VxRail OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

VxRail is the #3 ranked solution in HCI Software. PeerSpot users give VxRail an average rating of 8.6 out of 10. VxRail is most commonly compared to VMware vSAN: VxRail vs VMware vSAN. VxRail is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 61% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 20% of all views.
VxRail Buyer's Guide

Download the VxRail Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2022

What is VxRail?

VxRail is a hyper-converged appliance based on VMware virtual SAN Software and is jointly engineered and built with VMware, for VMware, to enhance Vmware. VxRail software-defined architecture simplifies compute, storage, virtualization, and management. It will safeguard performance, reliability, and flexibility across your organization with a broad range of workloads and applications from business-critical to next-gen. With VxRail, you are covered.

VxRail is a single turn-key appliance that is a validated, fully integrated, pre-configured,  pre-tested solution and offers non-disruptive scaling. Every node includes compute storage and IO. All-flash configurations can contain between 12-28 cores per node. The storage capacity options run from 7.6 TB to 19TB with either 256 GB or 512GB of memory. Hybrid appliances may have 6-20 cores per node, 3.6 TB to 10 TB of storage capacity, and 24GB to 256 GB of memory. 

VxRail offers high availability fail-over, an active/active stretch cluster, and VSan Kernal integration. VxRail is a power-edged server with APIs built on automation. There are over 15 million different combinations of hardware available with VxRail. VxRail provides a simple, cost-effective solution that solves a large range of use cases. Additionally, you also get a mixed workloads automated system that is backed with fully automated system updates, and complete end-to-end lifecycle management all in a single two-rack appliance. 

VxRail is a value-added suitable solution for distributed small to mid-sized enterprises, remote offices, private clouds, and virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI). You choose the deployment option that best suits your organizational needs, from appliance to integrated rack offerings, with or without networking, and it will be delivered to you, ready to deploy out-of-box. 

If you know VMware, you know VxRail.

VxRail Features and Benefits

  • Seamlessly accelerate deployment to a hybrid cloud 
  • Fast data center modernization
  • Create developer-ready Kubernetes platforms
  • Powerful performance and reliability
  • Improve and simplify operational efficiency
  • Excellent integration 
  • Save time
  • Reduce costs

Reviews from Real Users

VxRail is an all-in-one solution: "You don't have to worry too much about the hardware and you don't have to work on integrating a storage device. We instead have this as an all-in-one solution and everything is available as a box."

VxRail is remarkable: “The cover points feature in VxRail is remarkable. It's unique. It has an intervention failover system as well as an automatic failover system, reaching clusters existing in VxRail…

VxRail is a powerful performer: “...VxRail delivers a very high number of IOPS for a hybrid configuration or an all-flash configuration. The processors that are available in the Xeon family are very powerful. They are multi-core with typically 2 gigahertz, 2.4 gigahertz, or higher frequency, so the performance is very much appreciated.” 

VxRail was previously known as VCE VxRail .

VxRail Customers

World Wide Technology Inc, Renault Sport Formula One Team, 8x8 Inc, Brownes, Canadian Pacific, Canopy, Denton, EDF, Unilin, Xerox

VxRail Video

VxRail Pricing Advice

What users are saying about VxRail pricing:
  • "More cost-effective than Nutanix."
  • "VxRail is not cheap, but it's not expensive either."
  • VxRail Reviews

    Filter by:
    Filter Reviews
    Industry
    Loading...
    Filter Unavailable
    Company Size
    Loading...
    Filter Unavailable
    Job Level
    Loading...
    Filter Unavailable
    Rating
    Loading...
    Filter Unavailable
    Considered
    Loading...
    Filter Unavailable
    Order by:
    Loading...
    • Date
    • Highest Rating
    • Lowest Rating
    • Review Length
    Search:
    Showingreviews based on the current filters. Reset all filters
    Alok Ranjan - PeerSpot reviewer
    Technical Lead at a comms service provider with 5,001-10,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 5
    Good automation makes this solution practical
    Pros and Cons
    • "The feature that I have found most valuable with VxRail is its upgrade. Because if you talk about the normal ESX process you have to upgrade the firmware, the bios, and you have to manage the compatibility. You have to do a lot of things. But in the case of VxRail, it's a single upgrade, end to end. You simply upload the bundle, click next, it will do some pre-checks, if those pre-checks pass, it will update everything one by one. It will put one ESX in the maintenance and move other VM's to another mode. There is no downtime to the VM's."
    • "If we could have some out of the box ideas in integration, I think that would be a great feature."

    What is our primary use case?

    The general use case for VxRail was to deal with the obsolescence because the current infra was not adequate to deal with the licensing and the support as we were running on the older hardware and the ESX version, and being a manufacturing site we didn't have a good level of redundancy.

