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Cisco Ethernet Switches OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Cisco Ethernet Switches is #1 ranked solution in top Ethernet Switches. PeerSpot users give Cisco Ethernet Switches an average rating of 8 out of 10. Cisco Ethernet Switches is most commonly compared to Fortinet FortiSwitch - Secure Access: Cisco Ethernet Switches vs Fortinet FortiSwitch - Secure Access. Cisco Ethernet Switches is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 56% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a comms service provider, accounting for 29% of all views.
Cisco Ethernet Switches Buyer's Guide

Download the Cisco Ethernet Switches Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: June 2022

What is Cisco Ethernet Switches?
Cisco Ethernet Switches scale to meet the needs of networks of all sizes. They are Secure, Reliable and Seamless.

Cisco Ethernet Switches was previously known as Cisco Industrial Ethernet Switches.

Cisco Ethernet Switches Customers
Linz AG
Cisco Ethernet Switches Video

Cisco Ethernet Switches Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Cisco Ethernet Switches pricing:
  • "Quality comes at a price. I've been around the block a bit, and I know that good quality comes at a price. However, some of the organizations don't have big budgets, so you have to develop different solutions for them. They don't have the budget to get some of the high-end features. Cisco can consider providing entry-level hardware to suit SMBs."
  • "Price is a pain point for us. We've lost a lot of bids, and the reason has been that we majorly quoted Cisco devices. Some of our competitors quoted other devices like Ubiquity or Microchip. Some even quoted this Chinese product TP-Link, and they won the bid over us because we quoted Cisco. Meanwhile, the major reason why we quoted Cisco is reliability and stability from day one. They also last longer. The prices could be worked on so that they become more affordable. We had to deploy a city-wide WiFi network, and we were working in conjunction with Google. Because of the price, even Google recommended a product called Ruckus, so we used Ruckus over Cisco. Its price and license were the main reasons. You have to pay to renew the license every year. Even though you also renew the licenses for Ruckus, but they are much cheaper than Cisco. So, while I would recommend Cisco any time, the trouble remains with the pricing."
  • Cisco Ethernet Switches Reviews

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    Ivan Manchev - PeerSpot reviewer
    Network Delivery Lead at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Stable and scalable solution for all business sizes
    Pros and Cons
    • "Cisco Ethernet Switches are great devices."
    • "We are less in the Cloud because the Cloud technologies didn't work so well. That happened in all of the companies where I've been engaged."

    What is our primary use case?

    Our primary use case is for ethernet switches. We mainly use switches and routers as edge distribution switches. Some of the plants have been with the big pharmaceutical company Aragon. We have also been with a North American company, and others. Most of their switches were Cisco in pharmaceutical company where I worked for 10 years. Some of the switches in the plants were used as a core. Many of them, especially in Bulgaria and in Europe, I installed myself. Others in America are responsible during the shift time for the configuration changes and so on. They are used in any level, as a Layer 3, Layer 2, whatever. All kinds of switches are used in the different places in our LAN. 

    How has it helped my organization?

    Cisco Ethernet Switches are great devices. I remember when we decided to replace all the HP switches from the American company when they acquired us. We replaced all the core switches with 3850, except in the bigger and biggest sites where we used the 4745 switches. That was great. They are very useful and very easy to configure. It was not much trouble at all and we got a more stable network.

    What is most valuable?

    We have been very satisfied with using Cisco 2960 series X with EIGRP Cisco proprietary protocol. This saved us much money and worked very stably. We also installed 47 and 3850 Switches to the main servers on the 10-gig in some places and Nexus devices using 40-gig connectivity.

    What needs improvement?

    We are less in the Cloud because the Cloud technologies didn't work so well. That happened in all of the companies where I've been engaged.
    Buyer's Guide
    Cisco Ethernet Switches
    June 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Cisco Ethernet Switches. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
    609,272 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Cisco Ethernet Switches for a few months in my current position but I would say 20 years or more in other companies.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability is great. Some Aruba devices are more stable, but with Cisco, we never had problems, with some little exceptions. It is very stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It is very scalable. In this company we have a single usage. I first started with Cisco routers in 1997, now we install Cisco routers all the time.

