Ruckus Wireless OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Ruckus Wireless is the #4 ranked solution in top Wireless LAN tools. PeerSpot users give Ruckus Wireless an average rating of 8.6 out of 10. Ruckus Wireless is most commonly compared to Aruba Wireless: Ruckus Wireless vs Aruba Wireless. Ruckus Wireless is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 49% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a comms service provider, accounting for 17% of all views.
Ruckus Wireless Buyer's Guide

Download the Ruckus Wireless Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2022

What is Ruckus Wireless?

Ruckus Wireless is part of Ruckus Networks/Commscope and provides reliable wireless network solutions and services to large venues, schools, hotels, hospitals, malls, and public spaces (and more) worldwide.

Wireless access is an integral necessary part of today’s modern, fast-paced lifestyle. It is essential that dependable, safe wireless capabilities be available in most of today’s largely populated public spaces. Ruckus Wireless is the trusted industry leader in assisting organizations of all sizes to provide wireless access throughout their locations, both inside their physical structures and adjacent open outdoor areas.

Ruckus Wireless empowers users to design and create a wireless network across their organizational space to ensure that wireless coverage is available consistently to anyone who needs it. Ruckus can handle anything from homes and small to medium-sized businesses to hospitals, college campuses, airports, malls, stadiums and more. Ruckus also has excellent options for outdoor wireless networks. Many users choose Ruckus Wireless for broad extensive outdoor use. The solution offers excellent durable outdoor access points and a very robust, super fast, reliable Wi-Fi. Each and every access point is very powerful, and the outdoor access points can be very easily disguised to keep the network secure.

Another strong point is that Ruckus technology is based on frequencies. If there is ever any type of wireless interference, Ruckus Wireless can change frequency automatically so there are never any interruptions. Users also have the option to block outside access points and signals that may interfere with their network and make their network the only one that people can see within the network. Users can additionally whitelist certain networks if desired.

Ruckus uses the latest next-gen Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi 6, ensuring that more devices can be handled with greater speed and continuity. With Ruckus, users have great control over network traffic. They can also allocate the amount of bandwidth network users are granted based on their status - eg., guest, corporate, etc. - and give users priority on the network based on their status. Ruckus also has mesh and beamforming capabilities, which are recognized as a valued feature for many users.

Ruckus Wireless is robust, extremely reliable, very easy to deploy, and offers amazing coverage and rock solid connectivity. It is very easy to add additional access points across the network. Ruckus Wireless is very easy to use and manage using an app on any mobile device.

Reviews from Real Users

A Director Engineering & New Business at a comms service provider says Ruckus “provides superior coverage and is very dependable”

Sintayehu A., Director Of Information Communication Technology at Dire Dawa University, relates that "Ruckus Wireless supports the most recent technologies. We can trace every individual and what kind of traffic they're using on our campus. It is very helpful."

Philip S., Independent Consultant - Wireless, says, "The solution is very stable. I've worked with it at a hospital before, where we deployed it all over the hospital. It worked everywhere and continuously worked flawlessly."

Ruckus Wireless Customers

American University of Sharjah, Baruch College, Centro Escolar Liceo Santo Tomšs, Chevalier College, Chico Unified School District, Colegio de Fomento El Prado, Columbia Public Schools, Delta School District, Dordt College, Douglas County School District, Drew University, Armonea, Central Utah Clinic, Grove Hill Medical Center, Inner South Community Health Service, Midwest Surgical, Satilla Regional Medical Center, Lyndoch Living, Polonus, Roaring Fork School District, Sonora State, Vivid, Sydney, Players Club, Sandals, Scandic Hotels, Sheraton LAX, Sunbird

Ruckus Wireless Video

Ruckus Wireless Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Ruckus Wireless pricing:
  • "It is decently priced."
  • "This is a very expensive solution."
  • "With Ubiquiti, there's no annual cost to keep the software upgraded, whereas with Ruckus, you have to pay an annual fee or three-year fee. That makes it a little more pricey."
  • Ruckus Wireless Reviews

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    Tim Brumbaugh - PeerSpot reviewer
    Solutions Architect at Golden West Technologies
    Real User
    Top 5
    Great performance, easy to set up and simple to configure
    Pros and Cons
    • "The product has some very awesome patents on their radios and their antennas and antenna patterns and how their signaling works. That's why nobody can touch them. If they go head to head with anybody."
    • "The cost could be slightly improved. It's not on the low end, and it's not in the high end. It's in that middle area, which can be a deciding factor between someone going with this solution versus another one."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for its performance, compatibility, and general capabilities. We do a lot of schools, colleges, large civic centers, large arenas, etc. That kind of stuff. We know how to deploy this so that the clients get great client connectivity.

    How has it helped my organization?

    In terms of COVID, we've deployed external access points to the outside of a lot of the buildings. These are very weather-resistant, all-metal enclosures. The students have been able to do assignments and schoolwork and that kind of stuff from the parking lots of the schools. They can drive up in their car, get their assignments, or do work that they need to while they're connected to the school. It made social distancing in this way pretty seamless as everything was already set up on their laptops. Most of the schools are what they call the one-to-one initiative, where every student gets a laptop and they've been able to work through COVID from their cars in parking lots when they needed to be at the school for something. It's really benefited a lot of the schools to be able to do that.

    What is most valuable?

    The performance of the product is amazing.

    The ease of configuration that's on offer is very good.

    The product is very compatible with other solutions.

