2020-05-27T16:23:00Z
Miriam Tover - PeerSpot reviewer
Service Delivery Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
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What is your primary use case for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)?

How do you or your organization use this solution?

Please share with us so that your peers can learn from your experiences.

Thank you!

25
PeerSpot user
25 Answers
Faustine Chisasa - PeerSpot reviewer
Engineering Supervisor- Corporate Data Solutions and Services at TZ Telecoms. Corporation
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
2021-12-03T10:02:22Z
Dec 3, 2021

We use RHEL for network management and network services systems. 


We have DNS servers, data collectors, network management systems, subscriber management systems and network operations systems running on RHEL. 


I personally have dealt with systems as early as RHEL 4,5,6 and now running 7. RHEL is stable and secure so we never had OS-level performance issues or security incidents that can be attributed to the OS.

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ShanAhmed - PeerSpot reviewer
Virtualization Specialist with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
2022-11-06T23:37:00Z
Nov 6, 2022

I worked with different organizations. So, the use case varies from organization to organization. Right now, some of the teams are using it for applications like BI, and then there are a few others that are using it for Websphere, middleware, etc. In terms of the version, most of them are on 7.9, but there are a few on 8.2 and 8.4 as well.

Nicolae - PeerSpot reviewer
System and Solutions Architect at a computer software company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 20
2022-10-24T11:13:00Z
Oct 24, 2022

I work for an IBM business partner and we install Red Hat for our customers. They use Red Hat for databases, application servers, and some IBM applications that we also install. There are different uses.

Allan E Cano - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr IT Solution Architect at a wholesaler/distributor with 10,001+ employees
Real User
2022-10-11T08:21:00Z
Oct 11, 2022

We primarily use RHEL for LAMP stacks. Our deployment is currently on-premises, but if they change their licensing model on the cloud, we might start rolling it out in the GCP. It's used globally in VMware environments. We use it in APAC and AMEA, but the majority of the deployments are in the US. The major platforms that we run on it are PLM environment and digital asset management. Our shop is what we call out of the box and if it doesn't run on a container out of the box, then we don't run it on a container. So none of our stuff is running containers right now.

Sherwin Lee - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior System Engineer at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Real User
2022-10-09T22:43:00Z
Oct 9, 2022

I use Red Hat to run applications like Apache, MySQL databases, etc. It is suitable for data storage and firewall. I can also measure performance with the SAR tools and do all I need with the Linux stack. I run several server farms, community applications, and more. Multiple teams use it. We have a hybrid setup, but we try to keep the use cases separate for each, so they're not transiting that much.

Md.Jasim Uddin - PeerSpot reviewer
Assistant Manager at Cosmopolitan Communications Limited
Real User
Top 5
2022-09-01T16:46:23Z
Sep 1, 2022

We are internet service providers in Bangladesh and resellers of this product to our customers to manage their network infrastructure.

Learn what your peers think about Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
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ER
CTO at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Reseller
Top 20
2022-08-24T22:55:00Z
Aug 24, 2022

I use it for almost everything. I run a company in South Texas and Mexico. We are a cloud service provider, and we have implementations for almost everything. We are using it for websites, virtualization, orchestration, and containers, and we are also using it a lot for telecommunications. We use almost all of its features. We have many versions. We have versions 8, 9, 9, 9.1, 9.2, etc.

Mostafa Atrash - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Enterprise Solutions Engineer at Palpay
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
2022-08-01T12:00:00Z
Aug 1, 2022

I'm using Red Hat as an OI solution with some Oracle databases and an FTB server on top of it. I am not using containers in Red Hat. It's solely serving as an OS with direct applications installed on it. We have a few thousand users benefiting from Red Hat indirectly, but only 10 to 20 people work directly with it. I only use Red Hat in one location right now. Previously, I had it deployed in a cluster.

DW
IT Systems Engineer
Real User
Top 20
2022-04-05T18:20:00Z
Apr 5, 2022

We're using it to support security applications. We also use it for various infrastructure aspects, such as hosting Satellite or Ansible Automation or Confluence. We have a mix of different apps running on it.

Thomas H Jones II - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Cloud Engineer at a consultancy with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Top 10
2022-03-22T14:58:00Z
Mar 22, 2022

I am primarily doing developer enablement for users of Red Hat-based software stacks. Most of my experience for the last five years will be in the context of AWS and Azure. As my customers are primarily cloud-based, they are primarily using the Red Hat repositories hosted with Amazon and Azure. My customers are primarily DoD, so they are using EL7. We are trying to get them to move in the direction of EL8, but it is a slog.

