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Oracle VM OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Oracle VM is #5 ranked solution in best Server Virtualization Software. PeerSpot users give Oracle VM an average rating of 8 out of 10. Oracle VM is most commonly compared to KVM: Oracle VM vs KVM. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 37% of all views.
What is Oracle VM?

Oracle VM for x86

Oracle VM for x86 is a Xen based server virtualization platform for public and private cloud and traditional on premise deployment. Oracle VM offers full lifecycle and application deployment from disk to cloud.

Designed and optimized for security, efficiency and performance Oracle VM supports major hardware vendors x86 and storage platforms and can run workloads on Linux, Windows and Oracle Solaris. Uniquely for our virtualization platform it offers live patching via Ksplice enhancing security and minimizing service disruption. Oracle VM supports hard partitioning which can significantly reduce software applications licensing costs.

Oracle VM for SPARC

Oracle VM for SPARC is a firmware based virtualization platform for Oracle and Fujitsu SPARC based servers running Solaris. Oracle VM supports hard partitioning which can significantly reduce software applications licensing costs.

Oracle VM Buyer's Guide

Download the Oracle VM Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: January 2022

Oracle VM Customers

Ambulance Victoria, Australian Finance Group (AFG), Avnet Technology Solutions, CERN, cloudKleyer, Danish Tax Authority (SKAT), Data Intensity, Dubai World, Engineers Australia, Enkitec, Groupe FLO, Guerra S.A. Implemento, s Rodovišrios, Interactive One, IT Convergence, Jesta Digital, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, KT, Kyoto Prefecture, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory / National Ignition Facility, Multinet Pakistan, National Australia Bank (NAB), Navis LLC, Overhead Door, Overstock.com, Paragon Data, Parks Victoria, Pella, Sunway Shared Services, St. Louis Metro, Terminales Ro de la Plata S.A., University of Massachusetts, Versace,

Oracle VM Video

Oracle VM Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Oracle VM pricing:
  • "Licensing costs are less for Oracle Linux and for clients moving to the Oracle Cloud, as it is included in the price of the subscription."
  • "I recommend this for any customer wanting to reduce their licensing costs for packaged applications."
  • "If you choose Oracle hardware, then this virtualization software is included along with support."
  • "We were able to deploy our solution at near zero cost compared to other vendors since the licenses come with our Oracle hardware."
  • "All other vendors are selling their licenses to use the VM, but Oracle isn't doing that, which is its biggest advantage. It is free. All you have to do is get the hardware. You can create an unlimited number of VMs for free. With VMware, you have to purchase licenses for the number of VMs that you want to create. You only pay for their premium support, and even that is optional. I am now learning this product, and we can even do without the support."
  • "The licensing for Oracle VM solution is very nice because you license the box."
  • Oracle VM Reviews

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    President with 201-500 employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Good documentation and a simple setup but has a terrible licensing structure
    Pros and Cons
    • "Oracle is probably the best database technology out there. I've never found anything as complete in terms of feature and functionality and sophistication."
    • "I've found that using Oracle VM is like stepping back in time. It's not kept up with technology. The only reason anyone uses it is that they're afraid of Oracle's licensing. Oracle has a tremendously bad licensing approach."

    What is our primary use case?

    Clients are typically running Linux on Oracle VM, and then they're running Oracle databases on top of that.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The solution helps manage a company's costs. I typically run into great resistance as most organizations already have an existing virtualization infrastructure or technology. If you're running someone else's virtualization, having a third party or a second virtualization technology tends not to be warmly received. Any place I've got VMware, I never get a large Oracle VM infrastructure. I get what's needed, however. It serves a purpose as it keeps the number of cores down. It works. It's reliable. It's stable. It does what it needs to do. I've got no technical complaints about it. 

    What is most valuable?

    Due to the fact that it doesn't have as many, let's just say, bells and whistles, it's less distracting. It's not that difficult to master. 

    The documentation that the product has on offer is very good. 

    Once you get it set up, you tend to set it and forget it, and there's not a lot that you have to do.

    The biggest reason for using Oracle VM is the CPU fencing or licensing of CPU cores. Oracle makes the claim that if you run on VMware, you're getting value from the processors in the cluster over and above the processes that are associated with your particular VM. Due to that stance, companies wind up licensing basically the entire cluster for VMware. If all you're doing is running Oracle's database, and it's got a particular purpose and it's very focused, you can put Oracle's VMware or Oracle's VM on the server, create your virtual machine, and set the number of CPU cores that is going to use. Oracle finds that acceptable for licensing. That will control your costs, due to the fact that suddenly you don't have to license 24 cores when in fact you're only consuming four or eight. It is used at that level as a licensing mechanism, quite frankly.

