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Buyer's Guide
Cloud Backup
July 2022
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Technical Presales Consultant/ Engineer at a wholesaler/distributor with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Easy to backup and restore data to the cloud, and the support is responsive
Pros and Cons
  • "A really good feature is backing up the emails of the company."
  • "Basically, a huge amount of storage capacity can be required in certain cases."

What is our primary use case?

I am a research consultant and my organization provides various solutions to the market. I work with a variety of solutions, although currently, Veeam is one of the ones that I am focused on.

Basically, we get a lot of inquiries, whether it be from our partners or from end-users. They would like to backup their Office 365. They would like to inquire about how to do so and what are the prerequisites, what exactly is required. Generally speaking, the biggest concern is how much storage is needed to store backups.

Every company has a different backup policy, different RPOs, different retension policies. We help them in determining how much storage they're going to need. That's basically it. That's how we deal with it.

How has it helped my organization?

The most valuable is that basically a lot of customers have the misconception that when they host their data on the Cloud, the Cloud providers actually protect the data. Meanwhile, Cloud Providers are generally responsible for the availability of the service. The data is always the responsibility of whoever owns it. Nobody can ensure the data can always be there. So there's a lot of news cases that happened. Sometimes, people lose data on Office 365. For example, some emails get deleted and they seek the attention of Office 365. On average, it has been discovered that it takes about 140 days for a user to discover the email was deleted.

You never know. Employees become disgruntled all of the sudden. There are also hardware attacks on Office 365, even though there is cybersecurity on Microsoft. Nothing is bulletproof in the cybersecurity industry. So, it's always good to have a second copy of your data.

What is most valuable?

A really good feature is backing up the emails of the company. It also offers an easy ability to restore from the Cloud.

The other really amazing part that it doesn't just stop at Office 365. For example, some people have hybrid setups. They have non-private Exchange email software and then they have a hybrid with Office 365. It is useful for that use case because it can back up both of them at the same time.

What needs improvement?

With the Veeam Backup application, you have really good compression and deduplication ratios, which means you can save lots of space on your backup storage. With Veeam for Office 365 and companies that require long-term retention, they often complain about the capacity storage it might take. There's no deduplication on that level. Basically, a huge amount of storage capacity can be required in certain cases.

The general feedback I get from the market is that there is no deduplication.

Basically, I'd love to see, I'm not sure technically if it's possible to do deduplicate Office 365 documents. Or, what I'd like to see is make a page for support so that you are able to back up to tapes. Usually, I'm a company and I have a long retention plan, and I backup on disk space storage, it's going to cost me a fortune. Meanwhile, if I preserve a short-term retention plan, like backup, if I need to have backups for three years for example, and I'll need huge amounts of storage. Now, storage can be expensive or it can be cheap. This base storage is useful for short time retention. For example, keep it for one month, and then you can archive it on tape for the rest of the year. In a situation where a company needs to restore from long term retention, tape storage is really inexpensive.

So I'd like to see the Veeam Backup to tapes, support Cloud Object Storage, now the new trend for archiving data is not just on tapes and data deduplication appliances, this is considered really old technology. Deduplication appliances are only fit for enterprise customers because they can be expensive, but they save lots of data.

So the only real need for it is in enterprise but some small companies, they'd like to archive their data long-term. They find financial challenges to do so. So nowadays they look to this new Cloud Object Storage with Cloud providers like Azure Blob Storage or Amazon s3 or IBM, they have their own object storage. So that can really be useful for archival. So, basically supporting archive peer for the Veeam Backup for Office 365. Archive peer storage, whether it be the deduplication or Cloud Object Storage or tapes.

It's probably on the way. When you look at Veeam Backup and Replication and how long they have come through the way, probably it's on the way there. There are programs to do all that I have said to you if the client is also using Veeam Backup with Replication. Because you can basically install Veeam Backup for Office 365 with a VM and just back it up using the Veeam Backup with Replication, then you can get the use of the deduplication then you can archive to the Cloud by a virtual machine. There are workarounds, too.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using this product for about one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

To be honest, it's pretty stable. It's the third major release for it. It is showing lots of improvements. Not any issues of instability with the product at all, whether it be with backing-up or restoring.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The good part about them is that they make modular solutions, so, basically, you can install Veeam Backup for Office 365, and Veeam Backup and Verification in one single server, or all in one installation, and roll it out.

There's a lot of companies that use this solution and they range from 15 users to companies that have 5,000 users.

