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Network & Cyber Security Manager at a energy/utilities company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
Cut our response times down to "nothing" and reduces our dependency on a SOC
Pros and Cons
  • "When there is an incident, the solution's Storyline feature gives you a timeline, the whole story, what it began with, what it opened, et cetera. You have the whole picture in one minute. You don't need someone to analyze the system, to go into the logs. You get the entire picture in the dashboard. The Storyline feature has made our response time very fast because we don't need to rely on outside help."
  • "All they need to do to improve it is for it to grow further. The hackers don't sleep. If the hackers don't sleep, the solution continually needs to be updated. They need to keep ahead of the hackers."

What is our primary use case?

We have the solution deployed on-premises and, for the last year, on the cloud as well. We have two systems.

Over the last year of Corona, we provided a lot of laptops to our workers to work at home. But because they're not connected, at first, to our network, they can't connect to the SentinelOne instance on-premises. We wanted something that would protect them when they're on the internet, and not only after they connected to our network. That is why we got the system that is in the cloud, to protect all the company laptops.

We don't have a lot of incidents because ours is a very closed network. We don't connect directly to the internet. So SentinelOne is only a barrier between us and the emails or between us and the files that go into our network. 

How has it helped my organization?

Three years ago, one of our employees got an email from someone and opened a file. It was ransomware. It started to infect the disks and I didn't know if it had started to encrypt the network routes. I stopped the computer, but I didn't know if another computer had also been infected. I waited for a company that was giving us support for those kinds of things. They got the disk and they started to check and analyze it. After four hours—and that was very quick, by their standards—I got the first analysis. If I had had SentinelOne the whole thing would have taken between 10 seconds and one minute. And then there was the cost of the SLA that we paid to the support company for that kind of support. A four-hour SLA costs a lot of money; the basic SLA is eight hours.

It has cut the response times to nothing. When we have an incident, we get an email in seconds and I can respond in a second to any threat. Even if it's a false alarm, I get the alarm immediately. For example, when we started to work from home, I accidentally installed a program that writes to the MBR partition in the laptop. It wanted to write to the MBR partition and SentinelOne stopped the file and it saved me from having to install the whole computer again. So it not only protects against threats but against mistakes. It's like having a big brother sitting behind you who protects you.

When you pay for a system like SentinelOne, along with the other systems that we have, we're less dependent on a SOC.

The solution gives me peace of mind when it comes to the reliability of the computers on our system. We can work through the internet, as has been happening recently with half of the company working from home, and I know that I have a system that has my back, that protects me. I know it does because I have tested it.

What is most valuable?

There isn't a single valuable feature, it's the whole engine and system. It's working online in  real-time and gives us alerts, on-click. We chose SentinelOne because in the millisecond that I clicked on the file, I got a block-alert.

SentinelOne's Static AI and Behavioral AI technologies are among the most effective for protecting against attacks because they analyze not only the file's surface, but the behavior of the file. When I described to my manager what I was going to buy, I described a system that analyzes file behavior. If you open a calculator, calc.exe, you know it's going to open calc.exe, and maybe open service X or Y, but it won't go to the internet, to an IP, and spread something. When you analyze the behavior or reaction of each file that works on your PC, it's something else. It's a different level of EDR.

When there is an incident, the solution's Storyline feature gives you a timeline, the whole story, what it began with, what it opened, et cetera. You have the whole picture in one minute. You don't need someone to analyze the system, to go into the logs. You get the entire picture in the dashboard. The Storyline feature has made our response time very fast because we don't need to rely on outside help. We see the whole picture in front of us, from the beginning to the end. We can see, with the click of a button, if that file ran on more computers, not only one or two, and how it spread to other computers. We can see the whole tree and we can immediately respond. We don't need to wait for analysis.

The UI is very clear. You don't need to look for something or to dig to understand where it is. It's all in front of your eyes.

What needs improvement?

All they need to do to improve it is for it to grow further. The hackers don't sleep. If the hackers don't sleep, the solution continually needs to be updated. They need to keep ahead of the hackers.

Buyer's Guide
SentinelOne
September 2022
Learn what your peers think about SentinelOne. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
635,513 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using SentinelOne for two years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has never gone down. In two years I haven't had any software or hardware problems.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is driven by demand. If I need to buy 100 licenses, I can buy 100 licenses. We started with 50 and now we have 200 on-premises and 100 on the cloud.

In terms of expanding our usage, we have a SCADA network. It is our operational network. That network is 100 percent disconnected from the outside world. It's not connected to any network, not to IT and not to the internet. We use a regular antivirus there. We plan on deploying SentinelOne to support that and to remove the old antivirus.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to using Sentinel one we were using McAfee Endpoint Security. We switched because I understood that the systems that are only checking file signatures don't work anymore.

How was the initial setup?

We installed it, in the beginning, on-premises on our computer inside the network, and the installation was done with an integration company. Every three or four months we upgrade because our location is not connected to the internet directly.

The on-premises deployment took something like a week to get it deployed to everyone, but the installation itself was very quick, half a day. Then, to see what should be put in the blacklist or what to exclude took about two weeks. The deployment was done by me and the IT manager.

The cloud version was very simple, no problem. Things were done automatically.

What about the implementation team?

The integrator we used was DnA-IT. They only did the installation for the first implementation.

Now that we are going back to the workplace, I will start to work with them on an hourly basis, and we'll learn about all the features from them. They have good guys who know what I need and what we're going to do. I am one person who supports 400 people, so I need the time to sit with the system and to learn it. The system has a lot of features that we don't use or that we don't understand how to use because we haven't had a lot of time in the past year to research them and sit with the company to teach us. We work with the basic features, things like the blacklist and the USB restrictions. The integrator will show us how to use the more advanced features. I'm starting to think that if we can implement all the features from SentinelOne, I will be able to cut the antivirus that we are paying for.

We also use DnA-IT for support. If necessary, they open a ticket with SentinelOne.

What was our ROI?

It's cost-effective. The price of 100 licenses that I need in the cloud is cheaper than one Bitcoin I would need to pay in the case of ransomware. It's already paying for itself.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The pricing is very fair for the solution they provide.

Aside from the standard licensing fee, the only other costs are for the hardware, because we use Hyper-V on-premises.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I don't remember the names of the other solutions we tested because it was more than two years ago. At that time, SentinelOne was a very young, small, Israeli company with a new product. We were using another startup on our OT network and I asked them if they knew of a good EDR company and they told me there's a little company like ours, our friends, check them out. We also checked two other companies.

We did a penetration test on some solutions. A company that we work with on pen testing planted malware in Excel files, in a macro. We tested how each of the solutions alerted us on the macro and about what it was doing. SentinelOne alerted us at the moment I clicked on the mouse. When I got the popup alert from SentinelOne, I said, "That's it."

