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Broadcom Clarity PPM OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Broadcom Clarity PPM is #2 ranked solution in top Project Portfolio Management tools and #3 ranked solution in top Project Management Software. PeerSpot users give Broadcom Clarity PPM an average rating of 8 out of 10. Broadcom Clarity PPM is most commonly compared to Jira: Broadcom Clarity PPM vs Jira. Broadcom Clarity PPM is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 75% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 28% of all views.
Broadcom Clarity PPM Buyer's Guide

Download the Broadcom Clarity PPM Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: July 2022

What is Broadcom Clarity PPM?

Clarity is the Project and Portfolio Management (PPM) solution created by Broadcom. The platform aims to help medium and large organizations to manage products and services. Clarity features scoreboards, financial analysis tools, and more.

The platform facilitates the delivery of projects and programs and can accelerate an organization’s digital transformation. It allows users to create initiatives, add budgets and projects with a few clicks, and assign and track teams. It shortens the time to make changes to projects to minutes instead of days.

Broadcom Clarity PPM features in-app collaboration and timesheets accessible via mobile devices. Users can access the platform via desktop or mobile. The platform can be deployed on premises or as a cloud-based service with a hosted or SasS delivery.

How does it work?

Clarity’s Strategic Portfolio Management enables planning and prioritizing of work to fit customer demands and business needs, managing the value stream from concept to cash.

Broadcom Clarity PPM Key Features

  • Strategic roadmaps: Clarity’s multidimensional road maps effectively eliminate organizational fatigue. It includes useful features such as drag-and-drop capabilities. It also allows you to map risks and dependencies and track project progress.

  • Project financials: Clarity integrates with Power BI and Tableau with business intelligence solutions. The platform uses Microsoft Excel charting and grouping functions to keep a familiar feel to project and financial reports. You can customize your projects according to investment types and fiscal periods.
  • Collaboration features: Broadcom Clarity PPM provides a central view of each employee’s projects, schedule, and status. You can assign tasks to teams with pinning features without time-consuming filters.
  • Resource management: Clarity enables you to filter available resources and investments to the department level. Doing this allows for managing labor and non-labor resources with ease.

Other features include:

  • One-click charts
  • Staffing and resource management
  • To-do boards
  • Investment hierarchies
  • Business widgets

Broadcom Clarity PPM Benefits

  • Quick setup: The platform is easy and fast to configure and deploy. It also includes migration services to help customers move to the cloud.

  • Lower cost: The SaaS version is a user-based subscription service that eliminates the need for infrastructure investment.

  • Constant updates: Updates are rolled automatically and included in the subscription to ensure the user always has the latest version.

  • Strong security: The Clarity infrastructure constantly updates identity-centric intrusion detection services. It features data protection capabilities on desktops and mobiles, including protection against distributed denial-of-service (DDoS).

  • Scalability: Its load-balanced environment enables users to scale up or down to match spikes in project-based activities. It also features pay-as-you-use.

  • Integrations: Integrates with financial apps, executive dashboards, HR software, ERP systems, etc.

  • Configurability: You can adapt Clarity PPM to your organization’s requirements.

  • Reporting and business intelligence: Clarity’s features include a built-in data warehouse and BI platform.

  • User-friendly: It features an intuitive user interface and interactive communication options.

  • Project management options: You can manage your project with Agile, classic, or hybrid methods inside Clarity PPM.

Broadcom Clarity PPM Use Cases

Organizations use Clarity PPM for a variety of use cases:

  • Time management
  • Product management
  • Resource management
  • Financial management
  • Project portfolio management
  • Reporting services
  • Project management
  • Ticket and change management
  • IT service desks
  • Financial services

Reviews from Real Users

"Broadcom Clarity PPM is a high-value product that helps users become productive. It's a very stable, scalable, and fast platform, even from a self management perspective," says Mohammad J., Senior Clarity PPM Technical Consultant at Al Rajhi Bank.

A Director of Operations at a tech services company adds that "It's very good out of the box, without configurations required."

Sergio C., Service Delivery Manager at Syntech, says, "The most valuable feature is the portfolio functionality because we have the ability to work with different scenarios and many kinds of financial management. We can integrate with ERP, and with other solutions from third-party vendors. The financial model in Broadcom Clarity PPM, it's the most valuable aspect."

Broadcom Clarity PPM was previously known as Clarity PPM, CA Clarity, CA PPM, CA Clarity PPM .

Broadcom Clarity PPM Customers

Toyota Financial Services, GameStop, Polycom, Sky, Qantas, Cox Enterprises, Banco Mercantil, Borealis

Broadcom Clarity PPM Video

Broadcom Clarity PPM Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Broadcom Clarity PPM pricing:
  • "Cost-wise, the tool is very expensive and some tools might be able to cater to 80% of the functionality provided by Broadcom Clarity PPM but are not as expensive."
  • "Broadcom Clarity PPM costs us $500K, and that's only for the installation and kick off within the first year. For each succeeding year, it could cost $200K."
  • Broadcom Clarity PPM Reviews

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    Experienced Analyst at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Good tracking and custom reports with helpful support
    Pros and Cons
    • "There were probably about five or six metrics that we used. As a result, the groups that I supported were consistently ranked at the absolute top of the organization, as we were leveraging these built-in tools for tracking."
    • "Whenever that second instance of Clarity came about, it was overwhelming even to people who were accustomed to working with program management tools."

    What is our primary use case?

