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TFS is #2 ranked solution in top Quality Management Tools and #5 ranked solution in top Application Lifecycle Management Suites. PeerSpot users give TFS an average rating of 8 out of 10. TFS is most commonly compared to Microsoft Azure DevOps: TFS vs Microsoft Azure DevOps. TFS is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 66% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 24% of all views.
TFS Buyer's Guide

Download the TFS Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: June 2022

What is TFS?
Visual Studio Team Foundation Server (TFS) is the collaboration platform at the core of Microsoft's application lifecycle management (ALM) solution. TFS supports agile development practices, multiple IDEs and platforms locally or in the cloud and gives you the tools you need to effectively manage software development projects throughout the IT lifecycle.

TFS was previously known as Team Foundation Server.

TFS Customers
Vendex KBB IT Services, Info Support, Fujitsu Consulting, TCSC, Airways New Zealand, HP
TFS Video

TFS Pricing Advice

What users are saying about TFS pricing:
  • "I believe we pay on a yearly basis. I don't know the current costs of them. We outsource all that to a third party. Each of the developers gets a Microsoft Visual Studio Azure DevOps license, which gives them access to the TFS server as well. We probably pay on average about 1,800 Canadian Dollars a year for every developer, but that covers a lot more than just TFS."
  • "Microsoft products are always expensive. Obviously, they are quality products, but it would be helpful if there was a reduction in price. But compared to other vendors, I think the cost is high."
  • "I was working with the engineering team, and that was not under my umbrella. From what I can remember, its license was yearly. They had the licenses on a per-user basis, and they included MTM."
  • "I wouldn't say that this tool is cheap or expensive but in the middle."
  • "The price of the solution is cheaper than other competitors and it is a per-user license."
  • TFS Reviews

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    CarlBrown - PeerSpot reviewer
    Vice President Engineering at Vertex Downhole Ltd
    Real User
    Top 20
    It is helpful for scheduled releases and enforcing rules, but it should be better at merging changes for multiple developers and retaining the historical information
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable features are related to source code management. Using TFS for source code management and being able to branch and have multiple developers work on the same projects is valuable. We can also branch and merge code back together."
    • "They have room for improvement in merging the source code changes for multiple developers across files. It is very good at highlighting the changes that the source code automatically does not know how to handle, but it's not very good at reporting the ones that it did automatically. There are times when we have source code that gets merged, and we lose the changes that we expected to happen. It can get a little confusing at times. They can just do a little bit better on the merging of changes for multiple developers."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use TFS for all of our source code. We develop a software suite with about eight different applications that work together, and then we also do firmware development. We use it for our firmware development source code repository. It is deployed on a private server. We've gone all the way from version 2012 up to 2017, and we will be doing the 2019 upgrade very soon.

    How has it helped my organization?

    An example would be that now we have scheduled releases. We have scheduled builds that happen every Thursday that get rolled out to our development testers. In the past, before TFS, the developers themselves used to initiate that, and it was done randomly. So, being on a schedule is much better.  It basically enforces our rules. Because everything is more controlled, source code cannot be checked in unless it builds correctly. It basically forces the developers to adapt to the agile methodology that we use, which is small chunks of work at a time. 

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable features are related to source code management. Using TFS for source code management and being able to branch and have multiple developers work on the same projects is valuable. We can also branch and merge code back together.  Another valuable feature is our continuous integration because we do continuous builds. So, continuous building with the build server is also very important.

    What needs improvement?

