Broadcom Clarity PPM OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Broadcom Clarity PPM is the #5 ranked solution in top Project Portfolio Management tools and #8 ranked solution in top Project Management Software. PeerSpot users give Broadcom Clarity PPM an average rating of 8.6 out of 10. Broadcom Clarity PPM is most commonly compared to Jira: Broadcom Clarity PPM vs Jira. Broadcom Clarity PPM is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 49% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a educational organization, accounting for 36% of all views.
Broadcom Clarity PPM Buyer's Guide

Download the Broadcom Clarity PPM Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: June 2023

What is Broadcom Clarity PPM?

Clarity is the Project and Portfolio Management (PPM) solution created by Broadcom. The platform aims to help medium and large organizations to manage products and services. Clarity features scoreboards, financial analysis tools, and more.

The platform facilitates the delivery of projects and programs and can accelerate an organization’s digital transformation. It allows users to create initiatives, add budgets and projects with a few clicks, and assign and track teams. It shortens the time to make changes to projects to minutes instead of days.

Broadcom Clarity PPM features in-app collaboration and timesheets accessible via mobile devices. Users can access the platform via desktop or mobile. The platform can be deployed on premises or as a cloud-based service with a hosted or SasS delivery.

How does it work?

Clarity’s Strategic Portfolio Management enables planning and prioritizing of work to fit customer demands and business needs, managing the value stream from concept to cash.

Broadcom Clarity PPM Key Features

  • Strategic roadmaps: Clarity’s multidimensional road maps effectively eliminate organizational fatigue. It includes useful features such as drag-and-drop capabilities. It also allows you to map risks and dependencies and track project progress.

  • Project financials: Clarity integrates with Power BI and Tableau with business intelligence solutions. The platform uses Microsoft Excel charting and grouping functions to keep a familiar feel to project and financial reports. You can customize your projects according to investment types and fiscal periods.
  • Collaboration features: Broadcom Clarity PPM provides a central view of each employee’s projects, schedule, and status. You can assign tasks to teams with pinning features without time-consuming filters.
  • Resource management: Clarity enables you to filter available resources and investments to the department level. Doing this allows for managing labor and non-labor resources with ease.

Other features include:

  • One-click charts
  • Staffing and resource management
  • To-do boards
  • Investment hierarchies
  • Business widgets

Broadcom Clarity PPM Benefits

  • Quick setup: The platform is easy and fast to configure and deploy. It also includes migration services to help customers move to the cloud.

  • Lower cost: The SaaS version is a user-based subscription service that eliminates the need for infrastructure investment.

  • Constant updates: Updates are rolled automatically and included in the subscription to ensure the user always has the latest version.

  • Strong security: The Clarity infrastructure constantly updates identity-centric intrusion detection services. It features data protection capabilities on desktops and mobiles, including protection against distributed denial-of-service (DDoS).

  • Scalability: Its load-balanced environment enables users to scale up or down to match spikes in project-based activities. It also features pay-as-you-use.

  • Integrations: Integrates with financial apps, executive dashboards, HR software, ERP systems, etc.

  • Configurability: You can adapt Clarity PPM to your organization’s requirements.

  • Reporting and business intelligence: Clarity’s features include a built-in data warehouse and BI platform.

  • User-friendly: It features an intuitive user interface and interactive communication options.

  • Project management options: You can manage your project with Agile, classic, or hybrid methods inside Clarity PPM.

Broadcom Clarity PPM Use Cases

Organizations use Clarity PPM for a variety of use cases:

  • Time management
  • Product management
  • Resource management
  • Financial management
  • Project portfolio management
  • Reporting services
  • Project management
  • Ticket and change management
  • IT service desks
  • Financial services

Reviews from Real Users

"Broadcom Clarity PPM is a high-value product that helps users become productive. It's a very stable, scalable, and fast platform, even from a self management perspective," says Mohammad J., Senior Clarity PPM Technical Consultant at Al Rajhi Bank.

A Director of Operations at a tech services company adds that "It's very good out of the box, without configurations required."