    We have two server rooms there. But if we lose one server room, we will not be able to run all our workload from the existing server room. So we deployed the V Service cluster during this deployment, wherein we have four modes in total in each room, and in the corporate data center.

    We also deployed a backup solution with the Data Domain application. Then even if we lose one server room we have all the backup data in the other server room. So now at least we have local redundancy.

    So the main use case is redundancy, obsolescence, better architecture, better throughput, and better back up time. Pfizer was not very responsive after we did the VxRail with the vCenter architecture with the upgraded styles. So we got feedback that Pfizer was responding well. Their help was good.

    Also the backup time is good. Pfizer has the 1.5 PV. It used to take five to six hours on the back up but now it takes almost half of the time. So we are saving back up time and throughput is good. After deploying we have been getting some good benefits. Even the local businesses are happy with this solution.

    So we are now deploying VxRail to more manufacturing sites.

    What is most valuable?

    The feature that I have found most valuable with VxRail is its upgrade. Because if you talk about the normal ESX process you have to upgrade the firmware, the bios, and you have to manage the compatibility. You have to do a lot of things. But in the case of VxRail, it's a single upgrade, end to end. You simply upload the bundle, click next, it will do some pre-checks, if those pre-checks pass, it will update everything one by one. It will put one ESX in the maintenance and move other VM's to another mode. There is no downtime to the VM's.

    It will upgrade end to end infra, including bios from there, your ESX host, everything. So this is a really good feature. Then in new mode feature, they only have to configure it from the network standpoint and it can listen on a second mode. If they see a new mode in the network, the cluster will automatically have that mode as a new member.

    VxRail has helped us with the automation. So we are happy with that.

    What needs improvement?

    As I said, one place for improvement would be the automated update for VMware Tools. Additionally, better integration with ServiceNow because if there are some issues, we could directly get the notification through IPS and Tools, so that integration is missing.

    Somehow they did it, but it was not a very smooth integration because we have to use email features since they are sending emails. We contacted someone at ServiceNow at our end and we sent emails to ServiceNow and they converted it to some incidents or something. If we could have some out of the box ideas in integration, I think that would be a great feature.

    VxRail provides more automation. For example, the process going from VMware to Tools is still a manual process where we have to manually update the VMware Tools. There should might be an option to upgrade VMware Tools automatically. We know that we need some downtime, but still, there should be a possibility to do this as an automated process.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using VxRail for about six months. We deployed it back in September and did the migration, so it's been three or four months in the company.

    I think we're using version 4.7 because we had some limitations with respect to vCenter and Vserver costing because ESX was the older version. So we went with VxRail 4.7 rather than going with VxRail 7, which is the latest.

    Buyer's Guide
    VxRail
    November 2022
    Learn what your peers think about VxRail. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
    656,862 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We are maintaining this solution ourselves. We have some level of support from Dell, as well, but they are not directly responsible for the support. We are the ones who are supporting it.

    Initially, it had some issues. As I said, the version we deployed had some known issues. But the stability is pretty good. There were some issues here and there, but that was not due to ESX, but due to some network fluctuation we had.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    VxRail is especially useful for a manufacturing site. I can't really know many end users are there, but I know that they are participating in the manufacturing process. This is a pharma company and for us, VxRail is critical in our process.

    So far, looking at its specifications, it looks good. It's scalable.

    How are customer service and support?

    In general cases, technical support is good. They're pretty responsive. But besides that, there have been some issues with the cluster. For example, the version that we deployed had some bug which was a known bug. Later on we were advised to get this upgraded. But that advice came to us after two or three reassignments within their own IT section because one person evaluated it and they collected multiple logs. Then he transferred the case to somebody else, then she then collected some further logs and did some analysis. I'm not saying they were not good. They were pretty good. They had some good technical skills. They did all the analysis. Then they assigned it back to the IT guy. But as soon as the IT guy came in, he saw the version. He immediately said we have to update it because this version is having some known issues.

    I would say they are pretty good. I'm not complaining about them, but this is the feedback that I personally have - that technician should have come in the very first place by just looking into the VxRail version and told us there is a known bug in this version and we should upgrade it. But that took almost two or three weeks to identify.

    But still, I'm happy with the Dell services. No complaints. But just constructive feedback. The rest are good.

    They are always helpful. If we join the call, they are very polite and knowledgeable. They bring more people as required, so overall, it's good.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We did not have a complete HCI product, but we had storage-defined software, like Datacode and EqualLogic. Now we are replacing Datacode and EqualLogic with this VxRail because we are using it in vCenter.

    How was the initial setup?