    The guest onboarding is so simple. We can onboard guests really easily. Each guest that connects has a pre-shared key that they get which are all unique. We have some great control over the guest and corporate traffic. We can control how much bandwidth a guest user gets versus a corporate user, and who gets priority on there. 

    Ruckus is way ahead of the game on a lot of stuff like Wi-Fi 6. They're already rolling out the second version of Wi-Fi 6, which is a huge improvement over even Wi-Fi 5. The way wireless started is you had 802.11b, 802.11a, then 802.11g and 802.11n, then 802.11ac, then AC wave to 802.11ax which is the first version of Wi-Fi 6. The next version of Wi-Fi 6 is rolling out already.

    The product has some very awesome patents on their radios and their antennas and antenna patterns and how their signaling works. That's why nobody can touch them. If they go head to head with anybody. They blow Cisco and Aruba out of the water and even Mist for radio plant connectivity. On top of that, they have very good engineering. If I ever need help with engineering stuff, I can call on them. The company does a really good job, which is why we've stayed with them.

    What needs improvement?

    They're leaders in what they're doing. I don't know what they can do to improve what they're doing currently. 

    The cost could be slightly improved. It's not on the low end, and it's not in the high end. It's in that middle area, which can be a deciding factor between someone going with this solution versus another one.

    They've got a rotation or a life expectancy of about four years for the radio. Not that radio is going to die right hten. I've got some that are way older than that, that the customers are still using. However, they take them and they end the life of them at four years. Any of their wireless products are end of life by year four. Most of it's because technology has changed so much that those old videos can't do stuff that is now available for PCs to connect or phones to connect to that kind of stuff. 

    What they do is they force you into a Cloud controller. We've got a couple of them. If I've got a Cloud controller there and it's on version 5.1, and I want to go to version 5.2, bdue to the fact that I need to support the new radios coming out, I can't if I have some older radios on that controller. I can't upgrade that controller to the latest software to support the new radios as I've got some end of life radios on there that go into life when I upgrade the software. They need to be able to allow us to keep some of the older products on the Cloud controllers or any of their controllers longer, and just start supporting the new controllers. They force you into an upgrade unnecessarily.

    We have some customers that have just a few APs. There are some small businesses that don't want to, or don't need to upgrade their controllers and they're crushing their access points. For us to be able to work with the latest access points, we've got to upgrade our controller, however, we can't. That bites us every year. We'll have customers that have APs that are going end of life that still work fine, but we can't manage them anymore.

    I know the reasoning behind it is it could be security features or it's something that the access points don't support that newer devices do. They'll support this new Wi-Fi 6 coming out, however, I can't run the same types of radios on this particular controller software anymore. That kind of puts me off a little bit, however, that's the only thing that the company has done that's made me mad.

    Buyer's Guide
    Ruckus Wireless
    November 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Ruckus Wireless. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
    655,994 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for the past six years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability of the product is rock solid. We haven't had any issues at all.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is extremely scalable. I can have up to three controllers with each one housing 10,000 APS. I can have a cluster of controllers controlling 30,000 different APS. I don't have anything that big. One is close to a thousand and that's the biggest I have. Still, it's nice to be able to build in more redundancy. 

    How are customer service and support?

    As a Ruckus partner, I've got access to Ruckus. I've got access to tech support, and it makes things a lot easier for the end-users and businesses I work with. If they have an issue, they can come directly to me or they can go directly to Ruckus, it doesn't matter. I'll be happy to help them. If I can't answer the question or get them fixed, then we'll get with tech support. I don't call tech support very often. Maybe once a year, if that. They make a good product and offer good training. Once you learn it, it's pretty easy to manage. 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used to have Cisco's products for one or two years. I don't know the last time I had to turn in an RMA for a Ruckus radio. They're a solid product.

    How was the initial setup?

    I've been doing implementations for a long time. If it's brand new to the system, like any system, it can be fairly complex. However, they have great documentation on their website on how to set it up. If a client needs complexity, however, they need help. That's where I come in.

    I can go in and configure things securely for guest access and BYOB devices and corporate laptops with 802.1X. I have a stand-alone AP, I just got one office with one AP. I don't need it to be controlled by anything. If I've got one or two SSID, it can still be configured. It's just that you're doing it on the AP or, alternatively, they have what's called Unleashed, which is controller-less. The AP is the controller that can do up to 50 APs all controlled by one AP. If that AP was to die, it doesn't matter, that configuration is saved on all of them. 

    There are several different interfaces you may run into, to be able to configure everything. However, they're all very similar in how they work and react. The full controller has much more capability than Unleashed and at least has more capability on the stand-alone. In any case, it's all well documented, and all straightforward.

    In terms of deployment times, we figure for AP it's an hour and a half, so you can just figure in that as the base amount of time you need for each AP and that includes configuration and installation. Therefore, if you have 20 APs, it's about 30 hours for 25 APs and that's setting up the controller virtual, or Cloud-based, setting up the AP, the SSIDs, passwords, 802.1X., and then physically mounting them.

    What was our ROI?

    The solution definitely offers my clients a good ROI after they implement it.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    They don't really need to be cheaper. They're not the most expensive, and they're not the least expensive. They're right there in the middle.

    What other advice do I have?

    We're a reseller as well as a customer.

    We're running the latest software. We deploy through a controller and we use 802.1X. There're multiple ways to deploy to customers. There's a cloud controller, for example. We typically do a virtual controller on their systems.