How are customer service and technical support?

Generally speaking about Veeam, as a vendor, from a technical support perspective, I've really enjoyed the fact that they have a really high response rate. You can just open a support ticket, and just call them on the phone and you refer to the ticket number. Then, you just have a remote engineer who also engages in technical support. They are very supportive in general, I love the support there.

I enjoy it, Veeam's support. I enjoy it a lot because it helps me a lot when I am with a client, and an issue presents, and I'm not able to resolve it. I open a support ticket and call the toll free number, and have an engineer engage with me within five minutes, which is amazing for my establishment.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not use another solution prior to this one.

How was the initial setup?

To be honest, it's easy as downloading the file and installing it. Then, just simply add the administrative accounts for Office 365. Having internet access is required, of course. It's really an easy task and it's literally just next, next, next.

So, from an ease of use perspective, it's really good. It's just that when enterprise companies come to deploy it, they might face a bit of a challenge. Specifically, when it comes to internet bandwidth. When organizations have, for example, 5,000 users or huge mailboxes, then it is a problem if there are bandwidth restrictions. Here in Saudi Arabia, bandwidth is a huge restriction. It's really expensive to have a corporate internet in Saudi Arabia. So, it can be a challenge when backing up these environments under restricted bandwidths. It's not a restriction from the solution. It's just a regional restriction. Other markets can enjoy the privilege of backing up with any issues related to bandwidth.

It's also deployable on the Cloud. That's an option, although over here in the region, some government entities don't allow that.

We recently did a PoC that I will use as an example. We were backing up a physical server using the other product and it took us about half an hour. During that half an hour, I downloaded Veeam Backup 365 Office 365 from the website. I joined the client's Office 365 account. Downloaded and installed Veeam Backup for Office 365. Then I asked for the client to enter his credentials and boom. We were seeing all the mailboxes and we just started to run backups from there.

Backup, of course, because the mailbox was pretty huge it does take some time. Generally, ease of use and configuration is pretty simple. It's easy and straightforward.

What about the implementation team?

So, it's basically a decision criterion for them, to have a solution that's really, really easy to use and manage. It doesn't require more than one person from a backup perspective, because I come from a technical background in this and the best practice is always to have some redundancy on it. You can have two, but you don't really need two people. It's just for the fact that if someone just doesn't show up to work or something goes wrong with backups and this guy is not available, someone else should be there. But purely speaking, it's a one-man job, and he can also share with other IT.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

There are other options because Veeam backup for Office 365 is the software, and backing up from the internet, or you can install it on any Windows VM on the cloud as well. There are other options like NetApp, and they have software in the server, in which you don't have to really worry about installing the software onto anything. They'll backup the data for you and keep it, and some clients may not be keen on that with the privacy component. Also, some clients want to have a copy of the data with themselves here.

However, it is also heedless when it comes to infrastructure resources. You don't have to worry about having servers put in place, dedicated for Veeam backup for Office 365, and the storage that you need, and then worry about the bandwidth that you need. These kinds of operational costs as well. Some of that, I've seen and I've heard about the benefit of having the staff offer other backup solutions, but I've never even thought deep into it.

There are some clients kind of do the backup manually as well. It's kind of a tedious job. Maybe when it's a small environment, it can be manageable. But for a big environment, it can be a nightmare.

What other advice do I have?

So, the use basically is for two use cases. It's a combination of three use cases. Compliance, some companies nowadays, compliance standards force them to have a specific backup policy and a specific retention policy, and it's kind of hard to do that manually. Some people just prefer to have a solution that also meets that. That makes it easy. That's compliant. However, some people just want to take their detail. Some people are actually upset about protecting their data being that it's pretty evident.

Just sum it short, the backup server is the granular solution. It's basically responsible for managing the tasks and the jobs and all of the other components. The backup proxy is basically the muscle of the solution. This is what actually is interacting with Office 365 and doing the actual backup, it is coordinating the Veeam backup server to do that.

You either have radically attached storage or you have storage over the network or it's shared, or it might be a sound storage. Regardless, just any storage that is presented to the Windows operating system, you can use it as storage for the Veeam backup. As long as you have internet connectivity, and no firewall is in place, or specifically, the required firewall forced to be open, that is okay. 

Most of the users we deal with are shared. They are behind the entire IT environment. The main pitch from our end is based on the fact that this edition is really easy to use, and we want you to try it and see that. Because nowadays, there's a lot of challenges in the market. Clients don't usually have dedicated IT personnel for everything. They usually share one IT person of all the IT folks, for all the workflows in the IT department.