    In terms of the initial setup, only the network part was a little complex for us. Maybe because we were doing it for the very first time because there is a very strict firewall applied there, being a manufacturing site. We had multiple firewalls there, so we had to open each and everything one by one. That was the only thing.

    Once the network part was done, everything was smooth and we had a product life support from Dell. It was Dell who basically deployed it from a remote session with our presence. We only give them some input around the infra set up and they actually did the end to end deployment.

    It took one day for rack and stacks and then two days for its set up, installation, and configuration as per our department. Later on we did the migration on our own based on the downtime that we received because we had to update the VMware Tools. We had to configure the backup, et cetera. We did it slowly, one by one, three, four servers a day.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    In terms of pricing, I would say it's reasonable, not cheap and not too costly. If you compare it with some other HCI solutions, for example, there were a lot of discussions around Cisco UCS for one of the manufacturing sites. The local ITP had a preference for Cisco UCS because they had some prior experience working on it. We had already successfully deployed VxRail in some of the manufacturing sites and we found that Cisco UCS is much too costly. 

    In the deployment, all the softwares were included, only the vCenterv was excluded because we were using an external vCenter, so we had to manage an external vCenter license. All the rest was included.

    Some licensing, like vRealize was not included, so we have not taken it.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would definitely recommend VxRail. But again, it depends upon the use cases. If they have a big data center, then you have to look for some other version of VxRail, maybe VxBlock, but for normal sites, for a small manufacturing R&D site, or for remote sites, they may go with VxRail.

    On a scale of one to ten, I would give VxRail a nine out of 10.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    PeerSpot user
    Account Executive at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
    MSP
    It's built on platforms that have been in the industry for more than 15 years, so it's very stable
    Pros and Cons
    • "The VxRail is built on two specific platforms that have been in the industry for the last 15 to 20 years: the 1-U socket and the 2-U socket platforms from Dell. They're in their sixteenth generation of those platforms, I believe, so they're very stable."
    • "I would like to see Dell take a crack at simplifying the process of moving from a node to a cluster and assembling everything into the appliance. It would be great if Dell could provide a pathway where a customer could actually install it without the certifications. Of course, I can't say how you would dumb down something so complex."

    What is our primary use case?

    Our whole company uses it. We have VxRail in our solution center, which designs software and hardware solutions for our customers' new opportunities. For example, recently, we were asked to develop a Kubernetes environment that the customer wanted to use and researched several different organizations, such as Red Hat's OpenShift.

    We wanted to test capabilities on Tanzu, and VxRail was a great home for that, so we brought all the software into the VxRail and showed the inner workings of the data flows for this new capability to the customer. In the end, they didn't necessarily need a VxRail, but that's the beauty of it. It's a vanilla platform to reside modernized software on.

    What is most valuable?

    The VxRail is built on two specific platforms that have been in the industry for the last 15 to 20 years: the 1-U socket and the 2-U socket platforms from Dell. They're in their sixteenth generation of those platforms, I believe, so they're very stable. 

    What needs improvement?

    VxRail is in its third generation, I think, and I know there are consistent updates to that material on nearly a monthly basis. Most of my customers are federally focused, which means some of this material comes into an environment where few people will have access to that environment.

    I would like to see Dell take a crack at simplifying the process of moving from a node to a cluster and assembling everything into the appliance. It would be great if Dell could provide a pathway where a customer could actually install it without the certifications. Of course, I can't say how you would dumb down something so complex. That's a challenge, but it would be valuable.

    It would also be helpful if they added some warnings to prevent users from making mistakes when upgrading stuff with VMware, like a notification that says, "Hey, this upgrade should be done through the VxRail manager." Those could steer customers off the path of decoupling that cluster or pulling a node offline when it doesn't need to be.

    These things have room to grow in the industry. As more organizations look to develop what they currently have, Dell could provide a pathway to taking integrating the older hardware with the new hardware. I think that would be valuable, too. There are a couple of things that I'd also like to see them improve upon. One could be to actually deliver a cluster to the customer from their manufacturing facility that is already put together. That might be a good opportunity for them.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The VxRail platform is stable. Anytime you're dealing with technologies, you'll find a bug somewhere. There's always a challenge that must be overcome, but once the initial cluster has been stood up, we find it's one of the most stable platforms today.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    If you want to scale VxRail, you buy another node and add it to the cluster. That process is straightforward. It will re-image the new node, give it the same firmware, and provide the same orchestration as the rest of the node. Scalability is probably one of the biggest reasons people choose VxRail.

    How are customer service and support?

    I've contacted Dell tech support on many occasions for VxRail. I always put in a case with Dell on all the service tags of the nodes before taking on any support mechanism. I recommend starting that process early. One of the main reasons we put in a case is to do some maintenance or make some changes.