    If a company is new to Ruckus, it's best to work with a partner. You need somebody that knows what they're doing, and knows what questions to ask so that you're getting the right information. When I go to do an implementation, I've got a list of 50 different questions. I'll ask somebody, what about this? What about this? What about this? It will help with the implementation process if someone has a complete view of what to ask for and what to do.

    You get what you pay for. People will throw in Linksys, and this other stuff. If you're a business, say you're a coffee shop and you have 50 customers sitting there. You want all of them to get the same performance all the time. I want to make sure everybody gets an equal amount of time without anybody getting any interruptions.

    With Linksys and Ubiquiti and all these other brands, you don't get that. When it comes to the head-to-head competition, the Ruckus far out-shines them. Ten to one, you just can't compete. When they say it's going to do something, it does it. They don't put documentation out that is misleading. If it says it'll do 1,024 clients it'll do 1,024 clients. If it says it'll do 4.3 gigabytes, it'll do 4.3 gigabytes. It's great.

    Overall, I would rate the solution at a nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Tim Brumbaugh - PeerSpot reviewer
    Solutions Architect at Golden West Technologies
    Real User
    Top 5
    Easy configuration with a good performance and good scalability
    Pros and Cons
    • "The solution has an easy configuration."
    • "They need to be able to allow us to keep some of the older products on our cloud controllers or any of their controllers longer and just start supporting the new controllers. They force you into an upgrade unnecessarily."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for its performance, compatibility, and capability.

    We do a lot of schools, some colleges, large civic centers, large arenas, that kind of stuff. We know how to deploy this so that they get great client connectivity and have easy guest onboarding. We can onboard guests really easily. Each guest that connects has a pre-shared key that they get. They're all unique. We have some great control over guest traffic, and great control over say, corporate traffic. We control how much bandwidth a guest user gets versus a corporate user, and who gets priority on the network.

    How has it helped my organization?

    When COVID happened, we deployed external access points to the outside of a lot of the buildings that are very weather-resistant, all-metal enclosures, and their students have been able to do assignments and schoolwork and that kind of stuff from the parking lots of the schools. They can drive up in their car, get their assignments, or do work that they need to while they're connected to the school. It made it pretty seamless as everything was already set up on their laptops. Most of the schools are what they call the one-to-one initiatives, where every student gets a laptop. They've been able to work through COVID from their cars in parking lots when they need to be at the school for something. It's really benefited a lot of the schools to be able to do that.

    What is most valuable?

    The solution has an easy configuration.

    The performance is good.

    Ruckus is way ahead of the game on a lot of stuff, like Wi-Fi 6. They're already rolling out their second version of Wi-Fi 6 which is a huge improvement over even Wi-Fi 5. The way wireless started is you had 802.11b, 802.11a, then 802.11g and 802.11n, then 802.11ac, then AC wave 2, 802.11ax, which is Wi-Fi 6, the first version. Now, the next version of Wi-Fi 6 is rolling out already.

    These guys are an engineering company that has some very awesome patterns on how their radios work and their antennas and antenna patterns, and how their signaling and stuff works. That's why nobody can touch them. If they go head-to-head with anybody, they blow Cisco and Aruba out of the water, and Mist, for radio client connectivity. 

    They compete head-to-head with all the big names.

    What needs improvement?

    As far as what they can improve, that's a good question, as they're leaders in what they do in my opinion. I don't know what they can do to improve what they're doing currently. 

    They're not the most expensive, and they're not the least expensive. They're right there in the middle. Pricing might be a deciding factor for some companies. If they were cheaper, they might land more customers.

    They've got a rotation or a life expectancy of about four years for the radio. Not that the radio is going to die. I've got some that are way older than that that the customers are still using. However, they take them and they end the life of them at four years.

    Many of their wireless products are end of life by year four. That's most of it as technology has changed so much that those old radios can't do stuff that is now available for PCs to connect or phones to connect to, etc. What they do is they force you into upgrading. We've got a couple of cloud controllers. If I've got a cloud controller that is in the same version 5.1, and I want to go to version 5.2, due to the fact that I need to support the new radios coming out, I can't if I have some older radios on that controller. They make it so I can't upgrade that controller to the latest software to support the new radios as I've got some end of life radios on there that go end of life when I upgrade the software.

    They need to be able to allow us to keep some of the older products on our cloud controllers or any of their controllers longer and just start supporting the new controllers. They force you into an upgrade unnecessarily. We have some customers that have just a few APs, small businesses that don't want to or don't need to upgrade their controllers. For us to be able to work with their latest access points, we've got to upgrade their controller, but we can't as it's got some older ones on it, and that bites us every year.

    I know the reasoning behind it. It's because it could be security features or it's something that the access points don't support that newer devices do, like your laptops and cell phones. They'll support this new Wi-Fi 6 coming out, yet I can't run the same types of radios on this particular controller software anymore. They can't have both. That kind of puts me off a little bit. But that's the only thing that the company's done that's made me mad.

    There's a lot of new features coming out of Wi-Fi 6 that they don't even have the chips in the phones for yet. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for six years or so at this point.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable. We don't have any issues with it at all.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is very scalable. I can have up to three controllers, each one housing 10,000 APs. Therefore, I can have a cluster of controllers controlling 30,000 different APs. I don't have anything that big. The closest one is close to 1000, however, still, it's nice to be able to have redundancy. I can build in more redundancy if I need to. 

    How are customer service and technical support?

