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VMware SD-WAN OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

VMware SD-WAN is #3 ranked solution in SD-WAN tools, top WAN Edge tools, and top Secure Access Service Edge (SASE) tools. PeerSpot users give VMware SD-WAN an average rating of 8.4 out of 10. VMware SD-WAN is most commonly compared to Fortinet FortiGate: VMware SD-WAN vs Fortinet FortiGate. VMware SD-WAN is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 61% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 21% of all views.
VMware SD-WAN Buyer's Guide

Download the VMware SD-WAN Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: September 2022

What is VMware SD-WAN?

Software-Defined Wide Area Network (SD-WAN) is the application of softwarebased network technologies that virtualize WAN connections to provide agility,
performance and reliability for network traffic between remote and branch offices to
data centers and the cloud.

SD-WAN leverages cloud-hosting to simplify deployment and management of
network devices and employs traffic steering to applications in the data center and
the cloud. It combines the bandwidth of broadband with existing WAN connections to
more efficiently and cost-effectively connect users to data center and cloud-based
applications from any location in the network.

SD-WAN optimizes traffic over multiple available connections (MPLS, broadband,
LTE) to deliver traffic across the network, delivering a better user experience to any
location. SD-WAN will dynamically steer traffic to the best available link, and if the
available links show any transmission issues, it will immediately apply remediation for
jitter and packet loss based on policies to ensure performance of the high-priority
applications.

VMware SD-WAN was previously known as VeloCloud.

VMware SD-WAN Customers

Redmond, Coca Cola, Roka Bioscience, MetTel, Deutsche Telekom, Rockford Construction,  The Bay Club, tru Independence, Triton Management Services, DevCon, AXPM

VMware SD-WAN Video

VMware SD-WAN Pricing Advice

What users are saying about VMware SD-WAN pricing:
"Overall pricing could be lower. It is much more expensive than traditional hardware vendor pricing."

VMware SD-WAN Reviews

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Joel Bacaycay - PeerSpot reviewer
CIO at freelanceitengineer
Real User
Scalable, has DMPO to ensure data integrity, good technical support, and zero-touch set up
Pros and Cons
  • "The biggest feature is called D.M.P.O., or Dynamic Multipath Optimization, which is one of the technologies that they use to deliver or ensure data integrity."
  • "They need more gateways"

What is our primary use case?

The biggest benefit to SD-WAN is with VoIP. Any real-time data transfer where you cannot have any latency and packet delivery.

What VeloCloud provides is a solution that maintains data integrity. 

The biggest challenge for voice over IP telephone systems, are real-time and also video, and any kind of video conferencing. 

That type of thing, if there are any latencies, you're going to get trashy voice calls and also a lot of intermittent ghosting on conference calls. That's where VeloCloud comes in. They provide a resilient connectivity points system. 

Your connectivity is pretty much preserved.

How has it helped my organization?

A lot of companies are moving over to VoIP because they're cheaper. It's a cheaper telephony system than regular phone PBX systems. So, any major company is moving towards a hosted or internal VoIP solution. Again, the biggest challenge is point-to-point latency.

What is most valuable?

The biggest feature is called D.M.P.O., or Dynamic Multipath Optimization, which is one of the technologies that they use to deliver or ensure data integrity.

One of the things they've done is they've made it user-friendly. If you're a multi-national company and you've got company in France, England, United States, and also in the Southern hemisphere like Australia, and you've got a manufacturing plant, you can see how your plants are performing. You can see the kind of connectivity, as well as the resiliency between each manufacturing plant.

You know whether your internet provider is performing to their service level agreements.

What needs improvement?

The challenge right now is the customers understanding that it's a subscription-based service. The price is a sticker shock to clients because most clients are used to buying a product and not a subscription service. 

What VeloCloud requires is a combination of a subscription service, which is the cloud orchestration, and the devices, which can be purchased independently. Clients think that they can just buy the product for their endpoint usage and that's it. But, they don't realize they've got to pay for a monthly subscription because the technology that ties the two edge devices together is up in the cloud and you need to have that. That intelligence, you have to pay for monthly. 

It helps to understand this when people are using Microsoft 365, a subscription-based service. People except the fact that, oh if I need Word or Excel, I can buy it from Microsoft for a monthly subscription rate.

Services similar to that are now more and more being accepted. Whereas back a year ago, people were saying, "No, I just want to buy a hardware device." That's where the Cisco Meraki comes in. They don't really have much of a cloud orchestration solution. They have devices that provide SD-WAN solutions. You're dependent on each device to do their functionality, whereas VeloCloud puts it into the cloud.

It's not like you buy a router, install it, and you're good to go. It's the service, and what they call orchestration of maintaining data integrity, delivering point-to-point. 

If you're in China and you're trying to ascend data across the United States or whatever country you're in, you can imagine the path that it's going through from any world destination from the US. There's going to be thousands and thousands of hops, and by the time you get to your endpoint, any of those hops can introduce some sort of problem. High latency. 