Sergio C., Service Delivery Manager at Syntech, says, "The most valuable feature is the portfolio functionality because we have the ability to work with different scenarios and many kinds of financial management. We can integrate with ERP, and with other solutions from third-party vendors. The financial model in Broadcom Clarity PPM, it's the most valuable aspect."

Broadcom Clarity PPM was previously known as Clarity PPM, CA Clarity, CA PPM, CA Clarity PPM .

Broadcom Clarity PPM Customers

Toyota Financial Services, GameStop, Polycom, Sky, Qantas, Cox Enterprises, Banco Mercantil, Borealis

Broadcom Clarity PPM Video

Broadcom Clarity PPM Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Broadcom Clarity PPM pricing:
  • "The licensing costs are a little bit high, and unfortunately, it has been a while since I've had that paperwork in front of me. I don't remember how much it was, but it seemed like it was fairly high. It is probably comparable to some of the other solutions because I do know that, for example, on a lot of the AWS stuff, they found that the costs wound up being higher than having some on-prem solution. Comparatively, Clarity is within the price range of other solutions."
  • "Cost-wise, the tool is very expensive and some tools might be able to cater to 80% of the functionality provided by Broadcom Clarity PPM but are not as expensive."
  • "Pricing is flexible, depending on the customer and the region."
  • "Broadcom Clarity PPM costs us $500K, and that's only for the installation and kick off within the first year. For each succeeding year, it could cost $200K."
  • "There are different licensing models with Broadcom Clarity PPM. With the software as a service model, you pay as you go, and if you are on-premises, you can buy a perpetual license and an annual fee for maintenance."
  • "The price point of Broadcom Clarity PPM is less than Planisware. If a customer comes to me, and the cost is the main parameter for the selection of a tool, then I'll recommend Broadcom because cost-wise, they are less than other solutions."
  • Broadcom Clarity PPM Reviews

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    Experienced Analyst at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Good tracking and custom reports with helpful support
    Pros and Cons
    • "There were probably about five or six metrics that we used. As a result, the groups that I supported were consistently ranked at the absolute top of the organization, as we were leveraging these built-in tools for tracking."
    • "Whenever that second instance of Clarity came about, it was overwhelming even to people who were accustomed to working with program management tools."

    What is our primary use case?

    We were doing projections. I happen to work in an IT organization for the past couple of assignments, however, at the end of the day, my background is in finance, internal controls, and business operations. We were also using the tool for forward-looking projections, to kind of get our head around where we think spending is going to be at the project level, and where there might be holes, either financially or in the need of certain kinds of human resources type kinds of things, just classic project missions.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Sometimes you get applications where there might only be one user, or five users, or a very, very small group. Maybe we could migrate them from a little-used application to something that we could bring to the attention that might be better suited for them. There was a variety of things, why we gathered information and collected it inside Clarity. The more important and heavier use of the tool was program management.

    What is most valuable?

    There was a need to keep better track of hours spent by employee type and how their times were allocated to given projects, or if not on a project, if it was just like a general administrative type kind of thing, how were we using our time. Of course, at the employee level, they would have their profiles. There were a variety of data fields that were made use of in order to identify the person by name, their skill sets, their charge-out rate, whether they were assigned full-time, or part-time, or not at all to a particular project or projects, plural. It was, of course, like a lot of things in life, it could be as simple or as complex as you want.

    One of the things that we found out very quickly was when we went from kind of dabbling in program management and using Clarity, where management at the highest levels of our IT community, it was decided that this right here is our tool of choice. We're not going to be making use of any other tools. Everyone needs to make use of this project management. What they did is, they swung one way and then went to the other extreme. It was everybody who had to log their time. This was done at the highest level. Whether you were a contract employee, whether you were a full-time badged employee, whether you were part of supervisory, or management, or even a member of our senior leadership team, our executive management team, everyone had to account for their time.