    Oracle is probably the best database technology out there. Arguably, it is. I've never found anything as complete in terms of feature and functionality and sophistication. You could make arguments with niche or smaller venues. DB2 is certainly a viable alternative. So is the SQL server. Nothing scales and nothing handles complexity like Oracle. 

    That said, not everybody buys Oracle for the complexity. They buy it for a particular purpose, whether they're a state and local government, or whether they're in some particular industry vertical. I work with four or five different industries. I've seen it in very small companies, in which case it's almost part of the woodwork or the fabric, so to speak. You don't really pay attention to it. On the other hand, large organizations that use it have it as it's the only game in town for certain features.

    What needs improvement?

    I've found that using Oracle VM is like stepping back in time. It's not kept up with technology. The only reason anyone uses it is that they're afraid of Oracle's licensing. Oracle has a tremendously bad licensing approach.

    VMware, in comparison, has got so many different features that you can use in ESXi for example. Oracle is a lot simpler with fewer features.

    I find their VM backup features to be somewhat difficult. I wish it was a little easier to back up and clone.

    It would be ideal if Oracle could grow to take on VMware directly, in order to foster more competition.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used Oracle for many years. It's been a long time. It's probably been about ten years on and off, depending on what the client needs.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability is quite good. You set and forget. It's not a fussy solution. There aren't bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze. It's great.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I didn't find scalability to be an issue, however, the difficulty is with any hardware refreshes done today. You're going to get more cores due to the fact that that's all Intel can do. Intel can't crank the clock speed much past five gigahertz, not without heroic amounts of cooling. It's just the laws of physics. All Intel can do, all AMD can do, is give you more cores. 

    The problem is that Oracle's licensing model charges by the core. There's a formula to it and it depends on which features, etc., however, basically it's by the core that dictates the cost. At the end of the day, you're going to pay for the number of cores you're using.

    Therefore, you've got to put it on a new machine without Oracle's virtualization technology to help you manage the licensing. You go from a basic 5,100 series Intel chip with four cores. to a new gold chip, or whatever it is, and it's got 18 cores. All of a sudden you owe Oracle a lot more money, as there are a lot more cores. 

    That's not the kind of surprise that most companies appreciate. Your costs went up simply due to a newer chip. That's a hard sell. By using Oracle's virtualization technology, you can manage those licenses, allocate virtual CPUs to the level that you have an existing license, and control your costs while essentially getting a little bit more oomph. At least you're on a new, more reliable hardware platform. That's where virtualization really comes in.

    It helps manage the licensing. Oracle should just fully embrace VMware as a viable licensable technology. It would make life a whole lot easier for a lot of companies, however, they're not going to. They had the same stance when Sun Microsystems had its own virtualization technology. In that case, Oracle acquired it, and all of a sudden Sun's virtualization technology was acceptable. It's a marketing game, to be perfectly frank, and we all know that. That said, Oracle gets to set the rules. 

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've used their technical support in the past and they are very, very good. I'd rate them at an eight or nine out of ten in terms of the service they provide.

    Like a lot of environments, if you had a system down, that's a priority one issue, and they handle it well. I would put everything I own on their tech support. They have multiple support centers around the world, and you can follow the sun - which I have done to fix issues. That's outstanding.

    If you have small questions, odd issues, it can take a while to get through tech support. That's typical, as your problem is not the default. Your problem is some complicated issue with an interaction between multiple pieces of software or multiple configurations, whatever it might be. Those kinds of issues are difficult to dissect and resolve. You'll go into this loop of, "Well, try this. Well, try this. Well, give us more information about this." I understand, however. That's just simply debugging. There's nothing to be done. It can just take a while. However, if it's a priority, if it's a P1, they're fantastic. They really do a good job.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I've used VMware quite often, and it's an outstanding solution. It's got lots of different options, and of course, you can do things like VMotion, which allows you to move a VM in the cluster. The reason for deploying Oracle's VM is to manage the licensing, however, as we would have had to buy 10 times the number of cores if it was in a VMware cluster. That would drive up the costs.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup takes a little bit of thinking, and a little bit of reading, however, it's not particularly difficult. If you have the rest of your hardware and everything in place, it installs within a day or two. By that I mean you need a day to install it and then another day or so to adjust and tweak, and I haven't found it to be that difficult to install.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    On one hand, I like Oracle's licensing strategy in that they don't have license keys. You don't have to call and beg for another 30-day key and all the hassle that a lot of smaller companies do. Oracle does allow new users to understand what the value of their VM is for you. 

