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TeamCity OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

TeamCity is #4 ranked solution in top Build Automation tools. PeerSpot users give TeamCity an average rating of 8.0 out of 10. TeamCity is most commonly compared to GitLab: TeamCity vs GitLab. TeamCity is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 67% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 21% of all views.
Buyer's Guide

Download the Build Automation Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: September 2022

What is TeamCity?

TeamCity is a Continuous Integration and Deployment server that provides out-of-the-box continuous unit testing, code quality analysis, and early reporting on build problems. A simple installation process lets you deploy TeamCity and start improving your release management practices in a matter of minutes. TeamCity supports Java, .NET and Ruby development and integrates perfectly with major IDEs, version control systems, and issue tracking systems.

TeamCity Customers

Toyota, Xerox, Apple, MIT, Volkswagen, HP, Twitter, Expedia

TeamCity Video

Archived TeamCity Reviews (more than two years old)

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Tim Suchodolski - PeerSpot reviewer
DevOps Enginee at Local Projects
Real User
Scalable and simple to use with lots of very good plug-ins
Pros and Cons
  • "TeamCity is very useful due to the fact that it has a strong plug-in system."
  • "If TeamCity could create more out of the box solutions to make it more user friendly and create more use cases, that would be ideal."

What is our primary use case?

For my company, we require a CI server that's very flexible. Our bills are simple, almost template-based, however, we need to be able to deploy to almost any platform, basically whatever the customer could end up using, whether it be Windows, Mac, Android, and even mobile or tablets, et cetera. We can do it with this solution. 

It needs to be simple because right now as I am the only IT person knowledgable of infrastructure on the team. If we need to build a pipeline, it needs to be simple enough that the rest of the team would be able to understand and work with it.

How has it helped my organization?

The solution has been fantastic for our organization due to the fact that we do not need a designer having to build the product. We don't need to figure out how to deploy it either. It's created improved efficiencies which have saved us time and expense.  

What is most valuable?

TeamCity is very useful due to the fact that it has a strong plug-in system.

It's fantastic how simple it is to set up a pipeline. You don't need to be a technical user to understand the process and make it work and to create and build steps within the pipeline.

What needs improvement?

Harness stuck out to me due to the fact that it looked like testing and deployment was very simple and out of the box. TeamCity it definitely isn't plug and play. It's not a few clicks and you're done. It takes a bit more work.

If TeamCity could create more out of the box solutions to make it more user friendly and create more use cases, that would be ideal.

I would like it if they had a better system for copying or editing what has already been created. Right now it's either too simplistic, or you have to go through several steps just to delete something and to copy something that either does a whole copy or almost nothing. There is no in-between. You can't choose how much of something you take. I would prefer if there was more of, "okay, copy all of this, but leave out these steps." That would just make things a lot faster.

Buyer's Guide
Build Automation
September 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about JetBrains, Jenkins, Atlassian and others in Build Automation. Updated: September 2022.
634,775 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using the solution for about a year now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is reliable. I don't recall bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash. It's stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution is scalable. If an organization needs to expand it, it's possible to do so.

Currently, we have 10-12 users on the solution. These include the creative design team, software engineers, and project managers.

How are customer service and support?

The technical support is good. It's forum based. You post on their websites. You don't really create a ticket and you don't call anyone. You post on their website someone will help you by answering your question there. Then, everyone can also see the answer.

How was the initial setup?

The solution is a little bit complex. It's not quite straightforward. You have to set up servers and agents. Essentially, you need three computers to get up and running.

What about the implementation team?

We did not use an integrator or consultant to assist us with the deployment. We managed the process by ourselves.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The licensing costs depend on what you use the solution for, however, it's free to start and you get up to three agents for free. If you want to do more than a hundred builds or a hundred different setups, then you have to pay more or start paying. 

It's a Freemium model. Once you pass the free stage, it can cost anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars per year.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We're currently looking at Harness, which seems to have a few more out of the box features that we need, so we are considering either integrating the two together, or switching over entirely.

What other advice do I have?

We're just a customer. We're using the most up to date version of the solution currently.

TeamCity is our main continuous integration tool, however, it is deployments that we were looking into improving. With Harness I saw that the deployment process was very polished. And at this point I was wondering if there was any interactivity between the two solutions, or just what would be the benefits of just switching completely to Harness. We're currently researching that now.