In the other software that we checked, there was a little delay because the software got the file, transferred it to the cloud, waited for the cloud to handle the file, and then got the answer back. It took about half a minute or a minute. But in half a minute or a minute, an attack can destroy half of the network. In fact, one of the others didn't detect it at all.

What other advice do I have?

My advice is check out SentinelOne. See how the system works in a real-time attack. Only when you see how it works in real life, in real time, will you understand the ROI of the system. Simulate an attack, simulate a file, simulate that file changing something, and see how it works. I can say to my manager, "I have McAfee installed on my system, I'm safe," and they'll check the checkbox and move on, without understanding what they are doing. I need to sleep well at home and I can do so by knowing I have a system that has my back. That is what SentinelOne is.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Sr. Information Security Manager at a computer software company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Shortened our incident response process because all of the information we need is already there
Pros and Cons
  • "Previously, we had some processes related to incident response which required more steps. We needed to upload to VirusTotal, Sandbox, et cetera. Now, this process is shortened because all of the information we need is already in SentinelOne. We can briefly analyze and even respond from one management console. If someone has SOC, using the API, they can control everything. It's very cool. I think this is the future."
  • "In terms of improvement, they should work on agents' updates because that is not a strong part. It's not their strong point. It's not straightforward to upgrade agents. I send them questions about it. They already worked on this and they promised that in the next release that they will show me their solution for it. But this year I have had complaints about agents' updates, that they aren't clear."

What is our primary use case?

SentinelOne has completely replaced the antivirus solution that we used before. It's also an EDR solution. In the case of any suspicious malware, we can control the system with this agent.

How has it helped my organization?

Previously, we had some processes related to incident response which required more steps.  We needed to upload to VirusTotal, Sandbox, et cetera. Now, this process is shortened because all of the information we need is already in SentinelOne. We can briefly analyze and even respond from one management console. If someone has SOC, using the API, they can control everything. It's very cool. I think this is the future.

Behavioral AI does recognize novel and fileless attacks but we hope not to experience an attack like this. These days, there is no life without the internet. I don't think it is really a plausible scenario because we all use Microsoft services, 365, etc. If you don't have an internet connection, then you don't have anything. The guys from SentinelOne showed me an example where they can actually work without an internet connection and it worked just fine, like a common antivirus solution. But it wasn't important to us that it can do this because we know that in the real world, there are not many scenarios that wouldn't involve the internet.

We do use the storyline feature because it's SentinelOne's main feature that they are proud of. We don't see a lot of viruses in our environment and from what we have seen, it doesn't really help because a user will download a virus, the antivirus blocks it, and that's the end of the story. So there isn't much of a storyline behind it. But the SentinelOne guys showed us how it works and in the case of a difficult attack, it should work fine. 

We work with the storyline feature when we are suspicious of something and we need to check. But we didn't have an exact case where something highly critical was in our systems.

What is most valuable?

I find all of the features to be valuable. It's a cool and very informative tool. The management console analyzes, stops, and prevents the spread of malware. You only need to work with the console. There is nothing to do on the agent side. The user does not need to be involved in this process. 

The level of information it provides is enormous. You have all you need in case something happens. If we need to have an incident response with third-party external companies, we can give them the data that they can analyze further. The information about what's happened on the computer is absolutely amazing.

It's very comprehensive. It offers a lot of data but you can see only what you need or you can go further. If you need to investigate a little further, you can do that in any process. It's a SOC-analyst style.

If you are not an analyst, you can still do a lot with it. It's very convenient. We have workers who are not in the office, who are working from home. This is a good solution for them because it's Cloud-based. I can control everything from one console and even for users who are not in the office. We work with lots of vendors and not many of them have this solution. Traditional antivirus software doesn't have these features.

In terms of its impact on the endpoint, when you have a house computer working on antivirus, it doesn't make a huge impact on the system resources and even more, it can be installed parallel to antivirus. We have had scenarios where we have traditional antivirus and SentinelOne installed in parallel. It's two antiviruses on the computer and users won't know about it. They know about it when they start to download bad stuff and the antivirus starts yelling. 

According to what I see in the console, I do think that SentinelOne covers a wide variety of operating systems. It's even more than it needs to. In the traditional way, it's like antivirus but it does even more because it's also like an EDR solution. It covers all processes, what it does, where it goes, et cetera. There's a lot of stuff under the hood. I'm surprised it doesn't use a lot of resources because I thought it would be more aggressive for CPU memory.

What needs improvement?

In terms of improvement, they should work on agents' updates because that is not a strong part. It's not their strong point. It's not straightforward to upgrade agents. I send them questions about it. They already worked on this and they promised that in the next release that they will show me their solution for it. But this year I have had complaints about agents' updates, that they aren't clear.

They have a lot of updates on their management console. They have a lot of features. There is not enough time to read about it all. It's really a lot. The features that they apply are great and I would love to use them, but it's lots of things to know. And if you're not only working with antivirus on SentinelOne like me, there isn't much time to learn about it. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using SentinelOne for almost a year. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I'm very excited to work with SentinelOne but they have a problem with agent updates. We lose connectivity when we update agents. When users are working from home it's not good to lose connection because you don't have options to connect or have meetings. 

I think they started working very closely on this problem. This solution will be better but so far, that's been my experience. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We use the Cloud. It's completely scalable. They use a management console for lots of companies. It's tremendously scalable, it can be used with hundreds of thousands of computers.

Right now, we protect only 100 endpoints, it's for highly critical systems. Before the COVID crisis, we had plans to increase usage. We need to renew at the end of the year. We will for sure renew for 100 endpoints. I'm not sure about expanding though.

We don't need to do anything related to updating service backend sites. For agents, we only need to click "select all" and "run update," that's it. It only requires one person for maintenance, to see events and analyst information, technology, etc. It has access for three people who are security engineers and our CSO.

How are customer service and technical support?

They have excellent support. There are security vendors who take up to 48 hours to just answer back a "Hello," without an explanation to my problem. The SentinelOne guys answer within the hour with a solution to any concerns expressed in an email. Support is very awesome. They also connect me with engineers who can help me. I can share a screen with them to show them the exact problem. This is important because a lot of vendors don't do this.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is very easy and straightforward. We don't use the on-premise solution, we are Cloud-based. It's important because we have a lot of resources on our side who work fast. We can deploy in minutes. The initial deployment took one hour. 

What about the implementation team?

We did the deployment ourselves. It's really easy. We have a Wiki page where end-users can see what they can install themselves. They just need to click on it, type, tell us where they want us to put a computer, and that's it. The users can do it themselves.

We installed it for a pilot group of 10 users and then deployed for others.

What was our ROI?

