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Tidal Automation OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Tidal Automation is #9 ranked solution in top Workload Automation tools. PeerSpot users give Tidal Automation an average rating of 8 out of 10. Tidal Automation is most commonly compared to Control-M: Tidal Automation vs Control-M. Tidal Automation is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 72% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 22% of all views.
Tidal Automation Buyer's Guide

Download the Tidal Automation Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: June 2022

What is Tidal Automation?

Tidal Software is a leading provider of enterprise workload automation solutions that orchestrate the execution of complex workflows across systems, applications and IT environments. With a comprehensive portfolio of products and services, Tidal optimizes mission-critical business processes, increases IT cost efficiencies and satisfies legal and regulatory compliance requirements. Hundreds of customers around the world count on Tidal for modernizing their workload automation and driving their digital transformation. Tidal Software is headquartered in Chicago with offices in Houston, London, Minsk, Belarus and Chennai, India. For more information, visit tidalsoftware.com.

Tidal Automation was previously known as Tidal Workload Automation, Cisco Workload Automation, Tidal Enterprise Scheduler.

Tidal Automation Customers


Tidal Automation Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Tidal Automation pricing:
"The licensing model is very flexible and very transparent... It's flexible for budgeting. I know what I need and I have licenses to cover those needs. If a project comes along that needs a new type of license or an added license, that would just be added to the project."

Tidal Automation Reviews

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JonFredrickson - PeerSpot reviewer
JDE Manager at Oshkosh Corporation
Real User
We know when we schedule a job it will submit and we'll be notified of any errors, enabling us to be proactive, not reactive
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution also enables admins and users to see the information relevant to them. They're able to actually run jobs that they weren't necessarily able to run before. They can see the output and they can be notified when there are issues and resolve those issues before they cause more issues."
  • "One thing I would like to see is better training on both how to set up and support the product as well as on how to make use of the product, especially regarding the scripting that is available."

What is our primary use case?

We have a product called J.D. Edwards which is our ERP system. Our biggest use case for Tidal is to automate jobs that we submit through J.D. Edwards. Our second use case would be automating maintenance — stopping services, deleting logs — your "keeping the lights on" type of stuff. And our third use case is using it for any automation tasks that we come across. Tidal is our product of choice at the moment. If we're going to automate something, we're going to use Tidal to automate it. We integrate Tidal with Linux, Windows, iSeries, SQL Server, and Oracle, in addition to J.D. Edwards.

How has it helped my organization?

The biggest thing we see is the fact that when we schedule a job we know that it will submit, and if there are any errors we will be notified and able to resolve them. That's our biggest benefit. That way we're being proactive instead of being reactive. We use the solution for cross-platform and cross-application workloads. We'll submit a job in J.D. Edwards and that will create a CSV file. We'll take that file and we'll either copy it up to SharePoint or we'll FTP it to another location where it gets used by something. Through J.D. Edwards we have an MRP, which means run a bunch of jobs. If it wasn't for Tidal, and we had to use any of the standard tools, we wouldn't be able to run those jobs sufficiently. If there's an error with a job, there is an alert with a PDF. In that alert, we can customize any messaging that would assist people in resolving it. If it was a specific file location that they need to go look at, we can put a link to that file location. If it's something with logs, we can attach to the logs to the email so they have one place to start looking. We can even attach work instructions to that email notification: "Hey, if this job errors out and you received this email, here are the steps to resolve." So people don't have to go looking for that information. They can just start resolving it right away. Tidal has also definitely helped to reduce at-night hours. It's able to monitor itself. If a job fails, we're able to resolve the job and let the customer know, instead of the customer calling us and saying, "Some job failed. Go fix it," and having to research it. It could save my team about an hour's worth of work in each of those situations. Overall, it saves us about 20 hours of work each week, hours where we would have been stuck trying to determine what the issue was instead of having an alert that tells us exactly what the issue is. In terms of the number of jobs we run, I don't know if Tidal has increased it, but it's made it more flexible. For example, with J.D. Edwards there is no way to email attachments, so we had to have a developer spend some time to create a custom application. That application is built into Tidal and I have a lot more flexibility to make changes. Instead of being tied to just sending emails, I can also take the files and copy them to a SharePoint or FTP them to a location outside of the company. We didn't have that ability before.

What is most valuable?

