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IBM WebSphere Application Server OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

IBM WebSphere Application Server is #2 ranked solution in top Application Server tools and #4 ranked solution in top Application Infrastructure tools. PeerSpot users give IBM WebSphere Application Server an average rating of 7.8 out of 10. IBM WebSphere Application Server is most commonly compared to JBoss Enterprise Application Platform: IBM WebSphere Application Server vs JBoss Enterprise Application Platform. IBM WebSphere Application Server is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 72% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a financial services firm, accounting for 24% of all views.
IBM WebSphere Application Server Buyer's Guide

Download the IBM WebSphere Application Server Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: September 2022

What is IBM WebSphere Application Server?
IBM WebSphere Application Server provides a range of flexible, secure, Java EE 7 runtime environments available on premises or across any public, private or hybrid cloud.

IBM WebSphere Application Server was previously known as WebSphere Application Server.

IBM WebSphere Application Server Customers
TalkTalk, Property management group, E.SUN Bank, Ohio National Financial Services, Aviarc, Cincom Systems, FJA-US, D+H, Staples, Michigan Municipal League
IBM WebSphere Application Server Video

IBM WebSphere Application Server Pricing Advice

What users are saying about IBM WebSphere Application Server pricing:
  • "We used to pay about $100,000-$120,000 US or somewhere around there. That was a bit cost-prohibitive for us to continue."
  • "It is very expensive."
  • "My company is on a perpetual or permanent license agreement with IBM WebSphere Application Server. There's also a pay-per-use option, but customers rarely choose that option. Most of the customers are on the perpetual license deal that's all-inclusive. As the license cost is quite expensive, I'm rating it two out of five."
  • "It costs more than some of the others, but, you get what you pay for."
  • "When you purchase Maximo, you get WebSphere for free."
  • "The licensing policy is based on the PVU base."
  • "The price of IBM WebSphere Application Server could be less expensive and there is an annual license required for this solution."
  • IBM WebSphere Application Server Reviews

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    Head, Operations at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Top 10
    Bad documentation, does not scale well, and has a lot of complexities
    Pros and Cons
    • "It does integrate well with the Tivoli Federated Identity Management system."
    • "Based on the field and based on the build that was provided, we've noticed a lot of constraints in terms of the performance now."

    What is our primary use case?

    This solution is part of an enterprise web presence. It integrates well with the Tivoli Federated Identity Management system, which works as a single sign-on mechanism for other e-services that we have shared with other clients. They utilize some of our authentication engines and they provided access for their users back into their system, however, the presentation and the web presence for it comes on the WebSphere portal solution.

    What is most valuable?

    We've had so many challenges with the solution in the last two years that it's a bit difficult to find highlights.

    It does integrate well with the Tivoli Federated Identity Management system.

    What needs improvement?

    I'm not certain if the WebSphere solution was deployed by IBM. There are a lot of complexities in how the solution was actually built and deployed, which means troubleshooting on management for us is pretty difficult. 

    One of the biggest issues that we've had is there are certain features that we required that were hardcoded into the solution itself. When you manage them for making any architectural or solution changes, it becomes very difficult and near impossible to do. With respect to that, we tried to change the SSL certificate that would be in use, and because of how we tried to change the SSL certificate, we tried to change the DNS mover that it was pointing to.

    There were hardcoded elements in the solution that didn't make it very easy for us. At the end of the day, we just kind-of renewed whatever services that we had already ongoing with it, which was a duplicate payment with what we had from other sources. We couldn't take advantage of the shared resources that we had before. We now have to maintain it as an isolated instance.

    Based on the field and based on the build that was provided, we've noticed a lot of constraints in terms of the performance now.

    Due to GDPR and other issues, not everybody is able to utilize cloud services. That's something that people need to be aware of. The company needs to be clear on the business use case and how they need to maintain compliance with its policies and regulations. Some of the feature sets that we found a little lacking in this particular solution. By now they've probably changed the ability to embed and utilize the rich media content and web presence. 