    We were doing projections. I happen to work in an IT organization for the past couple of assignments, however, at the end of the day, my background is in finance, internal controls, and business operations. We were also using the tool for forward-looking projections, to kind of get our head around where we think spending is going to be at the project level, and where there might be holes, either financially or in the need of certain kinds of human resources type kinds of things, just classic project missions.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Sometimes you get applications where there might only be one user, or five users, or a very, very small group. Maybe we could migrate them from a little-used application to something that we could bring to the attention that might be better suited for them. There was a variety of things, why we gathered information and collected it inside Clarity. The more important and heavier use of the tool was program management.

    What is most valuable?

    There was a need to keep better track of hours spent by employee type and how their times were allocated to given projects, or if not on a project, if it was just like a general administrative type kind of thing, how were we using our time. Of course, at the employee level, they would have their profiles. There were a variety of data fields that were made use of in order to identify the person by name, their skill sets, their charge-out rate, whether they were assigned full-time, or part-time, or not at all to a particular project or projects, plural. It was, of course, like a lot of things in life, it could be as simple or as complex as you want. One of the things that we found out very quickly was when we went from kind of dabbling in program management and using Clarity, where management at the highest levels of our IT community, it was decided that this right here is our tool of choice. We're not going to be making use of any other tools. Everyone needs to make use of this project management. What they did is, they swung one way and then went to the other extreme. It was everybody who had to log their time. This was done at the highest level. Whether you were a contract employee, whether you were a full-time badged employee, whether you were part of supervisory, or management, or even a member of our senior leadership team, our executive management team, everyone had to account for their time. There was tremendous pushback in doing this. The counterargument was, well, there's a lot of companies, high tech, defense industry, et cetera, et cetera, they always do this. This is nothing new. If we're a "high-tech" company, we should follow suit and get on board with doing this. This is actually fairly common practice. Inside of the tool, there were performance metrics, things that could be tracked, graphed, and what have you. I began distributing to my internal customers at the management level where we were relative to other family groups if you will, or sub-organizations within the IT community. Where we were relative to entering our time sheets on a weekly basis on time. We could follow what was the quality of the input, et cetera. There were probably about five or six metrics that we used. As a result, the groups that I supported were consistently ranked at the absolute top of the organization, as we were leveraging these built-in tools for tracking. There were some groups that were laggards or not performing very well at all. It almost became some kind of internal competition. Whether it was program management, or just metrics and entering data, or keeping records up to date, because people would go out of the organization, there were tools that were inherent or built into Clarity that we leveraged. I'm just an analyst at heart, I can take data from disparate systems. I can correlate them and provide management with what they need in order to make decisions and affect change in the organization or what have you. I did not have any issues with the system. The whole interface would fit on the inside of the screen of a laptop computer. I wouldn't say at 100%. Let's say the screen was brought down to like 80 or 90%, the entire interface would fit on the screen. At the top of being where the true interface was, where you were able to do your filter selections, things like that, that's where you were able to, an individual, depending on their access that they've been granted. I was actually given almost administrator access, where you could see all the options that you could drill down into. I did create custom reports. Some people had great difficulty with that. To me, it was, what data fields do you need, and dragged them into the report that you want to create and save it. That, to me, was always a very simple thing. Some people have to be spoon-fed. Other people are naturally curious or inquisitive and will look at second-level, third-level options for a given application interface. That's what I did.

    What needs improvement?