I'd advise other organizations to do a lot of research before you begin creating anything.

The solution needs a lot of maintenance in the sense that you need to understand all the different pieces. You need to be able to look at the servers and the agents, and, if you're going to implement anything new, you'll need to understand it is going to take a while to get it right.

I'd rate the solution eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
RalfRosen - PeerSpot reviewer
Software Developer at a tech vendor with 51-200 employees
Real User
Stable, a straightforward setup, and easy to configure
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable aspect of the solution is its easy configuration. It also has multiple plugins that can be used especially for building .net applications."
  • "If there was more documentation that was easier to locate, it would be helpful for users."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily use the solution for application building and testing, continuous integration testing, and continuous delivery.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable aspect of the solution is its easy configuration. It also has multiple plugins that can be used especially for building .net applications.

What needs improvement?

Some of the configurations have room for improvement. They are partly calling another tool via the command line and the parameters on the command line are occasionally hard to use.

If there was more documentation that was easier to locate, it would be helpful for users.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In the prior version, there were some problems with the doc agents, but the latest version is quite stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We're not a big company, so we don't need to scale in a big way. It is possible to partly scale by adding multiple agents within the license. It would be quite easy to do this if you need to.

How are customer service and technical support?

We've never used technical support. We haven't needed to use it yet.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward.

What about the implementation team?

Our company handled the implementation.

What other advice do I have?

We use the on-premises deployment model.

I'd advise others that it's absolutely necessary to use an integration tool that can run integration tests. 

I'd rate the solution eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Build Automation
September 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about JetBrains, Jenkins, Atlassian and others in Build Automation. Updated: September 2022.
634,775 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Lead Engineer at a healthcare company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
The flexibility of the product allows it to support a seemingly infinite number of build workflows.
Pros and Cons
  • "I have not yet implemented the remote build feature, but this will be a big plus. We want to be able to build legacy products on a build agent without developers needing to have obsolete tool sets installed on their local PC."
  • "The flexibility of TeamCity allows it to fit in workflows that I have yet to imagine."
  • "Their online documentation is fairly extensive, but sometimes you can end up navigating in circles to find answers. I would like them (or partner with someone)​ to provide training classes to help newcomers get things up and running more quickly."

What is our primary use case?

Creating build environments for a various range of embedded (C/C++) products with multiple build agent configurations. Empowering the integration team (verification testing) with the ability to test subsystems of applications before launch.

How has it helped my organization?

The flexibility of TeamCity allows it to fit in workflows that I have yet to imagine. As we learn how to configure the build processes to fit our needs, it will prove to be a significant time saver.

What is most valuable?

TeamCity has a remote build feature that we have used to support legacy products (that use compilers that cannot run on current OS versions).  Rather than having developers locked into an outdated PC for legacy support, we now only need to support a single VM that is configured as the build agent for the legacy product.  TeamCity provides integrations for Eclipse, but in our case, it worked better to create a Python script that provided the necessary interaction between SlickEdit and TeamCity.  Developers can make code changes on a current Windows or Linux system, and changes made locally are pushed to the build agent as a personal build.

We are also exploring capabilities of use of the "Report Tabs".  To ultimatly support FDA compliance concerns, I have a prototype of an HTML report being generated that includes CRCs, SCM URLs, SCM Revisions, etc for all items of a build chain.

What needs improvement?

Their online documentation is fairly extensive, but sometimes you can end up navigating in circles to find answers. I would like them (or partner with someone) to provide training classes to help newcomers get things up and running more quickly.

For how long have I used the solution?

Approaching 4 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Have not experienced any "failure" of TeamCity.  An occasional lack of responsiveness from the web interface happens from time to time.  May have been appropriate to provide more CPU resources when the VM was originally created.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

At the Enterprise licensing level, there are no limits to the number of, or complexity of the build configurations that can be set up.

How are customer service and technical support?

For billing & license renewal questions, their Customer Service is very responsive.  Technical support is also available for Enterprise users, but have not had a need to use it more than once or twice.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

No, we were new to CI/CD.

How was the initial setup?

Installation was reasonably straight forward using information from their web site.  Our installation was built in a virtual environment (VMware ESXi/vCenter) and is running on a RHEL 7 minimal installation using MariaDB.