Our analysts spend less time doing his job because he has everything he needs in one management console. He can programmatically do everything and only react to real incidents. It reduced the costs of analysts' work. Their work costs a lot of time and money and having SentinelOne enables us to save on these costs. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

There are actually three versions of this product: the user version, professional, and professional plus. If analysts need to see something, like what the users are doing, what processes are running, we can go to the console and see. The traditional version only shows when incidents happen. I think the next time we renew, we'd go with the lesser version because it shows enough information. 

There aren't additional costs to the standard licensing.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have the option to choose different vendors. We briefly looked at other vendors. We looked at Carbon Black, Kaspersky, and ESET EDR.

We evaluated them one year ago. These vendors are comparable to traditional antivirus while SentinelOne is and all in one solution. It has everything you need. SOC analysts is straightforward and they gave us a straightforward proposal. 

It takes the same amount of time for SentinelOne to catch malware as it does other solutions. There's not much of a difference. In our case, we don't see a lot of viruses because we have a lot of levels of security that prevent them. 

What other advice do I have?

We can see the difference between traditional antivirus and what we can do with SentinelOne. Even if the price is a little bit more, we can see what we can do with it. We can use EDR, stop network activity, do whatever we need on the endpoint, from the security engineer side. We can see that it's at a completely different level. We have a traditional antivirus but we're going to rid of them at the end of the licensing period.

My advice would be to go with the Cloud version, not on-prem. 

I would rate SentinelOne a ten out of ten. It's a ten out of ten in terms of the EDR. It's also a 10 of 10 for the product and company. The solution does a lot. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
SentinelOne
September 2022
Learn what your peers think about SentinelOne. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
635,513 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Software Engineer at a healthcare company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
Lets us centrally manage our active endpoints
Pros and Cons
  • "It delivers the type of security which we were hoping for, since we have a lot of different endpoint users utilizing different types of software. We have people who only use Office software, like email, Word, and PDFs. Then, we have people who use some applications that other people wrote. We also write applications in-house using people who develop software. Therefore, we have some machines using very high-end developer software for mechanical development, electronic development, and software development. Those users are used to managing their PC on their own. The centralize platform allows us to differentiate between those three groups of people. We have overall control and can oversee the security levels at all the endpoints. They have not yet been blocked in any way when performing the functions"
  • "We have had one or two occasions when we had to roll back off our Windows machine. Then, we had an issue with SentinelOne where we couldn't let the client make contact with the cloud service anymore. Therefore, the integration with the Windows Service Recovery could be improved in the future."

What is our primary use case?

We are a company with several types of PC users. Our office ranges from marketing to sales, and we also have people who are remote on laptops all over the world, as well as an R&D department. Those people use PCs in different ways. 

We wanted a platform that has ways of dealing with various kinds of users, but we also wanted a central management so we could overview the state of all our endpoints with one view.

We use the central cloud interface to manage all our endpoints.

We only use it on Windows machines.

How has it helped my organization?

It delivers the type of security which we were hoping for, since we have a lot of different endpoint users utilizing different types of software. We have people who only use Office software, like email, Word, and PDFs. Then, we have people who use some applications that other people wrote. We also write applications in-house using people who develop software. Therefore, we have some machines using very high-end developer software for mechanical development, electronic development, and software development. Those users are used to managing their PC on their own. The centralize platform allows us to differentiate between those three groups of people. We have overall control and can oversee the security levels at all the endpoints. They have not yet been blocked in any way when performing the functions.

I have one instance where we had a trigger of an attack. Luckily, it appeared to be in an unregistered program created a lot of threats by renaming files. This was something that the employer developed by his own. This was an unknown program that generated a lot of threats to very quickly rename a thousand files. However, it was not an actual attack, but the behavior of that program was such that the AI protection of SentinelOne kicked in and alarmed us of a possible attack. One of our employees created a program just for his benefit. It had exactly the same behavior as a ransomware attack would have had, then it kicked in. This is why I'm confident that SentinelOne will also detect real ransomware actions. That is the only one instance where I encountered the Behavior AI software kicking in.

We haven't had any real attacks over the last year. We did have some intrusions mainly from suspicious files that people were getting via their browser and some attachments that I tried to open with double extensions. Luckily, in the last year, we haven't had any actual attacks.

The effectiveness of the solution’s distributed intelligence at the endpoint is 100 percent. We haven't had any incidents break through. We only see a very small reduction in PC performance.

What is most valuable?

The main reasons that we use SentinelOne are the antivirus and Behavioral AI protections. We have this solution centrally managed to see what endpoints are active, along with the latest software protection running. It also provides us external control, so we can block machines remotely, even if they are in another country, because we have account managers all over the world. All these features together protect us against strange behavioral programs.

SentinelOne's one-click, automatic remediation and rollback for restoring an endpoint is very handy. We had some issues with programs that were unknown by SentinelOne, then marked as suspicious and quarantined, because we also develop software ourselves and have software packages that were compiled in 1995 and don't conform to the normal rules. SentinelOne always marks those packages as suspicious because they do something different than they should when you compile them with current libraries of Windows, etc. Therefore, we had some interventions of SentinelOne where you can easily whitelist them and rollback the quarantine action so people who use those old-fashioned programs could easily continue with their work. 

This was only an issue during the first month when we rolled out the software, then it starts doing scans mainly on the R&D PCs, which was our great concern. Normal office use is fairly straightforward, but when you develop software (and we also develop software to communicate with our embedded systems), then the demands are a bit different. However, until now, we have been very happy with it.

What needs improvement?

We have had one or two occasions when we had to roll back off our Windows machine. Then, we had an issue with SentinelOne where we couldn't let the client make contact with the cloud service anymore. Therefore, the integration with the Windows Service Recovery could be improved in the future.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using it for about a year now. We rolled it out in December 2019.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

All the endpoints are running without problems. It is very stable. We have deployed several versions of agents. I haven't encountered any issues, apart from when that rollback occurred, and the SentinelOne agents were locked out of the cloud platform, and the only way to retrieve that was by installing it again by hand. 

Up until now, SentinelOne's effectiveness has been 100 percent.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We are a relatively small company with about 80 employees. Most things are offsite. We do not use automated things very much.

There are four users from the admin side.

Together with another colleague, we chose SentinelOne, then tested and deployed it. A few other colleagues have monitoring views in SentinelOne, e.g., if a site has to be whitelisted. 

How are customer service and technical support?

I had one issue that I brought up with customer support. They delivered a solution in about two hours. It was related to the issue with the agent. I just issued an email, and in about an hour, the problem was solved. I was delivered a good solution: an uninstalling procedure and how to go about it. That's the only thing that we needed it, and the only time we needed the technical support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before this solution, we used McAfee, which was not enough for our use. Then, SentinelOne came into the picture. It not only had static virus checking (antivirus), but it also had the Behavioral AI features, like triggers, that we could investigate.