    How are customer service and support?

    The technical support for the core switches especially, but for the rest as well, is very good. It's excellent support. Especially for the core switches we had 24/7 support. On some sites in Bulgaria we one time had a problem at midnight and they delivered that switch in time. They brought the switch very fast. Very good, excellent, technical support solution. Also, with previous accounts with the pharmaceutical company we had access to a dedicated engineer for the project. We had access to their WAP environment. So, all told, tech support is brilliant.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have used Aruba which is very similar to Cisco. It is also easy to manage and to install. Installing it is straightforward but I don't have too much experience with the priority. We were responsible for their LAN but they have some special requirements which we didn't touch. We didn't use all functionalities in the Aruba. We just used them as Layer 2 switches or as access switches on the main site, and on the bigger sites they had still some old HP switches. Also, if I remember correctly, Comware had all those old HP switches. We used Aruba just as Layer 2 access devices and didn't use much of the functionalities. I prefer Cisco. Of course, Aruba is cheaper overall but not necessarily for those small Layer 2 device access switches. I don't know what the price is now, I didn't compare each comparable device. If I had to choose, I would definitely go with the Cisco.

    How was the initial setup?

    In terms of the initial setup, for me, with much experience, it's straightforward. With most of the switches we had a good team and prepared more than the configuration on the access sheet and then automatically generated the configuration file, just moved it to the note part, visually checking for a minute. Then copy, paste, and done. Start installing. Mounting and connecting. Straightforward. It takes about one day for the device, if you don't count the cabling and the rack mounting and moving those and so on, and including the break, between 30 and 60 minutes, not more, for each switch. If they are stackable with some stack devices, for all of them, let's say an hour to hour and a half. Not more because we had all the configurations prepared in advance.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I you have a big client or if you have a big project and register it, the discount is good. In the companies that I have worked for, mostly for switching, we had a 55% discount or more. So with that good discount, who cares? It's cheap enough.

    What other advice do I have?

    Cisco Ethernet Switches are appropriate for small and medium businesses. They also are large enough for our data centers which we had in Tel Aviv, Israel and in California. We had such big devices there. On a scale of one to ten, I would give Cisco Ethernet Switches a 10. I would advise others who are looking into implementing Cisco to buy and implement it.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Ken Simiyu - PeerSpot reviewer
    Manager Infrastructure & Projects at Kinetic Pride
    Real User
    Top 20
    Durable, robust, and my go-to solution for organizing the network for my clients
    Pros and Cons
    • "Being able to deal with multiple VLANs to segment the network logically is the biggest feature for us. The management of these switches is okay for us. These switches work very well, and they meet our needs."
    • "In terms of features, they tick all the boxes as of now. That could be because we tailor the solution around the product. I have not seen anything that pulls me back or is not working well for me. However, there could be better integration with the network monitoring systems. It doesn't mean it is currently not there, but there could be better discoverability with some of the network monitoring systems to be able to have more visibility. When you're setting up a control room, you can have more visibility into what is going on in the network. It has been doing that, but it can do that more."

    What is our primary use case?

    We have distributed locations, and we have them at different locations behind firewalls.

    What is most valuable?

    Being able to deal with multiple VLANs to segment the network logically is the biggest feature for us. The management of these switches is okay for us. These switches work very well, and they meet our needs. 

    What needs improvement?

    The pricing can be improved to make them more suitable for SMBs.

    In terms of features, they tick all the boxes as of now. That could be because we tailor the solution around the product. I have not seen anything that pulls me back or is not working well for me. However, there could be better integration with the network monitoring systems. It doesn't mean it is currently not there, but there could be better discoverability with some of the network monitoring systems to be able to have more visibility. When you're setting up a control room, you can have more visibility into what is going on in the network. It has been doing that, but it can do that more.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using this solution for over five or six years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Their stability is very good. Even when they are reaching the end of life, they still have a lot of life in terms of stability. They are very durable and stable. They can run for a lot more time, but for a business, security is important, and it becomes necessary to upgrade to new models and let these devices die. We have to upgrade to the latest models because of company policy, but there is no problem with their durability or robustness.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We usually over-spec, and there is no problem with scalability. They're able to handle everything very well. In all the fields where we are using them, we haven't encountered a situation that they are not able to handle. They work fine.