    There was tremendous pushback in doing this. The counterargument was, well, there's a lot of companies, high tech, defense industry, et cetera, et cetera, they always do this. This is nothing new. If we're a "high-tech" company, we should follow suit and get on board with doing this. This is actually fairly common practice. Inside of the tool, there were performance metrics, things that could be tracked, graphed, and what have you. I began distributing to my internal customers at the management level where we were relative to other family groups if you will, or sub-organizations within the IT community. Where we were relative to entering our time sheets on a weekly basis on time.

    We could follow what was the quality of the input, et cetera. There were probably about five or six metrics that we used. As a result, the groups that I supported were consistently ranked at the absolute top of the organization, as we were leveraging these built-in tools for tracking.

    There were some groups that were laggards or not performing very well at all. It almost became some kind of internal competition. Whether it was program management, or just metrics and entering data, or keeping records up to date, because people would go out of the organization, there were tools that were inherent or built into Clarity that we leveraged.

    I'm just an analyst at heart, I can take data from disparate systems. I can correlate them and provide management with what they need in order to make decisions and affect change in the organization or what have you. I did not have any issues with the system. The whole interface would fit on the inside of the screen of a laptop computer. I wouldn't say at 100%. Let's say the screen was brought down to like 80 or 90%, the entire interface would fit on the screen. At the top of being where the true interface was, where you were able to do your filter selections, things like that, that's where you were able to, an individual, depending on their access that they've been granted. I was actually given almost administrator access, where you could see all the options that you could drill down into.

    I did create custom reports. Some people had great difficulty with that. To me, it was, what data fields do you need, and dragged them into the report that you want to create and save it. That, to me, was always a very simple thing. Some people have to be spoon-fed. Other people are naturally curious or inquisitive and will look at second-level, third-level options for a given application interface. That's what I did.

    What needs improvement?

    Whenever that second instance of Clarity came about, it was overwhelming even to people who were accustomed to working with program management tools. There were so many data fields that could potentially be leveraged, so many kinds of internal metrics. They actually brought in an outside consulting team.

    I can't recall the name of the team, and where they were from. I remember they were from down South. They were actually on-premises for a week or so. Then, they came back periodically just to fine-tune things. I interacted with them on some occasions, as they wanted to pick my brain on how I was leveraging it to track applications and to run high level reporting for management on just basic metrics and also initially on just program management.

    Overall, I found the tool to be fairly straightforward. That said, for people who did want to create their own reports, whatever instance we had, a lot of people found it difficult, and what they typically ended up doing is getting training.

    They're very, very smart, certainly smarter than me, where they would come to me as a resource and say, "Hey, you seem to have a knack for this tool. Can you create a report that kind of sort of does this?" I would say, "Sure." Then, I would knock it out and they would say, "Great." Then, they would have a customized report that met their needs, where they could kind of fire at will and run the report whenever they wanted it to. However, many people didn't find it as easy as I did.

    Many roles that I've had was the role of a financial analyst. There's been a number of sales organizations, sales organizations that I've supported over time. These are organizations that'll have anywhere from a couple hundred to as many as almost several thousand salespeople, the people who support them, et cetera. One of the organizations that I supported was the main sales force. These are like your rank and file sales representatives who go out and just sell equipment, that sells services, et cetera. It's everything from your entry-level sales reps, all the way to your highest-performing sales reps, all the supervisory management, and all the industry VPs and sales VPs, et cetera, right up to the highest levels of the sales organization for the United States. They had a variety of almost competing tools that were used to consolidate their prospects, and with their pipelines, et cetera. Salesforce had already been installed in Europe with great success.

    There, you have, obviously, different languages, you have different management styles, organizational structures, et cetera, and yet they were able to install and make use of, Salesforce quite successfully. They actually did it fairly quickly. For us, Europe included Eastern Europe, Russia, all of North Africa, and the Middle East - they all installed Salesforce and did so fairly quickly and successfully. However, there was great resistance in North America. The primary reason was that Salesforce was a cloud-based technology. There was tremendous resistance in both the Canadian and the US communities to have anything other than something that was internal inside of our firewall.