    Our site is basically little image JPEGs, and that's it. We have low embedded video. We have low dynamic speech response for mobile viewing, we have low integration or extension for mobile apps. We have low integration as well as for dynamic content of bits from other sites. For some of our clients who wish to display information on our website, we actually have to lift the content, reform our tips, and recreate it into the content management engine.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We first did a deployment back in 2008. It was an enterprise deployment where we wanted to get modules for forms and themes and gateways, especially an SMS Gateway. We needed to have different services. The IBM WebSphere solution was the only one at the time that was able to provide a full suite solution. 

    We upgraded in 2014 and since then, we've kind of continued to utilize the service. In 2017 it became a bit cost-prohibitive for us to maintain all the different levels of support on it. We've just kind of been getting by with some third party support services and reactive support services.

    Buyer's Guide
    IBM WebSphere Application Server
    September 2022
    Learn what your peers think about IBM WebSphere Application Server. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
    635,987 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Since we've been monitoring it directly ourselves, we've found that there has been an increase in the number of failures. The failures result in deadlock processes that generate very little to no troubleshooting logs. A lot of time we find ourselves just really staffing services to get these solutions to market in our online space. Reviewing logs to get the root cause and drilling down into something more definitive so that we could enable resolutions that are more permanent, that has been absent, basically.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    When we exited the contracts, IBM did an audit of the solution and there were licensing entitlements that we had no information about. The products themselves could only run on specific servers of specific configurations, which we worked at up until the audit was done. 

    The scalability in terms of company full storage looks fine. What we've realized is that the DB2 disappears, as there is an amendment and build. Therefore the IBM DB2 database has been less than optimal as we've grown over the last two to three years. And we've started to see this as a little more of a challenge, in terms of the configuration for the build as well. It doesn't support the groups. The license entitlement rarely gives us a bare minimum for the capacity to process what we have now. So the scalability of the solution is very limited.

    The scalability for the solution was supposed to be for about 800,000 users. We just coming up on 100,000 and we're already seeing performance issues.

    We have roughly 100,000 users and the majority of them would be using the single sign-on service to access our client services. We have probably about 20 to 30 persons who deal with user administration and content of this onsite maintenance and management in terms of web posts, et cetera.

    The rest of them are really just users - either web browser users or users of the single sign-on.

    How are customer service and support?

    The documentation around the product is not very clear, even post-implementation. IBM just basically cut us off and whatever we had was what we had. They weren't going to offer us anything. If we found gaps in the configurations or the documents, and we asked for the other stored information, nothing was forthcoming. IBM was actually very dependent on a third-party provider. There were a few instances where IBM directly handled either an implementation or configuration aspects. A lot of it was actually passed on to a third-party provider, who was the person that we used to know. A very small fraction of the price was what we were paying to IBM, in fact.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    A Microsoft solution that was used between 2006 and 2008. I believe it was based on a SharePoint platform. It really utilized the IIS together with standard HTML features, et cetera. It looked good, however, it didn't have the expandability for the other service modules that we wanted to use at the time to expand to true competitors bid. The IBM solution would have been the most comprehensive in terms of meeting the technical requirements. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The first deployment took about 18 months. That was in 2008. The upgrade took roughly six months, however, there were certain features and there was specific stuff we wanted that was never implemented. For example, the authentication system. While it uses our randomly generated 16 digit username, we wanted to do an alias for that system and we couldn't. I don't know what was the reason, however, it just couldn't be done. We've had issues as well with the file sizes being very bloated of using Blogger instead of any other optimized file storage mechanism. When the IBM deployment was contracted it used to run very smoothly. What we recognize now is that we're not set up properly and we're finding a lot of intricate complexities that we don't believe were necessary.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We used to pay about $100,000-$120,000 US or somewhere around there. That was a bit cost-prohibitive for us to continue.

    You need to pay for both software licenses and software support, which was the IBM backline. There were two levels of support for software and software bots. We had hardware support, which was separate, and we had to proactively monitor service maintenance support as well.

    What other advice do I have?

    The solution that we have now, one of the challenges we have is with the WebSphere portal. The WebSphere application and WebSphere content management software are no longer IBM products. IBM would have sold it off to ETL back in 2018 or 2019. Maintaining that as a full end to end IBM solution has become very difficult. They basically have a hands-off approach now. Anybody who's using this needs to be aware of what is available to them by way of manufacturer support and then other support. The licensing entitlements for the product need to be very carefully understood. There are limitations to the hardware configuration that goes together with the implementation.