    They have room for improvement in merging the source code changes for multiple developers across files. It is very good at highlighting the changes that the source code automatically does not know how to handle, but it's not very good at reporting the ones that it did automatically. There are times when we have source code that gets merged, and we lose the changes that we expected to happen. It can get a little confusing at times. They can just do a little bit better on the merging of changes for multiple developers. When you restructure your source code, the historical information doesn't directly come across. It doesn't link when you move those source folders around. I would like to see that ability. The whole source code control system should show you the history of all the changes you made to a bunch of files. If we take a folder with a bunch of files and move it from one place to another, the history is gone. It just doesn't bring over the history of everything that was moved. That has prevented us from restructuring some of our source code to suit the larger number of developers that we have. I haven't called Microsoft to see if there is help that they can give me on this because on the web and on their sites, I can clearly see that that is just the way it is, and we're not doing something wrong. So, that is something for which I would really like to have the ability. I can't recall the versions, but when I upgraded from one version to another, it didn't retain history as well because they made some fundamental changes. It might have been from 2012 to 2015. I upgraded and moved it to a new server, and it lost the historical information. We needed the old stuff running so that we could access the historical data. So, the upgrade path wasn't that easy. I don't know if that's the case anymore. When we go to 2019, we'll be finding that out.
    Buyer's Guide
    TFS
    June 2022
    Learn what your peers think about TFS. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
    610,812 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We've been using TFS for 10 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It has been extremely stable. We don't have any issues with it. It works. Performance is good. All the features that we turned on are working exactly as we expected.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    So far, so good. We've had one external developer consultant that had to come in and access it as well, and that went well. I don't have any gauge about how it would be for a team of 50 developers. The hardware we're running on it right now probably wouldn't be enough, but I don't feel that it wouldn't be able to scale to a larger number of developers. From a security model perspective and from a functionality perspective, it seems to have all the features to be scalable. I just don't know about the performance. That's all. Currently, there are five of us who work with this solution. We have one project manager and four developers. We have one firmware developer who does not work in the Visual Studio environment. This firmware developer works in a microchip MPLAB X environment. All other developers work in the Visual Studio development world. So, it's more integrated, but both roles work. The same people also take care of its maintenance. From a source code management perspective, it is being used very extensively. From a build server perspective, it is used extensively. We don't do release management with it, and we don't have integrated automated testing turned on in it as well. Those are two fairly large areas of functionality that we don't use currently. We may in the future, but we're not using them right now. We're using about 60% of the functionality.

    How are customer service and support?

    From a technical support perspective, we've used the Microsoft website to get answers to our questions. It has been very good that way. I would rate it a five out of five in that aspect. We haven't had to call a person or open up a case. We've been able to do our own self-support through the knowledge base that they supply. There are a lot of users of this product. So, a lot of the typical problems that people experience are out there, and it's easy to find them.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    In different roles that I've had with different companies, I've used CVS, which is a different source code system. It's on the Linux system. It's not on Microsoft Windows. I've also used TortoiseSVN. I find TFS much easier because it's fully integrated into our solution. In the previous world, I wasn't the decision-maker about which one to use. I came into projects that already had those in place, and they were not developing on the Microsoft platform. I understand why they didn't use the Microsoft platform in that case. In our world, we're developing software that runs mostly on the Microsoft platform, so it made sense to do that. Originally, when I used other packages, I was working as a consultant. I was working at different places, and I was using whatever the decision-makers used at those places as their source code control systems. When we started this company and I was the decision-maker, I used the Microsoft TFS platform.

    How was the initial setup?

    It's relatively straightforward for a developer. On the initial setup, I'd probably rate it a four out of five.  It took us about three days to get everything set up correctly, but we complicated our environment as time went on. We started off with one developer, then up to two, then to three, and then to four. So, as we increased our number of developers on the team, we changed the complexity of how it was deployed. It wasn't all done in one shot. It was done over a period of time. If we had to set it up from scratch today, it would probably take us about three or four days to map it out and do it correctly. The more developers you have, the more complicated the setup has to be because you need to set up permissions and you need to set up roles and responsibilities. If it was just one team doing the same thing, it would be no different for one developer or five developers, but because we have different areas of expertise that we work in, we were trying to protect certain code bases from one developer from another. So, it just becomes more complicated. It's really just a security permissions thing that makes it complicated.

    What about the implementation team?

    We did it all ourselves. We haven't outsourced. We have a company that we deal with that maintains our servers for us, but they don't have any TFS experience. We coordinated these changes through them, but we dictated the changes. So, they didn't provide us with any expertise.

    What was our ROI?