With the SD-WAN solution, it determines the optimal path because they have gateways that help reduce the number of hops. If you didn't use VeloCloud and you wanted to set up a telephone call using VoIP from the United States, here in California, to China or wherever, your chances of having good, solid connectivity is going to be slim because you've got no protection. Whereas the SD-WAN VeloCloud solution provides number one, reducing the linkage between the two points and then it also provides some resiliency and ability to recover from data packet losses.

Depending on the clients and how critical the data is for them, it will determine how expensive the solution is. If you are a real estate office and you have ten offices, it may be too pricey for that type of industry, but if you're a manufacturer or a software developer, or a company that makes games, and you provide the gaming service, then the cost of the solution is not going to be a major concern.

If you are in the medical industry and you need to keep your hospitals connected and especially with COVID 19 and sharing of data, then the cost is not the biggest issue. It's really delivering resilient service.

They need to increase their gateways. When I staring with this solution, they only had 600 to 700. I say only, but that's a lot still, but they're now over 1000 gateways. It's like Elon Musk's new satellite service. Their Starlink. It's the same with Gateway. 

For Elon Musk to have to launch 2,400 satellites, and in order to provide satellite internet services and to provide just enough, when they're touting one to two-gigabit transfer rates, in order to do that, where it's ubiquitous, it doesn't matter whether you're out to sea or whether you're in the office, or you're by the shoreline in California, you have access to the internet.  

It performance is mediocre but as more and more satellites are added, the performance and the capabilities are that much more.

They need more gateways. It comes down to access; if for example, you have a gateway in LA, it probably covers San Diego and parts of Sacramento, but if you have two gateways it will cover more traffic that is in that area. The more gateways you have the more connectivity access for clients to use to get to the cloud.

Because of the buyout, it has to integrate with VMware's distribution channels, with their support channels. They have to basically GRAT the development of their solution, and fit right inside with VMware's. It's like Dell buying a small company, and then that small company needs to conform to Dell practices. Right now there, they're in flux.

Right now I have to manually manage the SD-WAN dashboard for the connectivity to the internet and routing from point-to-point.

The routing from point-to-point and all of that stuff are separate from the internal local area network. So, right now, software-defined WAN and software-defined LAN are two separate controlling systems. If they can integrate that, such that they are on one dashboard, I can see what's going on with my China manufacturing plant from the US and I can see from the China plant what devices are failing from the US then that would make it even better. So far, it's certainly a step in the right direction, but there's of course, like in time there's going to be continued improvements.

It provides a solution that all companies need and that's connectivity, resiliency.

I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Buyer's Guide
VMware SD-WAN
September 2022
Learn what your peers think about VMware SD-WAN. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
632,779 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been involved with VeloCloud for over a year.

They recently were purchased by VMware.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

If I were to stand up a cloud service like Microsoft Office 365, I'm going to install it into a data center that can provide service anywhere in the world. I would have a server that's providing this service.

You can't put all your eggs in one installation location, you're going to have the same technology repeated in multiple data centers around the world. To provide that one service, you're going to have that service, and Office 365 virtualized so that you can run it up in Seattle and Redmond. Then you can add, you can run the same service in China, in Australia, and in the Southern hemisphere. All running the same software service so that if one drops out the other one picks up.

The resiliency is there for cloud-based services. That's why everything has gone cloud. Everybody's doing virtualization.

You can scale it such that, okay. You know, China's growing, they need their own data center that covers that whole market, maybe you need two or three and then you're done. Because virtualization is basically copying your server. You just take an image of your server's operating system and you just reinstall it on another server and you've got the same services on a different server.

Our client size varies from small to large enterprise companies.

It varies, but it can scale. The thing can provide scalability and I can solve a multinational company without actually having to fly to every location. I can just say, Hey, VMware VeloCloud, if you want resiliency, you want to connect your companies. We have Chinese manufacturing, food manufacturing companies in LA, Texas. They've got 13 locations and they're complaining about their phone services. The phone just keeps dropping out on them. I always said, well, you need a VeloCloud SD-WAN. So, it's now rolling it all out.

I deal primarily with the IT staff and obviously, it's helping them with the technology to sell the upper management with it.

How are customer service and support?

Technical support is really good, they are there to help out.

I would rate technical support an eight out of ten.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

SD-WAN has been out for the last nine or ten years, but it really hasn't grabbed on until the last five years. As an IT engineer, I had to come up with my own solutions, such that if I'm standing up a data center and I've got 10 to 15 switches, and each of those switches needs to be managed and controlled, each one of those switches has its own management console, so I'm managing 10 different management consoles. Whereas with SD-WAN and SD-LAN, you have a central controller that manages multiple devices, you have software to find networking, a controller that controls multiple switches, multiple routers, that type of thing. So that's where SD software-defined networking has advanced the way you manage networking. You're not overloaded with having to deal with each individual device or appliance. You buy devices that conform to SD-WAN technology or SD-LAN technology, and SD-LAN by Ubiquity is the one I use there.