    The Salesforce people were saying, "We work with governments. We work with everything from defense contractors, to military organizations, to intelligence organizations. There's nothing to fear. This is the future." Yet there was tremendous resistance. It wasn't until someone at the highest levels of the corporation said, "We’ve got Europe covered. We got developing markets covered. North America, get together and get on board with Salesforce. That way, we have unified technology worldwide." Meanwhile, I was actually taking these two competing systems, where the sales reps focused on equipment and then secondarily services, as opposed to another sales organization that would focus on services and then would periodically think about selling equipment.

    There were competing philosophies and their prospects resided in two different systems. What I would do is developed a knack for taking these two data sets, exporting them out of the two systems, smashing them together, removing the overlapping or duplicate records, then being able to present to management, "You have anywhere between an $8 to $9 billion pipeline for the next nine months. Assuming that you close 20% to 25% of your deals, this is what this might be. You're in striking distance of achieving these types kinds of services, signings, or equipment signings." Management got really, really excited about this. Then, what I did after that was that became the basis, the underlying data, that smashed together data, became the data that we ultimately fed into Salesforce.

    The reason why I'm giving this background is one of the things that Salesforce did that was very, very clever, is allowed just four people to take data and create a shell. What they did is they said, when they were doing the introduction to our team, they said, "There are literally hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of data fields that are used by our clients all over the globe, but what we're going to do, based upon the data set that you have in the present, we're only going to create this shell or this instance of Salesforce, and we're only going to use 75 data fields." That, to me, was very, very powerful. Even if they were data fields that were using different nomenclature, it was considered a standard naming convention that Salesforce was familiar with. As time went by, we began expanding, making use of a greater and greater quantity of data fields, and being able to slice and dice, if you will, data in greater levels of detail and complexity. It was easier for rank and file, whether you were finance, or information technology people, or salespeople, sales reps, management, whatever, everybody was able to get their heads around a tool that was becoming more and more sophisticated as the months went by as opposed to starting off with saying, "There are 300 possible data fields, and metrics, and calculations, or whatever, but we're only going to use 35 of them, or 50 of them, or whatever." The fact that everybody can see them is very, very intimidating. That was one of the reasons for the pushback in our organization when Clarity was rolled out. People could see all these data fields. Either the implementation wasn't good or the consultants that we were dealing with weren't very thoughtful. However, when people saw all the possible data fields that they had, it was overwhelming.

    That was consistent feedback that I heard through a variety of channels and there was resistance due to that. If there's any feedback that I would give is that it's one thing to say, "Here are all the possibilities." However, then, when the salespeople marry up with the folks who are going to do the implementation, they need to be able to say, "So what are your immediate needs? Maybe we'll throw some additional data fields in there to kind of spice things up." Then, as time goes by, reveal additional data entry options, either for people who are making the actual entries or what have you. That's something that I observed firsthand.

    I have seen interfaces that are much hipper, and much more intuitive. The layouts might have a more modern or current touch and feel. With the instance that we had, it seemed like it was just a little outdated. When you were clicking on hypertext links, as opposed to a button. Now, these are nuanced differences, however, having a menu where you'd see a header, underneath the header, you would see a blue font that was a hypertext link. Then, depending on whether you wanted to look at application data, whether you wanted to enter your time, or you wanted to look up specific projects and dig into those projects, into the sub-elements that make up all the different views within a given project, or you wanted to get to a data export function, or whatever, it was all a function of finding your overall category and then find underneath that the appropriate link.

    I don't know how old that interface was. Maybe it's still like that now, or a bit more modern, however, from my experience, a more modern interface would be a bonus. 

    Buyer's Guide
    Broadcom Clarity PPM
    June 2023
    Learn what your peers think about Broadcom Clarity PPM. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2023.
    708,461 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I was using Clarity, I would say, from August 2018 or 2019. I was using it right up until January 2022. I would say I used it solidly for three years.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    At my organization, in my last couple of assignments, I worked inside IT. It's the global IT organization. Inside of that organization, there, of course, are subgroups. One of which was our program management office. There were also areas within the IT organization that tracked things other than projects. They tracked applications. For example, on a worldwide basis, we had about 1,500 applications worldwide approximately.