    Whenever that second instance of Clarity came about, it was overwhelming even to people who were accustomed to working with program management tools. There were so many data fields that could potentially be leveraged, so many kinds of internal metrics. They actually brought in an outside consulting team. I can't recall the name of the team, and where they were from. I remember they were from down South. They were actually on-premises for a week or so. Then, they came back periodically just to fine-tune things. I interacted with them on some occasions, as they wanted to pick my brain on how I was leveraging it to track applications and to run high level reporting for management on just basic metrics and also initially on just program management. Overall, I found the tool to be fairly straightforward. That said, for people who did want to create their own reports, whatever instance we had, a lot of people found it difficult, and what they typically ended up doing is getting training. They're very, very smart, certainly smarter than me, where they would come to me as a resource and say, "Hey, you seem to have a knack for this tool. Can you create a report that kind of sort of does this?" I would say, "Sure." Then, I would knock it out and they would say, "Great." Then, they would have a customized report that met their needs, where they could kind of fire at will and run the report whenever they wanted it to. However, many people didn't find it as easy as I did. Many roles that I've had was the role of a financial analyst. There's been a number of sales organizations, sales organizations that I've supported over time. These are organizations that'll have anywhere from a couple hundred to as many as almost several thousand salespeople, the people who support them, et cetera. One of the organizations that I supported was the main sales force. These are like your rank and file sales representatives who go out and just sell equipment, that sells services, et cetera. It's everything from your entry-level sales reps, all the way to your highest-performing sales reps, all the supervisory management, and all the industry VPs and sales VPs, et cetera, right up to the highest levels of the sales organization for the United States. They had a variety of almost competing tools that were used to consolidate their prospects, and with their pipelines, et cetera. Salesforce had already been installed in Europe with great success. There, you have, obviously, different languages, you have different management styles, organizational structures, et cetera, and yet they were able to install and make use of, Salesforce quite successfully. They actually did it fairly quickly. For us, Europe included Eastern Europe, Russia, all of North Africa, and the Middle East - they all installed Salesforce and did so fairly quickly and successfully. However, there was great resistance in North America. The primary reason was that Salesforce was a cloud-based technology. There was tremendous resistance in both the Canadian and the US communities to have anything other than something that was internal inside of our firewall. The Salesforce people were saying, "We work with governments. We work with everything from defense contractors, to military organizations, to intelligence organizations. There's nothing to fear. This is the future." Yet there was tremendous resistance. It wasn't until someone at the highest levels of the corporation said, "We’ve got Europe covered. We got developing markets covered. North America, get together and get on board with Salesforce. That way, we have unified technology worldwide." Meanwhile, I was actually taking these two competing systems, where the sales reps focused on equipment and then secondarily services, as opposed to another sales organization that would focus on services and then would periodically think about selling equipment. There were competing philosophies and their prospects resided in two different systems. What I would do is developed a knack for taking these two data sets, exporting them out of the two systems, smashing them together, removing the overlapping or duplicate records, then being able to present to management, "You have anywhere between an $8 to $9 billion pipeline for the next nine months. Assuming that you close 20% to 25% of your deals, this is what this might be. You're in striking distance of achieving these types kinds of services, signings, or equipment signings." Management got really, really excited about this. Then, what I did after that was that became the basis, the underlying data, that smashed together data, became the data that we ultimately fed into Salesforce. The reason why I'm giving this background is one of the things that Salesforce did that was very, very clever, is allowed just four people to take data and create a shell. What they did is they said, when they were doing the introduction to our team, they said, "There are literally hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of data fields that are used by our clients all over the globe, but what we're going to do, based upon the data set that you have in the present, we're only going to create this shell or this instance of Salesforce, and we're only going to use 75 data fields." That, to me, was very, very powerful. Even if they were data fields that were using different nomenclature, it was considered a standard naming convention that Salesforce was familiar with. As time went by, we began expanding, making use of a greater and greater quantity of data fields, and being able to slice and dice, if you will, data in greater levels of detail and complexity. It was easier for rank and file, whether you were finance, or information technology people, or salespeople, sales reps, management, whatever, everybody was able to get their heads around a tool that was becoming more and more sophisticated as the months went by as opposed to starting off with saying, "There are 300 possible data fields, and metrics, and calculations, or whatever, but we're only going to use 35 of them, or 50 of them, or whatever." The fact that everybody can see them is very, very intimidating. That was one of the reasons for the pushback in our organization when Clarity was rolled out. People could see all these data fields. Either the implementation wasn't good or the consultants that we were dealing with weren't very thoughtful. However, when people saw all the possible data fields that they had, it was overwhelming. That was consistent feedback that I heard through a variety of channels and there was resistance due to that. If there's any feedback that I would give is that it's one thing to say, "Here are all the possibilities." However, then, when the salespeople marry up with the folks who are going to do the implementation, they need to be able to say, "So what are your immediate needs? Maybe we'll throw some additional data fields in there to kind of spice things up." Then, as time goes by, reveal additional data entry options, either for people who are making the actual entries or what have you. That's something that I observed firsthand. I have seen interfaces that are much hipper, and much more intuitive. The layouts might have a more modern or current touch and feel. With the instance that we had, it seemed like it was just a little outdated. When you were clicking on hypertext links, as opposed to a button. Now, these are nuanced differences, however, having a menu where you'd see a header, underneath the header, you would see a blue font that was a hypertext link. Then, depending on whether you wanted to look at application data, whether you wanted to enter your time, or you wanted to look up specific projects and dig into those projects, into the sub-elements that make up all the different views within a given project, or you wanted to get to a data export function, or whatever, it was all a function of finding your overall category and then find underneath that the appropriate link. I don't know how old that interface was. Maybe it's still like that now, or a bit more modern, however, from my experience, a more modern interface would be a bonus. 
    Buyer's Guide
    Broadcom Clarity PPM
    July 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Broadcom Clarity PPM. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: July 2022.
    610,336 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I was using Clarity, I would say, from August 2018 or 2019. I was using it right up until January 2022. I would say I used it solidly for three years.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    At my organization, in my last couple of assignments, I worked inside IT. It's the global IT organization. Inside of that organization, there, of course, are subgroups. One of which was our program management office. There were also areas within the IT organization that tracked things other than projects. They tracked applications. For example, on a worldwide basis, we had about 1,500 applications worldwide approximately. At its peak, I don't believe it exceeded 500 users. I don't know what the actual licensure arrangement or agreement or contract was with Broadcom CA, but what I do know is that as time went by, the number of users declined. There were trade-offs, and decisions were made. Some of the biggest complainers about doing the data entry were the most senior managers.In time, the more like mid-level managers would say, "Well, if our bosses don't have to make their time entries, why should we? All we really care about are the worker bees." Eventually, things became more diluted. Getting back to our ability to track applications within the corporation, to this day, it is still the official source of record for tracking the number of applications. There's a constant need to simplify our business and start making greater and greater use of better technology, et cetera. I know from that standpoint, the tool is still being used for that. They're still using it for program management, to understand and track project management costs, et cetera. That said, right now, I just don't know how many people are actually logging into the tool.There were rumors that they were going to stop requiring people to enter their time into the tool. Unless of course, you are actually working on a project. If you're a resource that's assigned to project management, then you're obligated to track your time. For people who have nothing to do with project management, and you're just pure overhead, that's where things began kind of winding down, especially towards year-end last year. I know it's come down substantially since its peak of 500.

    How are customer service and support?

