2018-08-02T11:48:00Z
Miriam Tover - PeerSpot reviewer
Service Delivery Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
  • 0
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What is your experience regarding pricing and costs for Chef?

Hi,

We all know it's really hard to get good pricing and cost information.

Please share what you can so you can help your peers.

8
PeerSpot user
8 Answers
TW
DevOps Director at Aerohive
MSP
2018-12-11T08:31:00Z
Dec 11, 2018

We are using the free, open source version of the software, which we are happy with at this time.

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Stefan Nava - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at Centurylink
Real User
2018-12-11T08:31:00Z
Dec 11, 2018

Purchasing the solution from AWS Marketplace was a good experience. AWS's pricing is pretty in line with the product's regular pricing. Though instance-wise, AWS is not the cheapest in the market. The AWS platform is solid. With the technologies that they offer, it makes it easy to integrate. When you are building environments and your able to integrate everything together, this is good thing.

TR
Engineer II at a transportation company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
2018-12-11T08:31:00Z
Dec 11, 2018

I wasn't involved in the purchasing, but I am pretty sure that we are happy with the current pricing and licensing since it never comes up.

JB
CTO at FCamara
Real User
2018-12-09T08:49:00Z
Dec 9, 2018

The price is always a problem. It is high. There is room for improvement. I do like purchasing on the AWS Marketplace, but I would like the ability to negotiate and have some flexibility in the pricing on it.

AC
Primary Architect at Autodesk, Inc.
Real User
2018-12-09T08:34:00Z
Dec 9, 2018

Purchasing through the AWS Marketplace was a good place to go to purchase this product because you receive a sense of authenticity with the products. Since AWS has its own checks on AWS Marketplace products, there is sense of relief that the product will not be problematic.

Wil Whitlark - PeerSpot reviewer
Lead DevOps Engineer at General Assembly
Real User
2018-12-05T07:52:00Z
Dec 5, 2018

When we're rolling out a new server, we're not using the AWS Marketplace AMI, we're using our own AMI, but we are paying them a licensing fee. We went the AWS route because we are fully cloud-based anyway. It was something that people who came before me were already familiar with, so it was a lot easier for me to get buy-in. The price per node is a little weird. It doesn't scale along with your organization. If you're truly utilizing Chef to its fullest, then the number of nodes which are being utilized in any particular day might scale or change based on your Auto Scaling groups. How do you keep track of that or audit it? Then, how do you appropriately license it? It's difficult. All you can do is communicate with them what's happening and get something that you're both comfortable with. However, if you're doing that, then what's the point of having the per-node model in the first place? It would be better to move to a fixed-pricing model.

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Sharath Annabathina - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Software Engineer at BMS
Real User
2018-12-05T07:52:00Z
Dec 5, 2018

We are still in the process of evaluating Chef Compute. Currently, we use Chef and Puppet. Soon, we will probably be purchasing it from AWS Marketplace.

MohammedHashim - PeerSpot reviewer
Principal Architect at Brillio
Real User
Top 5
2018-08-02T11:48:00Z
Aug 2, 2018

There are some flexible pricing models which you get from multiple partners, and then we bundle our solution. From that perspective, it is okay so far. But maybe when we go to the enterprise level, there will be components we have to pay for, when it comes to DevOps with customers who already have an existing license. Those things are always complicated. But otherwise, for regular commercial licensing, it can be flexible.

Related Questions
Miriam Tover - PeerSpot reviewer
Service Delivery Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
Apr 5, 2022
How do you or your organization use this solution? Please share with us so that your peers can learn from your experiences. Thank you!
See 1 answer
Murat Gultekin - PeerSpot reviewer
Presales Consultant - Solution Architect at Hewlett Packard Enterprise
Apr 5, 2022
Chef is mostly for the operating systems to deploy or style, e.g. not containers. Before the containers, you need hardware, then an operating system, then you start to work on Kubernetes. To automate those steps, we use Chef. The tool is useful for provisioning the operating system, because as you talk about the ops, sometimes customers ask to further deploy everything through automation, e.g. starting from scratch. You need to use different tools for you to provision via automation, so you need Chef. We use an automation tool such as Chef, then we were able to run Docker or containers on top of the hardware and operating system.
it_user434868 - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Director of Delivery at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Apr 5, 2022
Hi, We all know it's really hard to get good pricing and cost information. Please share what you can so you can help your peers.
See 1 answer
Murat Gultekin - PeerSpot reviewer
Presales Consultant - Solution Architect at Hewlett Packard Enterprise
Apr 5, 2022
Pricing for Chef can be relatively high for some customers but, if we consider the benefits it provides, we can say that it is a reasonable price. . Customers need to pay for the license of the tool on a yearly basis.
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