The McAfee solution that we had was more demanding, more expensive, and had less functionality. Three to four years ago, we had an incident with ransomware, and it wasn't detected at the time by the McAfee on all the points. There were two points that were affected. Since it wasn't noticed by the McAfee. we were considering other software solutions from that point on.

SentinelOne offered a good solution, which is the main reason that we went with them. It was easy to manage, although we didn't use McAfee the way we use SentinelOne right now. McAfee was incorporated in our company about 20 years ago, so we probably didn't use all the facilities that McAfee can offer now. 

SentinelOne made us a good offer, especially regarding the Behavioral AI aspect of the protection. Therefore, we just wanted to see what they could offer us. After a year, we are still very satisfied.

SentinelOne had a smaller footprint, both in resources and time-wise, as in load, than the McAfee solution that we had previously.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was fairly straightforward. It was very easy to start up. You didn't have to go into a lot of documentation to roll it out. We used the management from the central platform, not our own central platform on-premise, and did it on the cloud version. This way, it could be delivered and updated remotely.

The deployment took a week. We deployed it to about 90 endpoints.

What about the implementation team?

We just had a discussion with the SentinelOne service provider onsite. He gave a revision of how SentinelOne should be deployed along with some examples. Before we deployed it to the entire company, we had a testing time of about two months. 

What was our ROI?

SentinelOne has reduced incident response time. The two main pillars that SentinelOne helps us with: 

  1. Central management: I can ensure management that if there is a breach all the machines and endpoints are up-to-date and protected. 
  2. SentinelOne allows us to switch off an endpoint remotely, which we could do previously. Most people are on-premises, but there are 15 to 20 people all over the world with laptops connected everywhere. 

It saves a few hours a week for one person, because you can see the statuses of all the machines in one place. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It was cheaper than McAfee, which was a way to convince management to go with the solution.

What other advice do I have?

At the moment, we are very pleased with the solution.

We saw the Storyline technology briefly. However, the Storyline is only when you have actual attacks, and they are not caught in the beginning. Most of our attacks were caught just by static recognition of the files, so there was no story because the file was not allowed to activate. In the beginning, we did some fake file checks in an enclosed surrounding and in a CM setup, which is how I saw the Storyline facilities, but we don't use it.

I would rate this solution as a nine (out of 10).

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Jeff Doggendorf - PeerSpot reviewer
Operations Manager at Proton Dealership IT
Real User
Top 10
Excellent detection rate / allowed our team to focus on proactive management
Pros and Cons
  • "The detection rate for Sentinel One has been excellent and we have been able to resolve many potential threats with zero client impact. The ability to deploy via our RMM allows us to quickly secure new clients and provides peace of mind."
  • "One area of SentinelOne that definitely has room for improvement is the reporting. The canned reports are clunky and we haven't been able to pull a lot of good information directly from them."

What is our primary use case?

Everyone who is a client of ours gets SentinelOne by default. It provides ransomware protection, malware protection, and increased security. Those are our top-three selling points for SentinelOne when we talk to clients.

How has it helped my organization?

Prior to deploying Sentinel One, we had a team of staff members dedicated to ransomware prevention and malware alerts. Since deploying Sentinel One, we have been able to allow that team to focus on other proactive security measures for our clients.

The dashboard alerting is great and it has helped us out a ton.

SentinelOne has also greatly reduced incident response time, based on the toolsets and the ability to deploy it to new companies through a script. That has been very helpful. It has decreased the amount of time spent on incident response by 40 to 60 hours a month.

And when it comes to mean time to repair, while we haven't had a situation where we've had to reload an operating system or repair to that extent, we've used the 1-Click Rollback feature which saves several hours over a reload of a PC. 

What is most valuable?

The detection and response feature is really good for us. 

Also, there is a feature called Applications, and it shows all the critical applications that are on devices that may need to be reviewed.

The solution’s Static AI and Behavioral AI technologies are great when it comes to protecting against file-based, fileless, and Zero-day attacks. I would rate that aspect at eight out of 10. They have been great at detection.

The solution’s 1-Click Rollback for reversing unauthorized changes is also huge for us. That is one of the top reasons we have SentinelOne in place. For example, we had a site that had downloaded malware on a share for their sales office. It was trying to move laterally throughout the network but SentinelOne detected it. We then used the 1-Click option to remove it from the 10 or so PCs it had infected. Then we blocked it based on the information SentinelOne provided to us. That way if it happened again, it would already be blocked and wouldn't be allowed to launch.

What needs improvement?

One area of SentinelOne that definitely has room for improvement is the reporting. The canned reports are clunky and we haven't been able to pull a lot of good information directly from them.

Also, integration is almost non-existent. We would really like to see integration with ConnectWise. Within ConnectWise Automate, you're only allowed to deploy at the top-level group. Our company is dealership-focused, but if we have a parent dealership that has 10 sub-dealerships with SentinelOne, we have to treat them as one large group instead of one parent and 10 sub-groups. That's been a pain point for us. We've done some workarounds, but since there is no integration, it's tough.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using SentinelOne for about two years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We haven't had any issues, outages, or upgrades. I would rate the stability at 10 out of 10.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

One of the features that we love about SentinelOne is that we don't have to buy licenses ahead of time. It just scales up as we grow. We're bringing on a client now that has 500 endpoints and I don't have to worry about contacting sales at SentinelOne and getting a PO for 500 licenses. It just scales up and we're charged based on what we use, which is awesome.

The solution is on 100 percent of our clients that we manage, and that's going to be the goal moving forward. Our sales team does not put in a contract without SentinelOne.

How are customer service and support?

SentinelOne technical support has always been very quick and responsive. We haven't used them a lot. We're a technology company as well and we're able to fix the minor stuff ourselves or by looking at a knowledge base.

One of our concerns or complaints at the beginning was the lack of training, which they fixed. They allowed us to schedule our staff to do the eight hours of free training, which was great. That would have been my only complaint, but that was resolved a few months ago.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We didn't have any EDR solution in place like SentinelOne. We had Bitdefender for antivirus, but that has been removed. Our existing antivirus was failing in several ways. It wasn't detecting everything that was coming through. That was the big catalyst for the switch.

Originally, we had SentinelOne through SolarWinds, which was our previous RMM tool. And when we migrated to ConnectWise, we moved our existing licenses over.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. It was through our RMM. We bought licenses and we had a one-click deployment to deploy that software. And when we migrated, the gentleman who helped us was awesome. We migrated 9,000 endpoints from that RMM directly into SentinelOne, and he did a lot of the heavy lifting. We just had to check and confirm things were getting moved over.

The migration of the 9,000 agents took 10 to 14 days.