    We develop software for the oil and gas world. Our software runs right on drilling rigs and downhole and also on tools that we put downhole. When there are problems, we need to fix things quickly. It is critical. We're tens of thousands of dollars an hour at a rig, so we do need to make a quick fix. We now have release management and the ability to do small, hotfixes, and things like that to help customers. Definitely, time is money. It allows us to go back in time very easily to a known configuration in our worlds. We can go back with our source and pull out the code and compare and diagnose any problems that are occurring. It helps to rule out and diagnose problems quickly and way more efficiently in real-time. We remove the uncertainties of what software is and where and what has changed. It really helps us there. It helps us respond to our customers' needs in a much faster fashion and saves our customers' money in a way.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I believe we pay on a yearly basis. I don't know the current costs of them. We outsource all that to a third party. Each of the developers gets a Microsoft Visual Studio Azure DevOps license, which gives them access to the TFS server as well. We probably pay on average about 1,800 Canadian Dollars a year for every developer, but that covers a lot more than just TFS. The cost isn't prohibitive. We use a lot of different software in our company. We use a lot of engineering software. If I compare the cost of our developer team software to some of our other solutions, such as our CAD package SolidWorks or our PCB design software Altium, we pay orders of magnitude less for TFS than we do for those other packages. Microsoft's licensing terms are also much better. They're good. I would rate them a four out of five in terms of pricing. The only additional cost that you have is that you need to run it on a server, and you need a Windows Server software license. If you didn't have that to start with, you'd have to purchase it, but we already had that for other services within the company, such as file services, print services, etc. Other than that, there are not really any costs.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I'm always evaluating different things. The original Microsoft product, which was Visual SourceSafe, was something with which we had done some work in the past. TFS was the next release of that. I thought Visual SourceSafe had some shortcomings. I evaluated the difference between TFS and Visual SourceSafe and decided it was the right way to go.  I've used Git as well, which is now becoming fully integrated with TFS. So, I evaluated that. I like a lot of the features of Git because of the user community that uses it. The open-source community highly integrates with it. TFS is now integrated with that as well, so I've had no reason to switch entirely off the TFS system. Git is really a source code control system. The pro is that there is a very large component of open-source software that is supplied through the Git interface. A lot of developers of open-source applications expose access to their source code through Git, whereas Microsoft TFS is not like that. They don't do that. Microsoft TFS is more for internal. Microsoft TFS now supports Git, and it will use Git even as its underlying source code control system. So, TFS does integrate with Git directly now, and all the benefits of Git are now in TFS.

    What other advice do I have?

    The only advice I would give is to design the security model and the developer model assuming that you have a larger team of developers than what you have when you start. You should set it up originally for multiple users to be working on the projects rather than having to change your methodology partway through. We made some decisions on how we structured our source code and how we structured our team projects, and I would not have done that if I had known that the developers would be working on it in the fashion that we do now. Your configuration for ten developers would work with one developer too, but the configuration for one developer doesn't always work for ten developers. So, set it up for ten assuming that you're going to be doing that. I would rate it a seven out of ten because of the issues with the upgrade path, restructuring folders, and things like that. If you don't configure it right to start with, it's a little bit difficult to change. That's the only reason that I'm not giving it a nine. If I have to make the same decision again, I absolutely would buy it again. It does what it was advertised to do, and it's not causing us any harm. It's doing its job, and it does it well. There are just a few things around the upgrade and around the restructuring of source code that could be improved. That's all.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    Ashish-Kamat - PeerSpot reviewer
    Principal Consultant at Wipro
    Real User
    Top 20
    Lifecycle management tool that allows you to track the health of your project for the entire lifecycle of software development
    Pros and Cons
    • "I have found almost all of the features valuable because it integrates well with your Microsoft products. If a client is using the entire Microsoft platform, then TFS would be definitely preferable. It integrates with the digital studio development environment as well."
    • "Overall, I think it would be useful to have something similar where Microsoft comes up with supporting concepts of scaling Agile in TFS so that clients don't have to look for a separate tool."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use this solution mostly for our clients. It's a lifecycle management tool. We use it for the entire lifecycle of software development. Then we deliver it, and use it for production support. Basically, you can always use it for your requirements, as well as to track the health of your project.

    What is most valuable?

    I have found almost all of the features valuable because it integrates well with your Microsoft products. If a client is using the entire Microsoft platform, then TFS would be definitely preferable. It integrates with the digital studio development environment as well. So, almost all the features for TFS are useful.

    The good thing is, unlike other products, you get a complete suite of features. Many of the other vendors don't have an entire suite of features available. If you take Jira for example, the requirements might be captured in a different tool. Or maybe there are other features in the lifecycle development environment and different tools might be used, but TFS offers a consolidated package. You don't have to go to other tools to capture your requirements, or maybe even if you're doing build and release planning.

    What needs improvement?

    Nowadays, the shift is from Waterfall to Agile, so many vendors have come up with their own products. For example, Jira has many built-in features which support the PI planning. Overall, I think it would be useful to have something similar where Microsoft comes up with supporting concepts of scaling Agile in TFS so that clients don't have to look for a separate tool. That would be helpful.