    I see using this solution primarily as a way of maintaining or managing my costs. Anybody who's got any experience in another virtualization technology will pick it up fairly rapidly. It's not difficult to understand. It's not difficult to use. However, if you've got a set of standards and practices in your existing IT, it's another one to learn. It's another one to maintain. And most companies try to streamline.

    Their licensing is based on the number of cores. Companies need to be careful about costs as they can rise rapidly.

    What other advice do I have?

    We don't have a business relationship with Oracle. One of the things that's unusual about my company is we absolutely do not court or back any particular technology player as we're the trusted advisor helping companies understand and solve problems. How unbiased can I be if I'm getting marketing dollars from Oracle or from Microsoft or from somebody else? We stand on our own. That's not always easy, however, it's the right thing to do. When I make a recommendation, it is with 100% the customer's interests in mind.

    I come in and work with companies that are in the process of migrating or updating off of older systems and into newer technologies, whether it be an on-prem hyper-converged type of infrastructure or into the cloud. I've got about 30 years' worth of experience with Oracle as an administrator and as a manager.

    A lot of times the customers are not quite sure what they want to go with. VMware is the big player in the virtualization space. I'm involved with a customer right now doing a large virtualization project where they're moving from individual old servers to a virtualized Dell VxRail environment. Therefore, I don't work exclusively with Oracle.

    Oracle has moved to KVM. Essentially they're trying to consolidate and trying to use KVM as it's slightly more popular and more robust virtualization technology. There are other ways of solving the problem, however, KVM has been around a while and Oracle's very tied to the Linux platform - although they do run on Windows and I've got clients running Oracle in Azure cloud. It really doesn't matter for virtualization.

    In terms of the Oracle versions we would use, it was mostly the latest version that we could get our hands on. It's always best to go with the latest versions. Oracle has a support policy that they maintain the current version, one version back, and everything older than that tends to be somewhat difficult to get support on. Therefore, you don't want to linger. However, a lot of people use Oracle virtualization as what I'd call minimal infrastructure. We're running it due to the fact that we need to have virtualization based on Oracle licensing concerns. It works, however, it's not anywhere to the same level of sophistication or of tools that, say, a VMware would be. It's like stepping back about two or three generations of VMware.

    I would advise others to understand what the value of this particular layer of the stack is going to provide for you. Oracle has a very good policy in terms of letting you download the software. There's really no license keys. You can play with it and try to understand it and make sure that it's going to work for you. You don't want to run this longer than necessary. Oracle's not going to let you use it for six months. However, you certainly can pull it down, install it, understand what it can and can't do for you, and then use it appropriately.

    On a scale from one to ten, I would say it's a solid seven. It lacks some of the newer features that VMware and Microsoft virtualization technology have, however, that's not necessarily a showstopper for what it's used for. If you want all the flashiness, then you tend to rate it lower, yet it's quite functional and does the job.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Chief Executive Officer CEO at IT CROWD S.A.S
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Robust, mature, and easy to set up
    Pros and Cons
    • "It's a very mature product."
    • "The solution is at its end of life and is about to be discontinued."

    What is our primary use case?

    Clients who have two or more servers and want to virtualize their processes can deploy Oracle VM, the Virtual Machine. It's comparable with something called hard partitioning so that they can comply with Oracle's licensing policies.

    There are other products in the market from other vendors, however, those virtualization technologies are not certified with Oracle regarding their licensing policies. Oracle VM comes with something specific called hard partitioning, which has to physically update the CPU core to virtual machines. This is very important. It allows virtual machines to comply with Oracle licensing policies. Otherwise, we can have big issues regarding product licensing.

    What is most valuable?

    Oracle VM as a product is very complete. All the features that come with Oracle VM are available within a single subscription. There are no hidden costs. Every feature that you want to use can be used without any hesitation. For example, if there are other products in the market, other virtualization products, they start selling only the basic module, then, if you want some feature they tell you, "No, you have to purchase another module for this feature". In Oracle VM, that is not the case. There is one subscription, one product, and it's everything you need. 

    One of the features that we like in Oracle VM is live virtual machine migration. A virtual machine is either running on one physical server and can be moved from that physical server to another physical server live without shutting it down. That is the best part for us.

    Apart from that, the graphical process that happens in the Oracle VM environment is also a great feature.

    It's a very mature product.

    The setup process is easy.

    We find the solution to be stable. 