Our implementation strategy included a deployment where we would do a test phase. We picked certain endpoints at different clients and we would deploy and set it in a "listen-only" mode and see what it caught. If everything was good, we would then turn it on to regular mode. That process helped a lot in the implementation.

We have about 75 people in our company using SentinelOne. The main roles among them are about 60 percent help desk, which is view-only; 20 percent client-side, which is reporting and view-only; and the rest are our engineering level where they have the ability to do rollbacks and fix certain issues that are coming in. There is very little maintenance involved with the solution, maybe a handful of hours a month. We have it set up to auto-update. Prior to that, we had to set up our script to download the most recent version, but that's all been replaced now with automation. Maintenance on the actual system is very minimal.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

In the past, we had to purchase licenses in advance, so if we hit our license limit, we could not expand until we got a signed agreement in place with the sales rep after the back-and-forth. That meant if a client had ransomware and they had 200 agents, we couldn't deploy right away if we were up against our limit. So we always had that balancing act of figuring out if we were close to our limit and whether we needed to buy more licenses? We ended up paying for licenses we didn't need because we had to buy them in packages of 100.

We now pay based on usage. They do an audit once a quarter and calculate any overages. We pay a set amount quarterly, based on our licenses in use, and then they true-up the figure. Right now we have 12,800 agents with SentinelOne on them. We charge our clients monthly, so it would be really difficult for us to write a check to SentinelOne, in advance, for a full year's worth, at that level. It's been great for us to have the quarterly payments.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at CylancePROTECT in addition to SentinelOne. We liked the pricing better and the contract options better with SentinelOne. The deployment also seemed to be easier. In addition, SentinelOne detected things that others missed. We did a few quick trials of other solutions, but SentinelOne seemed to be the best in terms of detection. For example, we did a test with Mimikatz and SentinelOne detected it immediately, whereas some of the others bypassed or didn't see it at all.

And when we talked to the ConnectWise sales rep—because ConnectWise was integrated with Cylance at that point, and SentinelOne was not—the rep told us that they were actually dropping Cylance and moving to SentinelOne over the next year for integration, which was a big factor for us.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to implement SentinelOne immediately. It is one of the top things that we've implemented and it has saved us countless hours. It's really hard to quantify the savings, but if a client were to get ransomware, it could involve weeks of several team members working around the clock to get them back up and running. Since we've implemented this, we haven't had to do that in an environment where we had experienced having to do so previously.

The biggest thing I've learned from using SentinelOne is that there are a lot more attacks out there than a typical antivirus will display. Regular antivirus, rather than an EDR-type platform, gives people a false sense of security because there are a lot of processes running in the background that the typical antivirus solution is not equipped to catch. It was eye-opening when we started deploying this at clients, locations where we felt we had very good peace of mind in terms of what was happening. SentinelOne started detecting things left and right that were completely unable to be seen prior.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: MSP
PeerSpot user
Roel Schreurs - PeerSpot reviewer
System Engineer at Lyanthe
Real User
Top 20
The rollback worked flawlessly, saving me a couple of days of work
Pros and Cons
  • "The best part of the agent is that users can't remove or disable it, so endpoints will be safe. I can control it from the portal. I can see when it's updated and I can push updates from the portal. The greatness of SentinelOne is that our end-users don't see anything to do with the agents. Some of them don't even know it's on their laptops. And that's a good thing."
  • "It's good on Linux, and Windows is pretty good except that the Windows agents sometimes ask for a lot of resources on the endpoints. That could be in the fine-tuning for scanning. In Mac, they are complaining about the same problems, that it's using a lot of resources, but that could also be that we have to configure what it is scanning and what it should not scan. Currently it scans everything."

What is our primary use case?

It's for our regular laptop users, desktops, and our production servers. For the production servers we use it to make sure there is nothing coming from the outside. And for our regular users it works everywhere, so they can do everything with a laptop.

It's a cloud solution. We don't have a large business. We have a lot of services but we don't have many users. Everything is in the cloud and we have about 20 clients or 20 agents for normal users in the Netherlands and we have between 100 and 200 users in the Philippines. The rest is for server safety.

How has it helped my organization?

There is a lot of remote work at the moment and SentinelOne provides the safety I want. Everything goes outside now and the only control I have is Sentinel One, but it gives me enough control.

We have developers who do a lot on their laptops and sometimes they create problems. When that happens, SentinelOne is pretty fast with them. We have configured it to disconnect them from the network so we don't end up with more problems. Now, those developers know they have to contact our IT department if they want to fix it. The great thing there is that we know that when something happens on a laptop it is isolated.

We see what is mitigated and what is not. And when SentinelOne is in doubt, it asks the managers what to do with what it has found. When you have arranged that once, it will take care of it the next time. That's great.

Overall, it's effectiveness is 100 percent because we don't see many outbreaks anymore. Nobody's complaining about using their endpoints.

I've only done a rollback once and it worked flawlessly at that moment, but that was nine months or a year ago. It saved us a lot of time because the problem didn't spread over the network. It affected one machine because it was disconnected from the network. We then rolled it back and it was up and running again. If the rollback hadn't worked well, it would have meant a couple of days of additional work. If the outbreak had reached my network I would have had to clean everything. I was able to do everything from the portal. The connection with the manager was still there. We just had to click on two buttons and everything went.

Overall, it has helped to reduce our response time by about 20 percent. 

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the information it finds and what it is doing with that information. I can check if the info it sends is true. It's very clear. 

And if you configure it in the right way, it does a lot automatically. And that's what you want. You don't have to use it every day. I only log in to the SentinelOne portal once a day, just to check if there are alarms or the like and that's it. The rest is flawless.

Now that we've been using it for six months, SentinelOne knows what we want to have, what it has to do and it works that way. So it's very simple to use and that's pretty nice for the team. 

The best part of the agent is that users can't remove or disable it, so endpoints will be safe. I can control it from the portal. I can see when it's updated and I can push updates from the portal. The greatness of SentinelOne is that our end-users don't see anything to do with the agents. Some of them don't even know it's on their laptops. And that's a good thing.

What needs improvement?

It's good on Linux, and Windows is pretty good except that the Windows agents sometimes ask for a lot of resources on the endpoints. That could be in the fine-tuning of the scanning. In Mac, they are complaining about the same problems, that it's using a lot of resources, but that could also be that we have to configure what it is scanning and what it should not scan. Currently it scans everything.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been working in my current company since April 1, so I have been using it here for six months. But I used it in another company in Eindhoven for a couple of years. That company was also a provider of SentinelOne and that's why I know how it works and what it does.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has great stability. We haven't experienced any downtime or any kinds of bugs. If the users use the endpoints normally, nothing happens. We have some users who think they have to bypass SentinelOne, and then we sometimes have problems with those endpoints. But that's because of user action. It has nothing to do with SentinelOne.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We started with about 50 endpoints and now we have over 300. We haven't had a problem with it.