All of my switches, my routers, my access points, my cameras, security cameras, all of that is being handled by one software that manages them all. I can see at a glance, all of my devices, make modifications, see what's failing, see what needs to be replaced in the one in one software monitoring system.

How was the initial setup?

They have what they call a zero-touch setup. 

I can pre-configure the edge devices that get installed at the client site, and rather than me going in and installing it, I can pre-program it and set it up to where I can shift the unit to their IT person, and they can plug it into their network and they're up and running and have connectivity.

What other advice do I have?

It's an SD-WAN solution and they've got edge devices of different sources and types. Depending on the client's needs, you pretty much choose the type of product that's required. The end result is cloud-based. It's a cloud-based software-defined wide area networking affiliation.

VeloCloud is in the cloud. They have over a thousand gateways to get to their services in the cloud. 

They're tied into Microsoft Azure, Office 365, and also AWS services. If you're going to do a cloud design, what you likely want to do is have an SD-WAN solution like VeloCloud, such that if you're dealing with multiple people or multiple businesses with multiple locations, what you'll do is utilize their cloud-based solutions and edge devices to connect to clients' network nodes. There are different offices and provide resilient connectivity.

They have to understand the solution. A lot of IT technologists don't have a full grasp of the software-defined networking SD-WAN, SD-LAN.

Until technologists understand that, businesses won't understand because the businesses rely on their IT staff to stay in touch with the latest and greatest technologies that can save the operational costs.

We haven't reached the crest of the wave yet for all of us, even VeloCloud. They're just not quite at the crest yet, but soon everybody will understand. Oh, I know what SD-WAN is, I know it's going to save me money. I know it's going to allow me to reduce my IT staff because they're not having to be encumbered by the way the legacy management solutions were back then. That's all dashboard monitorization.

I would rate VeloCloud a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Microsoft Azure
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
PeerSpot user
Sami-Isoaho - PeerSpot reviewer
Principal Cloud Architect at Loihe
Real User
Top 20
To fully utilize cloud vendors' hardware networking, Microsoft and VMware support everything
Pros and Cons
  • "VMware is the only SD-WAN solution that integrates with Azure Virtual WAN."
  • "Implementing VMware is much more difficult, time-consuming, and expensive than implementing Fortinet or Check Point."

What is most valuable?

One of the solution's most valuable features is the VMware core automation stack at an SDDC. It includes NSX, the VMware virtualization layer for the networks (the LAN virtualization), which works extremely well with the VMware SD-WAN solution and is the primary advantage over all the others. None of the other vendors could integrate with the virtual LAN, making it quite complicated and virtualized to be fully automized.

The other extremely nice function from some vendors is that VMware has been integrating VMware SD-WAN with the cloud vendors or software-defined networking. Microsoft Azure is the most important because I work mostly with Azure customers. So far, VMware is the only SD-WAN solution that integrates with Azure Virtual WAN. 

Furthermore, if you want to fully utilize the cloud vendors' hardware networking, as in Azure Virtual WAN, Azure backbone, Microsoft and VMware support everything. No other vendors provide those two. An important element for my customers was their use of different hardware stacks for networking and security. If you go for a software-only product, like VMware, you don't need to replace your firewalls and routers immediately. This is where Fortinet and Cisco differ significantly from VMware.

What needs improvement?

To improve the product, the company, alone or with a good partner, should manufacture their own hardware brand with boxes to make the product more shippable.  

Implementing VMware is much more difficult, time-consuming, and expensive than implementing Fortinet or Check Point. With Fortinet, you pay a couple of hundred dollars for hosting and a low-cost firewall, there's only one box to ship to each site, and it's much easier to manage.

Moreover, it would be easy for the large telecom operators and system integrators to sell the solution. It would also be a good fit for customers with multiple small offices, who I currently advise to choose hardware-vendor SD-WAN solutions over VMware.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been familiar with this solution for about four years. I was familiar with it when the name was VeloCloud, the company VMware acquired.

How are customer service and support?

Customer support is very responsive to important issues. VMware has multiple support models. Basic support is rubbish, but real companies never rely on basic support. Production support is the basic model VMware offers, and it's pretty good. I would rate the service between seven and eight out of 10.

Mission Critical and Business Critical support for the larger companies are excellent. They are the best on the market. Of course, this support is an expensive extra, but VMware support probably deserves a rating of 10 out of 10.

Customers running all data centers on VMware definitely receive Mission Critical support.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Overall pricing could be lower. It is much more expensive than traditional hardware vendor pricing.