    With the latest version, I'm not too aware of whether Microsoft has implemented the PI planning features, the collaboration features, in TFS or not. But I think that would be one of the features that might be helpful to the development teams and for the overall planning.

    There have also been some security glitches with this solution.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used this solution for more than 10 years. I've been working on Microsoft technologies only, and my team members have also been working on TFS for a long time.

    The last time I used TFS was in 2020. After that, I moved out of delivery into consulting. I was using the last version before they moved to the cloud version, Azure DevOps.

    Earlier, we were using it majorly on-premises. Later on when Microsoft introduced Azure DevOps, then we moved onto the cloud.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It is stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It's absolutely scalable. If you are planning for a high availability environment, then you can definitely have a backup environment as well. Then if something goes wrong with your primary server, there is always a backup available, which you can always use.

    How are customer service and support?

    The support and documentation available on their website are very good.

    I would rate them between 4 and 5 on a scale of 1 to 5.

    How was the initial setup?

    I would give the initial setup a four out of five. It's not very complex. Microsoft provides all the documentation and guidance to do the setup, and even has videos available. The guidance is very good.

    The length of deployment is on a case-by-case basis. Some of the clients may have a complex environment, some may not. So it depends on what kind of supporting tools are available on the client's premises. TFS is not that complex to set up, unless the environment design is very complex.

    Most of the clients have their own support teams for incident management. So, it depends on each of the individual clients. They have the budget, and they will have an entire team to support your TFS and management.

    What was our ROI?

    It's worth the money. I've been using Microsoft products right from the start of my career, and I'm a big fan of Microsoft products. Many people don't like them because they work on different platforms. But the good thing about Microsoft products is that they're interlinked. For example, even if I'm a developer, the underlying development language is always going to be the same, irrespective of whether I use Dynamics 365 or ASP. The underlying programming language is always common. So, the rates are comparatively less than shifting from one Microsoft product to another, or implementing the suite of Microsoft products. The learning curve is always comparatively less.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Microsoft products are always expensive. Obviously, they are quality products, but it would be helpful if there was a reduction in price. But compared to other vendors, I think the cost is high.

    I've been doing the budgeting for clients, and I find that the costing part — when we are going for new environments or we are ordering new servers — definitely plays a big part.

    I would rate it between a 2 and 3 out of 5.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would rate this solution 8 out of 10.

    I'd give it that rating because there are security glitches, but otherwise, from a usability standpoint and from the operational perspective, I think the products are really good.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Microsoft Azure
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer:
    Flag as inappropriate
    Buyer's Guide
    TFS
    June 2022
    Learn what your peers think about TFS. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
    610,812 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    TitleSpecial Education Teacher at a educational organization with 201-500 employees
    Real User
    Good traceability for managing workflows, but not flexible enough for agile environments
    Pros and Cons
    • "The traceability is valuable. While managing the workflows, it was always nice to have that traceability from requirements and all the way through design. It integrates with Microsoft Test Manager, and you can have everything that is related to a requirement attached to it."
    • "It has been really dated. When you start to work more in an agile environment, it is not really that flexible. They tried to replicate the look and feel of Jira, but it is not quite there. It was nice to use in the past, but it is not as flexible now with the changing development environments and methodologies."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use it for software development, but we are moving to Jira.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We work with life science companies, and they need traceability. Because we have the capability of being able to provide the traceability that they require, it helps us with laying out what they need for their validation efforts.

    What is most valuable?

    The traceability is valuable. While managing the workflows, it was always nice to have that traceability from requirements and all the way through design. It integrates with Microsoft Test Manager (MTM), and you can have everything that is related to a requirement attached to it.

    What needs improvement?

    It has been really dated. When you start to work more in an agile environment, it is not really that flexible. They tried to replicate the look and feel of Jira, but it is not quite there. It was nice to use in the past, but it is not as flexible now with the changing development environments and methodologies.

    It should have some of the things that Jira has, such as boards. We're focused on the scrum boards where you can actually drag and drop work from one queue to another. There should be more flexibility where you can just drag and drop as a user and have more visibility about what's active, what's not, and what's assigned to you through dashboards.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using this solution for almost 14 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It was quite stable. We did not have a lot of issues over all those years. So, it definitely was a reliable solution for a long period of time. It just was not flexible when we started moving to a more agile model.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It was able to scale to meet our needs. It also allowed us to do our customization. I'm not sure if that ended up being a good thing, but it did allow us to do what we wanted it to do.