There will be more servers to watch over so our usage will be increasing. When the business grows, our IT will grow with it, and SentinelOne has to grow along with us.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have used their technical support and my experience with them has been very good. They are fast. They know what they're talking about. Those are two great things for support to have.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before SentinelOne the company was using F-Secure. It started as an antivirus and then F-Secure also made a cloud-based endpoint protection solution from it, with a managed base and automation and checking for updates. It works with a database, which is not the way SentinelOne works. F-Secure is much cheaper.

They switched to SentinelOne because it is more for malware. F-Secure doesn't do anything in malware, just virus scanning.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup of SentinelOne is straightforward. It's fairly logical. Everything works in the way you think it has to work. It's pretty simple to work with. It's just a matter of installing the agent and go. It takes about two minutes. There is an agent client with token codes. You just install the token code in it and reboot your endpoint and it's working.

We have it installed on 305 endpoints. This is a work in progress. We didn't have all of those endpoints when SentinelOne came in. We've rolled out new endpoints. But, it doesn't take long for a machine to get an agent and to make a connection and to get updates. Once you are in the portal, you can update from there. And then, you only have to check if it's already there and if the agent is working.

If we push an update, within an hour everything is there. If they are all online it will go pretty fast.

What was our ROI?

It's working simply. You don't have to learn a lot to know what it does and how to work with it, and that saves time. And it gives you a solid solution for security.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

You have to look at the kinds of problems you can end up with and the fact that you want security against them, and then SentinelOne is not expensive. That's the way I would sell it. 

If you avoid having one outbreak a year, just one, then SentinelOne is worth the money. When you have that one outbreak and it spreads across your complete network, it means days of work are gone. For a complete environment like ours, with 300-plus users, it would be very expensive.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I've also used Sophos with customers. If you want to have a safe environment, then you have to work with tools like SentinelOne. F-Secure and Sophos work with databases for virus knowledge and that creates a delay.

Also, SentinelOne has the rollback which works flawlessly, whereas F-Secure and Sophos don't have that.

What other advice do I have?

My advice is start working with it. You're going to love it.

The biggest lesson I've learned from using SentinelOne is that security tools can be different. SentinelOne has taught me that you can do security in different ways. If it sounds expensive, I would not always say that it is expensive.

We are a very small business. We don't have somebody who specializes in security. Our IT is just three people who do everything. That makes it difficult to say we are going to focus on SentinelOne and try to use it completely. We put it into use for malware security and that's it. We only have a WatchGuard firewall on the front-end and that's it in terms of security on SentinelOne.

They are improving the management tools. They are getting better. The portal is functioning with more logic. Those are good improvements. It's user-friendly enough. People with low IT knowledge can work with it.

It's a very good program. It does what it says it does, and I'm very glad that I have it.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Brian Fulmer - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Manager at American Incorporated
Real User
The MDR service is convenient for a small team like ours
Pros and Cons
  • "SentinelOne's managed detection response service Vigilance Respond is convenient for companies like ours with small IT teams. If something happens on the weekend, SentinelOne steps in and resolves the issue. It's a false positive 97% of the time, but at least they're resolved instead of hanging around for us to find on Monday."
  • "Managing the false positives creates additional management overhead. The behavioral analysis engine might misinterpret real user behavior as malware. For example, a drafter was cleaning up a Revit folder and deleting 4,000 files. That looks like ransomware. The SentinelOne agent kicked his computer off the network."

What is our primary use case?

We're a construction company using SentinelOne for endpoint security with endpoint detection and response. SentinelOne covers all of our endpoints and servers. It protects everyone across the company, even those not actively using an AV.

How has it helped my organization?

SentinelOne's managed detection response service Vigilance Respond is convenient for companies like ours with small IT teams. If something happens on the weekend, SentinelOne steps in and resolves the issue. It's a false positive 97% of the time, but at least they're resolved instead of hanging around for us to find on Monday.

We have the Ranger feature for network scans, allowing us to pick up any new devices that show up on a network. That was especially useful for us when we shifted to working from home.

If two or more agents are in a remote network, they will scan the network and give you an inventory of the MAC addresses and device types they see. This is handy when you have a small office or someone working from home. We do not allow employees to bring their own devices, but people are plugging their company computers into their home network, exposing them to risks. The ability to report on connections in remote networks is handy.

What is most valuable?

SentinelOne's machine learning engine is purely behavioral. The engine will shut down anything that's bad, isolate the system from the network, and alert everyone. We had tremendous success with CylancePROTECT for over five years. Zero successful attacks. In 18 months in with SentinelOne, we've seen the same lack of drama. No endpoints have been compromised to the degree that it has negatively impacted our network.

What needs improvement?

Managing the false positives creates additional management overhead. The behavioral analysis engine might misinterpret real user behavior as malware. For example, a drafter was cleaning up a Revit folder and deleting 4,000 files. That looks like ransomware. The SentinelOne agent kicked his computer off the network.

We interrupted that process and then isolated his computer and the file server. It was somewhat disruptive in the middle of the day. At the same time, it was a perfect simulation of what ransomware would do, so it was reassuring that SentinelOne stepped up and said, "Nope!" 

It was not a malicious process running that was detected. It was simply behavior he shouldn't have done. Now, our drafters know to co my team when they're going to do some file cleanup. The false positives are just inherent in just the large amount of poorly written software that's out there. Any competent antivirus is going to have a behavioral, heuristic engine looking at what's actually being done.

It might be something bad done by the software you use. We used a machine learning engine for five years. The Wire Hauser Corporation builds subpar software because they're supposed to be building lumber products. It triggered a false positive, that's about the only negative for any modern AV is just false positives.

In the future, I would like to see SentinelOne implement integrated patch management. It would be great to manage endpoint patching through SentinelOne. We're on our third patch manager in three years because they are lackluster. It would be nice to have a new patch management tool.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Sentinel One for about a year and a half.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

SentinelOne is stable and constantly improving. Today I did a demo of a new acquisition they made for Active Directory. Ranger is the product that scans networks. This is a new product from a company they bought.

They do automated scans of your Active Directory infrastructure to identify fixable problems and anyone trying to take advantage of the unfixable problems. They're improving their core product while adding new functionality and products that I'm interested in.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

SentinelOne is highly scalable. I know folks with 10 times the number of endpoints we have, and they're pleased with it. One fellow I know has 4,000 endpoints under management.

How are customer service and support?

I rate SentinelOne support nine out of 10. I wish our other vendors had tech support as good as SentinelOne. I can only think of one other vendor that possibly has better tech support, but the vast majority of software companies have sub-par tech support. Little goes wrong, but get a quick turnaround time when something comes up. 