    As a Ruckus partner, I've got access to Ruckus. I've got access to tech support and it makes things a lot easier for our end-users and the businesses that I work with. If they have an issue they can come directly to me, or they can go directly to Ruckus. It doesn't matter. I'll be happy to help them. If I can't answer the question or get them fixed, then we'll deal with tech support. I don't call tech support very often. Maybe once a year, if that. They make a good product and have good training. Once you learn it, it's pretty easy to manage. We used to have Cisco's products die on us every one or two years. I don't know the last time I had to turn in an RMA for a Ruckus radio. They have a solid product.

    How was the initial setup?

    I've been doing it a long time, so for me, the setup is straightforward. If a person is a brand new to the system, like any system, it can be fairly complex. However, they have great documentation on their website on how to set it up. To do very complex things, that takes somebody who knows what they are doing. I've got a very complex scenario that I need to set up then that's what I get paid for - to help set that stuff up. I will go in and configure things securely for guest access and BYOD devices and corporate laptops with 802.1x. 

    You can have a controller version, or it could be a controller-less. I have a standalone AP, I just got one office with one AP, I don't need it to be controlled by anything. I've got one or two SSIDs, and that can still be configured. It's just that you're doing it on the AP or they have what's called Unleashed, which is controller-less. The AP is the controller and that can do up to 50 APs all controlled by one AP. But if that AP was to die, it doesn't matter that configuration is saved on all of them and the next one in line will just take over as the controller AP. There are several different interfaces you may run into to be able to configure the things, however, they're all very similar in how they work and react. The full controller has much more capability than Unleashed, and Unleashed has more capability than the standalone. 

    In terms of deployment, we figure for an AP it's about an hour and a half. That's for both configuration and installation. Therefore, if you have 20 APs, it's about 30 hours for 25 APs. That's setting up the controller, virtual or cloud-based, setting up the APs, your SSIDs, passwords, 802.1x, and then physically mounting them.

    What was our ROI?

    Our clients definitely get a return on investment when they purchase Ruckus.

    What other advice do I have?

    We are a customer and reseller.

    I'm using the latest version of the solution.

    Through a controller, we use 802.1x. There are multiple ways to deploy it to customers, including via a cloud controller. We typically do a virtual controller on our client's systems.

    I would advise, if a company is new to Ruckus, to work with a partner. It's important to have somebody that knows what they're doing, and knows what questions to ask so that you're getting the right information. When I go to do an implementation, I've got a list of 50 different questions. I'll ask somebody, what about this? What about this? What about this?

    You get what you pay for. People will throw in Lynksys and this other home stuff up. I'll say, that's great. If you're a business, it won't cut it. Say you're a coffee shop and I've got 50 customers sitting side. you want all of them to get the same performance all the time. If I've got three people, four people in that coffee shop streaming videos or watching movies or whatever it might be, I want to make sure everybody gets an equal amount of time without anybody getting any interruptions. With Linksys and Ubiquiti and all these other brands, you don't get that. In head to head competition, Ruckus far outshines them 10 to one. You just can't compete. When they say it's going to do something, it'll do it. They don't put documentation out that is misleading. If it says it'll do 1,024 clients it'll do 1,024 clients. If it says it'll do 4.3 gigabytes, it'll do 4.3 gigabytes.

    I'd rate the solution at a nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Ruckus Wireless
    November 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Ruckus Wireless. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
    655,994 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Tim Cummings - PeerSpot reviewer
    Systems Engineer at JUHSD
    Real User
    Reliable with good performance, good backend, and good ability to provision the devices
    Pros and Cons
    • "The APs themselves have been pretty solid. We haven't had too many of them go bad or anything like that. The wireless performance seems pretty good. The ability to provision the devices is pretty good, and the back end is also pretty good."
    • "Their support has been lacking a little bit and needs to be improved. I have had a ticket open for a month, and it is really hard to get a resolution out of them. They haven't really come out with anything that is much of an improvement in a long time. It has mostly just been fixes and things like that. We used to have a ZoneDirector or a physical controller for the wireless network, and that was kind of end of life. It was very old, and at the time, we were expanding the wireless network, and we didn't want to rely on one piece of hardware that was pretty old. So, we went to SmartZone Cluster, which has two VMs in a cluster. Unfortunately, we lost the feature ability for guest networks and other things that we were using before, and Ruckus just kind of told us that they weren't supporting that feature in the newer product, which is not really great. I was told initially that SmartZone was an upgrade to ZoneDirector. It is the logical thing to think that it is going to have all the same features, but it didn't. The issue that we have right now is onboarding BYOD devices. It is not really great for us, and we're looking for a new product to make that easier. We did have Cloudpath, which was a product that Ruckus purchased from another company that was an onboarding solution, but it just didn't really work very well for us. So, we discontinued using it, and it actually created more confusion for people. They should make BYOD or guest network portals a lot easier and better. In some areas, we have been having issues because there are just so many WAPs that are so close that we had to manually turn down the radio of power because the automatic feature of the AP wasn't really doing it right. It should also have a little bit better RF analysis capability to be able to see on the controller side. The front end for our staff, students, and guests has also not been quite as good as we had hoped."

    What is our primary use case?

    We started rolling out Ruckus access points about eight years ago, but it was a very small deployment. We only had about 15 or 20 devices, and later on, we did a bond measure upgrade to basically go and expand that to having one per classroom and a few in the common areas such as cafeteria, gyms, and stuff like that. The idea was that we were going to put on-premises one-to-one, which is like putting a Chrome cart of 35 devices in each classroom. We wanted to be able to have the ability to have high-density wireless in the school district and up to possibly 80 devices per room because we were thinking of BYOD and devices that we already have. Generally, it was to be used for just normal day-to-day access to the network and internet.