    We have about 150 users, and they're developers, FQA, software quality engineers, business analysts, user experience team members, and architects. For its deployment and maintenance, in general, there are four or five people. They are from the DevOps team.

    We don't plan to expand its usage. We're transitioning to Jira.

    How are customer service and support?

    Their support was good. We had the support we needed for both TFS and Microsoft Test Manager.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We were not using any different solution. This company has been working with TFS for as long as I can remember. We're now transitioning to Jira.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was fairly complex, but some of it was due to us. We did more configuration and customization, and because we customized the system, it made it more complicated.

    In terms of duration, some of our previous upgrades took several days. Most of that was the actual deployment, but the preparation took several weeks.

    What about the implementation team?

    We did use an integrator once or twice. Our experience with them was good. It was easier because we didn't have to worry about a lot of things. They took the burden of the effort, and we just had to give them information.

    What was our ROI?

    We haven't quantified that. In general, there has been a great time saving because with what we've done around validation artifacts, we've been able to build it right into the system. So, we can automatically generate it at the end of a release. Earlier, it would've taken us six weeks to put together a validation package. With what we've set up in TFS, it would take us a week at the max.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I was working with the engineering team, and that was not under my umbrella. From what I can remember, its license was yearly. They had the licenses on a per-user basis, and they included MTM.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I'm not really sure what they did. It was already in place when I joined the company.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would advise Microsoft to update the tool. If a lot of users are starting to move to Jira because of the agile environment, Microsoft might want to adapt a little faster and provide similar or better functionality. It has been reliable for a very long time, and I've been really happy with it, but you've got to be able to change with the methodologies and the environments.

    I would rate it a six out of 10 because it hasn't changed enough. I would've given it a much higher rating years ago, but because of the lack of evolution and not being able to adapt to the current business needs, its rating is not higher at this point.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    Asst. Vice president, Applications Architecture at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Good project management features improve discipline and productivity in our application development lifecycle
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable feature from my point of view is project management, which includes user stories as well as task management."
    • "The user interface could be improved to make it simpler and increase usability."

    What is our primary use case?

    The primary use for TFS is for event planning, including things like writing the user story and then assigning tasks to the developers. Another task is writing test cases, then recording test results, and sending bugs to the team members. The third thing is that we use TFS as part of our CICD pipeline.

    As part of our pipeline, we use it for checking in code and it acts as a repository. This leads to the fourth thing we use it for, which is to move the code from dev to QA to production. Essentially, we establish a complete lifecycle using TFS.

    We also use it in conjunction with Azure DevOps.

    How has it helped my organization?

    This product brings a lot of discipline and consistency in the way that our developers use their tools. 

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable feature from my point of view is project management, which includes user stories as well as task management. I would say that these features are critical.

    What needs improvement?

    I would like to see better integration between TFS and third-party tools such as Jira. For example, integration with SharePoint is not very straightforward and we need to do a lot of manual work.

    The user interface could be improved to make it simpler and increase usability. Making it more user-friendly would be a good thing. While it is okay in some regards, it does not compare to tools like Jira. There is some complexity because there are a lot of features, but usability can still be much better and it would be more comfortable to use.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have been using Team Foundation Server for almost five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    This product is stable and we have not experienced any issues with it.

    The developers are completely dependent on TFS and are using it on a daily basis.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    TFS is quite scalable and there are different deployment options that are available. I don't see any problems with scalability. We have between 40 and 45 people in my department who are using TFS.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The support that we received during the initial setup was the only time that we needed to contact them. Beyond that, we didn't have to ask for technical support. I wouldn't refer to our initial support as very technical because it was more about knowing how to perform certain tasks within the tool.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Prior to using TFS, we used CVS as our code repository solution. All of our requirements and bug tracking were done using manual effort. We were using Word documents and things like that. However, all of that has now been put into TFS.

    What led us to switch was the ability to track all of the developers' activities. Before this, getting visibility and deliverables was a real pain point. For example, we didn't know how many stories the developers had completed, how much effort has been spent, or where we were with respect to the tasks that were completed by the teams.

    How was the initial setup?

    I would say that the initial setup is of medium difficulty. You definitely need help from an expert, as it is not like I can just pick it up and start running it. TFS requires a little bit of expert support in setting up, and we received solid support from Microsoft.