The question of licensing costs is slightly different because, in the VMware case, it's fairly rare for customers to buy a license without implementing VMware data center facilities or something similar. If you compare it to just buying a license per site and checking how much it is with Fortinet when you implement the software, it depends on how large a firewall you have. For a very small firewall, the Fortinet licensing is around 200 euros, but if your firewall is huge, it could be 5,000 to 7,000 euros per year.

From that perspective, it's pointless to evaluate VMware at a similar level because if you have VMware SD-WAN and NSX, then it's quite reasonable. It's more like a license for the data center. This process differs from the firewall vendors' because you don't need to buy a license for every firewall you have. However, you can do that in the case of VMware.

So think of it as the customer having data centers. Connectivity between the data centers will have two aspects. The first is the big costs for bandwidth and connectivity. The second is the software cost. The VMware environment is more about customers with different departments in different locations.

In these scenarios, customers with data centers should use a VMware stack. For customers with no data center who have everything on the cloud and are only looking for connectivity, Fortinet costs for 10 sites might be between 10 and 12, whereas VMware costs would be more than 20,000. But again, I would emphasize that the implementation is much, much more expensive on VMware in the case of virtual licenses.

What other advice do I have?

It's an excellent product. The only small disadvantage is it's a bit difficult.

I would rate the product as nine out of 10.

Regarding the number of people working with VMware SD-WAN in our customers' companies, these companies have around 7,000 employees; they all work with VMware SD-WAN, including some 300 people in IT, a networking team of 12, and around 20 cloud guys. Less than 20 actually do product administration.

For people who want to implement VMware SD-WAN, I strongly suggest checking out the VMware SASE offering because there is a big difference in the approach. If you want something that combines all your VMware data centers into one with everything virtualized when you implement NSX, etc., VMware is a good solution. 

On the other hand, if you are primarily looking to replace FPS connections, VMware SASE is totally different from the big three security players, which mostly offer transfer capacity, bandwidth, and bandwidth transfer capacity as part of their SASE solution.

You should then check the combined operation of VMware and Microsoft's Azure Virtual WAN because it beats Fortinet for pricing and performance.  

If you choose Fortinet, which might be slightly more mature than the VMware solution, you'll need to replace all your network equipment in every branch. Some customers can't do this. It's laborious and incredibly expensive. In China, for example, network equipment is extremely hard to replace. The only approved vendor is China Telecom, which uses its own devices. With VMware, you have the boxes and old VeloCloud routers. But if you want a physical device or a small office, you can buy it. On the other hand, if you implement a software solution, you won't have to touch any of the existing network hardware.

Regarding overall performance, if you compare SD-WAN, all vendors provide high performance; that's not under question. The crucial factor is routing. Although SD-WANs all go through the same "public" internet, not everyone gets the capacity they want. Capacity doesn't only depend on having an internet connection. You also need to have a fixed bandwidth.

Buying IP transit capacity and using it with SD-WAN is much more effective, whether using VMware, Fortinet, Check Point, or implementing it like Azure Virtual WAN using Microsoft Backbone. It has much more effect on performance than doubling investment in SD-WAN hardware.

In short, the bottleneck is not due to the SD-WAN provider but IP connectivity between sites.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
Flag as inappropriate
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
VMware SD-WAN
September 2022
Learn what your peers think about VMware SD-WAN. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
632,779 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Senior Lead Network Architect at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Easy to use, simple to install, and plenty of useful features
Pros and Cons
  • "VMware has been chosen by many of our customers who do not want to do a lot of complex routing in their environment and want a very easy-to-use solution. The most valuable features are simple troubleshooting, Dynamic Multipath Optimization (DMPO), and cybersecurity."
  • "In an upcoming release, they should allow customers the flexibility to use mobile applications where they can go and check on the information about their networks. A lot of vendors, such as Meraki, have a lot more integration with the use of portals to a mobile application. Having this feature as an alternative to logging into a laptop would be beneficial. If you are a SaaS-based company why not make a mobile application as well. You might not be able to do configurations but at least monitor while away or on vacation."

What is our primary use case?

Our main use cases have been for customers who have been traditionally using MPLS lines and are now moving into a lot more SaaS-based applications to transform the WAN infrastructure. A lot of our customers have end-of-life, end-of-support devices on the WAN and they are always looking for doing RFPs on cutting edge technology. Some of them happen to use a lot of VMware and Cisco portfolios in their data centers and they are constantly trying to see what solution fits best for them.

What is most valuable?

VMware has been chosen by many of our customers who do not want to do a lot of complex routing in their environment and want a very easy-to-use solution. The most valuable features are simple troubleshooting, Dynamic Multipath Optimization (DMPO), and cybersecurity. 

DMPO is a technology that is similar to a proprietary technology that VMware has. Customers probably do not understand too much about it in detail but they know about the benefits of it in general. What it does is constantly monitors all different areas, such as latency, jitter bandwidth, artificial intelligence, and machine learning. It makes sure that if there is a case where there is a networking jitter contained in the link, it figures out how to maneuver your traffic elsewhere. This is all done automatically without customers getting slowed down on those poor links. The customers do not want to spend too much time researching these complex technologies which VMware automatically takes care of them. It benefits many IT teams by taking a lot of the burden away who are constantly juggling a hundred different other things as well.