What about the implementation team?

TeamCity was implemented in house with support only from their web documentation.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Jet Brains allows using their product at no charge, but with a cap on build agents, and the number of build configurations allowed, so you can explore the capabilities before committing.  Our current licensing level allows up to 10 simultaneous build agents running, and unlimited build configurations for less than $2000 per year; although not free, it seems a very reasonable cost for the horsepower delivered.


Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Yes, considerations were given to open source products (Jenkins/Hudson, go.cd ...).  It did not appear that any of the others considered could provide an equivalent of the remote build feature offered by TeamCity.

What other advice do I have?

Wish the Tomcat server could magically convert to HTTPS (instead of the apparent default of HTTP).

There are published works on using TeamCity (separate works by authors Melymuka and Mahlingam, both on Packt Publishing), however both of these are out of date which makes the initial learning curve more challenging.  I invite these publishers to update their work; would gladly purchase updated revision.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Snr. Devops Engineer at Deem
Real User
Speeds up release cycles and automatically keeps everybody apprised of project status
Pros and Cons
  • "It provides repeatable CI/CD throughout our company with lots of feedback on failures and successes to the intended audiences via email and Slack."
  • "It will benefit this solution if they keep up to date with other CI/CD systems out there."

What is our primary use case?

I've used TeamCity for many years at three different companies. This has been mainly for CI -building and testing software, but also for CD - continuous delivery and deployment. This has included .NET, Java, Ruby on Rails applications, running database scripts, and basically doing anything that can be automated.

How has it helped my organization?

It provides repeatable CI/CD throughout our company with lots of feedback on failures and successes to the intended audiences via email and Slack. This speeds up release cycles tremendously. Also, it helps when it comes to PCI/auditing (if set up correctly), as TeamCity has great security and tracking model.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features are:

  • Build chains - it's really easy to set up all of your build dependencies
  • Snapshot dependencies and triggers - you always build the correct code as a snapshot is taken at the moment you run the build chain (i.e. no unexpected check-ins are included in your build!)
  • Templates - for setting standards and making the configuration easy and clean
  • Meta runners - sharing code 

TeamCity is very stable, is easy to set up and maintain. Once everything is configured there is almost zero time needed to maintain it.

What needs improvement?

It will benefit this solution if they keep up to date with other CI/CD systems out there. Although I think TeamCity has everything anyone would need, and covers almost every scenario, it needs to keep evolving just to appear to be in sync with others.

Also, more marketing would be helpful just to get the word out on what an amazing product TeamCity is.

For how long have I used the solution?

More than five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This is a very stable solution.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is easy and there is almost no maintenance.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Web Developer and Software Architect at a tech vendor with 1-10 employees
Real User
Execution of unit tests with code coverage reports is a valuable feature
Pros and Cons
  • "Using TeamCity and emailing everyone on fail is one way to emphasize the importance of testing code and showing management why taking the time to test actually does saves time from having to fix bugs on the other end."
  • "Last time I used it, dotnet compilation had to be done via PowerShell scripts. There was actually a lot that had to be scripted."

What is our primary use case?

Automating continuous integration and catching those culprits who introduce build errors or test failures who refuse to test on their own machines.

How has it helped my organization?

Being the sole TDD developer in an organization is not enough if the rest of the team does not test as well. Using TeamCity and emailing everyone on fail is one way to emphasize the importance of testing code and showing management why taking the time to test actually does saves time from having to fix bugs on the other end.

What is most valuable?

The three best features are the following:

  • Automated builds triggered on check-in
  • Execution of unit tests with code coverage reports
  • Automated deployment to various environments.

What needs improvement?

Last time I used it, dotnet compilation had to be done via PowerShell scripts. There was actually a lot that had to be scripted. Whether to present an error code or just throw an exception, it was unclear, as well as having to paste a script versus executing a PS file. Fewer "options" in this section with greater consolidation and handling would be appreciated.

For how long have I used the solution?

Three to five years.
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user607749 - PeerSpot reviewer
it_user607749Manager, Live Production at a computer software company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User

Thanks for the information!

it_user781401 - PeerSpot reviewer
Software Tools Developer II at a tech vendor with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
Templates, meta-runners, and agent pooling make it easy to move to a new release
Pros and Cons
  • "It's easy to move to a new release because of templates and meta-runners, and agent pooling."
  • "REST API support lacks many features in customization of builds, jobs, and settings."

