Buyer's Guide
Ethernet Switches
November 2022
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Jóhann G. Thorarensen - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Manager at Sund Upper Secondary School
Real User
Top 10
Reliable and easily accessible switches with a plug and play setup
Pros and Cons
  • "Easy to set up, stable switches with good accessibility that makes it quicker to identify problems, find solutions, and fix problems."
  • "The price for this product could be cheaper. For a low-budget school or institution, scaling up and implementing more switches could take longer because of budget constraints."

What is our primary use case?

We have computers around the school, but we've been cutting down on desktop computers and moving more towards Wi-Fi and laptops. In the dorms, we still have a docking station which is wired, so it's a mixture. The plan is to run everything through the Meraki system, so we can access it and we can control it, whether we are inside the school or outside the school.

How has it helped my organization?

As Meraki MS Switches are accessible, we benefit from them as it's quicker for us to identify problems and find solutions, which means the downtime is reduced.

What is most valuable?

Accessibility is what I find most valuable in Meraki MS Switches, because I'm able to check things and see if they're working, without being on-site at all times. I can, for example, travel across the country, yet I can still check on how things are working, or what's not working. I can figure out what's the problem, what's the solution, and I can fix the problem, even when I'm not on-site. Easy access to these switches has been a great help.

What needs improvement?

What could be improved in this product is the price. It could be cheaper.

Gaining a deeper access or deeper understanding of certain things, and being able to look further into the workings of Meraki MS Switches, is something I'd like in the next release.

Having bundles in relation to price would also work perfectly for us.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using Meraki MS Switches for three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I find this product stable. It's very reliable. We've only had two or three instances when one of the two Wi-Fi systems in our school fluctuated, but I'm not certain what really caused it. It has been relatively easy to fix that, and it could just be a configuration problem.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I don't see any problems with scaling Meraki MS Switches at the moment, but I will know more about it once we have replaced our old switches with this product. It's only then that I'll have a better understanding of its scalability in terms of it being a whole system, rather than individually.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We used Cisco switches, then we decided to go with Meraki MS Switches for several reasons. One reason was that the Cisco switches were originally set up by a company that was in charge of the whole system, which was run from a company outside the school. Then, we had someone come in to take charge here in our school, then we transferred that responsibility to an outsider. I then came in, and I started learning the system, so the outsider became the backup plan. 

It turned out, once we started digging into things, that the system was set up in a cumbersome and closed way, much like a banking system, rather than a setup that would be good for a school, that can rely on switches rather than closing the school into units.

Another reason was that our switches were getting outdated, so we had to do something. We started looking at various solutions, and we had to decided whether to continue the way we were doing things, which we did not like because it was cumbersome and it had to be done on-site, or if we could do it in a way that would be more accessible both inside and outside the school, while having the level of security and stability we need.

For example, we looked at Ubiquiti UniFi which was a cheaper system, but it was less stable, though I know that some schools were using that system. It was really just a question of stability and accessibility, and these were deciding factors in the system that we chose. Even though Meraki MS Switches were more expensive than the other solutions, we ended up with Meraki.

How was the initial setup?

Product setup wasn't complex. I was very surprised about how easy it was to set up.

What about the implementation team?

We implemented this product in-house, with the help of the head of our IT team.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

This product is pricey. We are a relatively low-budget school, and for a low-budget school to have a system like this, which is a great help, it means that instead of being able to move faster towards implementing everything, we need to take very small steps. What we should be able to do in two or three years, would take us five to seven years, so the price is a drawback.

Not only do we have to buy the product, we also have to get a license for each annually. For a school that doesn't have a lot of money, that is a problem, but we still decided to go with Meraki MS Switches.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated Cisco, Fortinet, and Ubiquiti UniFi switches.

What other advice do I have?

We ended up with Meraki Wireless, so we never got to use Fortinet, but we are happy with what we have. As of last summer, the state has taken charge of security issues, so we just follow them.