The most important features are being able to schedule jobs and being able to monitor and act on those jobs if they fail. Even if they're successful, we're able to act on them. The solution also enables admins and users to see the information relevant to them. They're able to actually run jobs that they weren't necessarily able to run before. They can see the output and they can be notified when there are issues and resolve those issues before they cause more issues. It allows them to concentrate on doing the work they're supposed to be doing instead of fixing issues. I like the integrations they have with ServiceNow and J.D. Edwards. A selling point to me was the fact that they actually have a J.D. Edwards driver and that works the way it should.

What needs improvement?

One thing I would like to see is better training on both how to set up and support the product as well as on how to make use of the product, especially regarding the scripting that is available.  Another place I'd like to see an improvement is that there are certain agents that I don't have access to. It's on the wishlist but they can't do everything for everybody. The one that I'm looking for particularly is IBM's Data Store driver. I understand why they haven't created one, but my life would be better if they did. They also need to make sure they have the adapters, or have a mechanism to get the adapters, that people need. There's an adapter that I would really like. I've even said, "I'll pay for it. Just tell me how much and I'll get it paid for." They're just not in a position to do that.
Buyer's Guide
Tidal Automation
June 2022
Learn what your peers think about Tidal Automation. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
609,272 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Tidal for three years with my current company, and at a previous company I used it for about three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Tidal is very stable. I have J.D. Edwards systems, Robot, Control-M, and I worry more about them not working than I do about Tidal not working.  In fact, we ran across a case where Tidal was too smart for us. It submitted a job and was detecting that the job wasn't acting correctly and kicked out an error, even though the job was actually completing. I took it to the developer and he was able to determine there was a problem with the code. Tidal was responding to that error, but we had never seen that before. I haven't seen any other system work as well Tidal's J.D. Edwards adapter does.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's very scalable. We haven't seen a limit yet with Tidal. The one limit we saw was actually caused by a third-party design issue. It wasn't a Tidal issue, it was a J.D. Edwards issue.  The issue is related to running UBE conversions with the XML adapter. We plan on using this as our only job scheduler. This will replace other solutions on multiple boxes, including our Robot scheduler. This will cross four different J.D. Edwards implementations, including production and non-production scheduling of jobs.

How are customer service and support?

Their tech support is the one reason why I can get away with not having additional training. When we have issues, we're able to open up the case with their tech support and they will help us with what amounts to our training issues.  Their tech support is top-notch. They take ownership of the product and they support it, regardless of whether the system isn't doing something right, all the way to a situation where we're not doing something right, and they help us to do it the correct way.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Yes, we've used Robot, JDE Scheduler, Smart Scheduler, and batch jobs.  None of them offer the amount of intergration and monitoring that Tidal supports.

How was the initial setup?

The setup was very straightforward. We had it up and running in a day. An employee of mine was actually upset with me that I had wasted his time with another product trying to get it to work. We spent over $40,000 having that other vendor come in, and we spent at least two weeks of my employee's time trying to get the integration to work with J.D. Edwards, the way it should, and ultimately we failed. We were able to do that same functionality within a day with Tidal, start to finish: Load the server, connect the adapter, and submit a job. We've slowly been growing this to all of our other segments and adding some of the scripting that makes it work — the nice-to-have stuff. In the beginning, to have the system up and running, it took us about two weeks of solid work. To bring a new J.D. Edwards system on may take about 20 hours to get all the little pieces correct and be able to submit a job successfully. It's not really an issue with Tidal. It's really an issue of making sure all the services on J.D. Edwards are up and running properly. We have multiple segments or systems, so our implementation strategy was to get it up and running as a proof of concept on one of our systems and then use that system to show the other segment owners how it works, and what the benefits are. We've been rolling it out to them. We start off with taking any new requests. For example, "Hey, we need this schedule change." We'll do it in Tidal and it will run there from now on. We'll go back and move all their old jobs over. In terms of the learning curve for Tidal, I made a statement once: "It's so easy that it's complex." What I meant by that is that the interface is truly, really easy. And it is very powerful. You can do pretty much anything you want to do with it, and that's what makes it hard. Sometimes, when trying to implement something there are so many ways to go about it that you don't know which way is the best until you try it a couple of different ways. You learn which ways work better for your environments and which ways don't. I had a guy who worked for weeks on another system, and he was truly upset with me that I put Tidal in here. But within five minutes of my showing him how to create his first submitted jobs, he did the rest of them on his own. I said, "Here's what it should look like," and he said, "Okay, I got it." And he did the rest of the scripts for the jobs that needed to be created. So it's really easy to use and pick up, but it's also really powerful in the flexibility that it has. The amount of training new users need to begin using the solution depends on what you consider to be a new user. First, you have the operators, and then you have people who design the scripts, and you might have another person who is an administrator of the system.  In terms of administering it, there is a document out there that walks you through how to install it, so we were able to do that. That document shows, at a high level, how to create different types of jobs. When you get down into the details, it becomes a little harder to know what exactly goes where. That takes a little bit of testing and trying and retrying. For brand-new users the documentation is really good and it gets you to know what you're doing. When you're going to try and do more complex stuff, that's when you start really wishing there was more training.