    I personally don't recall dealing with technical support. Very, very early on, I did, as there were questions that weren't answered internally, so I actually had to call support. I was able to get things resolved. There was some kind of a quirk, I can't recall what it was, however, it was beyond our understanding of the application. I did have to call a support number. My recollection was, that whatever it was, I was able to get it resolved.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    It's incumbent upon the information technology group to be aware of those systems, to help maintain them, to keep track of them. Then, in addition to that, to the extent that they can be eliminated, in other words, consolidated, so that we have ultimately fewer applications where more people can make use of them, it just helps simplify the business, et cetera, cut costs. We used Clarity as a tool to keep track of all the applications worldwide. There used to be a tool that was used, some other tool. I don't know if it was homegrown. It could have been a Microsoft access database for all I know. I just don't recall what it was, however, I know that it was problematic. Trying to scale up and it was problematic. They actually created a sub-element within Clarity to help the corporation keep track of all of its applications. I was actually a very heavy user of that particular element within Clarity. One of the problems was that a lot of folks didn't know just how many applications there were within the corporation. By using a variety of technology, sending out surveys, et cetera, we were able to find out that we didn't have 1,000 applications. We didn't have 1,200 applications. We actually had 1,500 applications. The reason is obvious why we would need to know whether they are maintaining internal standards or generally accepted standards relative to the IT community.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I did not directly deal with technical support.

    What other advice do I have?

    I know that our company, worldwide, does business with about 300 vendors for its information technology needs, whether it's manpower, equipment, or services. Inside that list of 300 vendors, I know for a fact that Broadcom is one of the top vendors relative to our company worldwide. We're not just a customer. If you look at it from a dollar standpoint, there are some vendors that maybe we spend $20,000 a year or $100,000 a year, and not $1 million a year. For companies where we spend hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, or multiple millions of dollars a year, Broadcom, in general, has a more elevated status on the list of vendors. It's probably in the top 30, or top 50, vendors, which, for me qualifies it as a partner. It meets the definition of being enterprise-wide. I don't know if it was on a company server or if it was some kind of a cloud-based service that we were ascribing to. What I do know is there was an initial instance where I know for a fact it was installed on a company server somewhere and that there was a transition, maybe to a newer version, or a newer instance, which may have changed the deployment. I never really had a need to know that. All I know is can I access it and get the data that I need. I'd recommend the solution. I didn't find any reasons why I would not want to use it. If somebody were to say, "Are you familiar with this tool in technology?" I would say, "Yes." I don't know what version or instance of it was of what I made use of, however, I would say, based on my use of the tool, my ability to look at data in the interface itself, or to get data out of it, export data to do additional manipulations and digging, or what have you, I would say, "To me, it was not difficult to use. It was straightforward. It was logical." I wouldn't have anything negative to say about it. I'd rate the solution eight out of ten.
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
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    Gaurav Datar - PeerSpot reviewer
    Technology Architect at Infosys
    MSP
    Top 20
    Highly customizable, extensible, and has helpful technical support
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most useful feature for me as an implementer of Broadcom Clarity PPM is its extensibility. The tool is pretty extensible, and I haven't had any issues with it in terms of it getting used for multiple scenarios and for multiple clients where there's a need for high customization. Broadcom Clarity PPM is a very, very customizable tool, so you can pretty much implement any business process on it with no issues."
    • "One of the major pain points for me when it comes to Broadcom Clarity PPM is the new UI. The new UI is very good in terms of functionality and the drag and draw features, but it's not very responsive. When I say that it's not very responsive, what I mean is that sometimes, the tool is not very user-friendly. For example, a user saves a value on the form, but the tool doesn't give any indication to the user that the value has been saved. Some users are moving from the classic UI to the new UI, and end up getting confused because on the classic UI, when you click "Save", it'll save the information and you'll get an indication that it was saved. With the new UI, it auto saves the information, but it doesn't give an indication in the form of a popup box that "this form has been saved", or any type of message indicating that the information was successfully saved. It's been confusing for users who move to the new UI because of that. The users don't understand when the values are being saved or not being saved, even if there's an auto-save feature in the new UI."

    What is our primary use case?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM has multiple use cases, and with one of the clients that had implemented it recently, the tool was used for capital budgeting purposes. The client is one of the giants in the U.S. that had a PPM tool for managing all the project portfolios, but that tool was developed in-house. It was a homegrown solution, but there were a lot of limitations because some specific expertise was required. The tool was outdated and was difficult to scale, so my company replaced it with Broadcom Clarity PPM as it is an enterprise-level solution with high scalability and could be moved to the cloud.

    The main business case was for capital budgeting, more like investment management, where there are multiple units and the client proposed some ideas. My company prioritized those ideas and did budgeting accordingly. For example, there are four different business objectives. One is lights on, the second is compliance, the third is business growth, and the fourth is running the business. My company tries to allocate a certain amount or certain funds towards the four business objectives for a particular financial year. My company then considers all the ideas from different stakeholders then tries to prioritize those ideas within Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    What is most valuable?

    The most useful feature for me as an implementer of Broadcom Clarity PPM is its extensibility. The tool is pretty extensible, and I haven't had any issues with it in terms of it getting used for multiple scenarios and for multiple clients where there's a need for high customization. Broadcom Clarity PPM is a very, very customizable tool, so you can pretty much implement any business process on it with no issues.

    What needs improvement?