    We now have about 350 WAPs. Half of them have been installed over three years, and the other half are probably installed just under three years. We did a switch refresh in 2015, and we went with Brocade to replace our aging Cisco equipment, which was probably 20 years old. So, that's what we have right now. 

    We are basically using the latest version of SmartZone. We are up to date on that. Unfortunately, about 98 of our wireless access points are now considered end-of-service. They don't support the newer boot code, so we had to create a separate zone. They are on a kind of legacy firmware that is probably about five or six versions back. Our other zone has the latest AP firmware. They basically have separate firmware. They are basically doing a firmware for the controller and then a firmware for the APs. You could even elect to have different firmwares per AP.

    What is most valuable?

    The APs themselves have been pretty solid. We haven't had too many of them go bad or anything like that. The wireless performance seems pretty good.

    The ability to provision the devices is pretty good, and the back end is also pretty good.

    What needs improvement?

    Their support has been lacking a little bit and needs to be improved. I have had a ticket open for a month, and it is really hard to get a resolution out of them.

    They haven't really come out with anything that is much of an improvement in a long time. It has mostly just been fixes and things like that. We used to have a ZoneDirector or a physical controller for the wireless network, and that was kind of end of life. It was very old, and at the time, we were expanding the wireless network, and we didn't want to rely on one piece of hardware that was pretty old. So, we went to SmartZone Cluster, which has two VMs in a cluster. Unfortunately, we lost the feature ability for guest networks and other things that we were using before, and Ruckus just kind of told us that they weren't supporting that feature in the newer product, which is not really great. I was told initially that SmartZone was an upgrade to ZoneDirector. It is the logical thing to think that it is going to have all the same features, but it didn't. 

    The issue that we have right now is onboarding BYOD devices. It is not really great for us, and we're looking for a new product to make that easier. We did have Cloudpath, which was a product that Ruckus purchased from another company that was an onboarding solution, but it just didn't really work very well for us. So, we discontinued using it, and it actually created more confusion for people. They should make BYOD or guest network portals a lot easier and better.

    In some areas, we have been having issues because there are just so many WAPs that are so close that we had to manually turn down the radio of power because the automatic feature of the AP wasn't really doing it right. It should also have a little bit better RF analysis capability to be able to see on the controller side. The front end for our staff, students, and guests has also not been quite as good as we had hoped.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using this solution for about eight years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It has been pretty reliable. I have not had any issues recently. A couple of times, we had some issues while upgrading the path to the latest version of the controller software, for which it took a long time to get a resolution, but otherwise, the system works pretty well.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It is scalable. It seemed pretty easy to scale. We went from having 25 to 350 devices, and it wasn't too difficult. The hardest part is just getting them in the physical location.

    In terms of the number of users, it could potentially be up to 4,000 people. When we had full normal school going on, we were seeing somewhere around 1,900 clients a day on average.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    One of the deficiencies that they have right now is their support. A lot of times I've opened a ticket with them, and I have this back and forth communication going on. I have had a ticket open for a month, and it is really hard to get a resolution out of them. I would rate them a five out of ten.

    Before they had the mergers, their support used to be really good. They have been really good in the beginning, but the company suffered a little bit from being bought out a couple of times. Brocade bought Ruckus, and then ERIS bought them. They then got bought by Broadcom, who sold off half of Brocade's business and then spun the campus switch over to Ruckus Networks. After that, they got bought by CommScope. So, the support has been lacking a little bit.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    In terms of an enterprise solution, this is the only solution that we have been using. Before that, we had some kind of APs that weren't really controller-based.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was pretty straightforward. Once we had it kind of configured and dialed out, it was pretty easy. Obviously, different buildings, devices, and things can be complex. There is no blanket setting that works for all places. 

    On campuses where we have buildings more spread out, it works better. When we have one site that is basically a whole giant building, the WiFi is a little too dense there, and we had to manually change some settings for that.

    As far as adding an AP is concerned, it is pretty easy. You plug it in, and it contacts the SmartZone controller and downloads the firmware. After that, it shows up as a new available AP. You just put whatever WLAN or zone that you want it to be in.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It is decently priced.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would advise others to make sure that they do a good demo and the feature set meets what they want.

    I would rate Ruckus Wireless an eight out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Asst. Manager Technical at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
    Reseller
    Top 20
    User-friendly with an easy setup but needs to diversify its hardware options
    Pros and Cons
    • "The solution is very user-friendly."
    • "They lack in some hardware stratification."

    What is our primary use case?

    We are a distributor of Ruckus. We are actually maintaining their channel partner in the Pakistan region. Our business model is that we create partnerships where we are the retailer for Ruckus and the partners going to sell Ruckus to the end customer. We are actually the box mover for them. We act as a bridge between Ruckus and end customers.

    We are box movers. We handle all the deployments in Pakistan, across industries including in the education sector, in the military sector, in health organizations, hospitality, etc. We cover every vertical. Whenever Ruckus is deployed, it goes through our channels. We are the ones who can provide the boxes to end customers. There are many use cases. Thousands of boxes are shipped from us and deployed in different market segments.

    What is most valuable?

    Their wireless products and their switching LANs have been the most valuable aspects for us.

    Their hardware, such as their access point controller and their ICX switches, are great. 

    The solution is very user-friendly.

    The initial setup is easy.