    The other thing is that we've recognized that there are few resources that have the experience and capability of monitoring this system. If you are going to deploy it, you should ensure that you either have strong and continued backline support with your vendors or third party managers or that your in-house team is well skilled in order to monitor and maintain everything and administer the system. If you can get to a point where the build, implementation, and commissioning could be done in house, that will give you a lot more visibility to all the different elements of the solution and how they integrate and interoperate so that it makes the management on troubleshooting a lot easier. 

    I'm biased due to my previous experiences. My experiences are really more influenced by the build and not necessarily the product as a standalone product. 

    I would rate the solution at a three out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PRINCEWILL OPARA - PeerSpot reviewer
    Head Banking Application Customization and Reporting at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Very stable, supports many languages, and helpful for faster time to market
    Pros and Cons
    • "As compared to other applications, it has tremendous support. We have built internal capability so that we use it extensively internally. It is also easier to use with the outside data. You can write in ESQL, Java, or any other technology that you want to use for development. So, it is a lot more flexible in the language that it supports."
    • "The business logic side of it is sort of missing in the sense that if I want to track and measure velocity, it is not really available. You have to buy another application and embark on a separate implementation. Instead of having different licensing, IBM DataPower should be integrated with WebSphere. It will allow us to build the business layer and rules a lot more efficiently, rather than developing rules within the application. It would be good if we can set up the business layer through parametrization rather than development. IBM DataPower has the business rule and the controls, and if it can be integrated, it would be fantastic. It will help the application in working better in terms of security features and business logic. If you're going to use it for open banking, you will be able to monitor velocity on the total pricing."

    What is our primary use case?

    There are two use case categories. We use it for integration with other parties or external parties across the world, and we also use it for internal applications. It has an enterprise service bus, and all applications talk to each other through IIB. We also using WebSphere for the exchange of messages between core banking applications and other applications and servers.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It has helped tremendously. Before we embarked on the enterprise service bus, we had to develop applications for integration with in-house and third-party applications. We had to develop an application and get a dedicated server. We also had to get the server within the firewall. There was no concrete policy around that, and it just was disorganized and disoriented. Now, we have a lot more structure. The time to market is a lot faster, and there is a structure around it.

    What is most valuable?

    As compared to other applications, it has tremendous support. We have built internal capability so that we use it extensively internally. It is also easier to use with the outside data. You can write in ESQL, Java, or any other technology that you want to use for development. So, it is a lot more flexible in the language that it supports.

    What needs improvement?

    It is very tough to get developers. It is not open, so there is a shortage of its knowledge in the industry. We have to get freshers and train them. We can't just go out there in the market and get developers who are proficient in IIB. I have attended several boot camps on AI and other products of IBM. Similar to what IBM is doing with big data and AI, IBM should open up IIB so that there is a lot more knowledge. They should open up the WebSphere application so that there is a lot more knowledge.

    The business logic side of it is sort of missing in the sense that if I want to track and measure velocity, it is not really available. You have to buy another application and embark on a separate implementation. Instead of having different licensing, IBM DataPower should be integrated with WebSphere. It will allow us to build the business layer and rules a lot more efficiently, rather than developing rules within the application. It would be good if we can set up the business layer through parametrization rather than development. IBM DataPower has the business rule and the controls, and if it can be integrated, it would be fantastic. It will help the application in working better in terms of security features and business logic. If you're going to use it for open banking, you will be able to monitor velocity on the total pricing.

    Its price is a bit expensive. They should improve its price to compete with other applications that are out there, which we are also exploring.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We've been using this solution for more than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It is very stable and very rugged.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    You can't reduce what you buy from there. You have to buy the whole product. It is highly scalable and extendable in terms of extending the feature developed to be used in other areas.

    We have two sets of users. We have the developers and the support people in different teams. There are approximately 12 developers in the Developer team. There is also a Support team with six or seven people. The support people are in the CTO organization, whereas, developers are in the forward-looking arm of our IT, which is the CIO organization. That's the way we are structured.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    They have partners who helped us with the initial installation, and we got technical support from them. The other one is the second level of support from IBM, which goes in line with their normal licensing framework. So, there is strong support from IBM.