The cybersecurity component is very important. VMware also has a lot of security components embedded into the SD-WAN, especially with the traditionally SD-WAN, and now a lot more integration through secure access with partnerships companies, such as Zscaler and other SaaS-based solutions. VMware has a lot of portfolios within themselves that can support many security use cases and if they cannot they have partnerships with industry leaders who can. For example, the Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA) solutions through the Zscaler partnerships can help customers who want to move from traditional VPN solutions towards ZTNA based ones.

Overall as an experience, I have found that customers like the UI/UX experience that they receive from VMware.

What needs improvement?

There are customers that have very large routing and segmentation operations who do a lot of segmentation within their network and have complex routing requirements. VMware does not provide the facilities in terms of doing a lot of operations with routing tables, such as complex routing policies. It is more about that out-of-pocket experience that customers get out of VMware. There are other technologies for this type of use case from solutions, such as Versa or other WANs. These are for customers who are wanting to maneuver or configure things themselves, similar to DIY solutions, for them going to technologies, for instance from Versa, makes much more sense because they can do a lot more with routing, complex segmentation, and complex configurations. For customers who have complex service provider requirements, VMware and other solutions cannot support a lot of those use cases.

In an upcoming release, they should allow customers the flexibility to use mobile applications where they can go and check on the information about their networks. A lot of vendors, such as Meraki, have a lot more integration with the use of portals to a mobile application. Having this feature as an alternative to logging into a laptop would be beneficial. If you are a SaaS-based company why not make a mobile application as well. You might not be able to do configurations but at least monitor while away or on vacation.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for approximately four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The software itself is very stable which our customers really like. They do not want to have buggy software or problems. I see the customers choose VMware over others and over time because of positive experiences with use cases, it becomes a trusted vendor and they tend to trust in the name as a brand in the future.

IT vendors are getting much more stable with the code, but nowadays everybody has more attention towards SaaS technology. Networking will just become another bundle to a lot of those providing this type of solution. Many vendors are getting into SaaS solutions and in terms of documentation, code releases, and features, there are probably more advancements. In SD-WAN specifically, a lot more features are moving into SaaS-based solutions. These new solutions are going to get reviewed and push the industries even further towards SaaS solutions it is the future.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is good.

How was the initial setup?

The solution is straightforward to install compared to other solutions, VMware makes setup simple. SD-WAN vendors have a kind of simplicity embedded into them, just because of the nature of the software-defined components into it. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I have evaluated Zscaler and Versa.

What other advice do I have?

The advice to others wanting to implement this solution is not to try and do everything yourself. A lot of customers choose this route and are negatively affected two years later. It is important to do a lot of proof of concepts and testing. Get the solution from a trusted service provider who can manage it for you because these technologies are really complex under the code. Having a trusted service provider who can work with you and can have a lot of benefits. If your company business is not running the WAN links, I would suggest just offload that burden to a trusted service provider because then you can focus on your business. Technologies are complex, and doing all of these operations through your own IP node is complex. A trusted service provider who knows what they are doing can offload a lot of that burden allowing for you to relax and actually focus on your main applications and business.

A lot of customers I have seen in the industry try to do all the operations themselves just because they think that it is good to insource everything. This is one of the areas that you should not be insourceed a hundred percent of your team because these technologies can be extremely difficult to do on a day-to-day basis. Service providers handle hundreds of customers and they know a lot more about what you are doing and can be very useful than if you did it by yourself.

I rate VMware SD-WAN an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Implementer
PeerSpot user
Network Analyst at a manufacturing company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Reliable, easy to work with, and easy to upgrade
Pros and Cons
  • "When we upgrade to one of the edges, it goes very smoothly."
  • "The only thing that I'm having issues with is on one of the sites, I can't see the location on the map."

What is our primary use case?

The use case is mainly just communication between the branch offices or the branches. That's pretty much it, the communication between the branches.

Also, currently, we're doing what we call a PCI segmentation as well. 

What is most valuable?

It's stable most of the time. It's reliable I would say. We have rarely or never disconnected unless there's a power issue or power outage. Even then, we have a disconnection from one of the branches. Beyond that we don't have a lot of issues. It's very minimum disruption. That's what I like about it.

It's very easy to work with the solution. We understand it well. Customer service is very good. 

When we upgrade to one of the edges, it goes very smoothly. 

What needs improvement?

We're trying to integrate it with our Prisma Access architecture in the future. We would just like to see it smoothly deployed. We are going now back and forth between our Palo Alto reps and VeloCloud or VMware SD-WAN reps to find a solution to integrate both into one solution. I'm not sure if this is on Palo Alto's or Prisma's or VMware's side.  Other than that, all the features and everything look great.