    We always consult with Dell on best practices initially. It helps to provide them with as much information as possible about the health and wellness of that initial cluster. It generally depends on the service agreement you get from Dell, but we'll get a response in five or 10 minutes after putting in that initial case.

    I've never had problems with Dell support, but I always recommend pro support from my customers and organization. Depending on the size of your organization and how much Dell hardware you have, they'll assign a technical account manager to your team or to the Dell team, so you always have a consistent point of contact if things don't go as planned. That's helpful if you have a technical account manager assigned to your organization.

    How was the initial setup?

    VxRail is a hyper-converged system that's automated and consists of nodes. Those nodes are one or two U-servers depending on the requirement. Bringing the VMware automation and lifecycle management platform together is difficult, so we recommend having a certification to do that assemblage. 

    It assembles these servers into nodes in an appliance. Once the appliance is set up, it's simple to manage the solution and the box. However, assembly and automation are complex. You want to make sure that the firmware is all the same between the nodes.

    We've seen situations where we had a five-node cluster, and one firmware was not mapped to the others. We recommend working with Dell on those challenges, but our architects are also really well versed in those nuances. And if you want to deep dive into a technical requirement, I have several that have done that for a living.

    What other advice do I have?

    I rate VxRail eight out of 10. I would say it is the go-to solution for hyper-converged infrastructure. 

    The scripts that bring all of those servers into a node and cluster situation are proprietary to Dell. Anytime you're using that proprietary stuff, you need to be trained on it. Let's say, for example, you are in one of those systems, and you're working with some software that may not be acting like it should. Or it may have a feature that you want in a new generation. In some cases, there may be some dependencies on vCenter, vSAN, or Vsphere, which are all part of that integration.

    One might be tempted to start to upgrade it outside of the lifecycle management that's inherent to the VMware platform. I've seen architects go ahead and update it right from the VMware console when they should be using the VxRail manager. Knowing how to do those upgrades is very important to getting the clusters to see the proper nodes together.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    VxRail
    November 2022
    Learn what your peers think about VxRail. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
    656,862 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Savera-Menezes - PeerSpot reviewer
    Head of IT Infrastructure at a insurance company with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 5
    Low-maintenance and cost-effective solution with hyperscale features
    Pros and Cons
    • "Low-maintenance solution with hyperscale feature so it has the ability to utilize the resources for the VMware cluster setup on which Citrix VDA runs."
    • "This solution needs to have the capability where even older versions of hardware can be seamlessly utilized and additional expansion becomes so much easier."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use it for implementing VDI solutions.

    What is most valuable?

    Hyperscale is the most valuable feature I found on this solution. It's the ability to utilize the resources for the VMware cluster setup on which Citrix VDA runs.

    What needs improvement?

    The only issue we've faced is with their Call Home Support Center. Any alert that has to be triggered, we're just currently working on to fix. Otherwise, it has been a pretty good system.

    One problem we had was when we ordered the first node of cluster setup, and then we wanted to add two more nodes, we could not get the same configuration. We had to use a different configuration for the cluster setup.

    Scalability becomes a problem when two or three years have passed because you don't get the same model. You get a better model and to make that model work, you need to have a different cluster setup. You tend to lose on the continuity or expansion. I would recommend having a capability where even your older versions of hardware can be seamlessly utilized and additional expansion becomes so much easier.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using this solution since 2020.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability of VxRail is good. We are content with its stability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    This solution is scalable. We purchased two additional units the following year.

    How are customer service and support?

    Technical support for this solution was very good, professional, and they had the skills to get it implemented.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used Nutanix. VxRail is more economical than Nutanix. It's more cost-effective so we prefer it over Nutanix.

    We used so far three different solutions. The first was not a recommended solution. It was pushed down our throats to use that particular hardware. As I was involved in that setup, I knew the first time that implementation was on the wrong hardware, against the recommendation of the partner and the implementer. We definitely did not succeed. The second was a failure again, because of not following the recommendation of the implementer or the partner. The third one, lesson learned and we had no objections to that. We got a better recommendation from someone we trusted, so we were successful with our choice.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was straightforward. The engineers asked for what is required and they came with the same initial set.

    What about the implementation team?

    We used a partner for the deployment. My experience with them was good. They fully supported us during the pandemic situation to get this up and running.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated Nutanix.

    What other advice do I have?

    We're quite content with this solution for the purposes it was purchased.

    Deployment was completed within two weeks.

    Almost all of the people in the company used this solution since the pandemic. Now it's mostly used by the task workers.

    For deployment and maintenance of this solution, we require four staff where some are admins who handle multiple storages in other systems as well. They don't do this full-time. They only spend one-third or less of their time managing deployment and maintenance.