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were using CylancePROTECT, one of the early innovators in machine learning next-gen AV. Then they added on an EDR component called  CylanceOPTICS. CylancePROTECT was an outstanding product for us. It was extremely low overhead and highly efficient. It crushed it in the proof of concept and did an excellent job for us.

Blackberry acquired the solution in 2019, the last year of our three-year agreement. It was awful. Development essentially stopped. All of the intelligent people started leaving. I found out that some went to SentinelOne. It was clear my worst fears were realized: that Blackberry was going to screw up yet another good thing.

How was the initial setup?

I had prior experience with this kind of antivirus, so I thought setting up SentinelOne was very straightforward. We stood up three different products in the course of 60 days to do this test. I didn't think there was anything unusual or unexpected about setting it up. It's perfectly understandable if you know what you're doing.

We have automated tools for deploying software. The biggest problem was getting the old endpoint solution off and the new endpoint solution parked on top of it. We had a 30-day window to get it all done for 250 endpoints.

My IT group has four people, including me, but it's not hard to manage or deploy. It fits right within our normal imaging endpoints, so it's super-low overhead.

What about the implementation team?

We did the deployment in-house. I'm paranoid. I wouldn't let anybody touch our security software.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We pay $30,000 a year for 275 endpoints. We're growing, so I plan to buy another 75 endpoints. There is still a year and a half left in my three-year subscription, so I'm going to increase my endpoint count by 30 percent.

I'm buying midterm. We're a little over our licensing right now—less than 10%—but we'll correct our device count and plan for future growth. We pay for additional managed detection and Ranger network scanning.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We started doing proofs of concept for a short list of candidates in October 2020 when things calmed down a little bit. In addition to SentinelOne, we were looking at Sophos Intercept X, and CrowdStrike Falcon, which I assumed would win the bake-off. I had every expectation that Falcon was going to be our new endpoint. SentinelOne was kind of a startup. CrowdStrike Falcon was number three. Our second choice would've been Sophos Intercept X.

We left behind traditional AVs like Symantec and Norton Antivirus in 2016. It's awful stuff. We would've been good with Intercept X or Falcon, but SentinelOne has just proven to be the right choice for what we're doing. I hope they don't get bought.

What other advice do I have?

I rate SentinelOne 10. It's an excellent next-gen AV with none of the signature-update nonsense. It'll kill anything that does something bad, which sometimes is an Adobe product, etc. False positives are expected in that situation, but it's not a problem.

If you're considering SentinelOne, devote time, money, and staff to a thorough proof of concept. If you don't test your use cases, You will regret it. Just assume it's going to be an exit project to do an endpoint security selection. Ignore Gartner's and the press. Don't pay attention to the big analysts. Read the peer reviews and the community feedback. 

Do the heavy lifting with a proof of concept. If you think you're spending too much time on it, you're probably not spending enough. It's so important. Treat picking a product like you would any other big project.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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PeerSpot user
SimonThornton - PeerSpot reviewer
Cyber Security Services Operations Manager at a aerospace/defense firm with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 10
Has good process visualization and automated response capabilities, and comes with excellent support and flexible licensing
Pros and Cons
  • "The process visualization, automated response, and snapshotting are valuable. The integration and automation possibilities are also valuable."
  • "The update process can be better. It is very easy to deploy, but over a long period, the updating process can be a little messy. In some EDR solutions, you end up with a very good mechanism to push new versions. It could do with a little work in that area. It is not particularly difficult, but it could do with a little work."

What is our primary use case?

We're a partner of SentinelOne, but we're also a partner of many other companies. We're not a vendor per se. We sell SOC as a service, and as a part of that service, we provide protection solutions. My area is around antivirus. So, we are not a reseller in that sense.

I am using its latest version. It can be deployed on-prem as well as on the cloud. I have customers with a requirement for both. SentinelOne provides their own cloud because that's where they do their artificial intelligence (AI).

How has it helped my organization?

SentinelOne is what they call extended detection and response (XDR). So, it is the next generation of endpoint detection. The main difference between Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) and XDR is that in XDR you have visibility on how something is executing. An EDR solution detects a suspicious or malicious package based on its signature or its behavior and sends an alert, but the problem is that you only see the file that it alerts on. For example, if it is an attachment to an email, you'll see the trigger on the attachment when you try to open it, but what you don't always know is from where that came. With an XDR solution like SentinelOne, you can see the whole process execution. You can say that it was executed from inside Word, Outlook, or something else. For example, when you opened an attachment in Outlook, it triggered Word and got opened in Word. This whole process execution is visible with XDR. It also offers the possibility to suspend or respond intelligently. So, you can use it not only to detect that the package is suspicious, but you could also suspend it so that when the person comes to investigate, the suspended process is still there.

What is most valuable?

The process visualization, automated response, and snapshotting are valuable. The integration and automation possibilities are also valuable.

What needs improvement?

The update process can be better. It is very easy to deploy, but over a long period, the updating process can be a little messy. In some EDR solutions, you end up with a very good mechanism to push new versions. It could do with a little work in that area. It is not particularly difficult, but it could do with a little work.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using it for about a year and a half.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It gives good stability. It can have an impact on the performance of the workstation, but that is usually a question of tuning. From a stability point of view, I've never had a machine with a blue screen.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It scales very well.

How are customer service and support?

They're excellent. I would rate them a five out of five.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We are technology agnostic in the sense that if a customer doesn't have a solution, we'll make a recommendation. If they don't have a solution, then our recommendation goes along the lines of SentinelOne, Palo Alto Cortex, Microsoft Defender ATP, or ESET. These are the ones that I typically would recommend, but Microsoft Defender ATP is problematic because you have to have the Azure and Office licenses to get it. For the other ones, you can buy the licenses separately. We also take over other solutions. I have some customers on Kaspersky and other solutions.

How was the initial setup?

It is straightforward. If we deploy it from a URL where it downloads, it can be done in 10 minutes. If it is coming from an internal deployment server, it can be a few minutes. It is essentially headless. There are no prompts.

What about the implementation team?

I have six people, but they normally work with the customers. As an MSSP, we normally work with the customer IT teams to deploy the agents in large companies. In small companies, it could be our people who do it. 

The number of people required depends on the number of endpoints, but generally, the number is low because it is a very simple installation. In fact, we even have end users running this.

What was our ROI?

It has the best ROI that I've seen. If I compare it to Microsoft Defender ATP or Defender for Endpoint, which a lot of people compare it against because it's included with the E3 or E5 Office licenses, Defender is three to five years behind SentinelOne. You're also tied to Microsoft's licensing scheme, whereas SentinelOne is independent of all of them. The ROI is very good. For me, its closest direct competitor is either Cybereason or Palo Alto's Cortex.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Its price is per endpoint per year. One of the features of its licensing is that it is a multi-tenanted solution. From an MSSP point of view, if I want to have several different virtual clouds of customers, it is supported natively, which is not the case with, for example, Microsoft Defender.