    In our company, they are being used at different levels. They're basically serving everyone, and there are about 500 people in our company. They serve right up to the data center.

    In terms of our plans to increase its usage, a lot of discussions are going on about moving to the cloud, SD-WAN, and things like that. With the ongoing situation of the pandemic, there have been discussions about scaling down the local network and moving towards service provision for remote workers, as opposed to on-prem. We might scale down the local network and move things to the cloud and other remote access technologies.

    How are customer service and support?

    I've not interacted much with them because I've not had a lot of issues. If there is anything, I get a lot of information from FAQs and online forums. It does not really go to the point where I've to go to Cisco's support desk. There is a lot of good documentation. They've done a good job with the documentation of it. It has always helped me.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We didn't use any other solution previously on this site. It was our go-to solution from the start because of its security and market sentiment. At different locations for different clients, we use different products, but this is what we have been using on our site.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was straightforward. I have a lot of experience with them in different organizations and through my own career path, so it wasn't hard for me. I'm used to them.

    The project was deployed in phases. Most of the time was spent on the server-side of things. The setup time for switches was very less. It took two to three hours to get them up and running. It was not a problem.

    What about the implementation team?

    It was done in-house. We have in-house expertise.

    We have four people for its deployment and maintenance, and we are able to handle it well. There are two technicians from the IT department, and the rest of them are in the management role, but when it comes to the deployment, they are able to do the physical work.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Quality comes at a price. I've been around the block a bit, and I know that good quality comes at a price. However, some of the organizations don't have big budgets, so you have to develop different solutions for them. They don't have the budget to get some of the high-end features. Cisco can consider providing entry-level hardware to suit SMBs.

    What other advice do I have?

    I have complete confidence in this solution. It is my go-to solution when I'm organizing any network for a client. Of course, for many people, its cost could be an issue, but when you consider running a stable implementation and the risk of downtime in case of any issue vis-a-vis the initial purchase cost of the equipment, it is a no-brainer. I would suggest people take this route. If someone has the budget, they shouldn't skimp on it.

    I would rate it an eight out of 10.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    Buyer's Guide
    Cisco Ethernet Switches
    June 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Cisco Ethernet Switches. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
    609,272 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Maurice Poor - PeerSpot reviewer
    Manager - Network Operating Center at BCN
    Real User
    Top 20
    The most stable and reliable switches that perform better than all other solutions out there
    Pros and Cons
    • "What we love about the Cisco switches is that they are very reliable. You can deploy them and go to sleep, and you can be sure that nothing is going to go wrong. Our initial equipment was installed by a Chinese manufacturer named Fiberhome a couple of years ago. Their switches were called S engines. They worked, but some days, you just wake up, and the switch has popped up. It was a lot of crisis. Therefore, we are in the process of trying to take out all their switches and replace them with Cisco switches. We are getting good results in terms of reliability and even technical support."
    • "Cisco switches are good as they are, but it would be a major feature if they have built-in routers. Some of the Microchip switches have routers built in the same device. They have a router switch. For some of the sites, we deploy such switches because the client does not want a separate router and a separate switch. So, we go for a router switch with maybe 24 ports. Some of them are fiber, and some of them are ethernet. It would be a major improvement to what Cisco is already doing. Behind the scenes, a lot of scripting and stuff like this is happening. A lot of workload can be lifted if Cisco had a good GUI. If you look at Microchip switches, they have a good GUI in addition to the CLI."

    What is our primary use case?

    We are a fiber-optic provider. We have a lot of switches from Cisco and some from Microchip. We have C3750E, which is one of the main Cisco Ethernet switches. All ports of this switch are fiber.

    We have a local Cisco partner here who is quite reliable, so we patronize that partner. They do everything on our behalf, especially the licenses.