We set up a new firewall three years ago, and we went with Cisco Meraki firewall. We used to have Cisco and after having looked at various options, we decided on Meraki. The head of school made that decision, because he was advised that even though Meraki's a bit pricey, it's still secure and offers a high level of accessibility to us who are looking after the system, and making sure that everything's working fine. That has turned out to be rather true, because Cisco Meraki firewall has the level of security we are looking for, with the accessibility to implement all the changes we needed to do, and the access to the end points as we needed them.

Since we have a Meraki firewall, it goes through the Cisco Meraki Wireless LAN, and the rest of the school really just has switches that will be replaced with Meraki MS Switches as time goes by.

I'm unsure about what version of Meraki MS Switches we're using, but it could be the most up-to-date version. It's deployed in the Cloud, so we access the website and control everything through there. The hardware is in the building, but there isn't any specific need to access the hardware, except for the old Cisco switches that we still have which need to be accessed locally. Once we've replaced all the old switches with Meraki MS Switches, which will take us a few years, then we should be able to access everything through the cloud.

The deployment of this product took less than a day, particularly a few hours. The head of our IT team helped set it up, and it was plug and play. We plugged it in, set up the ports, and made sure that everything was working. The product worked fine. There were a few issues to begin with, but those had to do with conflicts between Cisco switches and Meraki switches, because even if they were from the same company, they were still different sets of products. That was really the only thing that took a little time to figure out.

We have 850 users of Meraki MS Switches in our school. We only have two people for its deployment and maintenance. I'm the one who handles it full time, and when I run into problems, I talk to the other guy, then he jumps in. That's all we need to maintain this product. It's being used everyday, e.g. we open up at 8 a.m. and we close at 4 p.m. We use these switches constantly, throughout the whole day. I also use this product when I'm working from home, as I'm also connected to the Meraki system.

We didn't have the need to contact technical support for Meraki MS Switches, so I can't evaluate their support.

My advice to people thinking about implementing this product is to look at the price tag, because in the end, the price will always be a big factor, especially when you have a system, then you buy the hardware, then you need to pay the license for each product annually, as the costs will mount up the more machinery you add in.

I would also tell them the same thing I always advise people when they're buying a computer, and that is to ask themselves what they need. Do you need a secure system, but is not very stable? This is highly unlikely, in my opinion. Do you need a stable system that is very accessible, both inside and outside of a school or a building? What is it you need?

I would tell them from that point, look at accessibility, reliability, stability, security, and look at all the systems that are available. There are at least four or five big names all around. Have a look at them all, and don't just jump on the first one. We all have our preferences, so just keep an open mind, have a look at the different options. For example, I commented about Fortinet this one time, that I like that system, and I think it's a very interesting system, but we decided on Meraki MS Switches and I'm happy with this product.

There's a return on investment because this product is worth it. It's so accessible, stable, and secure, and because it's so accessible, it's quicker for us to find solutions. Meraki MS Switches make things run more smoothly, making these switches almost priceless.

I'm rating Meraki MS Switches a nine, because I'm very happy with them, but I'm very skeptical about giving a ten out of ten. Nothing is perfect.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Michael-Sugg - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at Sovereign Managed Services
Real User
Top 5
As a managed service provider, it's important to have a solution that can manage everything from one console
Pros and Cons
  • "I like the Aruba Central platform. It makes a lot of sense. The switches have a lot of great capabilities. Central can lockdown VLANs and control the apps and protocols. There are several built-in security features that I'm not utilizing. However, those capabilities are part of the reason I'm using enterprise switches in a small office. I like knowing that I can do these things when necessary."
  • "There are some growing pains with Aruba Central. When you first launch the wireless access points or switches, a lot of updates are needed to get Aruba Central ready, especially on the access points, so the initial deployment time could improve. I would hope that I could just turn it on and leave the updates until later on. The switches themselves probably did okay. I'm primarily referring to the wireless access points. There was a lot of back and forth before everything was in sync. It took hours."

What is our primary use case?

The Aruba switch is supporting a doctor's office, so it's an on-premise switch. These particular switches provide the fundamental network for the entire office, including power over ethernet for the security cameras and wireless access points. The solution also provides network switching between databases and clients. I manage the switches using the Aruba Central public cloud. 