    One of the major pain points for me when it comes to Broadcom Clarity PPM is the new UI. The new UI is very good in terms of functionality and the drag and draw features, but it's not very responsive. When I say that it's not very responsive, what I mean is that sometimes, the tool is not very user-friendly. For example, a user saves a value on the form, but the tool doesn't give any indication to the user that the value has been saved. Some users are moving from the classic UI to the new UI, and end up getting confused because on the classic UI, when you click "Save", it'll save the information and you'll get an indication that it was saved. With the new UI, it auto saves the information, but it doesn't give an indication in the form of a popup box that "this form has been saved", or any type of message indicating that the information was successfully saved. It's been confusing for users who move to the new UI because of that. The users don't understand when the values are being saved or not being saved, even if there's an auto-save feature in the new UI.

    What I'd like to see in the next release of Broadcom Clarity PPM is fine-grained security control on the new UI, because currently there's free level security, but it's based on the group, and I would like to have access to the individual phase and the users to lock a specific phase. For that type of security, higher level security is required, which is available on the classic UI, but not available on the new UI. The new UI interface should also be a little bit more responsive. Currently, it's responsive and it's fast, but whenever it saves information, it doesn't show any notification, and that can be very confusing for users.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been working with Broadcom Clarity PPM for a few years now. I'm an implementer of the tool, and I've implemented it across multiple clients throughout my career, mainly for three different companies. I do have hands-on experience with Broadcom Clarity PPM. Currently, I'm using version 15.9.3.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is a pretty stable tool. I haven't seen many issues, but it's a little bit sensitive towards JVM memory settings and how it is architected. My company had a lot of applications towards implementation and had some performance issues on the database side, so there was a need to adjust some of the parameters and those parameters were not documented anywhere, but once you open a support case with Broadcom, the team will tell you to try certain parameters and changes. The scenario my company experienced isn't exclusively documented, but Broadcom was aware of it and told my company that it was on a case-to-case basis, but Broadcom Clarity PPM is pretty stable.

    How are customer service and support?

    The Broadcom Clarity PPM technical support team was very helpful, though it would depend on the engineer handling the case. Most of the time, I found the support useful. I'm rating support four out of five.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    My company went with Broadcom Clarity PPM because of complex business processes and implementation, and we particularly chose the tool because it was highly customizable. Because of complex and secure business requirements, there was so much focus on security that it was very complicated compared to regular implementation, so my company decided to go with Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is also a leader in the PPM space in the Gartner Quadrant, so my company picked up the top five to six tools and compared those tools, but as Broadcom Clarity PPM was highly customizable, we picked it over the other tools.

    How was the initial setup?

    How easy or complex the initial setup for Broadcom Clarity PPM depends on the client, as my company worked with three different clients. For one client, the setup took two months and that included business processes, but it was a little bit on the simpler side. With heavy implementation, for example, the most recent project my company implemented took one year, but it was not because of Broadcom Clarity PPM. It was because of the client's business processes, security implementations, and a lot of other things that were highly custom. If it's an out-of-the-box setup, it would be completed within one week or so, and people can get started with using the tool.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Licensing for Broadcom Clarity PPM is a bit complicated. I'm not aware of the exact costs because the tool was for everybody's use. There are different license structures for different organizations and Broadcom doesn't discuss licensing right away. You have to reach out to Broadcom and the team will customize licensing for each client.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    My company took a look at multiple tools because one of the clients already had ServiceNow implemented, so adding a PPM entailed a lot of costs, so that was one consideration. The team also considered Micro Focus PPM, but it was lagging in terms of features, so we decided not to use it, plus it wasn't highly customizable. Planview was considered as well, but it was not as customizable as Broadcom Clarity PPM in terms of processes and integration, so we didn't choose Planview.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would definitely recommend Broadcom Clarity PPM to others because it's a time-tested solution, and I've been hearing it for the last fifteen to twenty years. Broadcom is also adding a lot of new features to the tool. The new UI is also very efficient, and though it's still not in its fully mature state, it's pretty usable. I'm advising others to avoid customizing Broadcom Clarity PPM as much as possible and use it the way it was designed, but I would definitely recommend it as it's a good tool, and the new UI is also very efficient. Broadcom Clarity PPM also has an agile model which is a plus, so you don't need separate JIRA or any other integration. The out-of-the-box agile model is pretty efficient to take care of all the agile requirements, so Broadcom Clarity PPM is the only tool that provides that kind of capability to agile as waterfall project management.

    My rating for Broadcom Clarity PPM is eight out of ten, and the reason behind this score is that it's a very expensive tool. Cost-wise, the tool is very expensive and some tools might be able to cater to 80% of the functionality provided by Broadcom Clarity PPM but are not as expensive.

    The tool has a new UI and that is good, but it has a lot of limitations. For example, you cannot access sub-pages on the second level or third level of sub-objects. There are also some technical limitations overall, so on a scale of one to ten, I deducted two points and rated Broadcom Clarity PPM an eight, rather than a ten.

    On the plus side, the solution is highly customizable, and I haven't seen any other tools which are as customizable as Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    My company is a partner of Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
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    Sergio Calvo - PeerSpot reviewer
    Service Delivery Manager at Syntech
    Real User
    Top 5
    Strong tool with many available components
    Pros and Cons
    • "The feature that I have found most valuable is the XFlow, that interface is pretty cool."
    • "In terms of what could be improved, the end user interface could be improved to be more intuitive, because we sometimes have issues with customization. Sometimes we are not able to customize everything for the end user's interface, and they require more customization. We should be able to perform a deeper customization here."

    What is our primary use case?

    I used to work for CA Technologies. After that, I worked for CA Partners. So I have some experience implementing these solutions. As an architect, I have designed solutions. 