    What is most valuable?

    What we love about the Cisco switches is that they are very reliable. You can deploy them and go to sleep, and you can be sure that nothing is going to go wrong. Our initial equipment was installed by a Chinese manufacturer named Fiberhome a couple of years ago. Their switches were called S engines. They worked, but some days, you just wake up, and the switch has popped up. It was a lot of crisis. Therefore, we are in the process of trying to take out all their switches and replace them with Cisco switches. We are getting good results in terms of reliability and even technical support.

    What needs improvement?

    Cisco switches are good as they are, but it would be a major feature if they have built-in routers. Some of the Microchip switches have routers built in the same device. They have a router switch. For some of the sites, we deploy such switches because the client does not want a separate router and a separate switch. So, we go for a router switch with maybe 24 ports. Some of them are fiber, and some of them are ethernet. It would be a major improvement to what Cisco is already doing.

    Behind the scenes, a lot of scripting and stuff like this is happening. A lot of workload can be lifted if Cisco had a good GUI. If you look at Microchip switches, they have a good GUI in addition to the CLI.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Cisco Ethernet Switches for four years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We've been using them for a couple of years now. They have been running from day one after we installed them. Besides general maintenance issues, we never really have to turn them off.

    They're very reliable and stable. These are the most stable switches that we have. In a country like ours, Cisco switches are the only devices that have second-hand value. You could go to a second-hand shop and buy a second-hand industrial version, not the small business or domestic version, of the Cisco switch or router. It will still serve you well.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We've not really used much of the technical support even though for the new switches, we pay for it. The main benefit is the updates on iOS. We've never really had a situation where something went wrong with it, and we had to get in touch with technical support.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is straightforward. I wonder why some of the new Cisco switches still come with anterior port RS232 and why do they still maintain that. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Price is a pain point for us. We've lost a lot of bids, and the reason has been that we majorly quoted Cisco devices. Some of our competitors quoted other devices like Ubiquity or Microchip. Some even quoted this Chinese product TP-Link, and they won the bid over us because we quoted Cisco. Meanwhile, the major reason why we quoted Cisco is reliability and stability from day one. They also last longer. The prices could be worked on so that they become more affordable.

    We had to deploy a city-wide WiFi network, and we were working in conjunction with Google. Because of the price, even Google recommended a product called Ruckus, so we used Ruckus over Cisco. Its price and license were the main reasons. You have to pay to renew the license every year. Even though you also renew the licenses for Ruckus, but they are much cheaper than Cisco. So, while I would recommend Cisco any time, the trouble remains with the pricing.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would highly recommend it, especially for people who are doing wide-scale deployments like campus networks or a city-wide network square. 

    I would rate Cisco Ethernet Switches a ten out of ten. I don't see any product that performs better. We had a Chinese company coming in to do a bunch of presentations and stuff like that, but at the end of the day, those of us who are at the back doing the configurations understand that it is nothing closer to what Cisco offers.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Account Manager at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
    Reseller
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Very stable, scales well, and has excellent technical support
    Pros and Cons
    • "It's all-encompassing and can help you in all these different areas. If people realize that they want something that's going to work, that's pretty foolproof, then Cisco's always worth the investment."
    • "You do have to buy into the Cisco architecture to be able to use them."

    What is our primary use case?

    We have them set up for customers, including SMB, Kindergarten through grade 12 schools, higher education organizations, and some enterprises. It's pretty much been used for everything except the federal government.

    What is most valuable?

    The Cisco software does everything under one umbrella better than the competition. HP kind of has the capability. I'm not sure if they still have it, however, they used to license Cisco's iOS software for their own switches, which were decent switches as well. Now, there's Aruba, however, they've been through a bunch of different changes over the years. ThreeCom was part of HP for a while. In any case, Cisco offers sort of a one-stop-shop of options.

    It's all-encompassing and can help you in all these different areas. If people realize that they want something that's going to work, that's pretty foolproof, then Cisco's always worth the investment.

    The initial setup has gotten easier over the years.

    The stability is excellent.

    The solution is very scalable.