What about the implementation team?

The first time I used it I used an integrator, and it went fine. I was truly new to it. But the second time we did it on our own.

What was our ROI?

We have an MRP process that runs nightly, but we could not go live unless we got that to work. If it wasn't for Tidal, we would not have been able to get that to work the way they wanted it to work. None of the other schedulers could be doing what we're doing with Tidal in our MRP process, which is part of our manufacturing of our firetrucks. I don't know if I can put a value on that. We wouldn't be able to run our MRP process if it wasn't for that. Also, being able to know that the jobs are going to run or that we're going to be alerted when they don't run is very beneficial to us because we do a lot of integrations to OSN. If we don't send out invoices we don't get paid. There's a lot of value to what Tidal does. There are savings in our total cost of ownership because we're able to go from running Robot on five different servers down to just Tidal running on a fault-tolerant server. The money we save almost gets us to break-even given the amount of money that we would be spending on Robot. We're going from our admin person supporting robot on multiple different systems to supporting just one implementation of Tidal. His job is four times as easy. For the administration side of Tidal, there's my team of six senior analysts and me. We also have BAs and developers who have access to view jobs and submit jobs. We also give them the ability to create jobs, but they haven't really embraced that. They would rather that we do that. We're trying to implement a paradigm shift along the lines of, "We're just here to make sure the tool works. You guys actually use the tool," but they just want to see that it works and have us do everything on the tool. I'm trying to decide which way is better and eventually we'll decide on one or the other. But right now we let the end-users, business analysts, and developers create the jobs, submit them, and test them.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The licensing model is very flexible and very transparent. I wish we were at a point where we could have a truly enterprise-wide license, but the way we licensed it limits our financial exposure in the most effective way. It's flexible for budgeting. I know what I need and I have licenses to cover those needs. If a project comes along that needs a new type of license or an added license, that would just be added to the project. Then, at the end of the year, we would have a new value that we would pay. The licensing is very supportable. I can handle it year-to-year. I know that the more people see Tidal, the more they're going to want to do stuff and the higher my licensing costs are going to go, but that's okay.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We've used Control-M, we've used the JDE scheduler, and we've used Smart Scheduler. None of them can do everything that Tidal can do.  None of them is really good, once you submit a job, at knowing when that job finishes. A lot of them are submit-it-and-forget-it, so you really don't know if that next job can start running, because you don't know if the first job has finished running. And if there's an error that stops a script at a certain point, none of the others do a really good job of alerting you and then letting you try to determine the best next action. Only one of the others, aside from Tidal, has a valid JDE adapter. Robot and Control-M are both dependent on the RUNUBE command, which doesn't give you very much functionality. Smart Scheduler is submitting it within JDE, but then you're tied to only stuff that JDE can see. Smart Scheduler also has an issue with handling multiple time zones. Tidal enables you to FTP and to copy files from different locations. For any other third-party stuff that you may want to do, it is a true enterprise solution. Also, the calendaring is much better in Tidal. The scripting is much better. You can integrate across multiple different systems and platforms. I don't know that any of the others can do that. I could literally run a job on one EnterpriseOne system, move that data over to the other one, and run another job on another system. I don't know how I would complete that task on any of the other systems, without having to run two separate jobs. Even then, how would I know that it's done before the other one started up? Tidal knows, "I can't run this until this other one is done."

What other advice do I have?

