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Buyer's Guide
Rack Servers
June 2022
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Field Solution Architect at a financial services firm with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Very scalable, delivers on promises, and offers good terms
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution delivers what it promises. You look at the specs and it delivers them."
  • "Until they get new technology and density, it would be nice to see four nodes in a one-year package instead of a three-year package."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily used the solution for the servers. It's a node among many in a multiprocessor, supercomputer environment. It's a very verified application. The customer uses a lesser file system, which means that one file system is shared among the entire installation. You're not going to see that very often in your career unless you're in that business. It's a multi-node, high-performance computing file system. It's Linux based.

What is most valuable?

It fit the requirements of the client, that's really all that it was for us. It could deliver the IOPS and the local storage that was required. It could have been anybody else, Lenovo, IBM, HP, etc. We were Dell's number one reseller in Canada and probably worldwide. We got very favorable terms and that also helped with the decision.

What needs improvement?

The only way you could improve it is, for the purpose of HPC installations, is IOPS and the only way to improve it is to get a more powerful machine to deliver more IOPS. Basically, you need more CPUs and you need more RAM and you need a faster backbone. We were running on 100 gigabits Infiniband.

Until they get new technology and density, it would be nice to see four nodes in a one-year package instead of a three-year package.

For how long have I used the solution?

I'm recently retired, however, I did work with the solution on one of my last projects which lasted a few months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution delivers what it promises. You look at the specs and it delivers them. If it doesn't deliver you move onto another model.

There's really nothing special about it, and Dell doesn't make servers that are any better than anybody else's. The prime reason we chose it is that it delivers what it promises to deliver in terms of IOPS and the price right for us because when you're a platinum level reseller for a server company, they will give you very favorable terms especially in this time of a pandemic, hardware sales are down across the board for the entire industry.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's very scalable. That's the whole idea. When you want to add more computation power to the platform you just throw in another act of compute nodes and storage.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've never used technical support. Out-of-the-box it works, and if it doesn't, then the client deals with it directly. The equipment is sold to them so they own the serial numbers and they own the service contracts, so if anything went wrong during the installation the client would take care of them, not us.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We've worked with HP, Cisco, Lenovo, and IBM in the past. We always choose the solution that makes the most sense for our clients.

How was the initial setup?

We handed over the complete installation in September. We started in August. It takes time. You're coming into an empty room. You have to have power, you need the AC for the equipment there that has to be moved out. It takes time. The racks were pre-populated in Toronto and shipped to Montreal, and then in Montreal, they were set up and powered. We had liquid cooling and radiators on the rear of the cabinet for the heat.

We've done many of these installations, and it's pretty routine. There's nothing complex about it. The complexity is mostly that there are so many key parts in terms of getting it delivered on-site. There are so many parts from so many different vendors and there are penalties if you don't deliver on time. Nobody wants to pay penalties.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I didn't deal with the pricing, and therefore don't know the exact costs. 

However, they would compete with pricing on the market. Even if HP made an equivalent platform, and they do, we wouldn't get good terms. They're all pretty well in the ballpark range in cost and the variation. The list price might be 10%. They know what the competition is doing so they don't want to price themselves, the values, off the list of potential. If I'm looking at servers that deliver so much IOPS and they price themselves out, HP knows what Dell is doing and Dell knows what HP is doing.

What other advice do I have?

My company partners with Dell.

I'm recently retired, however, I did most of the infrastructure, backup storage, and high-performance computing. I was in pre-sales. I was a solution architect. Therefore, I'm not an end-user.

We only used Dell for the servers. We used Seagate for storage. They have hard drives. They've been in the hard drive business for 40 years.

My biggest piece of advice for those considering the solution is to make sure they are delivered on time. When clients are spending $50 million for an installation and you say it's going to be ready September 15th, it better be ready September 15th. One of the main reasons stuff's not ready is because parts are missing. That means you can't deliver a complete solution. If you're missing a box of spare hard drives, they're just spares, they're not preventing the installation, however, they're missing, and therefore you haven't delivered the product.