    Technical support is quite helpful and responsive. 

    What needs improvement?

    The thing that people usually complain about is that they're a little bit more expensive than other options. That said, you get what you pay for and it's such a good solution.

    You do have to buy into the Cisco architecture to be able to use them.

    You have to make sure you size appropriately at the outset. They're for the smaller markets usually, and you just want to make sure you don't purchase something under what you might grow to. Users should try to think a little bit bigger than what they want just so that they can have extra ports if they need them, instead of having to buy another one quicker than expected.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Our company has worked with Cisco probably for more than 20 years. The company is 31 years old, and we've actually always worked with Cisco Switches since the beginning. We have the same master engineer that has been with us for probably 28 of the 30 years. He's always been working with that.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable. That's one of the main benefits of it. It's super stable, and it's been proven for years.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    They've got many solutions for small companies, which we work with, and some of our biggest customers, and even multinationals can use Cisco probably better than anybody else. That's why the fact that international community likes it so much. They can use it anywhere in the world in companies of any size. It scales very well.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is usually very good. You're paying for the best, so the tech support is really good as well. We are quite satisfied with the level of service provided. 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We also have experience with solutions such as Juniper, Aruba, and Ruckus. 

    If the people want to save some money, they'll go with a Ruckus switch or something else as it's less expensive. With Cisco, it has you covered, however, it's a little bit more expensive, and if you don't like the fact that it's got the closed infrastructure, it's a closed architecture, you're not going to mix and match it with switches from other companies.

    How was the initial setup?

    In terms of the initial setup, I'm never really involved in it. It's our engineers that do that. It's a definite effort to get everything set up and working correctly. It's not just out of the box, however, these days they've all gotten so much better. The Cisco products of today would be much easier to put together than the ones in the past.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The pricing is high. It's expensive, however, you get what you pay for and it is an excellent solution.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would advise new users to work with a reseller that has a good history of working with Cisco and that can do a good game plan upfront with what your actual long-term goals and needs will be.

    I'd rate the solution at an eight out of ten. The product is excellent, however, nothing is perfect, which is why I haven't rated it at a perfect ten. There are always ways to improve.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Reseller
    PeerSpot user
    Supervisor of IT Infrastructure & Cybersecurity at a tech consulting company with 51-200 employees
    Reseller
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Has impressive reliability, I have not experienced a failure
    Pros and Cons
    • "Cisco Ethernet Switches have great enterprise features like Cisco DNA Assurance. Cisco DNA Assurance features advanced artificial intelligence and machine learning. Cisco AI Network Analytics, a capability within Cisco DNA Assurance, allows easy management of all devices and services, prioritizes and resolves network issues, and ensures a better user experience across the network."
    • "The typical areas of concern for Cisco Ethernet Switches are not technical but cost including support costs. I’ve never liked the fact that end users cannot download security patches without a support contract. I’ve had trouble getting approval to renew Cisco support contracts due to the cost."

    What is our primary use case?

    Cisco Ethernet Switches are the product line I have the most experience with and have been my go-to solution for many years with mid to large organizations over the years. They are still top contenders for environments that need layer 3 functionality in a switch. They have a product line that covers the entire spectrum of switching technology from the high-end Nexus products through the traditional enterprise catalyst models and all the way down to the small business solutions. They seem to have the market covered with a solution to meet any IT shop's needs.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Cisco switches provide layer 3 functionality on the network taking that load off the security appliance and not requiring a router on the network. This prevents single points of failure for internal data routing and keeps internal routes off the security appliance workload. The CLI is the industry standard and most network professionals learn it and can use it.

    The reliability of Cisco Ethernet Switches is amazingly impressive. Maybe I’m lucky but I have not experienced a Cisco Ethernet Switch fail unless caused by a power event such as lightning. I highly recommend connecting switches via fiber-optic connections due to the lack of electrical conductivity. I learned this the hard way when a building with the electrical systems not properly grounded caused a cascade of switch failures during a lightning storm.

    What is most valuable?

    The CLI is very valuable as it allows network professionals to work fast and customize the configuration however they need.