    Our deployment took place over the course of a week. It was not a week's worth of effort but we had to schedule calls for support. I would say that TFS can be set up and tested in a single day, although it may take up to a week to finalize things.

    What about the implementation team?

    During our implementation, we requested help directly from Microsoft.

    Our in-house DevOps team is responsible for maintenance.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I wouldn't say that this tool is cheap or expensive but in the middle. TFS is definitely not as expensive as some other tools like Rational Team Concert. Basically, I would say that it is affordable.

    Professional Services is a separate cost from the standard licensing fees.

    What other advice do I have?

    My advice to anybody who is considering TFS is that the suitability depends on what technology you are trying to use. For example, if you're using Microsoft technology then it is better to use TFS. If on the other hand, you are developing something outside of Microsoft, perhaps using an open-source tool, then I wouldn't be able to recommend TFS. Instead, I would choose one of the other many third-party tools that are available.

    I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    AnujKataria - PeerSpot reviewer
    Project Manager at Duck Creek Technologies
    Real User
    Top 10
    One-stop solution that is useful, and makes things easier to manage, but the burndown charts are problematic
    Pros and Cons
    • "Basically, the capacity to construct various products is something I find handy."
    • "I'm looking for specific options that aren't currently available, such as active status, new status, or what's currently in progress."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use TFS for project management.

    What is most valuable?

    Basically, the capacity to construct various products is something I find handy. For example, I could write a user story and then add some tasks to it, as well as subtasks and test cases.

    Everything can be linked together, making it easy for us to track down and document hours for each and every task, whether it's a task, above, or anything else.

    Everything is interconnected. As a result, tracking and viewing the bulletin board dashboard and burndown charts, among other things, is much easier.

    It's a one-stop solution that is useful and makes it easier to handle.

    What needs improvement?

    The overall ability in the Agile process has some room to improve, even though it is interconnected. When I worked on Jira, it had the capability of better linkage.

    When it comes to project management, we are having trouble with burndown charts, which we can't seem to display. As a result, we have created new tasks and realigning our process. Rather than creating larger tasks, we are creating subtasks such as development tasks, QA tasks, and deployment tasks.

    An area of improvement is when there is a login for a specific user story present, it should display automatically. This is an area that where we are having difficulty and struggling in.

    The scalability can be improved.

    Linkage and task management are two areas that we are having difficulties with. It could be more like Jira, which has a number of different plugins. In addition, I feel that the status should include additional options. For example, they offer fewer options for a specific task user story or bugs.

    I'm looking for specific options that aren't currently available, such as active status, new status, or what's currently in progress. I would like to see an in-progress capability where you can mark it active, but you can also write that it is in progress. When I look at the dashboard, there is nothing there to show me what has been done or why it is active or not.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    My company has been using TFS since it started. It may be more than 10 years. I joined the company a year ago.

    We have been using it through the cloud during COVID and working from home. We can connect to it from any network.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There have been some lags in the past, and we have also encountered some latency when setting it up on the laptop. You may have some problems at first, but as soon as you connect to the internet and update your product, everything becomes stable.

    Within our organization, for example, we use Microsoft Teams for communication, chats, and for calls. We had some issues with it being unreliable and not fully airing the sound over the laptop speakers and mic. I discovered that as soon as we updated the product, the stability was restored. There was a problem with Teams, which they fixed and updated.

    Initial difficulties are to be expected, but things are constantly improving.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It can be scaled to some extent. The main issue is that, unlike Jira or any other tool, the burndown chart is not displayed.

    How are customer service and support?

    I have never used technical support because I've never been in a situation where it has gone down and I needed to contact them, but I believe that because Microsoft is a reputable organization with adequate technical support right now.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have also worked with Jira.

    I come from a QA background, and we used to do automation. Jira was far easier to integrate with our QA automation frameworks because it has a large number of exposed APIs and public APIs that we could use, which is a positive development. Also, the burndown charts, as well as the ability to manage different Agile model frameworks, where we could use scrum in one project but also had to use Kanban. As a result, the transition from one framework to another was simple. These are the things I found useful but haven't seen in the case of TFS yet.

    How was the initial setup?

    Initially, TFS was a bit complicated. Now that it's Azure DevOps the initial setup is much easier.

    It's a one-stop shop for building code repository, and a version control system within TFS or Azure DevOps, as TFS has been renamed.