How has it helped my organization?

Aruba gives me greater network visibility compared to an unmanaged solution. I mostly use unmanaged switches at other locations and offices.

What is most valuable?

I like the Aruba Central platform. It makes a lot of sense. The switches have a lot of great capabilities. Central can lockdown VLANs and control the apps and protocols. 

There are several built-in security features that I'm not utilizing. However, those capabilities are part of the reason I'm using enterprise switches in a small office. I like knowing that I can do these things when necessary. 

What needs improvement?

There are some growing pains with Aruba Central. When you first launch the wireless access points or switches, a lot of updates are needed to get Aruba Central ready, especially on the access points, so the initial deployment time could improve. 

I would hope that I could just turn it on and leave the updates until later on. The switches themselves probably did okay. I'm primarily referring to the wireless access points. There was a lot of back and forth before everything was in sync. It took hours. 

I can't think of any missing features, but it would be nice if there were a free version of Aruba Central for my small business clients that doesn't have as many features. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I got one switch a while back and was using it in a lab situation to play around with it a little bit. I wasn't utilizing it a whole lot. It was more like, "Hey, how do you configure this? How does it work?" In the last couple of weeks, I added a second 6200 S switch and threw it into an actual production environment where it's being utilized.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is fine. I've got two 6200 24-port switches, so 48 ports total. I Aruba switches are capable of putting trunk groups in between. It's a chiropractic office, so we've got 32 network tables all plugged in between servers and all of the devices, and then there are all the computers hanging on the walls and stuff like that. 

However, in reality, it's typically only four people working at the office at any given time, but they run around from room to room using x-rays, computers, and all that other stuff, so there are a lot of different devices. In total, there are 32 ethernet cables plugged into these two switches.

Some people define a user as a person typing on the keyboard, but In a chiropractic office, you have customers who walk into the adjusting room and scan their little cards. Meanwhile, the doctor kind of walks from room to room. It's really only one doctor.

We'll be bringing additional computers online over the next couple of years as they ramp up that office, so there will be increased utilization of the switches even inside that office. I will also be adding switches for each of my clients. I mean as I'm going in and taking over managed service provider relationships with these clients, I'll be looking at putting those same switches, so I have complete visibility.

How are customer service and support?

I rate Aruba support six out of 10. Like many vendors, Aruba is dealing with staffing shortages or other things. Once you get somebody on the line, they're usually pretty good. It's just a matter of getting to the correct person and the time it takes to respond. 

I'm not trying to bash Aruba because they're not the only ones having this problem with tiered support. It's crucial to learn the equipment, so you can hopefully do most of the maintenance and troubleshooting yourself.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Neutral

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

My other clients have unmanaged Netgear switches, but it's apples to oranges. They may be switches, but they're not in the same class. It's a home network switch versus an enterprise network switch.

How was the initial setup?

Deploying the switches itself wasn't that complex. You can make it complex depending on what you want to do. You can implement VLANs and do all sorts of wonderful things, but for this particular implementation, I didn't really need that level of complexity.

It took about an hour to take the switches out of the box and onboard the devices on Aruba Central. They work out of the box even without Aruba Central. You can take them out, turn them on, plug them in, and they will function as a basic unmanaged switch. There's not a whole lot that you have to do for it.

What about the implementation team?

I do all of my own stuff. I'm a solo managed service provider. 

What was our ROI?

The return on investment for me in these switches will come when we start facing network challenges. Some of the applications at this doctor's office rely on old file-based databases. When they start having problems with the application, and the vendor starts saying that's a network problem, that's when I'll get my real return on investment. 

I can pull up the Aruba Central platform and say, "Nope, it's not a network problem, and here's why. You're getting no gig speed. There are no errors on any of the ports or failed packets." Having all that visibility is where the true return on investment is going to come. It's preparing for those types of debates. I'm tired of people blaming the networks. It may be. It could be a configuration or something else, but it's something else most of the time.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I am paying for the hardware and Aruba Central licenses, but I would like a version of Aruba Central to come out with a light version with a few features turned off. Ubiquiti and other vendors have free tools.