What is most valuable?

  • Templates
  • Meta-runners
  • Plugins
  • Multiple version control system support
  • REST API support

How has it helped my organization?

We can build our code daily and automatically, with email notification for failures. It's easy to move to a new release because of templates and meta-runners, and agent pooling.

What needs improvement?

REST API support lacks many features in customization of builds, jobs, and settings. 

Also, integration with newer technologies needs improvement.

For how long have I used the solution?

Three to five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Depends on the server host, but it runs on Java so it needs high specs. Otherwise, the website takes a long time to load. 

Also, supporting newer technologies is limited.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

You have to clean up old projects, otherwise the load on the server increases with increase in size of projects.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is good.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

No previous solution.

How was the initial setup?

Straightforward, the documentation on the website is very helpful.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I don't handle pricing so I can't really advise on this.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did not evaluate other options but we may consider moving to Jenkins because it's free and has many similar features.

What other advice do I have?

Use Templates and meta-runners, they are very useful in scaling your product with new releases.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user781398 - PeerSpot reviewer
DevOps Engineer at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Automatic VCS Triggers, MSTest, and NUnit integration made our workflow much faster and efficient
Pros and Cons
  • "VCS Trigger: Provides excellent source control support."
  • "The upgrade process could be smoother. Upgrading major versions can often cause some pain."

What is most valuable?

VCS Trigger: Provides excellent source control support. Able to customize a feature with the specific conditions we want. For example, if we wanted only a specific branch to trigger a build, we can do that. 

How has it helped my organization?

Automatic VCS Triggers, MSTest, and NUnit integration made our workflow much faster and efficient. It just felt more mature and everything was working as we expected.

What needs improvement?

The upgrade process could be smoother. Upgrading major versions can often cause some pain.

For how long have I used the solution?

Three to five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We did not encounter any serious issues with stability so far.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues with scalability. When we needed more agents, we simply used pre-configured machines and quickly installed the agent on them.

How are customer service and technical support?

Great tech support with quick response times.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

TFS, back at the time TFS carried too much overhead for us. So, we looked for a better solution out there. When we discovered TeamCity, it totally speeded up our workflow. TeamCity's configuration and ease of use are way better compared to TFS, which eventually saved us a lot of time. 

How was the initial setup?

One of the things I liked about TeamCity. It is very easy to install and maintain.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Start with the free tier for a few build configs and see how it works for you, then according to your scale find the enterprise license which fits you the most.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Jenkins, but it was not mature enough and did not meet our needs at that time.

What other advice do I have?

It really is dependent on your product needs. Do market research and see the pros and cons versus open source or any other solutions out there.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user781404 - PeerSpot reviewer
Software Engineer with 501-1,000 employees
Vendor
Provides ​​good visualization of builds, however ​I would suggest creating simple and advanced configurations

What is most valuable?

  • Good visualization of builds
  • Easy configuration
  • Good integration with IDE and JetBrains products

How has it helped my organization?

People react faster on failing builds.

What needs improvement?

I would suggest creating simple and advanced configurations. Advanced configurations will give more customizations like Jenkins does.

For how long have I used the solution?

Three to five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Generally no, just in a few cases.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No, adding new build agents were enough.

How are customer service and technical support?

I would give technical support an eight out of 10. They provide help quickly.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

At another company, we switched from Jenkins to TeamCity because of the support.

How was the initial setup?

The setup is straightforward.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

If you can, try it out first.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Jenkins.

What other advice do I have?

Try to think about pipeline before buying this product, you can set it up on one machine and try it out.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Software Engineer at a security firm with 501-1,000 employees
Vendor
Features I like include: shared resource locking, customization via plugins and meta-runners, and storing build configurations per-branch for Git code repositories.

Valuable Features:

Features I really like:
Branch builds for Git repositories, shared resource locking, customization via plugins and meta-runners, and storing build configurations per-branch for Git code repositories.

Improvements to My Organization:

TeamCity allows us to have self-sufficient development teams that can create their own builds and deployments. TeamCity has really allowed us to embrace continuous integration (even running full CI on all code branches with no extra effort).