    We work with projects. We have integrated the solution where we open tickets into them, and change management. We open tickets, we track all the tickets, we re-work all the details, then we turn it into an idea in PPM. Then we convert it into a project and manage portfolios. We work with all Service Management administrations and then we have to work with the project solution.

    We work with IT service desks. We have worked with financial services, as well. We have here in Mexico some construction enterprises working with the solution.

    We have an integrated Service Management with third party solutions, with discovery solutions, with asset management solutions from other brands of their solution, and monitoring solutions, and with in-house solutions. We also integrate this Service Management with SAP financial solutions.

    How has it helped my organization?

    In terms of how Broadcom Clarity PPM has improved our clients' organizations, our users are working better with the solution because the first level of attention is now in charge of our configuration in Service Management. So we don't have any analyzed work with the first level of attention. With the second level, yes, the experts are working with the solution, but we were able to optimize the first level for this kind of attention. The first attention for the end user is now in charge of the solution.

    What is most valuable?

    The feature that I have found most valuable is the XFlow, that interface is pretty cool. We have worked with IT PAM with the first two commissions. We have mainly worked with those companies, because we work a lot with process automation, to perform workflows to optimize everything within the organization.

    What needs improvement?

    In terms of what could be improved, the end user interface could be improved to be more intuitive, because we sometimes have issues with customization. Sometimes we are not able to customize everything for the end user's interface, and they require more customization. We should be able to perform a deeper customization here.

    Additionally, I'd like to see more compatibility with the Active REST connection because we have worked with SOAP and WSDL but we need more compatibility with the Active REST connection.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been working with Broadcom Clarity PPM for about six, seven years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I think Broadcom Clarity PPM is a pretty strong tool. We use a lot of components to increase functionality, and with their latest versions, I think things have improved. I think we sell their roadmap - a wide roadmap to cover that.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM's scalability is okay. Obviously, it could be better. But now we have great scalability with Service Management.

    Our clients are medium and large enterprises. For example, I implemented for a company in Columbia which had about 3000 users.

    I think that the solution's usage has been decreased because the solution has a lot of competition right now. For example, Service Now is improving the end user interface and the final digital interaction and I think Clarity Service Management is not. I feel that Service Management is not developing more functionality to cover the end user's demands.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    In terms of technical support, from one to 10, I think it is a seven, because lately the support agents take a lot of time to give an answer. Sometimes we have issues and the attention is not as fast as we need. We have to wait for a long time to get a response.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I'm currently using ServiceNow and Service Management with some monitoring solutions from Broadcom.

    Most users that switch from other solutions to Clarity PPM were using open source solutions. Maybe they were using BMC Remedy, but it would be kind of weird that they jumped from ServiceNow to Clarity Service Management. I haven't seen that. They switched from open source to Clarity Service Management, and from BMC to Clarity Service Management, but I've never seen from ServiceNow to Clarity Service Management.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial installation is kind of simple, following the research, but the complexity begins when we need to customize part of the structure. For example, when we need to create a new field on the system we have to stop services and that's not possible in a protected environment. In a quality assurance environment, we need to open a change request ticket just to create one field within the database. That should be easier to manage and to handle. We haven't been able to create one internal field effecting the services.

    We have performed deployments that take from two months to six months. It depends on the customer size, because we have customers with many customizations, so we have to change some things within Service Management. This is because out of the box, it's not possible to cover all the customer's demands.


    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    The most important solutions here in Mexico are BMC, ServiceNow, and Broadcom. Five years ago, Broadcom was one of the most important solutions in Mexico, but now we made a transition from CA Technologies to Broadcom. They lost many customers here because they were not able to renew their licensing. Maybe Broadcom lost a lot of customers because of the service.

    The main differences, pros and cons, between Clarity PPM, and ServiceNow are that Broadcom Clarity PPM is easier to use and easier to manage. Clarity PPM has a more composite structure. That means that displaying, making changes, and performing customizations are more difficult for the end users. The consultants can deal with that, but sometimes the customers are not able to identify some components and to identify some configurations that you can perform in Clarity Service Management. Whereas in ServiceNow, you can do that with only a button. That's the difference.

    What other advice do I have?

    Just to be clear, when we are designing and recreating the solution design, we have to be fair with the scope. We need to use all the components to improve the functionality. We have to use all the components available. XFlow, IT PAM, all the tools that can be used to improve the functionality, because competition is getting very hard. This makes it very difficult because I have 12 years working with CA components and CA technologies. So for me to switch from CA, from Broadcom, is sometimes kind of hard because I am a Broadcom implementer.

    On a scale of one to ten, I would give Broadcom Clarity PPM an eight.

    The user interface should be improved to be able to receive any challenges from the users. They expect an easier interface, an easier way to find the sections, and an easier way to find the menus. I think that would be the biggest improvement.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    MohammadJarrar - PeerSpot reviewer
    Senior Clarity PPM Technical Consultant at Al Rajhi Bank
    Consultant
    Top 5
    Fast, scalable, and stable PPM platform that promotes productivity, and offers good technical support
    Pros and Cons
    • "Broadcom Clarity PPM is a high-value product that helps users become productive. It's a very stable, scalable, and fast platform, even from a self management perspective."
    • "The Broadcom Clarity PPM dashboard needs improvement , because it's too slow. The look and feel of the platform, including its UX, also need some enhancement."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use Broadcom Clarity PPM for business. We have many types of business cases which have to be approved, then once approved, we move them from idea to business case to project. We use the platform for different projects.