AH
Sr. Designer Data at a comms service provider with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-18T23:24:00Z
Mar 18, 2022

It's the operating system for different applications we have that are related to telecommunications such as VoIP, DNS, and many others including identity management. We are using it based on virtualization, including VMware, Red Hat Virtualization, and we have some OpenShift Virtualization.

Dan Shaver - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Automation Architect at a healthcare company
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-17T14:55:00Z
Mar 17, 2022

We have various use cases with about 12,000 instances across four data centers and three different clouds. In general, it's for the adoption of and standardization with other vendors, so that other vendors' software is known to work. We're doing lift-and-shift of existing hardware infrastructure that is onsite into the Cloud.

TR
Cloud and Infrastructure Architecture at CommScope
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-17T00:29:00Z
Mar 17, 2022

We use Red Hat for all sorts of use cases. This includes everything from running applications and databases, or the combination thereof, to building software for products that we use for embedded design. My company has several RHEL implementations deployed in the field, including versions 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.

Joerg Kastning - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Administrator at a educational organization with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-15T13:02:00Z
Mar 15, 2022

We use it for core infrastructure services, like package mirrors, configuration management hosts, and proxy requests going to the Internet or as reverse proxies in front of our applications. Our campus management software is delivered via RHEL and applications like Wikis learning platforms. Almost all machines are running on virtualization. Only a few bare-metal systems exist today. Currently, we are not engaged in any kind of public or hybrid cloud environment.

Jude Cadet - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr. Systems Engineer at Fiserv
Real User
Top 20
2022-03-14T22:18:00Z
Mar 14, 2022

Our use case is mostly for application servers. We are not really using it for any of our file servers. We have a storage department who usually just deals with NAS and things like that. However, this solution is primarily for application servers.

John Lemay - PeerSpot reviewer
Principal Systems Engineer at Greenway Health
Real User
Top 10
2022-03-14T15:51:00Z
Mar 14, 2022

Our primary use case is that we use it for transaction servers. We have it on-premises, mostly virtualized.

RicardoURQUIDI - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-12-14T00:35:00Z
Dec 14, 2021

We are primarily using it for services, such as cloud infrastructure services, for our business. We are working with a Town Council in Bolivia. We provide the environment for deployed applications, and we are using it for the private cloud, Linux server, and applications developed within the company. Mostly, we use version 7.0. We also have three servers with version 8.5. We are working with everything on-premise. We have a cloud, but most of the cloud is accessible from inside the company. It is not accessible from outside of the company.

Dinesh  Jaisankar - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Information Technology System Analyst at National center of meterology
Real User
Top 10
2021-09-05T14:09:00Z
Sep 5, 2021

It is used for our production system. We are running multiple web servers and multiple databases on RHEL operating system platform. We are also running some of our OpenShift containers on it. We have a lot of applications that are running on RHEL versions 5, 6, 7, and 8 in our environment, but the maximum number of applications are running on RHEL 7 and 8.

Bruce Young - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Systems Engineer at a university with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
2021-09-01T14:38:00Z
Sep 1, 2021

We use a combination of Red Hat and Oracle Linux in different parts of the organization. We have a cluster, where RHEL is running. The instances are both virtualized and real, depending on which part of the cluster you're utilizing. They are set up as either RAC or single instance, depending on what we are trying to achieve in terms of performance. We have PeopleSoft systems that are all deployed on Red Hat. We also use it for deploying simple websites. PostgreSQL is running on the systems, along with a frontend that was created by the developers. We also use it for DNS fallback authentication. We have quite a few Windows systems, as well, and some of the applications that we used to run on Linux have now been migrated to Windows. We have a mixed environment, although, in the cluster, our deployment is primarily on-premises. There are some deployments into different cloud providers, depending on the service that we're looking for. However, when we head into the cloud, we tend to go to Product as a Service rather than Infrastructure as a Service or the like. This means that we're less concerned about the underlying operating system and we try to avoid interacting with it as much as possible. So, it is just virtualization in this case.