Room for Improvement:

Features I would like to see in TeamCity:
Allow for shared resource locks across multiple build configurations (i.e. deploy then run integration tests against the same environment).

Allow shared resource locks to accept parameters for dynamic assignment of locks.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user289653 - PeerSpot reviewer
Release and deployment process manager at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
There are the occasional issues in deploying software, but it has centralized our build automation.

What is most valuable?

  • Centralized build automation
  • Ability to embed powershell scripts for automated deployments
  • Auditability of builds
  • Unit tests
  • Smoke tests
  • Automated deployments

How has it helped my organization?

Continuous integration has reduced build failures and highlighted issues sooner. Automated deployments of web services, database scripts and applications chained across all environments has minimized time and effort, sped up delivery time, reduced risk of human error and enabled automated communication to stakeholders via integration with JIRA for release notes.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used it for three years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

Occasionally issues deploying software using the tool due to configuration issues within the tool (mostly around powershell configuration).

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We had to add additional servers to enable a failover capability, but this was more to do with our infrastructure

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues enquired.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

I've not required customer service.

Technical Support:

It's good. It's done via online forums.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We previously used Jenkins and Cruise control. We changed to enable one common solution and standard support model, also better functionality.

How was the initial setup?

It was very simple. I have also installed on my home server to enable me to continue to develop and learn the tool.

What about the implementation team?

We did it in-house.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The initial cost was only the cost of a virtual server, and database which was less than 1000 Euros a month. I am not aware of ongoing costs.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

No other options were evaluated.

What other advice do I have?

Make sure you define the standards and naming conventions prior to implementing TeamCity.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user326337 - PeerSpot reviewer
it_user326337Customer Success Manager at PeerSpot
Consultant

Debra, how do you find your build automation 10 months later? Have you seen significant progress?

PeerSpot user
Software Development Senior Manager at a tech vendor with 10,001+ employees
Real User
It delegates the building of executable code to a machine, and it stays running and performs build regularly.

What is most valuable?

I spend less time scripting to get a build working and more time configuring TeamCity through its web-based front end.

How has it helped my organization?

It delegates the building of executable code to a machine.

What needs improvement?

More build runners and more options are needed, although I have no worries they keep improving.

For how long have I used the solution?

This is the second job I have used it at. I have used other CI systems in the past, but I have been using TeamCity around two years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

Actually, I ran into a problem and I needed to do a fresh install. TeamCity stores its configuration data separate from where it installs. so this makes upgrades smoother, but makes it harder to start with a fresh slate. The problem was the data directory of the service account was rerouted because it was a 64 bit OS to SysWOW64.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No, it stays running and performs build regularly.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

For our usage, it has scaled well to our needs.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

10/10 - their service is very professional and prompt.

Technical Support:

10/10 - their service is very professional and prompt, and their staff really wants to solve your problems.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I had used CruiseControl.NET in the past. It was useful once running, but painful to initially setup, and we used word of mouth and articles showing comparisons with other frameworks.

How was the initial setup?

Just installing it with one agent is a breeze. The starting free license comes with three build agents, which, if you install them all as services, takes a little modifying of config files and running of batch files.

What about the implementation team?

I implemented it.

What was our ROI?

Yet to be calculated. I am trying to automate the release of deliverables to free someone's time up.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Start with the free license it has decent room for one group.

What other advice do I have?

Start small. Start with just doing builds before executing tests.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user283431 - PeerSpot reviewer
Software Developer at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
It provides us with continuous deployment and integration, but get someone who knows it well to go through the basics.

What is most valuable?

  • General ease of use
  • Quick start up time
  • NUnit build runner

How has it helped my organization?

  • Continuous deployment
  • Continuous integration
  • Testing feedback

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used it for four years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

No issues encountered.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No issues encountered.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues encountered.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

There was no previous solution in place.

How was the initial setup?

It's straightforward as the UI is intuitive.

What about the implementation team?

I implemented it myself.

What was our ROI?

It's free, so very good.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Start with the free version, and go from there.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

No other options were evaluated.

What other advice do I have?

Get someone who knows it well to go through the basics, but there's also loads of help on Google.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user229776 - PeerSpot reviewer
DevOps Engineer at a media company with 51-200 employees
Vendor
The templates allow a consistent configuration on how an application is built.