    What is most valuable?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is a high-value product. It's amazing, and it helps us become productive. It's a nice product. It's helpful, and we can do a lot of things faster through Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    We also love that the platform is scalable and very stable. We have trust in it, even from a self management perspective.

    Easy to enhancements for any requirements In Clarity PPM environment VS other platforms.

    What needs improvement?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM has some areas for improvement, particularly its dashboard, because it's too slow. The look and feel of the platform need to be enhanced. The UX or user experience of Broadcom Clarity PPM also needs to be improved, e.g. sometimes when you need to do something on it, you need to click three or four times for the action to go through, instead of clicking just once.

    An additional feature we'd like to see in the next release of Broadcom Clarity PPM is being able to communicate through the dashboard. If the dashboard enables us to communicate and shoot the message there, that would be amazing.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using Broadcom Clarity PPM for 10 years, and I'm still using it, as I'm a technical person.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is very stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is a scalable platform.

    How are customer service and support?

    The Broadcom Clarity PPM technical support is good. They always reply back to us. Support for the platform is amazing.

    How was the initial setup?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM was really smoothly to install. There were no challenges with its initial setup. The deployment took three days. The installation of the software only took a little time, e.g. three days, but we spent two to three years with the configuration.

    What about the implementation team?

    We used an external team for the implementation of Broadcom Clarity PPM, particularly just for them to give their inputs. We used Ignite as the third party.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM costs us $500K, and that's only for the installation and kick off within the first year. For each succeeding year, it'll cost you $200K.

    What other advice do I have?

    I have experience with Broadcom Clarity PPM only. I have no experience with Jira.

    We have 800 users of Broadcom Clarity PPM within the organization.

    We have one guy: a business analyst, and he's in charge of handling and maintaining the project and Broadcom Clarity PPM itself.

    Everyone in the organization is using Broadcom Clarity PPM now, so there's no need to increase usage, e.g. all our departments including top management, even the CEO, uses the platform. We can approve, reject, and do things on the platform. We monitor each project and dashboard through Broadcom Clarity PPM, e.g. every PM on the CapEx project has access to the platform.

    The advice I'd give to others who are looking into implementing Broadcom Clarity PPM is that they need to be agile. They need to be flexible.

    I'm giving Broadcom Clarity PPM a rating of nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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    Director of Operations at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 10
    Stable and great for portfolio and project management.
    Pros and Cons
    • "It's very good out of the box, without configurations required."
    • "The user interface (UI) needs to be improved. Right now, it's not the best."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for time management, product management, resource management, and financial management. We use it for any type of governance that's needed for a project.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The solution has helped us with the finance aspects of our organization.

    What is most valuable?

    The solution is the best tool for portfolio and project management.

    It's very good out of the box, without configurations required.

    What needs improvement?

    The user interface (UI) needs to be improved. Right now, it's not the best.

    The usability at this point is terrible. It makes the product hard to use unnecessarily. It's not intuitive at all. I've had to force myself to learn it and it's been hard.

    We use an older version, so It might have been updated in newer versions. That said, everything needs to be fixed, including the font, colors, and navigation. It's literally every aspect that needs updating.

    The core of PPM is very complex.

    The solution needs more documentation.

    The technical support is not the best. It needs better support for Agile practices.

    It's very difficult to integrate anything with the product.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for five or six years at this point.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is stable. There are no issues there. I don't recall having any issues with reliability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability is a bit complex. It's hard to modify things on the product, which affects the ability to expand.

    I'm not sure of how many users are on the solution.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The technical support was terrible. We weren't too satisfied with their level of support.

    When it came to getting help with integration, we really didn't get any support.

    They also need more documentation. There's not enough to really be able to help clients.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We didn't previously use a different solution, however, Broadcom used to be CI Technologies.

    How was the initial setup?

    The solution is not straightforward. It's complex. On top of that, the usability is bad, which makes the entire process even harder than it has to be. It requires a lot of knowledge.

    With one client, with all the implementation and configurations needed, the deployment process took about a year.

    I'm not sure how many employees were needed for deployment or maintenance.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I don't know of what the actual costs of the solution were.

    I recommend PPM. I'd advise against changing functionality on the box, however.

    What other advice do I have?

    I'm not sure of the exact version of the solution, however, I believe it to be some aspect of version 12 - potentially 12.4. It's an older on-premises version.

    Overall, I would rate the solution ten out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Software Engineer at a retailer with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 10
    Technically sound, very user friendly, with good support provided
    Pros and Cons
    • "The solution is technically fine and user friendly."
    • "Could be using more updated technologies."

    What is our primary use case?

    Our primary use case is mostly for financial purposes. We have a finance team and it's used for time keeping as well. Those are the two major things that we use it for, financial budgeting and for time keeping. I am the tech support of our team so I'm responsible for keeping the servers working, upgrading the system and getting certain integrations and the like. I'm a software engineer. 

    What is most valuable?

    This is the first PPM tool I've used so I can't provide a comparison. It's technically fine, is very user friendly, and it's a good tool. We get pretty good support from Broadcom as well.

    What needs improvement?

    The solution is lacking in certain integrations but that's generally the way because each organization has different preferences. I feel like they could be using more updated technology, like EPA and things like that. I think those are the aspects that they might improve because we need to keep up with the times in order to be relevant with the current technology, and with what is happening in the world of technology. The standards are there and it takes a lot of time for every organization to move their core base to newer technology. I understand that aspect as well, but they could look into it.