Honestly speaking, lots of people just look at it from a business point of view. Like, hey, I just have a business need, I just want to backup my Office 365 data. But, they don't take much concern into what that also requires. Generally speaking, from a backup point of view, the biggest concern is how much data, and what the percentage would be, that you'd like to backup, and how much of the capacity of this data.

Also, what are the recovery point objectives, and how frequently do you want to do backups? What kind of retention policy are you trying to achieve, and the shorter the retention policy, the smaller the storage capacity you need, the lower the cost of the solution. But at the same time, some people are tied by their clients and by specific retention policies. So, tell people they need to archive their backups into application appliances, to save on the cost of storage like I do. However, that's not recently possible with Veeam backup for Office 365 yet. Nonetheless, it can be done manually, I believe.

So that's basically it. That's what clients need to be careful of and the really important part is to make sure they have enough storage for what they are trying to achieve as they prepare their backup plan. Then, make sure they have the internet bandwidth for this. It is always best to have the ability to channel for this. Backups have to be properly sized, then they should be good to go. They should be worrying about the details part, the sizing, design, and the solution to fit their needs. Other than that, so long as that process goes well, it is pretty seamless after that.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Distributor.
Clay Fosbrink  - PeerSpot reviewer
Computer Specialist at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Real User
VSA backups mean we don't have to have a client on each server, reducing complexity.
Pros and Cons
  • "What is most valuable to me are the search features, where you can search through large backup data sets and find what you're looking for. Our data sets are so big that we're over the petabyte mark. To find a specific file for a specific user out of 10,000 users is a challenge... If we can glean from them a general description of where it might be, the search feature comes in very handy to actually locate it and restore it for them."
  • "The main area for improvement is that we sometimes experience negative effects from their updates. If they had a larger test area for their updates, that would help."

What is our primary use case?

I've been here for 37 years and I've seen all the data challenges there are. The Centers for Disease Control consists of multiple centers that are all under one umbrella of CDC, but each center has its own budget, its own IT, and its own data collection. They were all disparate and they could not be put under one system where we could protect all of them. Everybody had their own protection. Everybody had their own little silos.

Around the time we brought in Commvault, our challenge was to bring those silos together where one larger team could diversify into specific areas. For example, disaster recovery was a whole team of people. That's all they did and they specialized in it. We could develop SMEs in each area of IT, such as disaster recovery, database, and hardware configuration. We had to attempt to bring all these silos together. There's resistance to that to this day, because everybody thinks that they're special and the other people don't matter. Our challenge was centralization at that point. Each area had its own way of backing up and several of them had Commvault already, but it was at that point that we settled on Commvault as our backup solution.

Before Commvault, virus infection was our big problem. If a virus got fished into a system, recovery was disastrous.

Currently, our use case is disaster recovery, pure and simple, including everything from a file restore to a complete system restore.

It is on-premises and also hosted in the cloud. 

How has it helped my organization?

We've had problems in the past where a storage person made an error and actually deleted a large chunk of storage, and we recovered it with Commvault. If we had lost that storage, it would have been a catastrophic loss of scientific data. The value of that is incalculable.

In addition, when we're applying for authority to operate, compliance requires that certain things just have to be backed up. That's a requirement of any system that we allow on our network. It has to be recovery-protected in some way, in the event of an error or a tragedy or an attack.

What is most valuable?

What is most valuable to me are the search features, where you can search through large backup data sets and find what you're looking for. Our data sets are so big that we're over the petabyte mark. To find a specific file for a specific user out of 10,000 users is a challenge. Sometimes the user doesn't know the file path. If we can glean from them a general description of where it might be, the search feature comes in very handy to actually locate it and restore it for them.

If you compare Commvault's user interface for managing on-prem, cloud, or multi-cloud environments in one place with some of the newer stuff that's coming out, it may seem to be a little too complex. But it's so powerful that I don't think the newer stuff competes with it that well.

And Command Center is helpful for reporting to upper management because they want to know the total figures, like how much we are protecting. They want to know the value of what we're doing compared to the cost of it. With Command Center we can tell them, "Look, we're doing this much and we've had this many restores." I have to do monthly reports to upper management on how successful we are at protection.

The solution also supports a broad coverage of workloads, absolutely. We use the VSA backups which means we don't have to have a client on each server. That, in itself, reduces a lot of the complexity. The broad coverage also means that we don't need as many personnel to administer things. It also helps with productivity. We're able to meet our SLAs for restores much better than we would otherwise.