    I have no plans to increase VxRail usage in the future. The only problem with it is the usage of the cloud is being promoted to its peak, so the next expansion would be on the cloud.

    The cloud has always been talked about and people have been asked to venture into it. On the cloud, you don't have to wait and implement or pay upfront for the whole hardware. For some of the cloud versions, you can pay as much as you use. You can start with 50 users and then grow. If it has to be on-prem though, I'll have to at least factor a box that can cater to 200 or 300 users. You need to pre-plan and the hardware delivery might take some time, so making it market-ready is a little time-consuming.

    I'm rating this solution a ten out of ten. This is because of my previous experience with other solutions where I had three failed implementations on different hardware. They failed because of one particular reason: They're not low-maintenance. This solution, on the other hand, does not need heavy system maintenance. People prefer to use the system rather than the desktop, which makes it convenient for them to work from anywhere. There are a lot of benefits. You have your data saved on a data center. The availability is there which makes it flexible for users.

    After the pandemic, when people returned to the office, we utilized this solution as an agile workspace, so people can sit and work on any desk. When they come to the office, they don't have to go to a particular desk. They can choose where they want to work, so this solution provides a lot of benefits for us.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    ManuelIglesias - PeerSpot reviewer
    Solutions Architect at Open group
    Real User
    Top 5
    Well integrated and architectured solution
    Pros and Cons
    • "The stability is very nice. We haven't had any issues with the cluster. The cluster is very stable. No problems with slowness. Everything has been stable. It was well-architectured."
    • "It would be an improvement if VxRail could be integrated with some other hypervisors and not just with VMware."

    What is our primary use case?

    We have some virtual machines for the active directory, some virtual machines for security like firewalls, and some for other security. We have some other solutions here that are on virtual machines, such as our web page. Its applications and some functions are on virtual machines, too. 

    Some solutions are internal solutions and I think they are going to setup a SaaS solution here in our cluster. We have about three more clusters here and it's around 20 terabytes.

    What is most valuable?

    The integration with VMware is great. I like it so much because it is so much cleaner and the VMware modeling with the VxRail Manager is very nice. The solution is very good. It is easier. We haven't had any issues with it.

    We have three nodes and we had an issue with one of the nodes once and the response time from their support was very nice. When they fixed the part that was bad in the cluster, it began functioning again very nicely and very quickly. It was a great solution. We didn't have any outage or crash due to this failure.

    It has a tool called RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines, and I liked it so much because it allows for business continuity, and I can replicate virtual machines from one appliance to another. Normally, there are all these rules that we have to have in VMware. We are just implementing this in the first one and the second one. I have the end unit of this distributed solution. It's going to be good but at the moment, we are just deploying it. We made some tests and RecoverPoint for Virtual Machines was very nice.

    What needs improvement?

    It would be an improvement if VxRail could be integrated with some other hypervisors and not just with VMware.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using VxRail for almost three years at my office. It's a great solution.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability is very nice. We haven't had any issues with the cluster. The cluster is very stable. No problems with slowness. Everything has been stable. It was well-architectured.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability of VxRail is very good because they told me that it scales up to 64 nodes, but at this time we haven't had the need for that kind of scale. We can scale it on disks but we don't have to scale it. We don't have a node. It is cheaper to scale it up with disks while we need some space. We are okay with the CPU and all of that, so the disk solutions are very nice. Its scaling is very nice because we can scale it up with only disks. When we need to scale a computer or something, we need to buy another node if we run out of the disks.

    Our organization has about 100 people.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is very nice. I think it's the best support that I have tested because I have some other solutions with HP which were okay. Before we had VxRail, we had a solution that is called Simplivity. I didn't like it very much. It was a two-node solution. It was very bad. We had some issues with both the support and the solution, so we had to change it.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was very easy. It took about one and a half days and then another three or four days, maximum, with the tuning and everything else.

    We had to energize each node and I did it a week before they went to implement the process. They asked about everything. They asked about IP addresses, everything that was technical. They made some assessments and the day that we implemented VxRail, they had everything set. They just wrote all the addressing and everything of our root and our network. The implementation goes so fast. Almost a day. That was what it took to implement that machine.

    The next day, they migrated from virtual machines with the VMware Converter. They used two RecoverPoints for Virtual Machines, I think. It didn't take too much time. Only a few hours, maybe half of the day, and it was okay. We started planning it and we made some tests over a day and a half on the timing and stability of the system and we had the process standard because we needed to have a hybrid solution.

    What other advice do I have?

    My advice to other people looking to implement VxRail is that it is a very nice solution. It's an integrated solution so we don't have to jump into several providers because it is only one point of contact. We don't have to call VMware or another vendor. We only have one point of contact.