    What other advice do I have?

    I am a project manager.

    I would rate TFS a seven out of ten

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
    Flag as inappropriate
    Product Owner at PerkinElmer, Inc.
    Real User
    Reliable, good performance, good reporting tools, and useful for managing all of your development tasks
    Pros and Cons
    • "The work item feature is most valuable. It allows us to store all product requirements. We can also link the test cases to those requirements so that we know which feature has already been tested, and which one is waiting for testing. We can also couple the code reviews, unit tests, and automated tests into these requirements. It is reliable. It has all the features and good performance. It also has reporting tools or analysis tools."
    • "Currently, we are looking for a solution with which we can incorporate third-party development sites or third-party project teams into the system. Because it is on-premise, it is a bit problematic because we need to have a VPN or something else in the system. A cloud-based solution would be better for us, and that's what we are looking for. Our biggest problem is the external connection, which, of course, is limited by our own IT. It would be good to have some kind of publishing service for this external connection. It might be there, and it might be that our IT is making it impossible for us. Its template editor could be easier to use. Currently, customizing the project templates according to your needs requires some work."

    What is our primary use case?

    It is mainly for the work item handling, which is the documentation for the development projects. We also use it for requirement handling and then following a project's progress with tasks or issues.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It doesn't improve the way our organization functions, but it supports the way we work. Instead of having separate Excel or other work item lists, we can just utilize the work items provided by TFS for record-keeping and monitoring the progress.

    What is most valuable?

    The work item feature is most valuable. It allows us to store all product requirements. We can also link the test cases to those requirements so that we know which feature has already been tested, and which one is waiting for testing. We can also couple the code reviews, unit tests, and automated tests into these requirements.

    It is reliable. It has all the features and good performance. It also has reporting tools or analysis tools. 

    What needs improvement?

    Currently, we are looking for a solution with which we can incorporate third-party development sites or third-party project teams into the system. Because it is on-premise, it is a bit problematic because we need to have a VPN or something else in the system. A cloud-based solution would be better for us, and that's what we are looking for. Our biggest problem is the external connection, which, of course, is limited by our own IT. It would be good to have some kind of publishing service for this external connection. It might be there, and it might be that our IT is making it impossible for us.

    Its template editor could be easier to use. Currently, customizing the project templates according to your needs requires some work.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using this solution for 15 years. I have been using its latest version for a couple of years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It is reliable.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't actually used their support very much. I'm not really the one who is maintaining the system. 

    You can find a lot of information by searching the web. There is also a community around it, and a lot of answers are available. Microsoft has its own support if needed.

    How was the initial setup?

    I haven't been so much involved in building up the TFS server, but I think it is rather simple. The installation is simple. There are so-called project templates that you might need to adjust according to your needs. These require some work. If you can use the default templates, then no work is needed. We have managed to adjust everything for what we needed. There were no problems that we couldn't overcome. Its template editor could be easier to use.

    What about the implementation team?

    It was done in-house. It is pretty easy to come up with an installer. There is nothing difficult there.

    What other advice do I have?

    The Team Foundation Server is now called Azure DevOps. We are using an old product. I would advise others to consider whether they need an on-premises or a cloud solution. The on-premises solution requires external developers. They can also look at the cloud option and see which product offering is better for their needs.

    It is a nice system to have. You get a managed system where you can manage your development tasks easily, and you don't need to keep your own bookkeeping for tasks and backup items. They are already there in TFS. You can just use the system monthly and produce reports out of the system. For me, it was nice to see that such a tool exists.

    I would rate TFS a nine out of ten. I'm pretty happy with it.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Program Solution Architect at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
    Real User
    Top 5
    Quality version control, good backlog management, and scalable
    Pros and Cons
    • "Some of the valuable features are version control and the ability to create different collections in terms of segregating the authorization for teams who connect to small projects."
    • "This solution is quite old and it is already being bundled as Azure DevOps Server."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use the solution mainly for store version control, backlog and product management.

    What is most valuable?

    Some of the valuable features are version control and the ability to create different collections in terms of segregating the authorization for teams who connect to small projects. The hierarchy they have is nice. The backlog management tool is good, you can manage your product backlog very easily and then assign your comments against it. 

    What needs improvement?

    This solution is quite old and it is already being bundled as Azure DevOps Server. 