I believe they're looking at that, but it's not out yet. I hope they will release that to make it competitive because I'm using an enterprise-class switch for small businesses. We're looking for some of those capabilities, but not all of them. 

Aruba has its Soho class switches, which are instant-on platforms. However, with the instant-on platform, you need to manage everything with individual clouds instead of bringing all of them under one console. 

There's an annual license fee for the Aruba Central cloud management platform for each Aruba device. You don't need licenses for the hardware and other support, but if you don't pay for the Aruba Central license, you will not get firmware updates or technical support. You have to have those at least for probably several years.

When you reach a point where you're managing 100-150 devices in a small business, you suddenly need multiple layers of switches, and then you have to get into campus networks, trunk groups, VLANs, etc. Then, you need segmentation between different levels. 

You have to utilize those additional capabilities and features more than you would for a dozen or so computers. You typically aren't going to create a bunch of VLANs, trunk groups, and multiple switches for a dozen computers. It doesn't make sense.

I think under 250 people would technically be classified as a small business. However, when I say "small business," I mean 10-20 people physically working at a building. Still, the price is reasonable. I'd rate Aruba eight out of 10 for affordability.

As a managed service provider,  I also have access to discounts that help me manage costs better. As I own all the switches, so I keep adding people to the switches I own. Aruba has been good about providing a managed service provider discount to make it competitive. If they didn't, it would be kind of hard to justify spending $4,000 on these switches for a tiny business like a doctor's office.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I looked at Ubiquiti, Cisco, and some other solutions, but I have a friend who works for Aruba. I opted to go with Aruba after chatting with him about where it's positioned in the market. Aruba seems to be a leader, especially in wireless access points and some of the newer capabilities and features. 

I was looking for network switches that could be managed with the same wireless access points in one console, so that gave it to me with Aruba. Some people are fine with having one console for switches and another for wireless access points. As a solo managed service provider, I'm all about simplicity, so I was really looking for one solution that would handle both. 

What other advice do I have?

I rate Aruba Switches nine out of 10. If you're deploying these types of switches, I encourage people to utilize some type of cloud-based management console. If you don't use Aruba, make sure whatever you use has cloud management to give you visibility into what's going on in terms of configuration, errors, etc. 

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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Walter Shelver - PeerSpot reviewer
Owner at CableWeb
Real User
Top 5
Comes with a lifetime warranty and is easy to implement and manage
Pros and Cons
  • "Its setup, usage, and access are most valuable. It is a very easy switch to set up."
  • "There are a lot of systems that are moving into different areas. There are a lot of cloud-based things happening. One nice feature that I've seen in other switches is artificial intelligence on the actual porting. They've got AI technology that will tell you when a port is down. They not only tell you when a port is down; they also tell you when a port is running slower. You can do a cable-fault check, or you can do other checks. It would be nice to have this information in NETGEAR. This feature might already be there in a new release of the NETGEAR's firmware, but I haven't seen it."

What is our primary use case?

We're a network integrator and supplier for our clients. We've installed these switches for various scenarios. We have installed them for core switching and remote switching, and we have also installed them in various standalone organizations where there is no core or distributed switching. There is just the main switch, and that carries the whole network.

In our previous deployment, we've had three NETGEAR 48-port switches that we installed as standalone switches. They were basically managing everything, such as the internet, firewall, switching, and then distribution to the other network.

In terms of the version, I have worked with GS724.

What is most valuable?

Its setup, usage, and access are most valuable. It is a very easy switch to set up. 

It is easy to do VLANs, software upgrades, etc. It is also easy to integrate it with other NETGEAR products.

One thing that NETGEAR does very well is that their switches come with a lifetime warranty, like HP. If a switch has not been neglected or misused, NETGEAR will replace your switch if it fails, which really helps.

What needs improvement?