Don't feel ashamed that you'll wonder why you waited so long. I've used so many other products, gotten them up and running, but I don't know of any other product that works as easily as Tidal does for scheduling jobs for J.D. Edwards. I'm sure there are other people who use Tidal for other stuff, but J.D. Edwards is what I mostly know. I think it's the only scheduler you should use if you run J.D. Edwards. The biggest lesson I've learned using Tidal is don’t wait so long. It took me five years to convince my boss that he should let me buy Tidal. He even brought in another product, and I sat there the entire time I was getting that other product up and running, saying, "I sure wish I had Tidal." Another lesson learned is to be prepared because the more people see the functionality and the abilities of Tidal, the faster they're going to want to make use of it. Another lesson learned is that it is truly a product that the end-user can run instead, of IT supporting it. To me, it's no different than somebody logging into production and submitting a job in production. Why shouldn't they be able to submit it through Tidal? If I can give them an easy way to do that, all the better. I rate Tidal at eight out of 10, because everybody else in the industry is about a five. For Tidal to get to a 10, they need more traction in the industry and to be recognized as the leader of scheduling in J.D. Edwards. I think they have the product for it. Now, they just have to market it and get it sold. They also need to work on the people who make use of it. The more training opportunities, the more hands-on, the more interactions with it, the more people will see the value of it.  There is a lot of room to for Tidal to grow, but over time they'll get there.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Microsoft Azure
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Tony Rice - PeerSpot reviewer
Head of Global Middleware Platforms at a pharma/biotech company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 20
Great visibility with a single pane of glass and a low learning curve
Pros and Cons
  • "We use the solution for cross-platform, cross-application workloads. That's the biggest use for us and that's the biggest advantage."
  • "The GUI, the graphical user interface, gets a little bit busy."

What is our primary use case?

Our largest use cases are for the execution of SAP and JD Edwards jobs. Then, there are a lot of other technologies, however, in terms of the Pareto principle, really that's the bulk of our processing. SAP is what we use for our manufacturing and operational type stuff with the actual products. JD Edwards is a lot more of financial reporting and projections and things like that.

We use the solution to run SAP and JD Edwards. Windows and Unix hosts are probably the second most common use case, as well as web services. Any REST API would apply - and we use a lot of REST API technology. Protocol, really.

How has it helped my organization?

Primarily the biggest thing is giving visibility to what, in a lot of places I've worked in, are transparent, like invisible processes. You have this massive batch and, unless you have someone watching that and you have a place to have a single point of truth and say this is successful or not, it makes it very hard to trace things. With Tidal, you can say, "Hey, this is the objective notifications," and all the ones you explicitly want are checkboxes. It's easy to add those things in.

What is most valuable?

Having a single pane of glass, regardless of which technology we're talking about has been great. A lot of time, I'm in middleware, so what will happen is people will want to say, "Oh, it's this part or that part or the other part." You can see all of them side by side in Tidal.

It talks both to web stuff, which is helpful. Everything you want to talk to is there. If you have stuff that's still more 20th century and you want to run it at a command line, you have that available to you as well.

We use the solution for cross-platform, cross-application workloads. That's the biggest use for us and that's the biggest advantage.

Our impression of the solution's ability to manage and monitor workloads has been good. It does what it's prescribed to do.

The solution enables admins and users to see the information relevant to them. One of the other features that we use a lot is really a part of web services. We talk to ServiceNow. We have specific metrics to go with failures for major incidents and things like that.

The solution’s drill-down functionality so that admins can investigate data or processes has been super useful. It allows you to instrument for teams at their skill level. As an admin, I can say, I don't let you see these certain elements as you don't use the other ones and that simplifies how those technologies work. You don't have to have everyone see everything. That part's really helpful.

The solution has increased capacity in terms of the number of jobs and integrations. For example, in one of the things that we run, we actually had to expand how big the queue was as they wanted to run 300 parallel jobs. Historically, we hadn't run three parallel jobs for the whole company. So the scaling of that was just 15 minutes. Then, boom, everything was ready to go. It scaled pretty easily for us.

The teams that are smart about the Tidal usage, that basically will get it to the point of human intervention, save a lot of hours, especially when it comes to log gathering. That kind of stuff now is automatic for them. That saves a lot of hours.

What needs improvement?

Honestly, the biggest problem we have with it is people's interpretation of the results. It gives you really good information and people sometimes are just not really good at working with that information.