    How was the initial setup?

    It is complex. It is not something that you can do on your own without recourse to IBM. You need access and all the support and help from IBM for this. We need consultants who are proficient and IBM partners to do the setup. When you get the license from IBM, they have the recommended partners in a country to set it up. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It is very expensive.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would advise others to have a very strong partner who understands IBM WebSphere very well. They should be mindful of the architecture that they're going to put in place for the IBM solution. You should ensure that load balancing and the architecture of the implementation are right. Otherwise, there could be issues. Having a stronger partner for handling implementation makes life a lot easier and more meaningful.

    I would rate IBM WebSphere Application Server an eight out of 10.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    IBM WebSphere Application Server
    September 2022
    Learn what your peers think about IBM WebSphere Application Server. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
    635,987 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Nicolae Chirea - PeerSpot reviewer
    System and Solutions Architect at Seidor
    Real User
    Top 20
    Stable, resilient, has good availability, and offers excellent technical support
    Pros and Cons
    • "What's most valuable in IBM WebSphere Application Server is its resilience. When you use the solution, you know that after the communication has been done, there will be no doubt that the data has reached its destination."
    • "What could be improved in IBM WebSphere Application Server is its interconnection with other products, for example, Kafka. What I'd like to see in the next release of the solution is a better graphical user interface."

    What is our primary use case?

    IBM WebSphere Application Server ensures that there's communication between applications from the customer side to the banks, markets, insurance companies, and even the retail industry.

    What is most valuable?

    What's most valuable in IBM WebSphere Application Server is its resilience. When you use the solution, you know that after the communication has been done, there will be no doubt that the data has reached its destination.

    What needs improvement?

    What could be improved in IBM WebSphere Application Server is its interconnection with other products, for example, Kafka.

    What I'd like to see in the next release of the solution is a better graphical user interface.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    In terms of stability, my rating for IBM WebSphere Application Server is five out of five.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    IBM WebSphere Application Server is a scalable solution, but because it's a little bit more complex to configure, I'm giving the solution four out of five in terms of scalability.

    How are customer service and support?

    The technical support for IBM WebSphere Application Server is a five out of five for me. The support is excellent.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup for IBM WebSphere Application Server is in the middle, meaning that it's not complicated, but you'll need some knowledge.

    Normally, one person is enough from my side to deploy the solution, then another person from the customer side.

    How long the full deployment of the IBM WebSphere Application Server takes would depend on various factors because it lies in the communication between the customer and the destination, so the solution is usually easy to deploy, but it could take days. Deployment is not difficult, but a common problem would be personnel availability or the person available to do the configuration.

    What was our ROI?

    In terms of ROI from IBM WebSphere Application Server, it's quite high, so I'm rating it as four out of five.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    My company is on a perpetual or permanent license agreement with IBM WebSphere Application Server. There's also a pay-per-use option, but customers rarely choose that option. Most of the customers are on the perpetual license deal that's all-inclusive.

    As the license cost is quite expensive, I'm rating it two out of five.

    What other advice do I have?

    My company is an IBM business partner. It provides IBM WebSphere Application Server to customers.

    I'm working on the latest version of the solution, which is version 9.3.

    My team is responsible for educating customers about IBM WebSphere Application Server and for the documentation, but maintaining the solution is the responsibility of the customers.

    I'd rate IBM WebSphere Application Server nine out of ten because it's a great product.

    My advice to people looking into IBM WebSphere Application Server is to go for it. If you want a product you can have confidence in, and a product with good availability, then IBM WebSphere Application Server is for you. It's deserving of its price because it's a good product, so even if IBM WebSphere Application Server is expensive, use it.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Enterprise Technical Leader at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
    Consultant
    Top 5
    Enterprise-level product with extensive console capabilities, including the ability to control multiple JVM containers
    Pros and Cons
    • "The thing about WebSphere, as opposed to other ones that I am aware of such as JBoss and Liberty, is that WebSphere has the most comprehensive scaffolding available to it."
    • "When we run into memory or locking issues, we resort to using third-party tools. However, it would be preferable to have native tools for debugging this type of problem."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use a generic WAS. 