    The pricing of the product is great.

    Technical support is always helpful and responsive. 

    What needs improvement?

    The solution is at its end of life and is about to be discontinued. Whatever it is there today, version 3.4.7, that's the last version that will be issued. They are now done with it completely.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability on offer is very good. There are no bugs or glitches. it doesn't crash or freeze. It's very mature.

    It is the best virtualization platform hypervisor that is out there. Oracle itself has used Oracle VM in all its engineer systems, as well as in the past generation of Oracle Cloud. It's very stable and very robust.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It's a highly scalable product. They have deployed a server form of 1,000 servers with Oracle VM. 

    It's totally scalable. For example, today you have some generation like Intel generation processor, and after three, four, five years, you want to add new servers to the same Oracle VM environment. However, you now have the next generation, like maybe Intel servers, Intel processors, Generation 10, whatever it is. You can still mix different Intel generation processors in the same Oracle VM consideration. From that point of view, it is totally scalable. It allows different CPU generations.

    At this time, we have more than 100 to 200 clients that have installed Oracle VM. The solution likely has millions of clients. 

    How are customer service and support?

    Regarding the support from Oracle, it's the topmost quality and leading the market of VM products. It's always very good. We've been very happy with their capabilities and support.

    How was the initial setup?

    The implementation process is very straightforward. It is very user-friendly and it is very well-documented. 

    The deployment process can be handled by one or two people. It's a total single product. It's a single product that needs to be installed on the physical servers. On the station side, just you have to install Oracle VM Manager, and that's it. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Clients who use the solution pay for a subscription. Oracle VM and Oracle Linux, they're not sold as a license. However, they have support subscription. It is so cheap. It's almost 3% cheaper than any other virtualization product that is there in the market. There are many clients who use it exclusively for virtualization; they have converted their existing virtualization solution to Oracle VM.

    What other advice do I have?

    We're a partner, a reseller, of Oracle VM.

    Oracle VM is basically an infrastructure product. It needs to be installed on-premise. For the cloud, Oracle VM is not applicable as Oracle itself virtualizes everything and provides for the clients. With Oracle VM, we have deployed it to our client infrastructure on-premise in all instances.

    This product now is more than 12 to 15 years old. It has been in the market for a long time. Oracle has announced the end of life of this product. Soon, it is going to be finished. Next year, they're not going to launch any more versions of Oracle VM.

    Right now, there is no advice that I can give as the product is at the end of life. If a company has Oracle VM in their environment, it is good to have an Oracle VM patch to the latest version and to keep it stable, and that's it. It's not going to be distributed anymore after next year.

    I'd rate the solution at a ten out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    Learn what your peers think about Oracle VM. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: January 2022.
    564,729 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Robin Saikat Chatterjee
    Head of Oracle Exadata Centre of Excellence at Tata Consultancy Services
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Low cost robust VM soln with ability to patch with no downtime and free Live migration
    Pros and Cons
    • "The ability to live migrate VMs on the fly from one hypervisor to another has been very useful."
    • "Ability to patch with no downtime."
    • "We do have a little trepidation with systemd, as it does have a learning curve."

    What is our primary use case?

    A disclaimer: Though I have been working with various flavours of Linux since Slackware 1.2 in 1996, and I more recently focus in more enterprise computing and Oracle Database, my opinions tend to be colored with those use cases. We use this Virtualization platform to host our internal development training and PoC environments. Though Oracel HAs increasingly been adding support for a KVM based solution in recent years many of their signature virtualization platforms like the private cloud appliance are OVM based.

    How has it helped my organization?

    • Oracle has now made it available as a hypervisor on Oracle cloud to be deployed on Bare metal servers.
    • Ability to patch with no downtime.
    • Ability to ensure all prerequisites are satisfied without manual intervention saves time, effort, and makes the systems that we deploy for our clients more secure. 
    • Licensing costs are less for Oracle Linux and for clients moving to the Oracle Cloud, as it is included in the price of the subscription.

    What is most valuable?

    The ability to live migrate VMs on the fly from one hypervisor to another has been very useful.The ability to pin cores to reduce licensing costs for our clients runnning core based oracel producs is also invaluable.One important factor to note is that to use live migration its important to create specifc pools devoted to certain products for exampel a pool for weblogic and a separate server pool for database. live migration is not permitted when using cpu pinnning to reduce license costs.

    What needs improvement?