    Cisco Ethernet Switches have great enterprise features like Cisco DNA Assurance. Cisco DNA Assurance features advanced artificial intelligence and machine learning. Cisco AI Network Analytics, a capability within Cisco DNA Assurance, allows easy management of all devices and services, prioritizes and resolves network issues, and ensures a better user experience across the network.

    Also, appreciate the industrial line of switches for SCADA or other environments where switches are placed in unconditioned space and the temperatures fluctuate a lot during the seasons.                        

    What needs improvement?

    The typical areas of concern for Cisco Ethernet Switches are not technical but cost including support costs. I’ve never liked the fact that end users cannot download security patches without a support contract. I’ve had trouble getting approval to renew Cisco support contracts due to the cost.

    The additional charges for the DNA capabilities of the switches further prices the switches are out of contention for a lot of IT shops. I understand the development of this technology is expensive but costs are sometimes borderline ridiculous.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have 27 years of experience with Cisco switches.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Cisco Ethernet Switches are some of the most rock-solid hardware I’ve had the pleasure of using.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Cisco Ethernet Switches are extremely scalable and have the broadest line of solutions in the market.

    How are customer service and support?

    Cisco's technical support has deteriorated over the years. They have call centers all over the world and sometimes the techs experience levels seem to vary. This seems to be the industry standard though in my experience.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have been using Cisco Ethernet Switches my entire career. I really like them but they are not always cost-effective.

    How was the initial setup?

    If you know the CLI interface the setup is straightforward. If not you are in for a bumpy ride.

    What about the implementation team?

    It was deployed in-house.

    What was our ROI?

    ROI is longer than other solutions in the enterprise space but comparable in the small business area of Cisco’s product lines.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Find a Cisco partner that has a lot of volume and pressure them for a better price. There is a lot of markup on the higher end devices. Plan for support contract expenses for the life of the device. Also check the EOL details prior to purchase so you don’t purchase an older device that will not get the years of software updates and security patches you need.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We compared it to Meraki if cloud management would be helpful.

    What other advice do I have?

    You will not be disappointed with a Cisco solution from a technical perspective. Learn the OS via CLI and you will always have job security too.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    Muhammed Eslami - PeerSpot reviewer
    Solution Architect at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Good availability and load balancing and relatively easy to scale
    Pros and Cons
    • "The security of the switches is pretty impressive. There are many security features available on the product."
    • "The enterprise-level switches should have a simpler deployment. They should make it possible for lower-skilled workers to be able to deploy the product."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for data centers and also for local area networks for enterprises.

    What is most valuable?

    I've worked with many features on Cisco's switches. However, the newest features I've used were on Nexus switches. The VPC on Nexus switches, supported on Nexus switches, provides high availability and load balancing for virtual port channels. It is a link aggregation we used in data centers. It's been fantastic.

    The security of the switches is pretty impressive. There are many security features available on the product.

    What needs improvement?

    The solution could always benefit from some more security features. For example, they need something which is mainly used for enterprise networks that allow for identity-based security or authentication. 

    The pricing of the switches could be lowered. Right now, they are quite expensive.

    The enterprise-level switches should have a simpler deployment. They should make it possible for lower-skilled workers to be able to deploy the product. It should be just as easy as turning them on, powering them up, and connecting the PCs, which would be the same as or similar to a generic simple switch. Many users can't use Cisco's advanced features and won't be able to deploy Cisco's advanced CLI or other management tools otherwise.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been dealing with Cisco's switches for more than 20 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable and Cisco is very reliable. It doesn't crash. There aren't bugs or glitches. I have experience on switches, which we've not reloaded for more than five years, even. They have been up and running for five years and don't cause us any trouble, which is impressive.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is quite scalable. They support our stacking feature, which means we can stack up to eight switches together to have scalable port numbers in terms of port numbers and also throughput. 

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've contacted technical support in the past, and, in my experience, they are very good. They are helpful and responsive. However, I do find that they don't answer all your questions or resolve your issues. Most of the time it depends on the customer's agreement. 