What needs improvement?

The main area for improvement is that we sometimes experience negative effects from their updates. If they had a larger test area for their updates, that would help. I'm sure that they test, but our environment is probably 1,000 times bigger than their test environment. There are way more complexities in our environment, things that their updates overlook, and that causes a ripple effect of errors.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Commvault for about 15 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

As long as everything functions in our environment, Commvault is very stable, but that's not the case. There are always ripples in the environment and sometimes those ripples can cause dramatic effects in Commvault, such as corrupting DDBs.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's plenty scalable. That's one of the main reasons that we use Commvault. It gives us scalability and versatility across multiple storage platforms.

How are customer service and support?

Their technical support is excellent. Any issues that we've had have been resolved.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

At the time we chose Commvault, it was the best, according to our evaluation. There were three main options: NetApp, Commvault, and one other. There wasn't a lot of competition in that area for enterprise-level organizations.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was a long time ago and I don't even know if I was involved in it. My lead engineer was involved in it. I was just an overseer at that point and just moving into that position. 

But I do know there have been a lot of complexities in upgrades from one version to the next. Sometimes we skip a version and go from nine to 11, for example, and there is complexity in that, or there has been in the past.

What about the implementation team?

We had direct support from Commvault.

What was our ROI?

When it comes to ROI, Commvault is like the return on investment with insurance. When you need it, you see it. But if things are going smoothly you don't see it. However, it has to be there. My favorite saying is, "People really don't care about backups. They only care about restores."

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

One of the most interesting aspects is that the licensing model can be modified. We're paying for our licensing by the client, as opposed to the size of the footprint of the backup, which decreased our cost by about 20 percent.

There are multiple costs involved. We have the hardware, the tape drives, and the storage that our backup targets use. We use non-recommended storage, which is not as robust as what Commvault recommends, but we're able to make it work. That saves a lot of money on storage and its maintenance.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I've looked at other solutions but to scale them requires multiple devices, dedicated appliances. In our environment, everything has to be security-scanned and remediated on a monthly basis. The more devices we have, the more complex it gets to do that.

What other advice do I have?

If you're a smaller-sized entity, Commvault may be a little bit more than what you need. You get what you pay for. Commvault's scalability and granularity are excellent for a large enterprise, but for a smaller one, some of the alternatives are probably more cost-effective. In this context, a large enterprise is one with storage in the petabyte range. That's where Commvault shines.

Our Commvault partner is KELYN Technologies. They're a very professional support service, as an intermediary between us and Commvault, so that we get really professional and timely support. We even bring them in on our proofs of concept. As new technologies develop, we have to prove that we can back them up or support and protect them. Having their engineers available to help us work through those issues is very valuable. Anything that they can't solve, they escalate directly to Commvault for us. That way, we don't have to be in that exchange with Commvault. If we're doing a proof of concept and get to an area where we just don't know how to deal with it, they go off, find out, and come back and say, "Okay, now we know how to deal with it."

And while my staff was mostly pre-trained on Commvault, as new developments and new enhancements come out, KELYN is right on top of them.

The value, for us, of KELYN comes from the following:

  1. We have a reduced licensing cost.
  2. We have more granular access to engineers to assist with new technology, new concepts. 
  3. And sometimes we'll change our methods due to a new enhancement and they're invaluable in getting those things set up and working correctly.
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Anthony Njoroge - PeerSpot reviewer
Product Manager - Netapp at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
A complete, mature, and intuitive solution that works well with various cloud providers and on-premise storage
Pros and Cons
  • "We are able to store it on various cloud providers such as Amazon S3, Rocket, Azure, and IBM Cloud. It can also do on-premise integration, and we are able to use storage from on-premise. We are also able to recover data. It is a really good and intuitive solution. Veeam has developed a fantastic product. I've never seen anything that I don't like about Veeam. It looks like a very complete solution. It is really mature, simple to use, and quite interrogative. It also has APIs for writing scripts."
  • "Its price could be improved."

What is our primary use case?

Our primary use case is the backup of 365 objects and emails. At the moment, you are just testing Veeam. We are using it for production, and we are running a few productions on APIs.

What is most valuable?

We are able to store it on various cloud providers such as Amazon S3, Rocket, Azure, and IBM Cloud. It can also do on-premise integration, and we are able to use storage from on-premise. We are also able to recover data.