What is most valuable?

  • Ease of configuring complete build chains with the use of build templates
  • Creating a single custom build runner that allows us to have a single entry point and filter steps by arguments for all our builds
  • The ability to trigger subsequent builds in a chain based off of multiple types of triggers in a deterministic fashion

How has it helped my organization?

Creating a meta-runner to use as a single build entry point. The templates allow a consistent configuration on how an application is built, and by combining the use of the meta-runner and build templates, the whole organisation understands, and follows, this convention. By following this convention, a complete build stack is completed in a single REST call.

What needs improvement?

  • Client side load as projects/builds with a lot of test history, and branches can take quite a bit of time to load
  • It would also be nice to have a conditional build step: https://youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/TW-17939
  • Having project templates

For how long have I used the solution?

I used it for three years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

You shouldn't use TeamCity as a deployment tool.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

As versions progress, TeamCity has greatly improved it's stability with it's resourcing. Also following JetBrains' documentation about how to set up TeamCity, distributes load in a more even fashion.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

There have been times when making copies of a project has caused major stability issues, especially when you have nested project structure based off of different build configuration templates.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

I've never needed to deal with customer service.

Technical Support:

YouTrack has been a great forum to raise/track issues.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We previously used CC.Net. TeamCity provided a much easier method of configuration as well as templating over CC.Net.

How was the initial setup?

If you want just a basic setup, it is extremely straightforward. If you require optimizations such as I/O distribution, you will need to do a little bit more work.

What about the implementation team?

We implemented it in-house.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user222807 - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at Testing QA Solutions Ltd (TQS)
Consultant
Useful to see how the build is progressing and how many tests are left to pass.

What is most valuable?

  • It's a very useful, intuitive tool to continuously deploy new builds
  • A clean user interface
  • It's very easy to use, even for non-build engineers
  • Ability to run automated tests as part of the build process
  • Easy to pinpoint issues with the detailed logs
  • Easy navigation
  • Useful to see how the build is progressing and how many tests are left to pass before the build is green

How has it helped my organization?

  • Improved the quality of builds by running unit tests as part of every build
  • Reduced the risks of regression defects by running automated tests as part of the build process

What needs improvement?

The UI could be more structured, as it is so customisable it is quite easy to get lost around the screens.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have used this product for over six months now.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

Only environment issues which caused failed deployments. Also, if people were connected to the database on the backend, the build would fail.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It seemed a very stable tool with hardly any downtime in the six months I was using it.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Not at all. In fact it was so stable we were able to add and create our own virtual environments each time we needed to deploy. This meant that each user had their own virtual environment, meaning nothing ever got overwritten.

How are customer service and technical support?

I had no need for it as we had DevOps engineers who fixed any issues.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used to use Jenkins in a previous job. I started using TeamCity when I changed jobs as that was the tool that was being used, but I preferred TeamCity to Jenkins.

How was the initial setup?

It's fairly straightforward.

What about the implementation team?

It was implemented by an in-house team.

What was our ROI?

We used to deploy multiple times a day too many different environments. Also, we had offices in Australia who were using it when we were asleep! Effectively we were using this tool 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

What other advice do I have?

Do it! Very easy to use and very stable. A must have tool for any teams using agile methodologies.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user218967 - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Product Manager with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Allowed us to create a visual flow of the processes and steps involved in moving a build through its phases.

Valuable Features

The ability to create Build Pipelines and create user groups are the two most valuable features.

Improvements to My Organization

  • As a business we had a custom build process where the only people with access to the build were our build engineers.
  • Teamcity allowed us to create a visual flow of the processes and steps involved in moving a build through its phases.
  • The product also allowed us to identify areas for improvement in our process.

Room for Improvement

This product lacks real reporting for all the information it captures; we should be able to create reports or dashboards for management.

The product captures a lot of information about build processes, but there is no easy way to create/generate reports that can be used by management.

Use of Solution

We have been using TeamCity for about 6 – 7 years.

Deployment Issues

There were no issues with deployment.

Stability Issues

There were no issues with stability.

Scalability Issues

It would be ideal if agents could scale up on demand using a private cloud. The functionality is there for Amazon.

Customer Service and Technical Support

Customer Service:

Good.

Technical Support:

Excellent.