    What needs improvement?

    They lack in some hardware stratification. They do no have a complete product line with respect to customer requirements. Their product line is limited and does not have the options which the end customer is actually looking for. For example, if a customer is looking for some redundant power supply switches, they have that option available in their mid-range or high-end switches. They don't have that option in their low-end or entry-level switches. That is the main problem we are facing when we are proposing a Ruckus solution to an end customer. That customer actually wants redundant power. If the customer wants the redundant power supplies in their entry levels switches, Ruckus doesn't have that option for them. 

    The same problem exists with its wireless platform. Some hardware limitations are there, which definitely need to be addressed. They need more controller options and more hardware options. They just have two models, ZoneDirector and SmartZone. They need to put some other hardware options on the market to fulfill the customer requirements. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution since about 2007 or 2008. It's been about a year.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is quite stable. We haven't had any issues in that regard. It doesn't crash or freeze.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Ruckus solutions are scalable. When you talk about flexibility, their solutions are very flexible. A single access point can work on any controller. As in wireless, your access point should be worked as a standalone with a controller or as a controller-less environment. 

    Their access point is flexible enough to work in any sort of deployment. They can work as a standalone, they work on their different controller platform. Their same access point can configure to the Ruckus cloud. 

    They are scalable in the sense that you can add access points to their controller. Switches have their own scalability and flexibility option. Basically, the solution is 100% scalable.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is good. They're very responsive to any technical issues. Their tech team is good enough on the technology side, so they can resolve the issues in a timely manner. I would give them 70% to 60% marks in terms of knowledge and responsiveness. Of course, there is some room for improvement. All in all, it's an average support experience.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is not complex at all. It's very easy and very straightforward.

    It's very user friendly, so it's not hard to set everything up and deployment is pretty quick.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    If I compare Ruckus licensing costs with the market leader, they're on the cheaper side. Our competitors are actually charging more for support and licensing fees to end customers. However, Ruckus charges less for both licenses and support. They are not expensive when you compare them to the competition. They are very cheap.

    What other advice do I have?

    We are a Ruckus distributor.

    We are proposing the Ruckus solution to our customers with the latest software versions, not the older versions. Whichever the latest version is, we propose them to our customer. We are always working on the latest version and all the products in the Ruckus, like switching, wireless, software, etc. They do have some different software versions. However, we are working on the latest, stronger versions.

    We use both the cloud and on-premises deployment models.

    I definitely recommend the Ruckus solution, however, there are pros and cons to every brand. Ruckus does have some benefits and they are very strong in their RF technology. If you talk about their switching side, they are the pioneers of that. Their switching platform is stable. They are using some proprietary technologies like BeamFlex and ChannelFly. 

    They are providing greater flexibility alongside the best scalability. They're great.

    Overall, I would rate the solution seven out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Distributor
    PeerSpot user
    Scott Tunis - PeerSpot reviewer
    Vice President at a comms service provider with 51-200 employees
    Reseller
    Top 10
    Good performance, easy to deploy, and the support is responsive
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable feature is the performance. It works great."
    • "I would like to see this product made a little more economical because it's very expensive."

    What is our primary use case?

    We are a solution provider and Ruckus is one of the wireless networking products that we implement for our customers. In this context, we are a managed service provider because after well sell the package, then deploy it, we manage it for them.

    This is a full solution including Rucks Access Points, Rucks Switching, Ruckes Cloud Controller, and we have a point-to-point set up in these installations. It's multiple locations, but they're all pretty similar to each other.

    As a managed service provider, we are a little different than a reseller. Our relationships are not with the companies that are selling us the equipment, it's more with our customers. So, we're trying to put ourselves in a position that we're making those decisions not based on a relationship with a vendor because those can change as technology changes. Today it might be Ruckus, tomorrow it could be Cisco Meraki. It's all based on customer needs and what they're looking for. Though, the vendor relationship is also important because, obviously, we need to support all of this stuff

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable feature is the performance. It works great.

    The second most important feature is that it is super easy to deploy. As an example, we deployed this without having any of our physical techs on site. We basically used a contractor to put stuff where we asked for it to be put, but there were no real technical people on site, due to COVID. It is a very large processing plant, so they have maintenance people that we were able to ask to plug things in and place hardware. Pretty simple stuff. After that, we were able to remotely configure and optimize the setup remotely. Again, we didn't buy it because of that, but that turned out to be a huge benefit to going with this product.

    What needs improvement?

    The management software is cloud-based and they're constantly revising their cloud software, so there's always room for improvement.

    I would like to see this product made a little more economical because it's very expensive. If I look at the percentage of my customers that I can sell it to, it's under 5%.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Our deployment for Ruckus Wireless started several months ago, at the beginning of this year.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Ruckus Wireless is extremely stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    This product is very easy to scale and I have a couple of pretty decently-sized Ruckus deployments.

    The one that we are currently working on is a very physically large deployment and it's a mix of indoor and outdoor access points. Inside the single physical location, there's a pretty large distance between the location itself and an offsite, which is the reason we have a point-to-point.

    There is the main physical location and then there is an offsite a couple of miles away, which is part of the deployment. The offsite doesn't really have any physical structures, though it does need the ability to have wireless. So, we're using a point-to-point to connect the two.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The technical support is tiered. Their first level of support is very responsive, maybe not super technical. But again, depending on the size of the problem, they are pretty quick to offer more advanced, technical support or escalate technical support pretty quickly.