Overall, I'd rate the product ten out of ten.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
DaraAzartash - PeerSpot reviewer
System Administrator at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
Robust, easy to use, and user friendly
Pros and Cons
  • "The robustness of the design of the server is the most valuable. HP servers are easy to use and user-friendly. The server is not complicated, and it is easy to use ILO systems."
  • "In DL 500 systems, the flow of air is not good enough, and some components get overheated. IBM systems have better airflow and scalability. We have a data center that has limited physical space. Therefore, we need to maximize the processing or compute systems that we use. In HP servers, such as DL 500, there are only four processors, whereas IBM servers, such as SR 916, have eight processors. We don't get any support from HP because of our geographical location. We solve all problems ourselves by doing research on the internet. It would be good to get HP support."

What is most valuable?

The robustness of the design of the server is the most valuable. HP servers are easy to use and user-friendly. The server is not complicated, and it is easy to use ILO systems.

What needs improvement?

In DL 500 systems, the flow of air is not good enough, and some components get overheated. IBM systems have better airflow and scalability. 

We have a data center that has limited physical space. Therefore, we need to maximize the processing or compute systems that we use. In HP servers, such as DL 500, there are only four processors, whereas IBM servers, such as SR 916, have eight processors.

We don't get any support from HP because of our geographical location. We solve all problems ourselves by doing research on the internet. It would be good to get HP support.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using HP products for six or seven years. We use HP Proliant DL 300 family and DL 500 family and blade servers like Enclosure C7000.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It works fine for general use or specific use of most enterprises, but for mission-critical servers, I don't think it is the best fit.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

IBM systems have better scalability.

In our company, we have about 4,000 users. We also have a lot of outside users.

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't had any technical support yet because our country is not in the technical support area.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We have been using HP products from the beginning.

How was the initial setup?

In the latest versions, such as G9 or G10, we have a very user-friendly installation. It took about 30 minutes to 1 hour. RAID is easy to install, and so is the server, but in earlier products or versions, it was somehow challenging. 

What about the implementation team?

I deployed it myself. We have about six persons for the deployment and maintenance of the servers. They are system administrators for physical servers. For virtual environments, we have different teams to administer the use of our environment.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have ILO licenses. We use this feature.

What other advice do I have?

HPE ProLiant DL Servers are easy to use and suitable for mid-range users. HP has other products for enterprise users. I don't compare them with this family. We had the physical servers for all services, but now we are migrating to virtual servers using VMware.

I would rate HPE ProLiant DL Servers an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Head of IT at Sonali Intellect
Real User
Offers flexible licensing when designing the architecture
Pros and Cons
  • "The processor is very helpful and the licensing is very flexible."
  • "They need some sort of modeling because IBM has different types of models."

What is our primary use case?

In India, we have a development center for implementation. I am in the FinTech industry. We have a large amount of customers that have implemented SPARC.

What is most valuable?

The processor is very helpful and the licensing is very flexible.

What needs improvement?

There is a huge difference between the M Series and the T Series. They need some sort of modeling because IBM has different types of models.

If I'm calculating the M Series, there is a large amount of core. The T Series has less, but there is no actual model we can fix up. When we actually require some support, we are going for the logical partitioning for two. At that point, when you are calculating processing power and memory, IBM offers more choices, whereas it's actually very difficult for Oracle.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been working with Oracle for more than 12 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's stable and runs smoothly.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's scalable.

How are customer service and support?

Technical support could be improved.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I also have experience with IBM.

How was the initial setup?

Compared to IBM, setup is much simpler.

What about the implementation team?

We worked with a third-party integrator.

What was our ROI?

We have seen ROI. The ROI is better than IBM.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The licensing is flexible.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate this solution 9 out of 10.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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Buyer's Guide
Rack Servers
June 2022
Get our free report covering Dell Technologies, Intel, Oracle, and other competitors of IBM Power Systems. Updated: June 2022.
609,272 professionals have used our research since 2012.