    I'm not the owner of the equipment. I work for customers in a deployment project's implementation and support. Most of the time the level of support provided depends on how much money the company we are assisting has paid to Cisco.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I've used Foundry switches in the past, which is a brand that does not exist any longer. Those switches were also very good in terms of stability. We used them in industrial ethernet environments. However, they are not products that are produced anymore.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup's level of difficulty varies quite a bit. For ethernet switches with default configurations, it's easy enough for normal operations. However, if you want to make use of more advanced features via Cisco, it requires a lot of advanced knowledge. It's not straightforward. It requires experience and in-depth knowledge of Cisco CLR or other management tools. You need to be an expert, or to hire one.

    Simple operations or simple deployments don't take more than one day. For both switches, it takes even less than an hour. However, if you want to deploy more advanced features like .money for the set or more features like routing, etc., it can take one or two days. It shouldn't take longer than that. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Cisco's pricing is quite high. It's on the higher end of the spectrum in comparison to other options on the market.

    What other advice do I have?

    I've worked with Cisco switches, but not industrial switches. I've worked with the 2900 series switches, as well as the 2800, 3700 series, and 3800 series of switches. Those are Cisco's enterprise and LAN switches.

    I would recommend using Cisco ethernet switches.

    I'd rate the solution nine out of ten overall.

    There are some issues with the product, which is normal. nothing is ever perfect. However, compared to other options, Cisco is your best bet.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Integrator
    Jim  DeFilippis - PeerSpot reviewer
    CGO at TMS Consulting Inc
    Real User
    Top 20
    Easy to manage and configure with the capability to scale
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable aspect of the solution is the ability to manage the switches and the ability to have a certain level of familiarity with setting up and configuring the switches."
    • "One thing we did have to work around is, on the broadcast side, we're reliant on the PTP protocol, precision time protocol, and the Cisco switches in general, don't support that."

    What is our primary use case?

    We're primarily using the solution for Jim basically the whole IT infrastructure, including the broadcast facility on the management side. It uses Cisco switches, which we spread out with the 9500 Series as sort of the main switches. We also use 93180s to create the backbone or spine of our setup.

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable aspect of the solution is the ability to manage the switches and the ability to have a certain level of familiarity with setting up and configuring the switches. You can link them together and manage them as one single switch.

    What needs improvement?

    The biggest pain point we had was getting the switches delivered. However, that likely was due to COVID and everything else. I don't think it's a Cisco issue. It's just a supplier issue, as they seem to have a hard time getting deliveries in order.

    One thing we did have to work around is, on the broadcast side, we're reliant on the PTP protocol, precision time protocol, and the Cisco switches in general, don't support that. Some do, however, the majority of ones we're using did not. We worked around it, however, that would be one area for us that would have been simply solved with more capabilities for PTP on Cisco's end.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've dealt with the solution for a long time, however, my most recent project has just been over the last six or so months.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution has been absolutely fine so far and I have yet to run into any scalability issues just yet. A company should be able to expand if they need to.

    We have about 100 people using the product at any given time.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I don't really have direct knowledge of technical support, however, I haven't heard anybody mention anything about reaching out to Cisco. They tend to work through their vendor CDW. I'm sure they have some support agreement with Cisco, although I'm really not the person that would be able to answer that. In general, I can't speak to Cisco's support as I've never had reason to reach out to them.

    How was the initial setup?

    I wasn't directly involved with the configuration, however, it seemed that the main problem we had was just nailing down the requirements. The way I've worked here is there's a central IT department for the company. They're remotely configuring it. There just was a lot of confusion about specific requirements getting imported. Once those were clarified, then there was no problem setting it up. 

    I don't think it's a Cisco issue. It's really an internal management issue in this company. The tools were there and once we nailed down the requirements and we understood them, then it seemed to work just fine. We haven't had any problems since then.

    In terms of maintenance, there's a core IT team here of about four people with a manager. Then, there are the corporate people that are shared amongst the whole corporation. At any one time, we probably have one of those persons working on some issue here, on average. Overall, we have six people who can handle maintenance, however, it's not full-time. There are other duties too.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The costs and licensing aren't part of my job and therefore I don't know anything of exact pricing.