It is a really good and intuitive solution. Veeam has developed a fantastic product. I've never seen anything that I don't like about Veeam. It looks like a very complete solution. It is really mature, simple to use, and quite interrogative. It also has APIs for writing scripts.

What needs improvement?

Its price could be improved.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for a year or two.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is scalable. We currently have about a hundred users. We are currently testing it, and we are looking at expanding to almost 2,000 users.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have contacted them, and they are good.

How was the initial setup?

It is straightforward.

What about the implementation team?

Currently, we have four engineers for its deployment and maintenance. We have the same number of engineers for NetApp.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Its price is a little bit high, but it is a fantastic solution. It is more expensive than NetApp.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We are already using NetApp, and we are currently testing Veeam to see which one has a much better use case. They are more or less neck-to-neck in terms of features and the simplicity of connecting to Office 365. 

Veeam has, of course, a little bit more features than NetApp. I see a lot more options in terms of where to store your backup, but, in terms of features, they're both good products. From the price point, Veeam does seem to be a bit higher than NetApp.

I really like the fact Veeam has integrated into a single pane of glass. That's one thing that NetApp should do in the future. Instead of running it as a standalone backup solution for 365, Veeam has got it right in terms of simplicity and putting everything in a single glass for access purposes.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend both Veeam and NetApp. Both of them have got it right. The only difference I see is in the management. For Office 365, we have to go into our web console which is directly integrated on the cloud, which is good because it gives that differentiation. At the same time, if you're an administrator and you're managing backups, you should have the simplicity of having everything in a single pane of glass. 

I would recommend using the Veeam console to someone who is doing Veeam on-premise or cloud backup. It gives you the simplicity of having everything in a single pane of glass. I like NetApp, but I would've liked its integration into the Netcenter. That would really raise the game for them in terms of giving a full position in a single pane of glass. However, if there are people who are using other backup solutions and they just want to purchase Office 365, NetApp is also a good product. I would recommend both to anyone, and let them feel for themselves, regardless of price, how they scale, what features they want, and how they want to store their backups.

I would rate Veeam Backup for Office 365 a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Distributor
Architect - infra at CDM Solutions
User
Top 20
Centralized interface is simple to navigate, reduces storage space and related costs
Pros and Cons
  • "The dashboard is very rich and provides details needed for a moderator."
  • "Better documentation is needed because the lack of information has necessitated having our team depend more heavily on Cohesity support."

What is our primary use case?

We are the largest organization in Europe and have 10,000 servers in-house being protected by Cohesity. We use several solutions including Archive, DR, SAP, Oracle, VMware, and others.

Our business thrives on Cohesity storage. Cohesity makes data management as simple as Sign Up, Connect, and Protect through new SaaS offerings for backup and disaster recovery.

We have been testing DataProtect delivered as a service for some time, and we very pleased with its performance. The UI is simple to navigate, and data ingestion and retrieval have been a snap.

How has it helped my organization?

Before Cohesity, we were mostly de-centralized in operations. After implementing it, our operations are now managed in a single pane of glass.

We have achieved a single source of operation and observation for backups. Every team has a stake in operations, and policy management helps to delegate the proper roles.

The storage costs and storage area occupied are now reduced dramatically.

What is most valuable?

We are using almost all of the features available in Cohesity today.

Our favorite feature is DataProtect but there are many good features that are part of the DataPlatform. 

We use Cohesity to eliminate mass data fragmentation by consolidating our silos onto a single, easy-to-manage software-defined platform that is managed using a single pane of glass.

The dashboard is very rich and provides details needed for a moderator.

What needs improvement?

Cohesity needs more hardening, in terms of stability. From our experience, we noticed gaps in the product function and the solution guides/documents. Better documentation is needed because the lack of information has necessitated having our team depend more heavily on Cohesity support. We need to have a more self-sufficient system.

More automation is needed for easier management.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using Cohesity DataProtect for the past four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Stability-wise, Cohesity is moderate and needs more hardening.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We found scaling Cohesity to be very challenging.

How are customer service and technical support?

The product team and Cohesity representatives are always reachable and fill the gaps that are not available in the documentation.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to using Cohesity, we were using Agility Data Backup and Recovery.

We are moving to Cohesity by migrating existing backup/storage solutions. We switched because were not confident in delivering backup solutions and managing SLAs.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The pricing model is impressive and very effective.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Prior to implementing Cohesity, we evaluated solutions by IBM, NetApp, Commvalut, and Rubrik.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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July 2022
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