The only thing that I'm having issues with is on one of the sites, I can't see the location on the map. That's the only thing that can be fixed.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used the solution for the last eight months only. I've been with the company only that long, however, they had this for probably a couple of years, I would say.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's stable. We've had it for a period of time now and it's very reliable. All of them have issues and most of the time, they're not even related to the solution itself. The solution really does run well.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's very scalable. One of the edges we have supports 2,000 tunnels and their edge is very scalable. It depends on the model you use. On even some of these small sites, we rely on them for Wi-Fi in our small sites it's been great overall.

We likely have 1,000 users on the solution. 

We have plans to increase usage since we're looking to migrate from a physical data center to Prisma Access on the cloud. Then we have to involve something called the VeloCloud Gateway, which is VMware.

They are our cloud gateways, so those have to be involved in our new architecture or design. We're increasing everything and the only thing that would be decreasing would be where we're closing some offices and that's just the nature of business itself. However, we're still opening others in other states.

How are customer service and support?

Customer service is great. They've been very responsive. One time we had to replace one or two of the edges in one of our main offices in the Houston, Texas area and they send a technician and everything went smoothly on that end.

The technical support is knowledgeable. Customer support is a partner with VMware, so when we ask for support or technical support, and it's always there and they're always helpful.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

How was the initial setup?

I wasn't part of that actual step.

You do not need much maintenance. The last time when I did one site it was only me and then probably a couple of people from our end.

What about the implementation team?

We likely had assistance from the reseller. That's who we deal with when we have any issues with our VMware SD-WAN.

What was our ROI?

I don't have any insights into any ROI. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I'm not aware of the licensing aspect of the solution. It might be somewhere in the middle of the market. It's likely not the least expensive not the most. 

Support may be an extra add-on cost as well. 

What other advice do I have?

We are using the VeloCloud version or model.

On each site, on each branch, we have edges of either one or two for redundancies and that's how they communicate. There's an overlay and that's how they communicate between branches so we have on-prem edges, yes. We have one on AW as well, however, the most we use for now is between branches in Texas.

I would recommend people use this product. We've been using it and we don't have any issues. Honestly, we don't want to get away from this solution at all. I recommend using the solution as it's very reliable, convenient, and easy when you communicate with it. Supporting it and then looking into issues and trying to implement rules and best policies is pretty straightforward. Even if not, we always work with their reseller and they always help us.

I'd rate the solution a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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ISM Network Architect at a transportation company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
Great QOE, good stability and pretty straightforward to set up
Pros and Cons
  • "They have a lot of built-ins. There are so many applications defined inside the solution. It makes it so that we don't have to create some policies. Each and every application is already defined in it."
  • "The solution doesn't offer failover between their own devices. If I want to, I should be able to put the two devices at the side, so there can be a failover."

What is our primary use case?

I work for a supply chain and we have a site where we want to offload the internet traffic and get to the application, etc. Some of the cloud applications go out directly and automatically through the SD-WAN device to the internet, so it is local and does not go to the MPLS. We can load balance those applications.

What is most valuable?

Their QOE, or Quality Of Experience, is the most valuable feature. Basically, VeloCloud measures the latency and the chatter and everything on a voice application, and it just routes the traffic or duplicates the packets according to that chatter. 

They have a lot of built-ins. There are so many applications defined inside the solution. It makes it so that we don't have to create some policies. Each and every application is already defined in it.

What needs improvement?

The solution doesn't offer failover between their own devices. If I want to, I should be able to put the two devices together, so there can be a failover. 

They need to come out with a new device, such as a 510 LTE which would have LTE capabilities.

On the 610 devices, they're saying they're going to have LTE in it. They don't have it. They don't even have a POE feature inside the VeloCloud devices. Therefore, if I want to set up a POE, just the one device with everything in it, I actually don't have a POE support on it.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for about six months now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Stability-wise the solution is quite good. It's reliable. It doesn't crash or freeze. It's not buggy at all.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is giving us problems at the moment. We want to put this as, for example, a primary MPLS, with internet secondary, and cellular tertiary. The LTE device doesn't even failover between them, however. Therefore, there is no scalability there.

How are customer service and technical support?

We don't deal with technical support, due to the fact that we have AT&T. Since we deal with AT&T, we don't deal with them directly. Therefore, I can't speak to their level of knowledge or responsiveness.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Our company is actually many companies. At another subsidiary, they are doing a POC with Cisco. Cisco is providing them with better pricing. On top of that, they have good availability and failover capabilities on LTE. The Cisco router can do the secondary subnet on the same VLAN, which VeloCloud cannot do.

They have a lot of features we technically need to have but don't on VeloCloud.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup isn't too complex. It's pretty straightforward.