    We ran into a few issues during this deployment, where stuff wasn't working the way we thought it should be, or we were having some difficulties configuring things, and they were very, very responsive to get involved in it. It seemed like that response was also pretty much on demand. So, even if we would call late in the day or at night, they were able to get someone on support. We rarely had to wait until the next day to get anything resolved.

    How was the initial setup?

    It is set up as a public cloud, with the vendor's controller on its cloud. All of the equipment is on-premises but managed remotely through the cloud.

    What about the implementation team?

    Our in-house team is responsible for deployment and maintenance.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    This is a very expensive solution.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Ruckus has a very specific niche and is surely not the cheapest solution. You have to have customers that are willing to spend that kind of money. If they are willing, then it's a really good solution.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Reseller
    PeerSpot user
    Sachin Vinay - PeerSpot reviewer
    Network Administrator at Amrita
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Great wireless, good reliability, and excellent connectivity
    Pros and Cons
    • "Configurations are highly customizable and we could tune easily to suit our Wi-Fi requirements."
    • "Ruckus should have an option to migrate existing licenses from an old controller to a new purchase; presently, this is not possible."

    What is our primary use case?

    We have an enterprise wireless solution with multiple vendor access points deployed across buildings and have implemented 802.1x authentication with dynamic VLANs. We have more than 100 Ruckus devices with Wpa2 enterprise authentication mode, and requests are getting authenticated from our NPS server.

    Our classrooms are equipped with 4*4 Mimo Wi-Fi 6 technology-based Ruckus access points that will handle more than 80 high bandwidth clients at the same time. Moreover, our meeting rooms are also equipped with 2*2 Mimo models that easily handle high bandwidth applications.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We have been migrating from Fortinet access points to Ruckus Wireless over a period of 5 years. We could experience good coverage and have increased the overall Wi-Fi quality in our organization to a large extent. We were able to provide stable bandwidth for students even at peak hours, so overall, students could learn even from hostels with uninterrupted Wi-Fi. 

    The reliability and stability issues of Fortinet have been considerably reduced after implementing Ruckus to hostels to a large extent. Overall, internet bandwidth utilization has also been utilized effectively after the Ruckus implementation.

    What is most valuable?

    Ruckus has two important features that proved to be very useful to us 0 Channelfly and background scanning. Channelfly was proven effective in areas where changes in Wi-Fi usage are at the least. It builds a a great utilization matrix and uses channel efficiently to manage bulk users and in highly dense Wi-Fi environments. 

    Also it has a quality rogue AP detection and exact real-time logs of intrusions. 

    Also configurations are highly customizable and we could tune easily to suit our Wi-Fi requirements. New Wi-Fi 6 models proved to be highly effective in our highly dense environment also.

    What needs improvement?

    Ruckus should have an option to migrate existing licenses from an old controller to a new purchase; presently, this is not possible. Also, the rates are a bit higher compared to its nearest competitors - like Cisco and Aruba.

    The New Ruckus VM controller has an increased set of options, yet all options are scattered and is a bit complicated for even users who handle earlier hardware versions.

    It would have been great if Ruckus Wireless had the standalone version which they had before. Presently, it can be used only in controller-based or cloud environments.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have been a legacy user of Ruckus wireless for the past nine years with models from the old Ruckus 2942 to the latest model Ruckus 650 in our environment.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Extremely stable Wi-Fi coverage is ensured with Ruckus Wireless.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It is highly scalable and can be done in virtual machine environments with scalable resources.

    How are customer service and support?

    It was pretty good customer service and support from the Ruckus team. RMA devices were shipped promptly without any delay.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We previously used Fortinet as well as Ubiquiti access points and were literally struggling to keep our Wi-Fi stable until and unless we got Ruckus into our environment. 

    We were forced to switch to Ruckus for better performance at peak times and also due to its increased penetrative power through hard walls.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was pretty straightforward; we got nice support from the Ruckus TAC team.

    What about the implementation team?

    We have an in-house experienced networking team for all configurations.

    What was our ROI?

    We could really utilize our bandwidth effectively after our Ruckus implementation. We could handle the yearly bandwidth cost and server access expenses when stable Wi-Fi access is being provided to end users.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Pricing and licensing are a concern for average enterprises as Ruckus is overpriced when compared to Aruba and Cisco. Also, it is better to go with a new controller license rather than adding to an old one since, over a period of time, most of the new devices will be supporting only the latest controllers.  

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We looked into Aruba and Cisco. However, Ruckus has the upper hand in terms of advanced Wi-Fi features. It has got a highly customizable controller to meet our flexible Wi-Fi requirements.

    What other advice do I have?

    Currently, Ruckus is the best in this arena, and I would highly recommend having this solution on your premises to get superb and stable Wi-Fi infrastructure.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Other
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Lead Presales at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Stable with good performance and connectivity
    Pros and Cons
    • "The solution has many innovative features."
    • "The pricing needs to be more clear and licensing could be less expensive."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for wireless connectivity.

    What is most valuable?

    The solution has many innovative features. 

    The stability is good.

    We find the implementation process simple and straightforward.

    The performance and connectivity are good.

    What needs improvement?

    Technical support has been really bad since Ruckus was acquired by another company.

    The pricing needs to be more clear and licensing could be less expensive. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We've been using the solution for more than five years. It's been a while. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is stable. There are no issues with bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze. It's reliable. 

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We have more than ten customers on Ruckus currently.

    How are customer service and support?