    • ability to use live migration and cpu pinning together would be very useful. for example reserving certain physical cpus on the target system prior tothe live migration for example.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Initially, we had some teething troubles that we found were due to use of an unsupported storage solution. We switched to an Oracle ZFS appliance, and since then, we have had no issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We did not encounter scalability issues. However, we are constrained by our hardware since this is a development setup.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We have found support personnel of the EMEA region with whom we have interacted to be very knowledgeable. They were very supportive and had a very good grasp of both Linux and the product.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We have used Vmware in the past be faced challenges with supportability , compatibiollity with oracle products and licensing costs and complexity.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was quite simple. We also were able to upgrade to various newer versions with minimum handholding.

    What about the implementation team?

    We implemented in-house.

    We are certified implementors of this technology now.

    What was our ROI?

    We were able to deploy our solution at near zero cost compared to other vendors since the licenses come with our Oracle hardware. Therefore, it is difficult to calculate ROI, as it is a very large number.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    If you choose Oracle hardware, then this virtualization software is included along with support. Licensing of various oracle applications is one of the more expensive components of any implementation, the ability to hard partition it is a major advantage which outweighs any other disadvantage for various x86-based solutions.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated using Oracle VirtualBox, but it was more for desktop virtualization and did not fit with server virtualization. We also tried KVM, but the complexities in migration from one host to another deterred us, and the management was not as seamless for multiple hypervisors.

    Given Oracle VM's favorable licensing policy allowing hard partitioning using virtualization, we found this to the the most optimal method to recommend to clients.

    There are compelling reasons why one might prefer Oracle Linux to Red Hat Linux. Some of the major factors are:

    1. One throat to choke. It is very useful to have one vendor on the pointy end of the stick. No finger pointing, and all buck passing is internal. Also, given the dev team is often using the same OS flavor, it can be a benefit in the first place. 
    2. Optimised for databases. Many of the options: RPMs and settings which are best used to run a database are packaged into a single RPM that can be automatically deployed on Oracle Linux, but must be painfully and manually setup on RHEL
    3. Ksplice: The ability to patch all aspects of a running Linux system, including the kernel with zero downtime is something that no other Linux provides. The UEK is enough of a differentiator to get the nod.

    What other advice do I have?

    I recommend this for any customer wanting to reduce their licensing costs for packaged applications.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We are Oracle Diamond partners (oracle platinum cloud elite ). We also have alliances with Red Hat and other linux vendors
    Robin Saikat Chatterjee
    Head of Oracle Exadata Centre of Excellence at Tata Consultancy Services
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Oracle VM is an effective Virtualisation Solution that enables Oracle licensing benefits.We can expand or contract the resources, such as memory, that are assigned to different solutions as needed.

    What is our primary use case?

    We use this solution For running our in house development work. As we work with Oracle packaged applications thius allows us to deploy a full red stack and prevents any application software vs hypervisor compatibility issues. We have also deployed this solution at many customer sites where we use it to reduce licensing impacts using cpu pinning to reduce the number of cores needed to be licensed for individual products such as oracle database and weblogic.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We are able to run many different solutions on a small number of hypervisors. We can shut down those solutions that are currently not of interest and can expand or contract the resources, such as memory, that are assigned to different solutions so that a developer may struggle a little, but a client demo will fly on the same instance when given 200% more memory. 

    We also use the live migration facility to move VMs among servers in our farm so we can perform patching and other activities.

    What is most valuable?

    This is supported by Oracle and optimized for running its database and software. Among the benefits is the ability to create huge pages within a VM, which is very beneficial for databases. The other major benefit is the ability to use OVM as a partitioning mechanism to reduce licensing costs for Oracle software.

    What needs improvement?

    Currently, there are some cases when the GUI and the back-end go out of sync. For example, the GUI shows the VM as running whereas it is actually already shut down. This could be improved.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used it for over four years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    When we were previously using a dual-head storage with automatic storage pathing, we faced issues with compatibility since the shared storage kept getting re-mastered to different heads by the various servers which did not choose to access by the default assigned heads. 

    We fixed this by replacing our storage with a supported/certified one. We have seen much better stability when using one of Oracle's purpose-built virtualization appliances, like PCA or ODA, to implement virtualization.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There have been no issues scaling it for our needs.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The customer service ranges from average to exceptional. We faced an issue with HBA NIC drivers that we could not solve and, at this point, we were told it was driver issue and they left it at that.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We chose this product because of the compatibility with other Oracle software and the ability to reduce license costs.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was a little challenging at first as when we first started the hypervisor, we did not have support for our raid controller card so we had to learn to compile a custom kernel. However, the latest versions are much better.

    What about the implementation team?