Its integration with other products can be improved. A lot of time our clients have got an existing access point solution, but they want NETGEAR switching. They don't want to buy NETGEAR access points. The third-party integration would be a big assistance.

There are a lot of systems that are moving into different areas. There are a lot of cloud-based things happening. One nice feature that I've seen in other switches is artificial intelligence on the actual porting. They've got AI technology that will tell you when a port is down. They not only tell you when a port is down; they also tell you when a port is running slower. You can do a cable-fault check, or you can do other checks. It would be nice to have this information in NETGEAR. This feature might already be there in a new release of the NETGEAR's firmware, but I haven't seen it.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've worked with NETGEAR switches for the last six years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Its stability is very good. I've never had a NETGEAR switch fail during all the time I've used them.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is very scalable.

How are customer service and support?

I never had to use NETGEAR's technical support in all the time I've used it. I presume it's good, but I never had to use their technical support.

How was the initial setup?

Its initial setup is straightforward. Deployment is usually fairly quick because it has a very straightforward setup. Your cable runs will obviously take you longer, but deployment is very quick.

The deployment strategy is always to connect switching first, and then as we terminate our points, we connect our points so that people immediately have access to the internet. The strategy is always to first install a firewall, then install a switch, and then install cabling. This way when your cabling is up, your people are already protected, and they're behind the firewall. 

For its deployment and maintenance, you don't need a lot of staff members. Usually, two members are enough. Specifically, if I've got a cabling team, there may be three people, but I don't need a lot of people to do an implementation. I can usually have two people on-site, and they'll implement and sort the switching out themselves. They are usually cable technicians and network technicians.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

You get what you pay for. From a price comparison, there are cheaper switch makers on the market that are definitely less expensive than NETGEAR. They give you the same functionality, but they don't come with a name. 

There are solutions like Ubiquiti that are very good. They have the ease of setup, and I find NETGEAR battling a little bit in comparison to Ubiquiti.

Cisco is obviously very expensive, and for a lot of people, it is usually for their core network.

What other advice do I have?

If you're new to switching, then obviously, there is a learning curve, like with any product out there. If you're an existing user of the equipment, it is really easy to use. It is easy to implement and work with. It is easy to run. It is a nice system to work with.

I would rate it an eight out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Information Technology Supervisor at JLR Construction and Aggregates Inc.
Real User
Top 10
Robust with lots of features and excellent pricing
Pros and Cons
  • "It has a lot of features. I haven't explored them all yet."
  • "The interface for management could be improved."

What is our primary use case?

I've mostly been using the solution for mostly routing and user management.

What is most valuable?

We like that the solution is full-featured. I have access to all the functions that I need for routing without the cost involved of having those - compared to a Cisco device or other devices like HP. With those, you need to license some of the features just to access them. MikroTik has access to all the features of routing so you can customize or be flexible in your deployment.

The solution is stable and the performance is good. 

It has a lot of features. I haven't explored them all yet.

What needs improvement?

There are some bugs in the newer modules. For example, when it comes to Routing, which is already a very old module, it is very stable. However, Hotspot is a fairly new module. They still need to work on things regarding that module. It's not as reliable. 

The interface for management could be improved. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for about ten years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We're very satisfied with the performance. It is stable. I could say if you are using only mostly the core functionality of the device that was built in it - primarily routing, firewall, and then the basic ones, it's very stable. However, for the newer modules, they still have some bugs to fix.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have 200 or more users on the product currently. They are in administrative and operations positions in all areas of the office.

The solution is very scalable. I would rate it a ten out of ten for scalability. 

How are customer service and support?

While technical support is available, I haven't tried it since the core functions are very stable. I haven't seen any major problems where I would need to call tech support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I've also used Ubiquiti.

We did try TP-Link and Cisco previously. Those were the two types of routers that were in the office in production. The main reason we switched was due to the price, cost, and feature availability of the other options.

This product comes in at a very low price compared to buying a Cisco router. I also had a bad experience with Cisco routers.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is more complex than Ubiquiti since it's more full-featured. It's up to you how you want to do things. You have to face a slight learning curve. You have to have a background in networking or routing.