    Since Ruckus was acquired, I have heard that support is not as good. Even as integrators, we couldn't get the support we needed. Therefore, we've started to move away from this product.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We've worked with Cisco, Aruba, and Huawei as well. We have system integrators for all these three solutions. We also have used it in our offices.

    How was the initial setup?

    As integrators, we have to know how to install it, and about configuration, as well as how to handle portal access and everything. We have to install it in our own organization first before putting it in the customer space. That's why we have the capabilities to implement it and it's not too hard for us.

    It was a straightforward installation. Actually, other than Ruckus, all other installations are a little bit tricky. Ruckus was really good when I installed it five years back. Recently, if you go for Cisco or even Aruba and Huawei, they have some tricky configurations. With a controller, there is a different configuration. If you wanted to use it as a standalone solution, there is a different configuration as well.

    Specifically, Cisco is very bad when it comes to installations. It can take three to seven days to sort out issues, to convert to emails, and to put in a support request, then they will help and everything. Though you will get good support from Cisco support, the process is not good. Aruba is definitely good. Ruckus is the easiest.

    We have 4% of our team dedicated to Wi-Fi and Network. We that three engineers, that include me, plus a manager.

    What about the implementation team?

    As implementors, we are able to help our clients with the initial setup.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    After all of the acquisitions and mergers, the pricing has been a bit of a mess. They need to work to fix it.

    There are no subscription fees for Ruckus.

    What other advice do I have?

    We are integrators.

    We are using the latest version of the solution. 

    Laptops and phones, all kinds of wireless devices, are at every office these days. Having a Wi-Fi network is really important. You need it as well to connect to meetings and IoT solutions.

    Due to evolving technologies in Wi-Fi, we are now getting more than one GBPS throughput. Even on the LAN, for accessing the applications, having something that can increase or guarantee connectivity is crucial.

    Ruckus, as a company, offers an absolute good product. The features they came up with weren't even offered by Cisco. The performance that we were getting made it so that we have replaced Cisco in a number of use cases. However, once support dropped off, we started to shift to Huawei and back to Cisco. We also occasionally work with Aruba.

    I'd rate the solution at a nine out of ten. It's the best solution on the market.

    However, due to the issues surrounding support, I would not necessarily recommend Ruckus. I'd likely recommend Aruba, which is also quite good. Aruba has very good support. They have very good access points and different models with different licenses. Overall, it is really good.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Information Technology Consultant at a educational organization with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    Increases data rates and avoids interference
    Pros and Cons
    • "I haven't heard any complaints about the WiFi equipment at all causing problems."
    • "We've had issues with the ISP, not enough bandwidth."

    What is our primary use case?

    I work for a small school. In fact, I've worked with two separate schools with different administrations and they both had Ruckus — they both had the same equipment. There's probably one controller and maybe six, seven, eight access points.

    We're running teacher PCs, might be about ten PCs on there, and then a bunch of student Chromebooks. We weren't one-to-one at the one school — they had carts they wheeled around. They might have had maybe 40 of them, but now they're one-to-one and they probably have a couple of hundred users — 200 to 300 users on there. The other school's been one-to-one, but it's a smaller school. They probably have a couple of hundred computers on the whole network — Chromebooks. That school's pretty much all Chromebooks.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using this solution for five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I haven't heard any complaints about the WiFi equipment at all causing problems. We've had issues with the ISP, not enough bandwidth. At one place, the firewall equipment failed us, but with Ruckus, no complaints on the controllers. It's just been a solid performer for us.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I have very limited experience with support because the vendor takes care of all of that. They're kind of pricey, especially when you look at Ubiquiti. 

    Interestingly enough, the vendor who sold us Ruckus is now quoting an upgrade and he's no longer quoting Ruckus, he's going with Ubiquiti. I asked them why they did that, he said "Oh, it's a better value." Maybe Ruckus dropped them and now they're representing Ubiquiti. They have some staff turnover, so we keep seeing new people. And that's the local vendor. I haven't dealt with Ruckus directly at all, so I don't know what the company would provide.

    How was the initial setup?

    I logged into the system to look at it. That was a number of years ago, so my memory is vague. The only thing I really changed when I looked at it was to set up a separate sub-network for the students. They had a guest network already set up and they already had the staff networks. I set up a student WiFi network to segregate them from the staff.

    What about the implementation team?

    I'm not the person who really configures them, our vendor did all that. When they first went in, I took a look at the configuration, but I haven't really touched them since then. You can configure them and just leave them to do their thing.

    I went in once and set up a guest network — it was pretty straightforward. I didn't even have to look at the manual to do it.

    The vendor is responsible for all maintenance-related issues.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    With Ubiquiti, there's no annual cost to keep the software upgraded, whereas with Ruckus, you have to pay an annual fee or three-year fee. That makes it a little more pricey.

    Ubiquiti is quite a bit cheaper, just on the upfront costs than the Ruckus equipment. I mean the Ubiquiti quote we got, we're not only doing the access points, but we're also doing our switches. If one person is doing Ubiquiti switches and Ubiquiti access points, another vendor's doing Ruckus equipment. We're seeing half the cost with the Ubiquiti equipment. I worked for Ubiquiti on a very small installation where cost was at a premium and they needed to get in as cheap as possible. It worked for them. It was a church. Dropped in about four access points and they were happy.

    What other advice do I have?

    Overall, on a scale from one to ten, I would give this solution a rating of seven. The cost is the only thing dragging them down.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free Ruckus Wireless Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
    Updated: November 2022
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    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free Ruckus Wireless Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.