer at a consultancy with 51-200 employees
Aug 8, 2022
"Benchmarks" is an ambiguous term. Are you referring to security benchmarks or performance benchmarks? In either case, which specify type of benchmark are you looking for?
RicardoURQUIDI - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Aug 10, 2022
Doing any kind of benchmark between an OS developed exclusively for workstation (Windows10) and an OS developed mostly for Servers doesn’t make any sense.
Netanya Carmi - PeerSpot reviewer
Content Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
Dec 1, 2021
Why?
See 1 answer
Janet Staver - PeerSpot reviewer
Tech Blogger
Dec 1, 2021
Red Hat Enterprise Linux is fantastic. It is an inexpensive solution that has excellent security, performance, and stability, and also lots of features. I specifically like that the solution has features that simplify adoption for non-Linux users, which makes it easier for administrators too. RHEL also has good customer support. In addition, RHEL enables me to deploy current applications as well as emerging workloads across all virtualized hybrid cloud and multi-cloud environments, which I find to be very helpful. Besides the stability and reliability of the OS, it provides a great user experience. Moreso, the fact that it is open-source and leading the open-source market trends and technologies speaks for itself. Although RHEL has a lot to offer, sometimes it can be difficult during disaster recovery. But if you know that ahead of time, you can plan accordingly. And their documentation definitely has room for improvement. In the past I have used Centos. Generally it was good, but the reason why I switched was because it used to be very stable and now it is not. Its operating system used to be great but when the updates came out, something changed. Additionally, if you are new to using Centos, the initial setup is not that straightforward unless you have prior experience with Linux and know your way around. (In which case installation won’t be difficult.) I also found that CentOS didn’t scale as well as I expected it to. For my needs, I was also hoping it would have more options built into the wizard. Conclusion: Although CentOS is a very efficient product and is very powerful with a lot of capabilities, I would still recommend RHEL. On a scale of one to ten, I would rate RHEL an eight. As someone who has used other systems, I can say from experience that Red Hat is one of the best - specifically in terms of its ability and consistency of the operating system.
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Sharif Islam - PeerSpot reviewer
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@Netanya Carmi,This is an insightful article.  But in my opinion, Rocky Linux (as a potential successor) of CentOS, will be the next big thing in the open-source world, as already many solutions are supporting it though only the BETA version for now.  Still, your article is quite a heads up. Thanks!
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