    There are many technologies that leverage JavaScript, for example, such as NodeJS and AngularJS and all of that and JSON as well. We're not using any of them which is understandable because they use Java. I'm younger, so in college I dealt with newer technologies like the NodeJS which I like. These are technologies that they may implement in the future.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using this solution for a year. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is mostly stable. I'm not sure if other organizations follow this or not, but I always stick with one version below the latest to give the vendor time to catch all the errors and bugs. I don't have any complaints with the stability. 

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We have a lot of Clarity users in the company and it already scales to a pretty substantial level, I would say.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We have very good technical support. 

    What other advice do I have?

    I would say that the support and the community of Broadcom is pretty extensive and it's actually very good. I did not use it initially, but I would suggest that you should use the support and the community that is available for Clarity. We were lucky to have good initial support so I didn't have to struggle that much because I got enough knowledge transfer to get me through.

    I would rate this solution an eight out of 10. 

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Sergio Calvo - PeerSpot reviewer
    Service Delivery Manager at Syntech
    Real User
    Top 5
    Useful portfolio functionality, stable, and scalable
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable feature is the portfolio functionality because we have the ability to work with different scenarios and many kinds of financial management. We can integrate with ERP, and with other solutions from third-party vendors. The financial model in Broadcom Clarity PPM, it's the most valuable aspect."
    • "The solution could improve the way the workflow is developed. I think they could be more dynamic because they are in a way static. They're very powerful, but they don't have any interaction with end-users."

    What is our primary use case?

    There are many use cases for Broadcom Clarity PPM. We have worked with large telecommunications companies, enterprises projects, and maintenance projects. We provide ideas with the life cycle management, then we convert the idea to be used in Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable feature is the portfolio functionality because we have the ability to work with different scenarios and many kinds of financial management. We can integrate with ERP, and with other solutions from third-party vendors. The financial model in Broadcom Clarity PPM, it's the most valuable aspect.

    What needs improvement?

    The solution could improve the way the workflow is developed. I think they could be more dynamic because they are in a way static. They're very powerful, but they don't have any interaction with end-users.

    In a future release, I'd like to see more stable chargeback procedures, because they are not as synchronized as they should be. Sometimes they do not provide real-time information. We have to use another solution to receive this information.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used Broadcom Clarity PPM since version 8. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is scalable because we can use it to do a lot of things in the area of organization. This is was the main solution for many enterprises to manage projects, financials, portfolios, workflows, and to manage all the integrations.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is easy, but it could be better. It could be more intuitive because there are a lot of configurations that must be done manually, such as environment variables. If there could be a wizard for the users to use it would make it easier for the users and administrators.

    What about the implementation team?

    We can deploy the solutions with two or three consultants for large organizations and if you want you can train them to do the maintenance.

    What other advice do I have?

    Technically some procedures are difficult, such as day-to-day queries, because they have their own structure. It's not a common structure for everyone. You should know the SQL  language to understand all the queries, this should be universal, it is a necessity.

    I would recommend to those that want to implement this solution is to understand all the project management terms that are related to large projects, such as time management, financial management, and resource management. It is important for the solution to be deployed by people who know all these management roles and are familiarized with these types of solutions.

    I rate Broadcom Clarity PPM an eight out of ten.

    I rate the solution an eight because there are more solutions on the market that are easier to manage.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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    Georgy N Joseph - PeerSpot reviewer
    Consultant at Ericsson
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    CA PPM: Multi-functional, Robust and Scalable Architecture. On-Premise and SaaS Versions Available

    Hi All,

    If anyone is looking for a Project and Portfolio Management tool, then I highly recommend CA Clarity PPM. Of all the PPM tools we had tried, Clarity PPM (now called as CA PPM) is the most robust, multi-functional and reliable tool.

    The different modules in CA PPM include Resource Management, Project Management, Portfolio Management, Timesheet Management, Financial Management and Demand Management.

    The technical side of this tool asks from Clarity developers skills in the following areas: XML Open Gateway (XOG), GEL scripting and NSQL. The reporting platforms supported which can be integrated to this PPM tool are Jaspersoft and Business Objects. But CA has recently dropped Business Objects support from v14.2 version onwards and has only Jaspersoft now as the reporting tool.

    CA has recently simplified the tool's installation and upgrade steps which was the only drawback I could see to this product. With this change and many other usability improvements coming from CA for the latest v14.x versions of Clarity PPM, I am sure you will find this PPM tool the best compared to its competitors.

    From the new CA PPM version v14.3 (released towards the end of September 2015) it even comes with product integrations with many agile tools like Rally and Agile Vision. It also has new stock jobs for housekeeping purposes and a new Data Warehouse for all your reporting needs, to be used with Jaspersoft. It even allows you to add any of your custom attributes to the Data Warehouse at the click of a button.

    When it comes to the look and feel, I am sure you will love the completely new and modern GUI of CA PPM v15. And of course there is always the admin configurable option not to use this and use the classic UI still.

    And here comes the best part. When you choose CA Clarity as your PPM tool, you also join a large community of users who constantly engage, learn and solve their issues using the https://communities.ca.com/community/ca-clarity forums. We also have several active LinkedIn Groups where members ask and get response to their queries. For more complex issues/queries, you can easily create a CA support ticket which will be promptly addressed by a CA Support Engineer. Sounds cool, right?

    Go ahead and try this tool. I'm sure you will fall in love with CA Clarity PPM

    Thank You,

    Georgy N Joseph 

    CA Clarity PPM Consultant 

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free Broadcom Clarity PPM Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
    Updated: July 2022
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    Download our free Broadcom Clarity PPM Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.