    On a scale of one to ten, I would give VxRail a nine.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Information Technology Solutions Architect at a comms service provider with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Great for modernizing a data centre but simulator access is limited to premium customers only
    Pros and Cons
    • "For me, the most valuable feature is in relation to the software updates."
    • "There could be better documentation and they should allow everyone to access the simulator."

    What is our primary use case?

    Our company is global. We have a wide range of customers and clients in many countries. Our customers who use VxRail are typically big companies.

    Some of our customers are in the banking sector and use VxRail because they're concerned about using automated software for updates, upgrades, etc. VxRail is for a specific category, mostly for banking, oil, and gas — a few others sectors as well.

    What is most valuable?

    For me, the most valuable feature is in relation to the software updates. Updated software is very critical as I cannot risk making a mistake. To avoid this, VxRail provides me with pre-tested updates that can be implemented with little interruption. Since we are talking about banking, oil, and gas, there's no need for automating virtual machine creation.

    What needs improvement?

    Currently, I don't see much room for improvement; however, there could be better documentation and they should allow everyone to access the simulator. If Dell could provide access to a simulator or a demo for regular users, it would make things much easier. 

    In order to gain access, you need to be a golden partner — normal users can't do it. It would be more beneficial to everyone if they could access the simulator and run some trial and error experiments before operating the real product. Many other companies (like Cisco) allow all of their users to do this. You can simply download the materials from the internet, including the simulator. 

    In regard to VxRail or Dell products in general, you cannot do this because it's very limited to specific partners — typical end users don't have access. It would be great if it was more available to all partners, not just their top-tier partners. There would be less resistance from potential customers because they wouldn't be afraid of daily operations, support, etc. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been dealing with VxRail for roughly two to three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    VxRail is very stable. We haven't experienced any issues, stability-wise.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    As VxRail is constantly updating, it makes it really easy to scale-out and scale-up.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We are experiencing some issues with Dell's live-chat support as the support is different based on the support included with the hardware. If you're on a basic plan, there will be some challenges. We're hearing this from our customers in Gulf countries, third-world countries, and even second-world countries. They also face some challenges due to international time zones. There should be online support everywhere, not limited to specific geographical locations, it's limiting. Other companies are not doing this. If you compare Dell with HP, that's not the case. With HP, whenever you have a problem, despite the hardware, you get premium support. With Dell, communicating with support can be a challenge.

    How was the initial setup?

    The complexity of the initial setup depends on your infrastructure as you need to integrate some existing components. It's not only about the VxRail components, but integration with the existing network and firewall. It's case-by-case. Sometimes it's very easy, sometimes it's not.

    What about the implementation team?

    We do not deploy this solution for our customers. We step in once it's been deployed. We handle end-to-end operations like security, computing, and networking — the whole portfolio.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    VxRail is not cheap, but it's not expensive either. Mainly it's for big enterprise customers. VxRail has its own or target customers and they know the value of this product; however, the hyper-converged solution is not for everyone. The good news is there are no hidden costs.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would absolutely recommend VxRail. From my previous experience, and because I work with a wide range of technical engineers, compared to other products, this solution offers a solid hardware performance. Generally, we look for value combined with price. If you're able to find a better solution, it will also come at a higher cost. Considering the range of prices overall, Dell is the best — my first choice. You can go for a premium version, but there will be an additional cost. For example, you can go for NetApp, which is better hardware, but the price is higher.

    Overall, on a scale from one to ten, I would give VxRail a rating of six.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    PeerSpot user
    Dian Dabek - PeerSpot reviewer
    Sr Director, Infrastructure at Lowe's Companies, Inc.
    Real User
    Easy to deploy and manage with helpful support
    Pros and Cons
    • "The ease of deployment and management of the solution are the most valuable aspects of the product."
    • "I would like to see more solutions for satellite capabilities where we can put it into smaller locations and still have the redundancy that we have with a larger cluster."

    What is our primary use case?

    For our stores, we primarily use the solution for what's called edge computing to provide all the data processing needs in our stores.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The product allows us to have the capacity for the future to be able to add applications to help us better serve our customers.

    We've seen reductions in cost by being able to reduce the amount of staff who needs to support the application. We've reduced staff by about 20%. It's enabled us to roll out applications that help us provide better customer service to our customers.

    What is most valuable?

    The ease of deployment and management of the solution are the most valuable aspects of the product. It's important due to the fact that, with 1800 stores, we can't afford to have an extensive staff to manage it.

    What needs improvement?

    We'd like to see improvements in the supply chain. We're evaluating that for the future.