    At its peak, I don't believe it exceeded 500 users. I don't know what the actual licensure arrangement or agreement or contract was with Broadcom CA, but what I do know is that as time went by, the number of users declined. There were trade-offs, and decisions were made. Some of the biggest complainers about doing the data entry were the most senior managers.

    In time, the more like mid-level managers would say, "Well, if our bosses don't have to make their time entries, why should we? All we really care about are the worker bees." Eventually, things became more diluted.

    Getting back to our ability to track applications within the corporation, to this day, it is still the official source of record for tracking the number of applications. There's a constant need to simplify our business and start making greater and greater use of better technology, et cetera. I know from that standpoint, the tool is still being used for that. They're still using it for program management, to understand and track project management costs, et cetera. That said, right now, I just don't know how many people are actually logging into the tool.

    There were rumors that they were going to stop requiring people to enter their time into the tool. Unless of course, you are actually working on a project. If you're a resource that's assigned to project management, then you're obligated to track your time. For people who have nothing to do with project management, and you're just pure overhead, that's where things began kind of winding down, especially towards year-end last year. I know it's come down substantially since its peak of 500.

    How are customer service and support?

    I personally don't recall dealing with technical support. Very, very early on, I did, as there were questions that weren't answered internally, so I actually had to call support. I was able to get things resolved. There was some kind of a quirk, I can't recall what it was, however, it was beyond our understanding of the application. I did have to call a support number. My recollection was, that whatever it was, I was able to get it resolved.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    It's incumbent upon the information technology group to be aware of those systems, to help maintain them, to keep track of them. Then, in addition to that, to the extent that they can be eliminated, in other words, consolidated, so that we have ultimately fewer applications where more people can make use of them, it just helps simplify the business, et cetera, cut costs. We used Clarity as a tool to keep track of all the applications worldwide. There used to be a tool that was used, some other tool. I don't know if it was homegrown. It could have been a Microsoft access database for all I know. I just don't recall what it was, however, I know that it was problematic. Trying to scale up and it was problematic. They actually created a sub-element within Clarity to help the corporation keep track of all of its applications. I was actually a very heavy user of that particular element within Clarity. One of the problems was that a lot of folks didn't know just how many applications there were within the corporation. By using a variety of technology, sending out surveys, et cetera, we were able to find out that we didn't have 1,000 applications. We didn't have 1,200 applications. We actually had 1,500 applications. The reason is obvious why we would need to know whether they are maintaining internal standards or generally accepted standards relative to the IT community.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I did not directly deal with technical support.

    What other advice do I have?

    I know that our company, worldwide, does business with about 300 vendors for its information technology needs, whether it's manpower, equipment, or services. Inside that list of 300 vendors, I know for a fact that Broadcom is one of the top vendors relative to our company worldwide. We're not just a customer. If you look at it from a dollar standpoint, there are some vendors that maybe we spend $20,000 a year or $100,000 a year, and not $1 million a year.

    For companies where we spend hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, or multiple millions of dollars a year, Broadcom, in general, has a more elevated status on the list of vendors. It's probably in the top 30, or top 50, vendors, which, for me qualifies it as a partner.

    It meets the definition of being enterprise-wide. I don't know if it was on a company server or if it was some kind of a cloud-based service that we were ascribing to. What I do know is there was an initial instance where I know for a fact it was installed on a company server somewhere and that there was a transition, maybe to a newer version, or a newer instance, which may have changed the deployment. I never really had a need to know that. All I know is can I access it and get the data that I need.

    I'd recommend the solution. I didn't find any reasons why I would not want to use it. If somebody were to say, "Are you familiar with this tool in technology?" I would say, "Yes." I don't know what version or instance of it was of what I made use of, however, I would say, based on my use of the tool, my ability to look at data in the interface itself, or to get data out of it, export data to do additional manipulations and digging, or what have you, I would say, "To me, it was not difficult to use. It was straightforward. It was logical." I wouldn't have anything negative to say about it.