Another nice thing about it is that you can buy one license if you want to. Some vendors insist that you buy 50 or 100, whereas here, you can just buy one.

The Singularity product has three versions: Singularity Core, Singularity Control, and Singularity Complete. The Singularity Complete one is really what I consider an enterprise rate solution. The middle one, Control, is more than adequate. In terms of price, it works out very similar to what you would pay for Kaspersky or for any other solution. The licensing per endpoint, per year, and per version is progressively more expensive for the Core, Control, and Complete versions. 

The interesting thing is that it is possible to upgrade across the versions without a major change. If a customer buys the most basic installation and would like some of the features out of the middle, it is possible.

What other advice do I have?

You have a choice between an on-premise console and the cloud. My advice would be to use the cloud, but it is a consideration of whether your endpoints can connect to the cloud or not. One of my customers is in the military defense area, and they have no connection to the internet. So, we had to deploy on-prem. What you don't get with the on-prem is all the AI. So, if you're deploying on-prem, you get the core features of SentinelOne, but you don't get all of the bells and whistles that you get from the cloud environment. The same is true for Cisco AMP and other solutions that are deployed on-prem. So, you need to consider how you're going to consume it if you have a disconnected network. If you're in the financial world, a lot of the production networks are not connected to the internet. So, solutions like Microsoft Defender are not an option because they're cloud-based, whereas SentinelOne is an option in those environments.

I would rate it an eight out of ten. It is a very good solution, but you have to compare it to understand it better.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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Head of IT at a transportation company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Straightforward to install, quick and detailed technical support, and application inventory is helpful
Pros and Cons
  • "In terms of the engines that SentinelOne uses, it has stopped various scripts from running and it's highlighted lateral movement that we weren't expecting."
  • "With respect to product patches, it should have the ability to patch directly from SentinelOne, rather than be presented with a list and have to do it separately."

What is our primary use case?

Our primary uses are endpoint protection and application inventory.

The management is done through the SentinelOne web interface.

We work strictly in a Windows environment, using it for both workstations and servers.

How has it helped my organization?

At the moment, using SentinelOne brings us peace of mind. It has only highlighted a few things and generally, we've been quite lucky.

In terms of the engines that SentinelOne uses, it has stopped various scripts from running and it's highlighted lateral movement that we weren't expecting. From that perspective, it's been good.

We don't have a lot of incidents but SentinelOne has reduced our response time by a couple of hours, per incident. It does a lot more than what the previous AV products did.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features are application auditing and malware detection.

Application inventory and auditing highlight which applications are installed on the endpoints, and whether there are any known vulnerabilities. If the endpoint is not patched then it will be reported. This helps us in terms of validating our patch management methodology.

On the malware protection, it looks like it stops all malware and detects things such as suspicious activity.

The automatic monitoring of OS processes is a good thing to have. However, I'm not totally familiar with the product in-depth. It gives peace of mind in terms of our security and it doesn't seem to have any impact from an end-user perspective.

We use the threat detection feature.

The Deep Visibility feature is something that we have used once or twice. It gives us visibility of all of the activities that took place, to determine what exactly was caused. We don't use this feature very much, purely because we don't have many things to look at. We did find some things that were suspicious, and we were able to resolve them. It highlights certain things that we weren't aware of, and then we were able to go in and understand them further. At that point, we either marked an issue as a false positive, or we denied it permission to continue. In either case, SentinelOne stopped it from proceeding. 

At the moment, my confidence is quite high with respect to the effectiveness of the distributed intelligence at the endpoint. I haven't had reason to determine if it's not working and at the moment, it seems to be doing what it says it does.

What needs improvement?

With respect to product patches, it should have the ability to patch directly from SentinelOne, rather than be presented with a list and have to do it separately. As it is now, it shows you what products require patching, but you need a separate application to install the patch. If you could initiate an update to the application from SentinelOne, that would be a nice feature. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using SentinelOne for approximately a year and a half.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Overall, the stability is very good. We have had one version where it had a high CPU usage, but the later versions were better.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have not run into problems with scalability. It can be very good.

There are three users in the company including the IT department, helpdesk, and operations manager. At the moment, we have implemented 100% of our endpoints. Probably, as we add endpoints over time, our usage will increase slightly.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is excellent. We have only had to use them two or three times, and the response has been very fast, very detailed, and very explanatory.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to SentinelOne, we used Symantec Endpoint Protection. We switched because SentinelOne offered various features such as Deep Visibility, threat analysis, and application inventory. There were a lot of features that SentinelOne had that Symantec didn't, at the time.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is very straightforward. It was pretty much all done for us. Essentially, all we had to do was install the agent on each workstation that was upgraded.

It took about three weeks to deploy, covering all 212 of our endpoints.

We didn't have a specific implementation strategy. We somewhat phased it in, and all of the new devices would be installed with SentinelOne. As we go through the different workstations, we replace what is necessary and upgrade the agent. It was a case of going through our four different offices and because we're quite small, we did it one by one.

There is no maintenance required, post-deployment.

What about the implementation team?

SentinelOne support assisted us with deployment and it was done pretty much right away. They were very good.

Once the tenant was created, they gave us an overview of how to use it. The product is quite straightforward and easy to use and. There are probably elements we could go through further with SentinelOne, but I don't know if it's because I buy through a third party. Maybe, the third party is supposed to do more, but I'm not sure.

The reseller that we purchased SentinelOne from is O2 Mobile, and the experience was fine.

What was our ROI?

Although there isn't a tangible ROI, the product gives us a lot more detail and insight into the threats, which is valuable. There has been ROI, but it's more time value rather than a hard dollar value.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The price is reasonable in terms of what the product offers. SentinelOne is more affordable than some competing products, and it's not overly expensive for what you're getting.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at Trend Micro before choosing this product. SentinelOne looked easier to use and it was almost a complete product. We didn't go into too much depth, and I cannot compare the detection capabilities, but the cost was a factor.

What other advice do I have?

My advice for anybody who is implementing this product is to fully understand all of the elements that it provides and to be aware of all of the features. For myself, I think it's important to have a deeper and better understanding of all of the functionality that the product offers.

At the moment, we have a lot of trust in SentinelOne. If it continues to stop future threats then I will continue to rate it highly, or even perfect. At this time, I wouldn't say it's perfect because I can't say that I haven't been compromised because of it.

I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Buyer's Guide
Download our free SentinelOne Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
Updated: September 2022
Buyer's Guide
Download our free SentinelOne Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.