The GUI, the graphical user interface, gets a little bit busy. You have these flyouts that sometimes are a little tedious to get through. They need to look at just ways to simplify the graphical user interface a little bit. That would be good.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used the solution since 2009. That's 13 or 14 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is very good. Almost every time where we've had an outage, it had not been due to the software, rather, it was some element of our infrastructure failing. The most common failure for us is we lose connectivity between the database and the application. There's not an app alive that's not going to have some problems when you can't connect like that.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We split users primarily into four roles. The viewers can't do anything other than see what's happened. There are also operators, which are people that can rerun jobs, yet can't modify anything. They're a little bit ahead of a viewer. Then you go into being a developer, which can write jobs in non-production. Finally, my admin team uses it. They keep it all running. The fattest part of the bell curve, the biggest user there is, is the developers. Overall, we're between 1200 and 1500 users. The admin team is six people, and the developers are about 800 of them.

We're worldwide. Unless we get some off-world friends to introduce themselves, I don't have a lot more room for expansion. What we're seeing now is people wanting to stand up more masters for more autonomy. I see us expanding into China, which is going to be a pretty nifty little trick since there are a lot of restrictions on communications there. That's about the only expansion I see for us. Obviously, there is increased job usage. However, in terms of expanding the footprint of the platform, that's only in geographic regions.

How are customer service and support?

Technical support is better than average. It's not stellar yet. They're still working out some kinks. They've got it a lot smoother. I've had predominantly good experiences, just not perfect ones.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We used AutoSys before. I'm familiar with that tool as well. The big factor in switching was the license model being just a lot more predictable. Then, as a result of that, it was for the number of features that Tidal had. It was significantly more powerful at a lower cost. It wasn't just the cheapest. They were pretty close in cost when we got it all down to it. It was still less expensive, however, also had the more advanced features, in particular REST API, which was super duper expensive with AutoSys. It was a license model that made it very hard to predict the growing cost, versus Tidal. With Tidal, at least in the model that we had, it was very, very stable. We just renewed for another couple of years recently.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. You essentially need two servers and a database. At its heart, it is pretty simple to set up.

The deployment took three weeks. We deployed in three separate geographic regions. We just did one per week and then gave people time to get comfortable with new steps. We just did it in sequence. We installed, for example, for Japan, then for the United States, and then for Europe.

Learning it is pretty easy. It is a narrow learning curve for operators, for people that are just going to run and monitor. It's a little steeper of a learning curve for an admin to instrument new user groups.

Depending on how fast they read, new users can get up to speed in between one and two hours. We have a one-hour interactive training platform called EdCast. They do a one-hour EdCast that says how it works and then there are two other documents they read that specify and call out how their specific technologies work.

What about the implementation team?

We did use a third party for deployment assistance. Our experience was very good. They are very knowledgeable about the product. They were a good partner. They helped us sort out the boundaries between when there's an error and when you've misconfigured it, and it's just telling you about it. They were very good in that regard.

What was our ROI?

We have seen ROI in the sense that it's primarily about our ability to stay flat in cost while constantly increasing our volume. That's the biggest ROI that I see.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

For me, the key aspect was the linear predictability of costs. I know what handles I have to do, what things cost what. When we renewed having a regular cycle of renewal and re-evaluation kept us on track. For the years that we've been using it, we've had an increase in growth, yet we haven't had exponential increases in cost, which is really good.

Just say from 2009, when we started with it, up to now, we've gone from 5,000 jobs to fivefold. We're at 25,000, 30,000 jobs. However, it wasn't like my costs went up fivefold or tenfold. That was really good for us. That was really important.

The total cost of ownership, given its capacity for jobs and our ability to control infrastructure costs, have been very good. Having stood it up in AWS and having a group that's very active and having those sizings be very easy, what I'm finding is that the hardware requirements and thus the cost stays pretty low for the amount of stuff we're doing, and Tidal seems to respond well to our ability at the AWS layer to change that hardware without really having too many problems.

What other advice do I have?

We are a customer and end-user.

I don’t know if the solution helped reduce or eliminate weekend or overtime hours as that doesn’t really apply to me. We're 24/7. There's no such thing as a weekend for us.

I'd advise new users to not underestimate the way that people will want to blame a tool for something they don't understand. Tidal will display errors from other systems and you need to be prepared for separating a Tidal error from Tidal reporting an error. That's the biggest learning point that you want to have in your head at the beginning.

It's a good idea to define the lanes of responsibility. That's been almost the entirety of my career, maintaining the lanes of responsibility through Tidal, as it's cross-platform, it's cross-technology, it's cross-team. You really have to be able to sort out the difference between a psychology versus a technology problem. It's the way someone feels about what's on their screen. It's been very helpful for that, however, it's probably a similar problem for anything like this. Tidal just makes it so easy to see those things yet oftentimes it gets blamed for stuff.