    I'd rate the solution eight out of ten.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
    PeerSpot user
    Lowell Wetzel - PeerSpot reviewer
    Systems Administrator at Cambia Health Solutions
    Real User
    Top 10
    A dynamic solution with a lot of great out-of-the-box calculations, but integration with reporting utilities is a bit painful
    Pros and Cons
    • "The dynamism of the application where you can modify it to fit your needs is valuable. For example, you can create fields, metrics, and measures on the fly. You don't have to be limited to what the out-of-the-box format would be. It allows you to generate fields, metrics, and reports off of that with relative ease."
    • "One of the things that have always been a bit painful is the integration with reporting utilities. The current integration is with Jaspersoft, and there are a number of difficulties with that. If you're using out-of-the-box fields and everything, it is a bit slow and clunky. It has a drag-and-drop interface for the users. On the backend side, there is a report designer. They haven't given or allowed me any training on it yet. So, it has been a bit limited in its features. On one of the earlier report utilities, they had one called Actuate, which had VBA as its base programming language, and you could do quite dynamic things behind the scenes, whereas the Jaspersoft interface seems rather locked. So, you're limited in your options. Being a programmer, you like to have room to be able to invent and create rather than just being limited to a few selection boxes."

    What is our primary use case?

    Currently, we're using it as a Project and Portfolio management tool. We temporarily attempted some financial tracking, but one of the problems with companies is they never want to fully adopt a tool. It actually winds up being more complicated to try to just do partial adoption. So, right now, we're mainly using it for project and portfolio management.

    We're one version or two versions behind the latest one. We are on 16.0.1. We have chosen on-prem deployment, but there are cloud solutions.

    How has it helped my organization?

    As a Project and Portfolio management tool, it allows the company to allocate costs based on projects, goals, or strategies. You can break down costs a lot easier because of the amount of detail you can put into the project. Being able to provide metrics and being able to break down costs is very important. It allows people to easily categorize costs.

    What is most valuable?

    The dynamism of the application where you can modify it to fit your needs is valuable. For example, you can create fields, metrics, and measures on the fly. You don't have to be limited to what the out-of-the-box format would be. It allows you to generate fields, metrics, and reports off of that with relative ease.

    The volume of information you can get out of a system is valuable. There is always a caveat when companies partially adopt something. So, resource capacity planning is an incredible value, but because we only partially use it, it is only partially valuable here. We don't fully put all the resource information in.

    What needs improvement?

    One of the things that have always been a bit painful is the integration with reporting utilities. The current integration is with Jaspersoft, and there are a number of difficulties with that. If you're using out-of-the-box fields and everything, it is a bit slow and clunky. It has a drag-and-drop interface for the users. On the backend side, there is a report designer. They haven't given or allowed me any training on it yet. So, it has been a bit limited in its features. On one of the earlier report utilities, they had one called Actuate, which had VBA as its base programming language, and you could do quite dynamic things behind the scenes, whereas the Jaspersoft interface seems rather locked. So, you're limited in your options. Being a programmer, you like to have room to be able to invent and create rather than just being limited to a few selection boxes.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I started on the software in July of 2007. It has been 15 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It has been very reliable. It has improved over time. In some of the earlier versions, they didn't have pre-checked utilities to validate your setup to see if you're going to run into a problem, and in the later versions, they started introducing that. It really improved the upgrade capabilities. That would be one place where I would give them credit for improving.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It is incredibly scalable. It is deployed on-prem. I ran into a little bit of a complication trying to move to the cloud, and then I saw someone offer a solution to that problem. Basically, the application needs to be able to communicate with itself, and we set up multiple instances. In a cloud environment, you can basically set up a super large instance of a cloud environment and have all the instances on that same cloud server. We had the opportunity to move to a cloud, and I just didn't do that because I didn't have a solution to that simulcast issue where the application needed that to work, but the cloud didn't offer it. In a cloud environment, because it doesn't allow multicast, you'd have to expand just one cloud server, but you can re-instantiate a cloud server with a larger environment, but with the on-prem solution, you can just add another server and add instances and some items. You can just keep expanding. It is very expandable.