    I would like to see more solutions for satellite capabilities where we can put it into smaller locations and still have the redundancy that we have with a larger cluster.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We implemented the first solution in February 2019. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It's stable. I would rate it ten out of ten for stability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We've now implemented it across our store network. We'll have 1800 stores on the VxRail by the end of October.

    We have more capacity than we need. The reason we selected the product is that it is scalable. We can add additional components when needed. We haven't had to, however, it's available if we need to.

    At this point, we've adopted the solution 100% across our organization.

    How are customer service and support?

    Technical support overall is excellent. It was a seamless process. We were very successful in the implementation. 

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used a three-tier architecture that we replaced with this product. It was the end of life and didn't have the capacity we needed to provide to our source.

    How was the initial setup?

    I was involved in the deployment of VxRail. The whole process was straightforward. 

    In terms of deployment, we did the first 600 stores in three months, and we now are doing 1200 stores and we'll be done by October. We worked together with Dell. We had a cross-functional team and we started slow and then built up to peak volume. Our strategy was to make sure we didn't disrupt any location.

    About four or five people on our side were involved in the implementation. Dell assisted us and I don't know how many Dell had. Obviously, they needed people to go to every store to implement.

    Our job was to act in coordination and communication with the locations where it was being deployed.

    The solution does require maintenance, however, it's very easy since there are tools that are provided with the technology. About five people are involved with administration and maintenance. They address any predictive alerts that come out on failures and care and feed any additional firmware or other types of updates that are required.

    What about the implementation team?

    We used the Dell Technologies services to help us with the deployment and that went very well.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The pricing is fair. It's combined with the hardware and the VMware technology to run it as well. It's bundled.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated Nutanix and HPE. Dell has the largest market share, however, and it's the most mature of the other providers.

    What other advice do I have?

    This solution is on-premises in our data centers and also in our stores.

    My advice to others would be to look strongly at the hyper-converged infrastructure technologies that come with it. It virtualizes a lot of the functions that were previously separate. It brings it together in one easy-to-manage solution.

    I'd rate the product ten out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Data Centre and HCI Solutions Lead at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Great performance, easy to scale, fairly stable, and very useful for scale-out upgrades
    Pros and Cons
    • "There are so many features, but if I have to choose, I would go for scale-out upgrades and performance. Scale-out upgrades are very valuable. Typically, when customers engage in virtualization, they're committing themselves to run many virtual machines on a fewer number of hosts. They'll have five or six hosts, and they will run all their virtualization on vSphere. They could be having anywhere from 50 to 100 or even more virtual machines. Once all these go into production, getting downtime or getting planned maintenance windows is extremely difficult. It is something that typically businesses will frown upon. With VxRail, you can just go ahead and add a node without disrupting the existing environment, which works very well. That's why scale-out upgrades are a key feature. Its performance is also valuable. It delivers a very high number of IOPS for a hybrid configuration or an all-flash configuration. The processors that are available in the Xeon family are very powerful. They are multi-core with typically 2 gigahertz, 2.4 gigahertz, or higher frequency, so the performance is very much appreciated."
    • "It would be nice if its installation can be simplified, but it is currently not too bad. They can provide deduplication and compression in hybrid configurations. To the best of my knowledge, these features are not there, and it would be nice if these are added. Some of its competitors already have these features, so it will help VxRail to have a better feature set and compete more effectively."

    What is our primary use case?

    It is used for server virtualization. Most of my work is around server virtualization. There has been a lot of interest lately in virtual desktop interfaces but not much is happening there. Most of the customers come for server virtualization. They generally have three-tier architecture running VMware vSphere, and they are looking to upgrade their technology for different reasons, such as performance or hardware being the end of life. Our customers are mostly using the new versions of this solution.

    What is most valuable?

    There are so many features, but if I have to choose, I would go for scale-out upgrades and performance.

    Scale-out upgrades are very valuable. Typically, when customers engage in virtualization, they're committing themselves to run many virtual machines on a fewer number of hosts. They'll have five or six hosts, and they will run all their virtualization on vSphere. They could be having anywhere from 50 to 100 or even more virtual machines. Once all these go into production, getting downtime or getting planned maintenance windows is extremely difficult. It is something that typically businesses will frown upon. With VxRail, you can just go ahead and add a node without disrupting the existing environment, which works very well. That's why scale-out upgrades are a key feature.

    Its performance is also valuable. It delivers a very high number of IOPS for a hybrid configuration or an all-flash configuration. The processors that are available in the Xeon family are very powerful. They are multi-core with typically 2 gigahertz, 2.4 gigahertz, or higher frequency, so the performance is very much appreciated.

    What needs improvement?

    It would be nice if its installation can be simplified, but it is currently not too bad.