Currently, if I have to do a deployment for a simple office, it would be less than a day to have everything up and running.

For our organization, when I started using it, it took maybe a month or two to get used to the features before I migrated fully to the device.

I'm the one who is responsible for the network and therefore I handle any maintenance as well. 

What about the implementation team?

I set it up myself. I didn't have any help from third-party consultants or integrators. 

What was our ROI?

We have seen an ROI from MikroTik in that, for 12 years their equipment has been very robust. Even older versions I can still use now without any problems or stability issues.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

You just pay for licensing and you don't have to worry about add-ons or anything else. You don't pay yearly, you simply pay for the equipment. 

What other advice do I have?

I'm a customer and an end-user.

I've mostly upgraded the product to the latest version. I have a few more left that are still on the older version.

I'd rate the solution nine out of ten.

MikroTik is very good, however, you need to know the fundamentals to use it. You have to have a solid foundation on the capabilities or concepts used in MikroTik for it to become very effective for your organization.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Andriejus Artamonovas - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Specialist at DataBank
Real User
Top 10
Has a simple and understandable user interface
Pros and Cons
  • "I value that there is a clear place to find a MAC table with HPE Ethernet Switches."
  • "The next release would benefit from adding a central management that could be deployable on premise and allow you to see the layout of topology."

What is our primary use case?

The use case of this solution depends on our client's environment. Some use HPE Ethernet Switches right out of the box, while some of them use models where the interface can only be opened by Internet Explorer.

The primary use cases would be office interconnection and industrial interconnection. The switches are best suited for our small or medium-sized clients. 

What is most valuable?

For me, as an administrator, I value that there is a clear place to find a MAC table with HPE Ethernet Switches. 

HPE Ethernet Switches are quite robust. I have not seen them damaged to the level that they are not operable anymore.

The solution has a simple and understandable user interface providing everything I need.

What needs improvement?

In the past, I have encountered configuration problems with the Spanning Tree Protocol. The switches were only handling a single loop. There were quite a few looped switches that could not handle the board blocking, creating the need to manually fight each loop. I have not had the same problems with the newer models of HPE Ethernet Switches.

HPE Ethernet Switches tend to hang from time to time, but all switches do that.

The next release would benefit from adding central management that could be deployable on-premise and allow you to see the layout of topology.  

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been working with HPE Ethernet Switches for about one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is stable. HFE does not fail any more or less often than other switches.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

HPE Ethernet Switches, especially the 1820s, are best suited to small or medium-sized organizations, however each case is model dependent. The switches we use, are used in large companies, but they are fractured into smaller layers of three subnets. 

The solution is scalable, you can add a switch when you need to, and you can reconfigure it.

How are customer service and support?

I have not had the need to contact customer service and support. Any past issues, we were able to resolve by go through some of our forums.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Since our company provides services, we work with the switches that the clients have. Most of the switches we work with are HPE's, Cisco, and UniFi.

I found that when using Aruba or UniFi, you have to search for the MAC table from CLI. This is difficult because when someone calls using a MAC, I will not get the IP address and I need to guess where the user is.

UniFi requires less intervention in configuration, requiring some tune-up support. HPE needs to be configured manually.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup of HPE Ethernet Switches is straightforward. The time it takes to deploy depends on the overall network configuration, including the number of LAN, number of up links and down links for that switch.

If you only need to connect the switch to the up link and give out for a test for the end devices, it would take a maximum of thirty minutes after installing the switch to its correct place.

In a case where there is a lot of VLAN with some trunking, deployment could take a couple of hours.

I would rate the initial setup of HPE Ethernet Switches a five out of five. They require little to no maintenance and are reliable enough.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

As a technician, I am not certain of pricing, but I believe HPE is less expensive than Aruba and UniFi and that is why certain clients have chosen them as their solution.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend to anyone looking into implementing HPE Ethernet Switches to go for it if the price makes sense for their organization.

Overall, I would rate HPE Ethernet Switches an eight out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Integrator
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Ethernet Switches
November 2022
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