Initial Setup

The setup is extremely straightforward.

Implementation Team

In-house implementation.

Other Solutions Considered

We evaluated a few other products. The only product that had was a real contender was Electric Commander.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Software Developer at a tech vendor with 201-500 employees
Vendor
The support for cross-platform builds is very valuable, as is the flexibility in creating build steps.

What is most valuable?

The support for cross-platform builds is very valuable, as is the flexibility in creating build steps. We love that we can include unit and integration tests as part of a build configuration! The plugin functionality is great too, and we couldn't live without the Octopus Deploy plugin.

How has it helped my organization?

With Teamcity, our build/packaging process and the ensuing deployment via Octopus Deploy takes less than half an hour. We have a customer base of approximately 40,000, spread over hundreds of virtual machines, so a fast deployment with little to no downtime is critical.

What needs improvement?

It'd be great to see future built-in support for Octopus Deploy. Currently, Octopus Deploy provides a plug-in for TeamCity, but the installation is manual, and requires a restart of the TeamCity service in order to complete the installation. This is really the only small improvement I would recommend, but it's obviously not a deal-breaker.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used TeamCity for approximately one and a half years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

While I didn't take part in the original installation of TeamCity at my current employer, I have set it up on various machines for testing/trial purposes. I use it regularly for a personal project that I maintain. The installation and setup of an initial build configuration were both very straightforward.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No issues encountered.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues encountered.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

I haven't had the opportunity to interact with support team at JetBrains, but I am impressed with the extent of the documentation.

Technical Support:

I haven't been in a situation which required the assistance of the JetBrains technical support team.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

It was in place before I arrived at my current employer, but I know that the deployments were handled largely through robocopy scripts that took hours to run. Deploys were typically done in the wee hours of the morning, and required having multiple developers on-site/on call.

How was the initial setup?

I've found the installation to be very straightforward.

What about the implementation team?

The installation was handled as a joint effort between our in-house development and IT teams.

What other advice do I have?

If you need an enterprise build management tool, and your budget permits, it's absolutely worth looking at. Even for independent developers with a limited budget, JetBrains allows you to use the product for free up to a certain number of projects. I use it for a personal project at home, and love it.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Software Configuration Management ad Release Management at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Very useful for setting up build agents in a Unix platform.

What is most valuable?

  • Continuous integration
  • Build templates
  • Triggers
  • Plugins
  • Platform independence

How has it helped my organization?

We used do all of our product development builds using .net and Java languages. It is very useful to setup build agents in a Unix platform for all kinds of Unix builds.

What needs improvement?

Deployment functions need work.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used it for two years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

We had an issue when we customized TeamCity for deployment functions in a Windows environment using PowerShell scripting.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No issues encountered.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues encountered.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

Good. I would give them a 9/10.

Technical Support:

Good. I would give them a 9/10.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

No previous solution was used.

How was the initial setup?

Simple and easy to integrate with Subversion source code tool.

What about the implementation team?

We used an in-house team whose expertise was 9/10.

What other advice do I have?

It was simple and easy to use. Great features which are always customizable.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user215799 - PeerSpot reviewer
it_user215799Software Configuration Management ad Release Management at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User

The tool has very great features for CI and CD. We can setup TeamCity for builidng applications in windows and unix environments and also can setup for deployments.

TeamCity was very easy to integrate with other build tools like Ant,Nant, Msbuild and Maven and Powershell and shell to implement the automated build and deployment process.

TeamCity Publish Artifacts feature is one of the best of its available features. Using this feature, any one can deploy the code or build directly from Teamcity to any environment(dev/testing/preprod and prod).

TeamCity was a great tool and it has no limits in customization with respective to CI and CD of any organizational SCM/Release Management process.

it_user215508 - PeerSpot reviewer
DevOps Consultant at a tech company with 51-200 employees
Vendor
I use it to increase visibility and clarity of build and deployment activities.

What is most valuable?

There’s loads of valuable features but PowerShell Runner is invaluable.

How has it helped my organization?

It increases the visibility and clarity of build and deployment activities.

What needs improvement?

.net deployment needs improvement. Also, I'd like to see more NuGet/Octopus style features and Azure stuff.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used it for over five years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

It's all currently hand rolled in PowerShell.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Never ever had any stability issues.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I have encountered some issues using large number of agents, and using git.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

The agents are amongst the best available/experienced around.