    We have WAS, which we basically use for JVM containers for services and REST APIs. We have some portal servers, and it is also used to host Pega. So it serves three primary functions.

    It's an application server in general.

    What is most valuable?

    The thing about WebSphere, as opposed to other ones that I am aware of such as JBoss and Liberty, is that WebSphere has the most comprehensive scaffolding available to it.

    A lot of JVM container products provide you with a raw JVM container and don't offer much else. However, WebSphere has the PRPC, which has extensive console capabilities, including the ability to control multiple JVM containers and the deployment. It's an enterprise-level product.

    WAS is not what I would want if I were a small shop with two or three WAS servers or app servers. However, if I had 4,000 servers and wanted to install JVMs on them, WAS is a viable option. In my opinion, its strength is its enterprise capability.

    What needs improvement?

    One of the things that we have struggled with is understanding what's happening inside the covers when we're running a JVM. 

    When we run into memory or locking issues, we resort to using third-party tools. However, it would be preferable to have native tools for debugging this type of problem.

    It's not bad lately in terms of performance. WebSphere has always had some performance issues, at least until about three or four years ago. But it's getting better. I guess, aside from the product's complexity, I think it's pretty good for what it's billed as an enterprise application server.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've spent the majority of my career working with IBM. Back in the late 1990s, I was working on WebSphere 3.0. So, for the last 25 years, I've been working on WebSphere on and off, or at the very least, the application service.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It costs more than some of the others, but, you get what you pay for. 

    Much like TWS, IBM, the way they price their products is known as sub-cap pricing. It can be very complicated and intimidating for people who don't understand the concepts. 

    I would like to see IBM simplify its licensing models.

    What other advice do I have?

    Its best platform, in my opinion, is AIX on Power. Unfortunately, AIX on Power is being phased out. However, if you have a Power VM/AIX shop and are committed to Power and AIX, WAS is the app server of choice.

    If you're considering ESXi or a hyper-converged solution, WAS works just as well on those platforms, the more cloud platforms.

    For the space that it plays best in, I would rate IBM WebSphere Application Server a nine out of ten.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Maximo - Technical Consultant/Architect/Analyst at a government with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Interchangeable, good performance, and is reliable
    Pros and Cons
    • "The performance is good."
    • "When compared with WebLogic, Weblogic is lighter and consumes less memory."

    What is our primary use case?

    I am always working. I am working with WebLogic and WebSphere. Some things are running on WebLogic and others on WebSphere. I use both.

    It is deployed on-premise, and I am able to do everything they are doing on the cloud.

    What is most valuable?

    I would not compare WebSphere and WebLogic because both servers are really good.

    However, once you have set up both of them, they work perfectly.

    There are always bugs, such as the recent bug with log4j, but they're both good web servers. I can make use of either one, it makes no difference. It's just a different setting, but I'd say the quality is the same.

    I am satisfied with this solution, as well as WebLogic. Both are good.

    The performance is good.

    What needs improvement?

    I don't think about what needs improvement, I work with what I have.

    There is always room for improvement. But it's getting better every time, with every new release, and every new patch, it's getting better. They are continuously improving.

    When compared with WebLogic, Weblogic is lighter and consumes less memory.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    IBM WebSphere Application Server is a stable solution.

    How are customer service and support?

    I usually solve my problems on my own. I Google it. I do the research, find out what other people are having problems with, otherwise look to Oracle for solutions to some of them. I was always able to Google it and find the solution.

    I have never had to contact Oracle or IBM for support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have worked with WebLogic, Apache Server, and SAP NetWeaver in the past. I've had a lot of experience.

    How was the initial setup?

    I set up everything. you just need the hardware, and I do everything else. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    When you purchase Maximo, you get WebSphere for free. Why would you pay more for WebLogic?

    What other advice do I have?

    I would recommend using whichever is cheaper. Both are interchangeable, and I don't see a difference in their performance.