    We did it in-house as we wanted to gain the skills since we are a vendor for other clients. Having gone through the experience and gained a lot of knowledge in the process, we would recommend that it can be a little challenging.

    What was our ROI?

    We have recieved major beefits due to reduction of licensing costs for our customer due to the ability to use hard partitioning or trusted partitions.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    OVM support licensing is included in the price of any Sun x86 servers. Since we can use the software for partitioning, it helps save on the licensing of other Oracle products that are licensed on a per-core basis.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We looked into KVm and Vmware however these options did not give us benefiits of hard partitioning and there were issues with certification and compatibility with oracle cots products.

    What other advice do I have?

    We have seen stability challenges if the storage and network is not rock solid. In fact, the most robust solutions are those where the integration is already done, namely Oracle PCA, Oracle ODA, and Oracle Exalogic. These can be a little expensive for smaller setups, though the ODA is a very interesting choice in such constrained budget scenarios.


    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Other
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: we are Oracle platinum partner cloud elite providers we are in the top 20 partners among Oracles 30,000+ partner ecosystem
    CTO at Datacell
    Real User
    Top 20
    Highly scalable, perfect support, free, and easy to manage
    Pros and Cons
    • "Its ease of management and simplicity are most valuable. It is free, and you can provision an unlimited number of VMs at no cost for clients. They also provide perfect support."
    • "The user interface of the version that we have requires improvement. They have already improved the user interface in the latest version, but we are yet to migrate to that. The new UI is much better. I would like it to be simple. It is serving all of our needs, and I don't think it is necessary to keep adding. We are able to provision a VM in ten minutes, and provisioning it in five minutes will not have any added benefit."

    What is our primary use case?

    We have a few servers, and I tag them to the storage. Through that, we create VMs by provisioning some RAM, CPU, and storage. The RAM and the CPU get adjusted when we buy more servers to add to the cluster. 

    We are not using its latest version. We are yet to migrate to its latest version.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It has saved us millions of dollars by generating many VM's out of a simple server added to a server  pool which is highly available.

    What is most valuable?

    Its ease of management and simplicity are most valuable. It is free, and you can provision an unlimited number of VMs at no cost for clients. They also provide perfect support.

    What needs improvement?

    The user interface of the version that we have requires improvement. They have already improved the user interface by moving away from OVMM to OVM or KVM which uses the oVirt engine and has a completely new feel for the user interface, but we are yet to migrate to that. The new UI is much better and more intuitive.

    I would like it to be simple. It is serving all of our needs, and I don't think it is necessary to keep adding. We are able to provision a VM in ten minutes, and provisioning it in five minutes will not have any added benefit.

    Just keep it simple.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using this solution for over ten years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It is very stable. That's why I've used it for all my clients.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It is highly scalable. It can be scaled to any amount that you want. The RAM, CPU, and storage can be easily scaled.

    It is suitable for big and small organizations. We have deployed it for financial institutions and banks with lots of users and VMs. They use it for all kinds of things.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We have their 24/7 support. The hardware that we're using is Oracle hardware, and it is mandatory that you have the HW support. We also have field delivery engineers for the hardware support and premium support for Oracle Linux and virtualization.

    Their support is perfect and wonderful. They respond immediately, but it also depends on the severity.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used a different solution which had license limitations but Oracle VM is free and unlimited VMs can be provisioned at any time if there is adequate compute power.

    How was the initial setup?

    It is very simple and straightforward. You just need to connect a bunch of servers to the storage, and you're done. For installation, you just download the parts of the software and install them on the server. Once installed, you discover them through the management interface, and that's about it.

    The software installation takes about 20 minutes, but it also depends on how many services you are attaching to the storage. Its maintenance involves just upgrades.

    What about the implementation team?

    We are Oracle Field Engineers and have lots of Specialization around the product.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    All other vendors are selling their licenses to use the VM, but Oracle isn't doing that, which is its biggest advantage. 

    It is free. All you have to do is get the hardware. You can create an unlimited number of VMs for free. With VMware, you have to purchase licenses for the number of VMs that you want to create. You only pay for their premium support, and even that is optional. I am now learning this product, and we can even do without the support.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We considered the following below:

    1. The physical memory supported by Oracle VM is higher

    2. No of vCPU supported on guest(VM) is higher 

    3. Product is free and this is the best part 

    What other advice do I have?

    I would recommend this solution to others. I have recommended this to many different clients. It is for free, which is its biggest advantage. We are also Oracle partners, so we tend to go for Oracle.