I'd rate the solution nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Buyer's Guide
Tidal Automation
June 2022
Learn what your peers think about Tidal Automation. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
609,272 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Shahaan Dalal - PeerSpot reviewer
Production Control Engineer at a healthcare company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Redundancy for the primary master, the backup master, as well as fault tolerance, keep things stable
Pros and Cons
  • "We use the solution for cross-platform and cross-application workloads. That's one of the core reasons we chose it. It's one of a few things in the industry that can be used for cross-platform integration."
  • "The biggest improvement they need to work on is doing better QA checks before they release new patches and service packs. We do find that you can't trust getting the new product right away, as they have to get some bug fixes out. They do tend to have some bugs in the first iteration."

What is our primary use case?

It's a company-wide batch scheduler.

It runs tons for us. It runs Windows, Unix/Linux. We connect with a lot of databases: Oracle, SQL, Sybase. We have BusinessObjects BI adapters, we scan emails, and we incorporate it with TriZetto Facets healthcare solutions. There's so much. It's our core enterprise scheduler.

How has it helped my organization?

It helps because we have brought in a lot of other applications and systems where we're able to use an enterprise-level scheduler that is consistently monitored and backed up and has a ton of redundancy so that we don't have any downtime. We're pretty close to 99 percent uptime on our scheduler.

It has reduced some of our weekend and overtime hours. For us, it's all based on the programming around the scheduler. For some teams, it has greatly reduced weekend and night hours, but for some people it hasn't because they babysit the process.

Tidal has also helped us increase capacity in terms of the number of jobs. Over the last three years we've added between 10,000 and 15,000 jobs.

What is most valuable?

It's very

  • user-friendly
  • intuitive
  • robust.

Most people, once you give them a quick tutorial on it, can figure out how to use Tidal. For the basic user and developer, it's very intuitive. I don't think it's very hard. I teach users how to use this in a quick, 30-minute conference call, and people are usually very quick to learn it. For a basic user, 30 minutes should be fine.

We use the solution for cross-platform and cross-application workloads. That's one of the core reasons we chose it. It's one of a few things in the industry that can be used for cross-platform integration. It has the schedules to monitor the workflow. We have a 24/7, 365 department that monitors the batch schedule. It's fairly easy and intuitive and we could easily set up the alerting systems around it.

Admins can do more because they have more access but you can set that up the way you would like it. That's all configurable, at least in the GUI. In the back-end, obviously, it's only the admins who have access. But both admins and users can see the schedules.

The drill-down feature makes the GUI interface and the scheduling interface load faster because you don't have as much to load into the screen. I personally use it more, but I do know a lot of users don't. It's all dependent on user experience and how much they choose to use it.

What needs improvement?

Before STA bought this product, Cisco owned it and, unfortunately, they did not update things as well as they should have. We're just now seeing improvements to the product and bug fixes.

The biggest improvement they need to work on is doing better QA checks before they release new patches and service packs. We do find that you can't trust getting the new product right away, as they have to get some bug fixes out. They do tend to have some bugs in the first iteration.

In addition, something that they already know about is that speed can be a little bit of an issue in the environments and the viewers.

And while everything is nice in the GUI interface — they recently upgraded it — they could take it a step further. I would like it to have more flexibility and the overall look of the product could be better. Before this recent patch that we're doing to 6.53, in the 6.5 series it still looked like a product from the 1990s. They recently did a mini-refresh on graphic user interface, but it still looks a little bit clunky. It doesn't look as smooth as I would expect from a 21st-century product, but it's getting there. But this a secondary item, versus the speed and working on bug fixes.

For how long have I used the solution?

I, myself, have been using Tidal for six or seven years. Our company pretty much runs all of our core processing through scheduling. Tidal is the default and has been the default for many years. So it's hard for us to come up with numbers for how it's improved our operations because we're not a company that just brought Tidal in, brand-new, and it suddenly revamped our company. We've been using it for close to 20 years and I enjoy the product very much.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Tidal is pretty stable. We haven't had any major issues, at least in the last three years that I've been working here, and especially since we upgraded. We haven't had many major issues, and we do have redundancy, which is great. We have redundancy for the primary master backup master, and fault tolerance. That that helps with keeping things stable. As of mid-year 2020, I am decreasing the product stability from 8 to 6 stars due to the amount of bugs we are constantly facing.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's very scalable. As the company grows you increase the resources. I've worked at a small company that has Tidal and I'm now working at a pretty big company that uses Tidal and it all works pretty seamlessly.