    I would rate IBM WebSphere Application Server a nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Yapı Kredi şirketinde Application Infrastructure Manager at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    A stable and robust solution which can be scaled with ease
    Pros and Cons
    • "The solution is very stable and robust."
    • "In spite of the solution's robustness, it is expensive and a bit difficult to support."

    What is most valuable?

    The solution is very stable and robust. 

    Management is very easy in the Network Deployment edition. The admin console allows one to easily manage many servers. 

    What needs improvement?

    In spite of the solution's robustness, it is expensive and a bit difficult to support, which is why companies nowadays tend to use more lightweight products such as Tomcat or cloud versions of the products. We are also moving to cloud versions and have a huge installation of IBM WebSphere as a legacy system. Probably, in two or three years we will migrate to cloud versions.

    The initial setup is a bit complex, although easy management is possible once one has set up the environment. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have been using IBM WebSphere Application Server since its inception, starting from versions 4 and 5. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable and robust.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    This solution can be scaled with ease, as evidenced by our use of it with the IBM operating system. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is a bit complex, although management can be accomplished with ease once the initial environment has been set up. 

    What about the implementation team?

    There are two IBM consultants who help us with the deployment. They are constantly with us. 

    Our middleware team consists of 12 people who are responsible for the deployment. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The solution is expensive. 

    We have 80,000 PVU, as this is referred to by IBM. The licensing policy is based on the PVU base. The initial setup and purchase cost approximately $4 and $5 million. The yearly support cost accounts for around 20 percent of the licensing cost, which means that we tend to pay IBM an annual sum of $800,000, which is a huge amount. 

    What other advice do I have?

    We are also customers of the product. 

    In our organization we use the WebSphere Network Deployment edition.

    We use this product in our core, internet and mobile banking, which means it is used by 20 bank tellers and eight million customers. 

    I rate IBM WebSphere Application Server as an eight out of ten. 

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Senior Business Development Manager at SL Information System Sdn Bhd
    Reseller
    A scalable and stable solution, but it's declining in popularity
    Pros and Cons
    • "One of the most valuable features might be the stability of the IBM WebSphere Application Server."
    • "The current trend is to move to Liberty because of the portability of its cloud and its Kubernetes, which containerize the application."

    What is our primary use case?

    We sell IBM WebSphere licenses and provide core installation of WebSphere for our customers.

    What is most valuable?

    One of the most valuable features might be the stability of the IBM WebSphere Application Server.

    What needs improvement?

    Most of my clients are quite happy with the WebSphere application, but I know that some are changing direction and the current trend is to move to Liberty because of the portability of its cloud and its Kubernetes, which containerize the application. Since most of the application vendors our customers use also offer the application on Liberty, I think they're probably going to stop enhancing the WebSphere Application Server and instead concentrate on Liberty.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been working with this solution for the past ten to fifteen years. My company has been an IBM business partner since 1986.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    IBM WebSphere is a stable solution.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I believe if customers want scalability, they can upgrade their WAS standard edition to the next deployment level, so it is scalable.

    How are customer service and support?

    I would rate the technical support as a eight out of ten because the support could be a bit more responsive. 

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    What other advice do I have?

    I would definitely recommend this solution to users, but there is always room for improvement. 

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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    PeerSpot user
    Viktor Dolyna - PeerSpot reviewer
    DevOps Engineer at Integrity
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Stable, good performance, and responsive technical support

    What is our primary use case?

    We use IBM WebSphere Application Server in the financial industry for applications.

    What is most valuable?

    The solution has good performance.

    What needs improvement?

    The solution could improve the integration.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using BM WebSphere Application Server for a few years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I have found the solution to be scalable.

    We have approximately 1,000 users using this solution in my organization.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The technical support from IBM is very good and responsive.

    How was the initial setup?

    The installation is not straightforward and it can take three days.

    What about the implementation team?

    We use approximately four technicians for the implementation and maintenance of the solution.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The price of IBM WebSphere Application Server could be less expensive and there is an annual license required for this solution.

    What other advice do I have?

    I recommend this solution to others.

    I rate BM WebSphere Application Server an eight out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Integrator
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free IBM WebSphere Application Server Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
    Updated: September 2022
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free IBM WebSphere Application Server Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.