    What other advice do I have?

    We provide engineering and technical support services with a hardware-software. It's my understanding that w don't have a business relationship with Cisco.

    I'm not sure which version of the solution we're using.

    My advice to other organizations is to make sure to ensure that whoever the supplier is, they can commit to delivering and making deliveries. In our case, we're waiting on one switch for instance. It's in the mail. It got lost. Now they're promising delivery by tomorrow. I don't see that as a Cisco issue, however, it is a problem when it comes to getting everything implemented. I would have locked in the vendor that could ensure delivery if I knew these issues would arise. 

    Overall, I would rate the solution as a solid eight out of ten.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Pre Sales Engineer at a construction company with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    High reliability and super stable for a wide range of use cases
    Pros and Cons
    • "The features that I have found most valuable are the core reliability and the switching group. All the features are very generic switching features with high reliability. That is the main key point I can highlight."
    • "An improvement would be to change their market intention. Almost all the Cisco switches are now coming with a license called DNA. D for Delta, N for number and A for apple. That feature is required, he must purchase it and it is a mandatory thing that has been introduced. This is not matching with the Asian market."

    What is our primary use case?

    The use cases that we have delivered to our customers include for hotel enterprises, government organizations, even military locations. This includes access switches and also distribution switches - perhaps for some organizations in call and data centers, as well.

    What is most valuable?

    The features that I have found most valuable are the core reliability and the switching group. All the features are very generic switching features with high reliability. That is the main key point I can highlight.

    What needs improvement?

    Feature-wise, almost all the features are there, but an improvement would be to change their market intention. Almost all the Cisco switches are now coming with a license called DNA. D for Delta, N for number and A for apple. That feature is required, he must purchase it and it is a mandatory thing that has been introduced. This is not matching with the Asian market, because let's say you are purchasing a vehicle and you don't want to have a reverse camera, right? But if the manufacturer is forced, fully telling you that you definitely should buy it, this is not fair in that way. DNA licenses, in most cases, are not required, but it should be told to the customers and added to the quotation, because we cannot remove it. This is not matching or suitable for the Asian market. It is not a requirement of the customer and it is forcefully added by the vendor. It's just a license, which you have to purchase for one year or three years, and it will never be used in some cases. In some cases, some specific customers may require that there should be the option to add it. But if it is not required by the customer, it should be optional.

    In terms of what I would like to see in the next release, it would be good if they could introduce a switch which can work on cloud and on a local deployment. Maybe the same switch will work. Because some switches are only working alone with local deployments, and some switches are working with cloud based environments. So if the same switch could work on both cloud and from its node, that will be great.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Cisco Ethernet Switches for probably six to seven years.

    I'm an integrator. We are using the latest version. I'm doing the designing and selling. I'm selling the latest version of these switches.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Cisco Ethernet Switches have the best stability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Scalability in the sense varies with switching. Some switches are fixed, which we cannot expand with the design, but some switches are those you can expand. It's basically the design. So scalability is good.

    How are customer service and support?

    They have great, great technical support from 100 miles to 200 miles.

    How was the initial setup?

    Initial setup is straightforward to complete. It is very user friendly for the engineer to configure the deploy.

    Implementation time depends, but in general, if it is a basic pre-plan implementation, it'll take only a few hours to configure and complete the installation. Maybe one or two hours, also we can complete it if it is a pre-plan, simple deployment. If it is a complex kind of networking fast structure, it'll depend on the solution and the configuration.

    It also depends on the solution. If it is one switch, just one one engineer can deploy it. If it is two switches, also one engineer can, but if it is a complex network, it depends on how many switches and how complex it is. Basically, for switch one you can put only one engineer and that also can be done using a technician level person and by remote logging or you can manage it with over the phone instruction.

    What other advice do I have?

    Cisco is the leader of networking and I would recommend it for anyone.

    On a scale of one to ten, I would give Cisco Ethernet Switches a 10.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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    Updated: June 2022
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