In terms of the deployment, we designed everything properly, and due to the fact that we took the time to design it correctly, it didn't take a long time. Strategy-wise, we have AT&T as our provider. That said, we have set up a reference architecture in such a way that it just copies every site, according to our site size and the requirements.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

If you compare VeloCloud to, for example, Cisco, the pricing is almost the same. However, Cisco offers more features that are integral to the way we need the solution to operate. In that sense, it's better value for money. For example, now we need to have an extra LTE modem outside of VeloCloud, and it's going to add to the cost, which ultimately makes it more expensive.

What other advice do I have?

We're just customers. We don't have a business relationship with the company.

We are not using the newest version of the solution. They already have a newer version, however, we have everything outsourced to AT&T, and they have not upgraded the new version on it yet. The version we have on the VeloCloud is 3.4.3, and the newest version, which, from my understanding, is four, and is already out there.

The greatest advice I have for potential new users is this: when you do deploy the VeloCloud, it's pretty straightforward. However, the only thing you have to remember is to make sure that you have the site requirements in terms of the primary and secondary circuits. For us, the last mile circuit is always a requirement, so we have a tertiary as a cellular. That way, even if the primary and secondary go down, you are okay. Also, you need to make sure to size your VeloCloud equipment or VeloCloud model according to the size of your needs.

Overall, on a scale from one to ten, I'd rate the solution at a nine.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Hirendrasinh R  Chauhan - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Technical Consultant at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
Exceptional performance on the cloud, but weak as an in-house solution
Pros and Cons
  • "The cloud gateway is a very good feature for scaling purposes, etc."
  • "They should provide us with the flexibility to scale up."

What is most valuable?

There is a cloud gateway feature that centrally locates every space, which you don't get with Cisco. The cloud gateway is a very good feature for scaling purposes, etc. It's a very simple feature. In fact, everything about VeloCloud is quite simple, including the concept of the circuits, and, from a  technical perspective, it's not as challenging as Cisco VPNs. They have VPN 0, VPN 1, VPN 2, VPN 3, but they're very simple in that approach — the concept of circuits. Overall, I think both products are good. 

Cisco has begun to push its SD-WAN code within all of its ISR routers. This has made deployment quite challenging. With VeloCloud, deployment is much easier because they include all of their own hardware.

What needs improvement?

Cloud-based, it's okay because they roll up the device and provide you with a link for access. In regards to in-house, when you want to deploy the orchestrator, it becomes very difficult. Currently, I don't see any such good documentation compared to their competitors, like Cisco, etc.

Also, If you look at Cisco, just Google it and you'll get every detail: what to do, what specific system, what server, how much RAM, how much storage, all the details — it's just much easier.

If a customer has an optimization solution within their network, then you have to be very careful when designing — optimization and all. This can make your design very complex. If the customer has an existing optimization solution, then you have to be very careful when designing any part of the SD-WAN solution — Cisco or Velo.

They should provide us with the flexibility to scale up.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for two and a half to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

VeloCloud is very stable — it's a very good solution.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I have not done a scale with something like 6,000 to 7,000 sites; however, if you look at the pure design, phase-wise, then you have to be very particular about new designs. Velo is purely based on design. I don't think the SD-WAN is that new and scaling that amount of sites requires a simple design rather than a complex solution.

With Cisco, we were working on a huge scale — I think it was around 1700 sites for that customer. After 900 sites, it started having problems. The controller was not sending the new site updates to the hub and it was not reflecting in the routing table; however, in the end, it scaled, but there were some challenges that we had to overcome.

How are customer service and technical support?

There are not enough people within their support team. I would give them a rating of three out of five.

They have to improve, they have to be quicker and understand the types of problems customers face. 

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is straightforward. The initial setup is very simple compared to Cisco. Cisco claims to be Zero Touch Provisioning, but I think they have a lot of complexity surrounding that Zero Touch. With VeloCloud, you can generate and send emails, and the receiver just has to connect to the device, open up the email and the configuration improves. In this way, I think Velo is good with Zero Touch Provisioning.

Deployment time really depends on what you deploy. If you want to roll out a small site on a single device, then the designing and the policies are all done — it's a really quick job. Your circuit and site will rollout quickly, everything will be up and running roughly within two to two and a half hours. If you're looking at a complex site, then of course, the complexity increases.

What other advice do I have?

VeloCloud is a good solution. They are only lacking in regards to the in-house version. 

On a scale from one to ten, I would give VeloCloud a rating of seven.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Integrator
PeerSpot user
IT Network Consultant at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 10
Easy to deploy and increases the performance of applications
Pros and Cons
  • "Increases the performance of applications and is easy to deploy."
  • "Can't execute commands quickly when troubleshooting. The graphic user interface is slow."

What is our primary use case?

We use VMware SD-WAN primarily to connect branch offices to our data center and to connect users to the application. Users could be in any place, working from home, in remote locations, and branch offices. Applications can be anywhere in the cloud in IaaS, in the platform as a service, on-premise, and at private data centers. The deployment process of SD-WAN is to connect securely so users with the application can perform well.