    In an upcoming release, more integration is needed.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using the solution for more than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I have found the solution to be scalable. There are approximately ten people using the solution in my organization.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have used Jira In the past and if you compare Jira with Microsoft, Jira integrates from portfolio to project, to product, to version control management. Everything is linked in Jira. If you have a company portfolio of several programs that someone can see. If your responsibility is at a program level, you can see all the projects under it. You can even go to product backlogs for each program and got the code version control to see the programs being developed.

    In terms of Microsoft, they have an organization structure. You can create multiple organizations, but Azure DevOps is only for product management. If you have your project risks and plan, that is outside Azure DevOps. You have to go to a separate tool in Microsoft, which is Microsoft Project. If you want to go to content management, if you stay in Jira you have another tool, which is also integrated into the overall platform, and that is called Confluence Content Management. If you use Microsoft, then either you need to do it on SharePoint or you will be using Teams.

    How was the initial setup?

    The installation was easy.

    What about the implementation team?

    We had a team doing the implementation, it was their first time and they did not have any problems. It took less than a week to do the full implementation. The amount of implementation personnel depends on the scope of the operation, but if you just want to get it up and running, then one person is enough.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The price of the solution is cheaper than other competitors and it is a per-user license.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I was using TFS in my previous company, which I recently left. Where I am currently employed, I looking to get Azure DevOps, and there will be approximately 20 to 40 users. It is a bigger project, it has more developers involved. This is where we are right now comparing what to go with DevOps or with Jira, or you can say Microsoft or Jira.

    We did evaluate other solutions before this one. Since our use case for TFS was mainly version control. We looked at GitHub and Bitbucket, but I think the licensing model for TFS was cheaper than both of them.

    What other advice do I have?

    If someone is looking for version control software and product management software today, then I would recommend them to go for Azure DevOps. If they do not have any restrictions in terms of keeping their data on-cloud, then they should go with Azure DevOps Cloud Service, because then you will not have to worry about installing anything on the server. If you want to have an on-premise solution, then you can use the Azure DevOps Server version.

    I rate TFS an eight out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Test Lead at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Consultant
    Reliable, scalable, easy to use queries, and proper traceability
    Pros and Cons
    • "As far as queries are concerned, creating, grading, or customizing the queries as a primary requirement is very easy to do."
    • "The dashboard and the customization of dashboards is an area they have to work on."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use TFS for test management. Our entire project management is done through TFS.

    We have our test cases uploaded, and we use it for user story tracking and progress tracking.

    TFS is on our client's VMs.

    What is most valuable?

    What I like is the backlog management, as it is very easy to track at the feature level and move onto the big level. It offers proper traceability for this and the features. 

    As far as queries are concerned, creating, grading, or customizing the queries as a primary requirement is very easy to do. It's a user-friendly interface when working with queries.

    What needs improvement?

    TFS has to be more user-friendly. We could have some friendly dashboards, which I feel is missing here, where I can easily plug in the dashboard and use it. 

    Part of the test case upload is there, but it's an addon that is not being used at this time.

    Creating dashboards is complicated. The dashboard and the customization of dashboards is an area they have to work on. It needs to be improved.

    I would like to see improved dashboards with easy plug and play. There should be multiple templates that would be easily and readily available where I can track and create my view.

    This is what I feel is missing or needs improvement.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been working with TFS for three years.

    We are working with an up-to-date version.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    TFS is a stable solution.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    TFS is a scalable model. If I have to look into large projects, we have multiple agile teams having different backlogs. Having a view on this is rather scalable.

    We have approximately 28 users for this current project, and we are using it on a daily basis.

    We plan to keep using TFS.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I have not had any instances where I needed to contact the technical support team.

    It goes back to our install team and they address the issues.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Previously, I was working with Jira and QC. 

    The change to TFS was because our client moved onto to TFS.

    TFS is more stable and more scalable. We handling multiple projects using TFS. Usability is good and it's very easy for me to have traceability with a view on everything. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup is done by our customer's IT team.

    In our case, it's a matter of plug and play.

    What other advice do I have?

    In my opinion, I would say that TFS is more supportive of a large enterprise.

    There is a lot of information available online.

    The suitability of TFS depends on the requirements of the customer. If it is for Test Management, I would say that TFS is a product that they should consider if it's a large organization that has multiple or multi-thread implementations.

    Overall, I would say it's fine and I would recommend it.

    I would rate TFS and eight out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free TFS Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
    Updated: June 2022
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free TFS Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.