Technical Support:

The agents are amongst the best available/experienced around.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used Jenkins, TFS, Cruise Control .net, and GO. I switched from using Cruise Control .net as TeamCity is easier to use and displays important information very well. It also has great support for integrating to other products, from JetBrains and other vendors – Atlassian, JIRA, and Windows AD.

How was the initial setup?

It's very, very simple.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Setup is the licence (and my contract rate).

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I have used all leading CI tools.

What other advice do I have?

With low costs to adopt what are you waiting for?

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user212079 - PeerSpot reviewer
Automation Test Analyst at a non-tech company with 51-200 employees
Vendor
It runs acceptance tests after each commit, giving quick and automatic feedback on software quality.

What is most valuable?

We're using it for CI and automating build pipelines.

How has it helped my organization?

  • Rerun failed tests after overnight execution, saving manual re-execution time during working hours.
  • Run acceptance tests after each commit, giving quick and automatic feedback on software quality.
  • Automate build pipeline process, removing human errors from the process itself.

What needs improvement?

Setting up build configurations involves too many steps, as the process is too much broken down. We could do with the same number of steps but less groups.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used it for about two years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

I'm not in charge of this, I have updated TeamCity once and it seemed like a quite straightforward task (but slow, due to the DB backup) once I found the online walk-through.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No issues.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's working perfectly with multiple projects running continuously on five build agents.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

I've never had to use customer support.

Technical Support:

The user guide is quite thorough and extensive. Some topics are hidden a little bit, but after a while all the queries are answered.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

No previous solution was used.

How was the initial setup?

After updating TeamCity, the setup process was quite straightforward, guiding me step by step through the configuration of the new tool.

What about the implementation team?

It was an in-house implementation.

What was our ROI?

It is vital to our business to have quick and robust builds, and TeamCity is helping us to keep everything tidy and under control.

What other advice do I have?

An FAQ section with all the most common issues/most asked technical questions would be more than welcome.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Systems Administrator at Facebook
Real User
I generally find TeamCity a lot more intuitive than Jenkins.

Moving to TeamCity from Jenkins

At work, we’re slowly migrating from Jenkins to TeamCity in the hope of ending some of our recurring problems with continuous integration. My use of Jenkins prior to this job has been almost strictly on a personal basis, although I pretty much only use Travis nowadays.

The biggest difference upon initial inspection is that TeamCity is far more focused on validating individual commits rather than certain types of tests. Jenkins’ front page presents information that is simply not useful in a non-linear development environment, where people are often working in vastly different directions. How many of the previous tests passed/failed is not really salient information in this kind of situation.

Running specific tests for individual commits on TeamCity is far more trivial in terms of interface complexity than Jenkins. TeamCity just involves clicking the ”…” button in the corner on any test type (although I wish it wasn’t so easy to click “Run” by accident).

I generally find TeamCity a lot more intuitive than Jenkins out of the box. There’s a point at which you feel that if you have to scour the documentation to do anything remotely complex in an application, you’re dealing with a bad interface.

One disappointing thing in both is that inter-branch merges improperly trigger e-mails to unrelated committers. I suppose it is fairly difficult to determine who to notify about failure in situations like these, though. It seems like TeamCity pulls up the first parent of the merge commit and sends the e-mail to them, when in reality it’s usually the merge author that should be getting that information. Maybe I’m just ignorant of where to find a setting to change that behaviour.

Being able to jump the queue is useful when releasing. It requires a plugin to do in a sane way in Jenkins, unless you’re willing to kick everyone else out of the queue. TeamCity can do it by default, and it’s obvious how to do so when scheduling the tests.

There are supposedly more advanced features in Jenkins that don’t exist in TeamCity (yet), but I don’t think we use them.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user241605 - PeerSpot reviewer
it_user241605Build & DevOps Engineer; QA Automation at a healthcare company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor

As usual, the answer is that there is a plugin to solve the problem: "Jenkins’ front page presents information that is simply not useful in a non-linear development environment"

Custom views allows a logged in user to see only the jobs they want to see.

Edit: and the custom views can be hard coded lists of jobs, or can be regular expressions that parse job names / labels, etc. Very flexible and very useful for large jenkins systems.