It's pretty extensively used in our company. We have 25,000 jobs in production, and we keep growing. We keep adding jobs.

We have about eight engineers who create jobs and we have about 10 people who are operators who monitor the production schedule. And we have 200 to 300 other users who are developers. They create code that integrates with Tidal and they work with the engineers to create the jobs in Tidal. They access Tidal to view and check their jobs.

We have an architect and two admins to keep the environments up and running. We have the eight engineers who create, monitor, and edit the jobs and the general environment. They are on-call as well. That's the core team for Tidal. And the NOC manages alerts if something happens, to reach out to the on-call people

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is great. They're fantastic. They're very responsive and detailed when we ask them questions. A big thing that I like since STA bought it is that their support has been very responsive and very quick.

How was the initial setup?

Each upgrade has gotten a little bit better. I remember back in the day, when I first started working Tidal, upgrades were a pain, but they're slowly making improvements on the upgrades. One thing I would like to see them improve a little bit on is the documentation, because some parts of the upgrade are not exactly clear and I've had to go through support to help me on what to fill out in certain parts. But their support is actually fairly quick and they have been able to help me with it.

We've done major upgrades, and that's always a multi-month process because you have to do the change-process testing. That depends on the corporation. But the recent upgrade that we're doing from 6.35 to 6.53 has been going really well and has been pretty fast in terms of the actual setup and installation. Other than a little snag that I had to work through with support, it has gone very well. To upgrade each environment has taken an average of an hour-and-a-half to two hours.

There is some very complex strategy for updates. The main thing is to start with the lower environments and back up everything, the database and the servers, and go through each environment in a slow and steady process. We come up with a testing plan before moving on to the next environment. We have to make sure we test each environment thoroughly, over time, before moving to production.

What about the implementation team?

When we did a major upgrade about two years ago, we used BLUEHOUSE to help us, when we went from 5.31 to 6.3 That was a major change. But ever since then, we have been handling each integration or upgrade in-house.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We purchase a seven-year contract. Once that's up, we'll look at renewals and costs and compare them again.

What other advice do I have?

The main thing is to look at whether you really need an enterprise scheduler in general. After that, implementation is very important. Setting up standards from the beginning for the scheduling and the jobs is very key. My biggest advice is to analyze all these processes and come up with a good plan for how to incorporate everything into your scheduling. That would be one of the most important things for Tidal or for any scheduler in general. From the admin side, for the technology itself and the technical stuff, work with and trust Tidal support at the beginning to get to a certain level of how to scope everything out, and then go from there.

I'd rate it an eight out of 10. The main thing is whether or not they come out with a better rollout of their upgrades and patches so that they are less buggy. Unfortunately, they still do come out with a consistent number of bugs. They also need better documentation at the admin level. Those are the two core areas that they're truly lacking in, and a little bit on speed. However, the newer version that we're still testing is supposed to take care of that. We'll have to see when that comes into play.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Vice President - Technical Delivery at a computer software company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Powerful job scheduler and good support, but there are several points in need of improvement

What is our primary use case?

We primarily use Tidal Automation to schedule batch jobs. 

We are a solution provider and the automation that we implement is for our clients.

How has it helped my organization?

Using this solution has improved the way our organization functions because support is available whenever we have problems.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the job scheduler, where you can schedule thousands of jobs to execute at specific times. It will schedule dependencies as well.

What needs improvement?

There are several improvement points that our team has provided to the vendor. 

For how long have I used the solution?

Our client has been running Tidal Automation for more than three years. We started taking care of it for them between two and three years ago.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This is a stable tool and we use it extensively.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have thousands of jobs that are scheduled in a batch and run using this tool. It is scalable, and there are a few hundred users.

Our usage may increase to some extent but maybe not because there are competing forces.

How are customer service and support?

Our team is in touch with the product team and whenever there is any problem, we reach out to support and they take care of the issues.

As we are working for a client, we have an arrangement such that we can raise tickets with the vendor. Once we do so, the problems are addressed.

Overall, the support is good.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not use another similar solution prior to Tidal.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was completed by our client's team.

We do not maintain the system, aside from the case where an upgrade is needed.

What was our ROI?

It does generate ROI but I do not have specific metrics available because it is known by my customer. When a customer continues to use the same product for a number of years then it seems that they are happy with the return on investment.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Updated: June 2022
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