    They can provide deduplication and compression in hybrid configurations. To the best of my knowledge, these features are not there, and it would be nice if these are added. Some of its competitors already have these features, so it will help VxRail to have a better feature set and compete more effectively.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been off and on working with VxRail for more than three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It is fairly stable. There are no showstoppers as such.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It is easy to scale, but typically, it involves adding more nodes. So, there is an investment from the customer side. They have to have the budget for it, and then scalability is not an issue.

    We are focused on all segments. Some of our customers start off with something as small as a three-node cluster, and we also have large enterprise customers who start off with 10 or 12 nodes.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I don't interact with their technical support.

    How was the initial setup?

    Its installation can be a little complex, but it is not bad. If you plan it well and stay in touch with the customer about requirements, it is not difficult. For an implementation project, it is a standard practice for us to work very closely with the customer. It is definitely not as complicated as deploying a three-tier architecture with SAN storage, SAN switches, and those kinds of things.

    In terms of maintenance, it usually requires version upgrades. When a VxRail cluster is already in production and in use, these things are discussed very deeply with the customer, and whether to go for an upgrade or skip it is decided based on the consultation with the customer. It depends on a whole lot of things, and the customer is the key in deciding such things. You have to consider the following:

    • What is the business cycle at that point in time?
    • What is the workload on the virtual machine?
    • Is this the right time to carry out the upgrade?
    • Is the upgrade really necessary?
    • Is the upgrade going to impact any of their applications?

    What other advice do I have?

    I would definitely recommend VxRail. If you have a heavy investment in VMware software infrastructure, it is definitely useful.

    I would rate VxRail an eight out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    PeerSpot user
    Ghulam Mustafa - PeerSpot reviewer
    BT Area Champion/Trainer at a financial services firm with 5,001-10,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 5
    Scalable, simple to use, and has good support
    Pros and Cons
    • "The support has been excellent, especially if you compare it to IBM."
    • "The licensing is a bit too costly."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for hyper-converged infrastructure.

    It's a four-node cluster that has internal storage and the solution has combined all four nodes via vSAN. vSAN is software, a software-defined storage software from which we can combine our four-node storage and other resources into one virtual storage tool. It's a software-defined model.

    We are using it for surrounding applications, not for core applications. For core applications, we are using Power Systems and IBM Cloud Storage.

    What is most valuable?

    The product is a very good software-defined solution.

    The product has been simplified so that it's very easy to use.

    VxRail is a good product and since Dell acquired VMware and went hyper-converged infrastructure, it's been great. It's a very robust solution.

    The main thing is that vSAN software is built-in, inside the hypervisor. It's an excellent way of doing things and it's common sense. If we are talking about other hypervisors, such as, let's say, Cisco HyperFlex, HP SimpliVity, and Nutanix, the difference is where vSAN is built on the VMware. You don't need to create a VM for vSAN. It's built-in, in its hypervisor.

    When VMware was acquired by Dell, the hardware and software were combined together, which has been very good.

    The support has been excellent, especially if you compare it to IBM.

    The solution is very good for smaller entities, such as small or medium-sized organizations.

    You can scale the solution quite well.

    From a security point of view, the solution is pretty good.

    What needs improvement?

    The licensing is a bit too costly. They should work on lessening the overall price.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for the last two years or so. It hasn't been for that long.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is very good for small and medium-sized organizations. 

    The product can scale. When we go for an upgrade, all the upgraded software is combined in a one-bundle unit.

    We've just extended our solution. We have four-node clusters, and recently we acquired more resources. We just extended this cluster to eight nodes. We are waiting for the delivery of the equipment. We already replaced some of it.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We've had a good experience with technical support.

    The support mechanism of Dell EMC offers a very quick response. They give us the attention we need when we say there's an issue. The engineer will come online immediately and provide support. We've been quite satisfied with their level of service overall.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The solution is expensive and it could be a bit more reasonably priced for its customers. We hope it's something that will get worked on.

    What other advice do I have?

    VxRail is the product of Dell, with both hardware and software combined together. It's a very good product.

    We bought this VxRail for our VMware-certified applications. Those applications only run on VMware-certified systems. That's why we procured VxRail. Otherwise, we have Hyper-V as well, Microsoft Hyper-V. Hyper-V is an American-based company, which always offers hyper-converged infrastructure solutions. On Edge we are using Hyper-V, It is also a software-defined box.

    We have our own private Cloud as well for converged infrastructure. We have the Lenovo Blade series and the external storage is connected to the chassis which we are using for our surrounding applications. This is our private Cloud. It is also on Microsoft Hyper-V.

    We aren't using the latest version of the solution. We are using the version before.

    Overall, I would rate the solution at a nine out of ten. We've been very happy with it.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free VxRail Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
    Updated: November 2022
    Product Categories
    HCI
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free VxRail Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.