Don Beyer - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Administrator at Ithaca College
Real User
Top 10
2021-08-18T14:55:00Z
Aug 18, 2021

Our primary use case for RHEL is running our front-end web servers. When you visit our site, all of the front-end servers are Red Hat. The databases that are hosted are Oracle and they predominantly sit on Red Hat 7. We're trying to migrate those to version 8. We also use it for BI. We have a digital footprint in Azure and AWS, as well as on-premises. Things for us are very fluid. We're always changing and adapting to our environment, based on what the needs of our faculty and students are.

CL
IT Manager at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-05-18T09:48:43Z
May 18, 2021

We are using it for application services.

LM
Analyste principal - AIX et Linux at a hospitality company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-02-09T15:01:00Z
Feb 9, 2021

It started mostly with websites and open source environments overall for development. Now, we are moving into business applications as we are migrating our ERP, which is a cp -r tree, to Linux. We are also migrating the database of SAP to SAP HANA on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. We use RHEL versions 7 and 8. There is a bit of version 6 still lying around, but we are working on eradicating that. It is mostly RHEL Standard subscriptions, but there are a few Premium subscriptions, depending on how critical the applications are.

Ifham Shahid - PeerSpot reviewer
Associate Engineer at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
2021-01-14T12:42:54Z
Jan 14, 2021

We deploy front-end and back-end software applications on RHEL, and it's our app server. Most of our app servers and our production servers are on RHEL. They're running on RHEL, and that's why they are profiting from it. I2C is the issuer in the processing payment industry. Basically, we do the issuer processing for credit cards, and all the bank magic that happens when you swipe a credit card is handled by us. We're also using RHEL servers for processing debit card payments.

FA
Linux Administrator at Cloudways
Consultant
Top 10
2020-12-21T11:04:57Z
Dec 21, 2020

I use it for running RAID servers, Database clusters, and a lot of other open-source tools. I have also used it as a firewall. We have on-premises dedicated servers located in some data centers. We also have cloud servers on the public cloud. I am currently using the latest version, and I have also worked on previous versions as well as Template.

Fredrik Lehtonen - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Analyst at Intraservice/City of G̦teborg
Real User
2020-05-27T16:23:00Z
May 27, 2020

We use it for * some of our websites * one of our main applications for the City of Gothenburg * automation * the underlying operating system for our GitLab server.

Related Questions
TN
User at Full Sail
Aug 10, 2022
Hi community members, What are some similarities that you see between recommendations in Windows 10 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux benchmarks?
See 2 answers
Thomas H Jones II - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Cloud Engineer at a consultancy with 51-200 employees
Aug 8, 2022
"Benchmarks" is an ambiguous term. Are you referring to security benchmarks or performance benchmarks? In either case, which specify type of benchmark are you looking for?
RicardoURQUIDI - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Aug 10, 2022
Doing any kind of benchmark between an OS developed exclusively for workstation (Windows10) and an OS developed mostly for Servers doesn’t make any sense.
Netanya Carmi - PeerSpot reviewer
Content Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
Dec 1, 2021
Why?
See 1 answer
Janet Staver - PeerSpot reviewer
Tech Blogger
Dec 1, 2021
Red Hat Enterprise Linux is fantastic. It is an inexpensive solution that has excellent security, performance, and stability, and also lots of features. I specifically like that the solution has features that simplify adoption for non-Linux users, which makes it easier for administrators too. RHEL also has good customer support. In addition, RHEL enables me to deploy current applications as well as emerging workloads across all virtualized hybrid cloud and multi-cloud environments, which I find to be very helpful. Besides the stability and reliability of the OS, it provides a great user experience. Moreso, the fact that it is open-source and leading the open-source market trends and technologies speaks for itself. Although RHEL has a lot to offer, sometimes it can be difficult during disaster recovery. But if you know that ahead of time, you can plan accordingly. And their documentation definitely has room for improvement. In the past I have used Centos. Generally it was good, but the reason why I switched was because it used to be very stable and now it is not. Its operating system used to be great but when the updates came out, something changed. Additionally, if you are new to using Centos, the initial setup is not that straightforward unless you have prior experience with Linux and know your way around. (In which case installation won’t be difficult.) I also found that CentOS didn’t scale as well as I expected it to. For my needs, I was also hoping it would have more options built into the wizard. Conclusion: Although CentOS is a very efficient product and is very powerful with a lot of capabilities, I would still recommend RHEL. On a scale of one to ten, I would rate RHEL an eight. As someone who has used other systems, I can say from experience that Red Hat is one of the best - specifically in terms of its ability and consistency of the operating system.
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