Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches is the #12 ranked solution in top LAN Switching tools. PeerSpot users give Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches an average rating of 5.0 out of 10. Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches is most commonly compared to Dell PowerConnect Switches: Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches vs Dell PowerConnect Switches. Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 48% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 21% of all views.
Buyer's Guide

Download the LAN Switching Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2022

What is Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches?
Dell-Force10 Managed Campus LAN Switches bring users efficient connections to the network with highly functional access and aggregation switching. Products consist of: Dell EMC Networking N1100 Series, Dell Networking N1500 Switches, Dell Networking N2000 Series, Dell Networking N3000 Series and Dell Networking N4000 Series.
Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches Customers
Norwich University of the Arts, Shelby American, City and Islington College
Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches Video

Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches pricing:
"You are selling it to larger customers and in larger environments, where it's a less expensive model than Cisco, which is attempting to use the same approach Arista did, but with a completely different programming language."

Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches Reviews

Filter by:
Filter Reviews
Industry
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Company Size
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Job Level
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Rating
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Considered
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Order by:
Loading...
  • Date
  • Highest Rating
  • Lowest Rating
  • Review Length
Search:
Showingreviews based on the current filters. Reset all filters
Al Vasek - PeerSpot reviewer
Executive Business Development Manager, Cloud and Managed Services at ConvergeOne
MSP
Top 5Leaderboard
Performs well, but the support and stability could be improved
Pros and Cons
  • "Port density and port speed performance are both suitable. It has some appealing intangibles."
  • "Instead of competing at the enterprise level with that product, they should probably scale it. With all of the ports, they should develop a good mid-level business to truly scale it and gain adoption before attempting to go after the enterprise."

What is most valuable?

Port density and port speed performance are both suitable. It has some appealing intangibles.

We are not comparing it with Linksys, D-Link, or similar products. The engineering behind it isn't bad, it's just that you're limited. I'm not going to sell something to a customer where it's difficult for me to find staff who can program it or train on it. It's a bigger risk than it's worth.

What needs improvement?

There is a lack of support because there is a lack of adoption.

Because Cisco switches are so widely used, anyone in the world can support them. It was two Cisco engineers who released Arista's code. In terms of programming functionality, they essentially duplicated the Cisco iOS, so all Cisco commands work on the Arista commands. You can do an Arista if you can do a Cisco. Aruba isn't all that different. It's a little different, but they have all of HPE's money and stuff behind it and things like that.

I would say the same thing about Extreme or some of the other switches where it's penny-wise, pound-foolish. You save some money if you are a small shop with only one or two guys, it's understandable. Fortinet is now in the switch business, and they have their FortiSwitch devices, which are controlled by the FortiGate firewalls to do all of the programs. There is a lot to choose from. But, in my opinion, a lot of it is dependent on the use case and the customer type. Meraki is a nice little Cisco product for the right kind of business, but I wouldn't use it in an enterprise setting.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have worked with Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches in the past, but I am not a huge fan.

It's just like any other switch. Right now, you must consider market share. By far, Cisco has the market share, in my opinion. From a switching standpoint, there are the Arubas and the Aristas. When Dell acquired Force10, they attempted to acquire it, and It does some things, but it hasn't taken off yet. It doesn't have a large enough market share. I wouldn't invest in something that doesn't have a large enough market share to support it. I've met Michael Dell personally, and if they are one, two, or three, they will drop it. It's similar to when they removed SonicWall and other features. To me, there is far too much risk versus reward. Arista would be my first choice if I needed a lower-cost switch than Cisco.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I have had it and seen it in a number of data centers. It is not a bad product. It's stable, runs smoothly, and performs well until it doesn't, and then you are stuck. Then you have to wait for someone to become available who knows how to program it, whereas the other ten guys are all Cisco experts. You are in a situation where you can save $5,000, but now you have to reimburse 10 customers for SLA breaches that you had because we can't fix them. This is the dilemma with the product that we are dealing with.

I would have said more about it if it had taken off more and been adopted more widely. Their basic PowerConnect switches are fine for small businesses because there isn't much to worry about, but that's an enterprise-grade switch.

Buyer's Guide
LAN Switching
November 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about Dell Technologies, Cisco, Hewlett Packard Enterprise and others in LAN Switching. Updated: November 2022.
656,474 professionals have used our research since 2012.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

You are selling it to larger customers and in larger environments, where it's a less expensive model than Cisco, which is attempting to use the same approach Arista did, but with a completely different programming language.

What other advice do I have?

I would not recommend it to smaller businesses because they could not afford it.

I wouldn't recommend it to anyone unless they come up with a small business model for it, which would be interesting to me. Instead of competing at the enterprise level with that product, they should probably scale it. With all of the ports, they should develop a good mid-level business to truly scale it and gain adoption before attempting to go after the enterprise.

It's too difficult to break into the enterprise, which is already heavily invested in those other ones. I mean, Arista did it, but they've recently gained traction. Fortinet is gaining traction, but, as previously stated, it began by establishing credibility in the commercial, mid-market, and enterprise markets. Whereas Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches have never attempted anything other than enterprise.

I would rate Dell-Force10 Campus LAN Switches a five out of ten.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
Flag as inappropriate
PeerSpot user