    In terms of usage, in my organization, they're using it for project and portfolio management, but not as much for time or resource tracking as they used to. Its usage changes with the business environment. So, it is rather unpredictable.

    I believe there are 2,000 users at the moment. We were at a high of 10,000 for a while, but then they scaled back a bit. We have all of our contractors entering time via the Clarity system, and then I have an interface with an external company called Beeline, where we export timesheets there, and that is for a contractor payment processing center. The system is very dynamic where you can generate exports and transfers like that. They create projects within Clarity, and this is where portfolio management comes into play. I transfer the assignments and the project information to Workday. The resources enter their time in Workday, but the project design and tracking are kept track of in Clarity because Workday, I guess, doesn't allow the same level of detail that Clarity does. I know it sounds a little complicated, but that's the way companies work. 

    How are customer service and support?

    I regularly have tickets, mostly for complications in trying to generate reports or something like that, or if a user has some trouble with a financial report or something else where they get an unexpected result. Usually, we find that it is just a data issue. A lot of the problems you run into are just because the data gets put in incorrectly, and it takes a bit to find that, especially when there are millions of records. 

    I would rate their support at least a nine out of ten. They're pretty responsive, and you can escalate tickets. With some of the earlier versions, I had a call that lasted 36 hours. I went around the globe and a half. You start with the US support, and then you move to the next time zone, and then to Australia, and then to India, and then to England, and then back to the US. It was a little difficult, but we finally were able to come to a solution, which was really good.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    How was the initial setup?

    I came, and it was already in use. I was put into designing solutions for importing data and exporting data. They have a custom scripting language called GEL scripting language, and because I had a history in that as well as databases, I was able to take on multiple roles without too much difficulty.

    In terms of maintenance, the system requires you to monitor it and keep track of errors and such, but so far, what I've noticed is that a majority of the errors are user data-driven. It is medium-light as far as maintenance goes. They've improved the application over time to where some of the maintenance-level jobs have become more stable. 

    They have a job called time slicing, which breaks time data into its different components, and occasionally, in the previous versions, it would run a long time on year turnovers and month turnovers. The year was the biggest one, where it would run for a couple of days. Now, it runs almost instantly all the time. That was a giant improvement.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The licensing costs are a little bit high, and unfortunately, it has been a while since I've had that paperwork in front of me. I don't remember how much it was, but it seemed like it was fairly high.

    It is probably comparable to some of the other solutions because I do know that, for example, on a lot of the AWS stuff, they found that the costs wound up being higher than having some on-prem solution. Comparatively, Clarity is within the price range of other solutions.

    What other advice do I have?

    The one tip that seems to be fairly universal is to get management approval or get executive sponsors for it, and it would be best to implement it universally across an entire company so that it is not like you're just feeding this set of resources over here and not setting up other resources. Universality is probably the easiest way for the best implementation because I have sincerely complex scripts to auto setup resources. Originally, we had it based on sets of team codes. So, I created a dynamic team code list to only activate this set of resources and not others. It becomes complicated when you only partially implement the solution, or technically, it is more complicated on the programming side.