    I would rate Oracle VM a ten out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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    IT Infrastructure Lead at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Stable, with good resource management, but needs to allow more access to documentation
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable aspect of the solution is the resource management from the OVM Manager."
    • "You need to have a model for documentation available for the users. Right now, if you have to search for some troubleshooting, you need to have Oracle login. Many personnel might not have that login. The reach, the availability of information to the end-user, is not there."

    What is our primary use case?

    The solution is primarily used for server virtualization. We have opportunities that we want to learn from. For our customers, we recommend this product. We have Oracle databases or Oracle, Linux, or Red Hat Linux to run it on a virtual machine, and Oracle VM fits perfectly into that.

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable aspect of the solution is the resource management from the OVM Manager. It makes document management very smooth. The performance is excellent.

    What needs improvement?

    I'm still evaluating the product and getting to know it.

    The only thing I'm finding is that the backup software, which is supporting Oracle's virtualization platform, needs improvement. We're struggling to get a solution that will support my Oracle virtualization environment for backup purposes. I just found one on the internet. I was trying to reach out to that team now, to see how best we can use it. However, if Oracle had a solution to this, that would be ideal.

    You need to have a model for documentation available for the users. Right now, if you have to search for some troubleshooting, you need to have Oracle login. Many personnel might not have that login. The reach, the availability of information to the end-user, is not there.

    There are some articles that are publicly available, but there are some important documents that are not available to the public. You need to subscribe, or you need to have a licensed copy, some subscription with the product.

    Any product, at the end of the day, needs support. When the support or the knowledge base or the information is not available or the documentation is not available for any of this, for the person who is implementing this, it's very difficult for them to get used to this product. They will simply move to another product.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for two or three months now.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution certainly is stable. We don't seem to suffer from bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze. It's reliable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is very easy to scale.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've never reached out to technical support, so I can't speak to their level of service. I tend to handle troubleshooting myself.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have experience with Hyper-V, VMware, and Citrix ZenServers.

    The technology is all similar. It's about virtualizing the servers. However, I feel that VMware is much better and much more stable than Oracle VM.

    How was the initial setup?

    At first, the initial setup was not so straightforward and was rather complex. This is largely due to the fact that we were not aware of the environment and how to use it properly. I believe it will get easier to implement over time.

    You need to deploy the server and have the virtualization on top of that. Then you configure and install everything. How long it takes depends on the environment. If it's a small deployment, it may only take about two days. A larger deployment could take as long as six to eight weeks. 

    I've done a file server deployment, and that only took three days.

    You only need one person to deploy the solution.

    What about the implementation team?

    We are consultants. We assist our customers with implementations.

    What other advice do I have?

    We're partners with Oracle. We're consultants.

    My advice to other potential users is this: nothing is better than planning. It's much in a better way to start a project. That way, you understand how much it is that you need to have or how many servers you require. It seldom matters when you deploy in the virtual environment. 

    You need to be very hands-on in Linux environments. I come from a Windows background. I am not a Linux user, for the most part. That said, fo this project, I learned Linux.

    I'd rate the solution seven out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    Ngole Ngole
    Oracle Techno Sales consultant at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Flexible solution with extensive features like OVM Manager, enabling you to avoid hard coding
    Pros and Cons
    • "It's a very flexible solution because you have all the commands that you can do yourself."
    • "Something that could be improved are the snapshots that go in the ZFS Storage. If you want to enjoy Oracle VM, you will definitely want it to go together with ZFS Storage to maximize on the snapshot facility."

    What is our primary use case?

    I handle both sales and technical. We also sell cloud technology, so I do a lot of extensive work on cloud implementation.

    We are Oracle Gold partners. We do a lot of deployments around Oracle VM. We are core in Oracle infrastructure and Oracle banking. When I say Oracle infrastructure, I'm looking at the x86 servers, also the SPARC servers. When you look at infrastructure, these not only carry the servers themselves, we look at the virtualization technology, which is definitely Oracle VM, both on SPARC and on x86.

    Recently, we have been doing a kind of mix where the customer wants Dell and Oracle x86 VM.

    I have done this deployment for an insurance company, and they have a lot of insurance solutions which run on the Oracle database. They could not go for the expensive Oracle server, so they decided to go for the Dell server but now are hard partitioning Oracle VM to cut down on the cost of licenses.

    We have installed life insurance solutions on Oracle VM hard partitioned, and the general insurance solution is hard partitioned to focus on Oracle VM. They have a dock management system that uses Oracle database, hard partitioned also to focus on Oracle VM. They have a business intelligence solution which also uses Oracle database, also hard partitioned to Oracle VM.