What is most valuable?

There is a feature called DMPO (Dynamic Multipath Optimization) which is good. Here in Latin America, the quality of the internet is very poor. So what DMPO does, well, in a branch office or in a work from home environment, we can have bad quality internet links, but with the IT team, SD-WAN or VeloCloud, the DMPO makes the link a Smartlink. For example, if the link is presenting packet loss, the VMware solution applies a remediation algorithm. For packet loss, DMPO introduces packet cloning so we send the packet twice. We recover all the packets despite the link having packet loss. If we have two or three internet links, we can also summarize all the links together so, this basically increases the packet capacity. It also decreases the timing of the VeloCloud Gateway.

VeloCloud Gateways are instant and deployed globally so we can create a DMPO tunnel on-premise to a VeloCloud Gateway and then serve SaaS applications. At corporate headquarters, there are three internet links, but employees were experiencing poor quality of Microsoft Teams. So all the Microsoft Office 365 traffic was sent from the location to a VeloCloud Gateway. The VeloCloud Gateway tunnel is protected by the DMPO, so users have a better experience. With Office 365 applications like Microsoft Teams, OneDrive and Azure, the DMPO features increase the performance of the applications because it can remediate bad quality links.

What needs improvement?

The solution doesn't have CLI (command line interface), but it's not needed because the graphic user interface is very nice. You can do everything, but when we are troubleshooting, we can't execute commands as fast as we'd like because the graphic user interface is very slow. So although the solution has a CLI, VeloCloud doesn't. I'd like for VMware to introduce CLI. The solution also needs stronger routing Broadcom support because we cannot deploy VeloCloud in bigger enterprises that have that kind of complex browsing protocol.

VMware does not work well if the enterprise has a very complex routing environment.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using VMare for 2 years.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

VMware works perfectly for most small and medium businesses with simple and basic routing, but not for large enterprises that have complex routing environments.

What other advice do I have?

I would give VMware SD-WAN a nine out of ten.  

Deploying SD-WAN is very easy. When we deploy it on-premise, we need to get SD-WAN or VeloCloud X. When VeloCloud X affects any kind of form factor, it needs to to be a hardware box, it could be a server or it can virtualize in any Hypervisor like Hyper-V or IBM in order to support any kind of form factor. To deploy it in the cloud with Amazon, Google Cloud Platform, or Azure, the features are configured in a central manager called SD-WAN Orchestrator. Then the device is shifted to the location and it only needs one internet connection. When the device connects to the internet it downloads the configurations necessary and that's the SD-WAN deployment process.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Paul Woods - PeerSpot reviewer
Founder at SDWAN Clan
Real User
Top 5
Zero-Touch provisioning, stable, and easy to set up
Pros and Cons
  • "Anyone can migrate over to VeloCloud, it's that simple, just plug in the necessary cables and it's done."
  • "It needs better security."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use cases of this solution are global WAN refreshment, Campus-to-Campus connectivity, and because my client is a global customer, they want zero-touch provisioning.

What is most valuable?

It's true, zero-touch provisioning. Anyone can migrate over to VeloCloud, it's that simple, just plug in the necessary cables and it's done.

What needs improvement?

Security needs improvement.

Also, it needs better scalability. There are certain products that if you need to create extra, the company expands and they will bring on extra branch-to-branch connectivity. There is a point where you will have to move to new hardware. We would need a larger scope for scalability.

I don't want to deploy a number of VeloClouds, and then in one year after business acquisitions, they need scalability. The only way to do that would be to remove the hardware and replace it with the new hardware.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using VeloCloud, on and off for 18 months.

We are using the latest version, but not in a deep dive method.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's stable, definitely.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's a scalable solution. We have approximately 700 sites at the moment, and it's growing more as we adopt Microsoft Azure for this particular customer. So, we will need to spin up virtual instances of VeloCloud in Azure Regions.

The whole company is going through a restructuring where they're going to segregate portions of the business. They'll have their own VeloCloud SD-WAN overlay instance, integrating into the Cloud.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have not contacted technical support. We have someone in our company that addresses anything obscure. He has a fair bit of experience that began prior to our engagement.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is simple. SD-WAN is the simplest, and anyone can do it.

To deploy VeloCloud itself takes approximately one hour.

In IT, things don't always go to plan, but for the most part, it's an hour.

What about the implementation team?

I used a consultant to help with deployment.

For the maintenance of each region, there will be a network SME to make sure that everything goes smoothly.

What other advice do I have?

I will continue to use this solution, we have another customer that wants to use SD-WAN, but they are better suited for Cisco Meraki, so we are just doing a proof of concept with them.

I would definitely recommend this solution to others. 100%. That said, it needs better security. There is always room to improve.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Download our free VMware SD-WAN Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
Updated: September 2022
Buyer's Guide
Download our free VMware SD-WAN Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.