    We have actually created the production and VR with loads of VLANs swinging through both production and VR side, all on Oracle VM.

    Storage is Dell Unisys storage, and then the computer is all Dell servers.

    What is most valuable?

    It's a very flexible solution because you have all the commands that you can do yourself.

    The OVM Manager is very extensive and very nice to use for those who don't have a 360 view of the hard coding of things. They can still use Oracle VM to run the show, especially in the SPARC version. I've done some deployment with Oracle SPARC VM, but using Connect to connect it to Oracle OVM Manager. We use the OVM Manager to provision the SPARC server rather than going through the hard work of writing the codes of SPARC VM yourself.

    All these things make Oracle VM a kind of panacea solution for me.

    What needs improvement?

    Something that could be improved are the snapshots that go in the ZFS Storage. If you want to enjoy Oracle VM, you will definitely want it to go together with ZFS Storage to maximize on the snapshot facility.

    In other virtualization like VMware, you can do the snapshot right at the level of VMware itself. You'll get customers complaining that, "We can't take a snapshot just like we do on our normal VMware solution."

    I always advise my customers to go with ZFS Storage. If you maybe had a snapshot on the Oracle VM itself, it would make sense.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been born and bred with Oracle since 2001. It is a career for me. In the past 10 years, I moved between flex to core banking, CRM, ERP and Oracle E-Business Suite to Oracle hardware T8 implementation.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It's extremely stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is scalable because we are using production and VR 35 kilometers apart. Scalability is no issue.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The licensing for Oracle VM solution is very nice because you license the box.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would rate this solution 10 out of 10.

    My advice is to throw away your VMware because the licenses will kill you. Throw away your Microsoft Hyper-V because it doesn't work. Just go with Oracle VM because it works.

    Oracle Virtualization works and is the best in the world, so I don't know what guys are doing with other solutions.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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    Syed Abid Hussain
    Snr. Infrastructure Architect (Data Centre) at DHA
    Real User
    Top 5
    Excellent performance, scalability and flexibility; great cloning feature . Best for oracle Products
    Pros and Cons
    • "The cloning is a great feature and live migration is very easy."
    • "There are currently issues with centralized storage."

    What is our primary use case?

    We have a data center with multiple racks. The product Oracle VM Server is deployed on two of our HP G10 servers. Comparatively this product is more flexible & reliable for oracle Applications & Databases. we have all our PROD env on this platform and It also enables us to clone an oracle app / db product for a test environment within a few minutes. We are Oracle customers and I'm the system and infrastructure Admin.

    How has it helped my organization?

    we have also test and development env. live cloning of oracle app /db within minutes is a great feature and very helpful for us. 

    What is most valuable?

    The live cloning within minutes is a great feature and live migration is very easy. It's the most reliable feature and it's not available in VMware or Hyper-V. Performance, scalability and flexibility are all good in this product. 

    What needs improvement?

    All features are ok. just need to add performance monitoring tools for all running VMs & reporting facility as well.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using this solution for six years. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There is good stability with this product and we've been able to upgrade when necessary without any problems. We have the technical skill and product knowledge so it's easy for us.  This solution is more stable than VMware and Hyper-V

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    This solution is easy to scale. We can add the storage and increase VM capacity without a problem. this product is scalable. storage, network, NFS, servers can be easily added or migrated.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    although we have technical support license. but from last five years we didn,t need any support. as we have technical skill set and product knowledge. . 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    we were using physical servers. then we move to VMWare but we faced issue regarding oracle apps / dbs performance. then we found OVM solution. this is best for oracle products. VMWare is also a good product but as for as performance of Oracle aap / db is concern . Oracle VM server is best option

    How was the initial setup?

    I configured the applications and deployed this solution. Deployment doesn't take very long, it just depends on the situation. I can build an Oracle environment in one day and deploy virtual machines. to mange Oracle VM server we need Oracle VM Mmanager. that is also easy configure. a complete guide is available. just study thoroughly before deployment.

    What about the implementation team?

    no vendors at all. i tested and deployed this product by myself. initially it was 3.4.2 then we upgraded to 3.4.5. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We found this product to be reasonably priced, it's not expensive like VMware. 

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    as mentioned earlier we used physical env as well as vmware & hyper-v. we are still using the same for other applications. But for oracle products we choose oracle vm server.

    What other advice do I have?

    I highly recommend this solution, especially for oracle apps & dbs. within five minutes you can make a clone even if it's one terabyte. 

    I rate this solution a 10 out of 10. 

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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