    I would rate it a seven because it is very dynamic. You can generate any of the metrics and fields you want, and it has a lot of great out-of-the-box calculations. Some of the complications come when your company decides to change directions. It does take a bit to find all the changes you made. There is a little bit of a complication there. For example, if you customize a lot of screens and such, it is a little tough to keep track of what changes. That can become a complication. Out of the box, it has got a lot of great project and resource calculations and financial calculations that you could readily implement anywhere.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Broadcom Clarity PPM
    June 2023
    Learn what your peers think about Broadcom Clarity PPM. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2023.
    708,461 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Gaurav Datar - PeerSpot reviewer
    Technology Architect at Infosys
    MSP
    Top 10
    Highly customizable, extensible, and has helpful technical support
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most useful feature for me as an implementer of Broadcom Clarity PPM is its extensibility. The tool is pretty extensible, and I haven't had any issues with it in terms of it getting used for multiple scenarios and for multiple clients where there's a need for high customization. Broadcom Clarity PPM is a very, very customizable tool, so you can pretty much implement any business process on it with no issues."
    • "One of the major pain points for me when it comes to Broadcom Clarity PPM is the new UI. The new UI is very good in terms of functionality and the drag and draw features, but it's not very responsive. When I say that it's not very responsive, what I mean is that sometimes, the tool is not very user-friendly. For example, a user saves a value on the form, but the tool doesn't give any indication to the user that the value has been saved. Some users are moving from the classic UI to the new UI, and end up getting confused because on the classic UI, when you click "Save", it'll save the information and you'll get an indication that it was saved. With the new UI, it auto saves the information, but it doesn't give an indication in the form of a popup box that "this form has been saved", or any type of message indicating that the information was successfully saved. It's been confusing for users who move to the new UI because of that. The users don't understand when the values are being saved or not being saved, even if there's an auto-save feature in the new UI."

    What is our primary use case?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM has multiple use cases, and with one of the clients that had implemented it recently, the tool was used for capital budgeting purposes. The client is one of the giants in the U.S. that had a PPM tool for managing all the project portfolios, but that tool was developed in-house. It was a homegrown solution, but there were a lot of limitations because some specific expertise was required. The tool was outdated and was difficult to scale, so my company replaced it with Broadcom Clarity PPM as it is an enterprise-level solution with high scalability and could be moved to the cloud.

    The main business case was for capital budgeting, more like investment management, where there are multiple units and the client proposed some ideas. My company prioritized those ideas and did budgeting accordingly. For example, there are four different business objectives. One is lights on, the second is compliance, the third is business growth, and the fourth is running the business. My company tries to allocate a certain amount or certain funds towards the four business objectives for a particular financial year. My company then considers all the ideas from different stakeholders then tries to prioritize those ideas within Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    What is most valuable?

    The most useful feature for me as an implementer of Broadcom Clarity PPM is its extensibility. The tool is pretty extensible, and I haven't had any issues with it in terms of it getting used for multiple scenarios and for multiple clients where there's a need for high customization. Broadcom Clarity PPM is a very, very customizable tool, so you can pretty much implement any business process on it with no issues.

    What needs improvement?

    One of the major pain points for me when it comes to Broadcom Clarity PPM is the new UI. The new UI is very good in terms of functionality and the drag and draw features, but it's not very responsive. When I say that it's not very responsive, what I mean is that sometimes, the tool is not very user-friendly. For example, a user saves a value on the form, but the tool doesn't give any indication to the user that the value has been saved. Some users are moving from the classic UI to the new UI, and end up getting confused because on the classic UI, when you click "Save", it'll save the information and you'll get an indication that it was saved. With the new UI, it auto saves the information, but it doesn't give an indication in the form of a popup box that "this form has been saved", or any type of message indicating that the information was successfully saved. It's been confusing for users who move to the new UI because of that. The users don't understand when the values are being saved or not being saved, even if there's an auto-save feature in the new UI.

    What I'd like to see in the next release of Broadcom Clarity PPM is fine-grained security control on the new UI, because currently there's free level security, but it's based on the group, and I would like to have access to the individual phase and the users to lock a specific phase. For that type of security, higher level security is required, which is available on the classic UI, but not available on the new UI. The new UI interface should also be a little bit more responsive. Currently, it's responsive and it's fast, but whenever it saves information, it doesn't show any notification, and that can be very confusing for users.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been working with Broadcom Clarity PPM for a few years now. I'm an implementer of the tool, and I've implemented it across multiple clients throughout my career, mainly for three different companies. I do have hands-on experience with Broadcom Clarity PPM. Currently, I'm using version 15.9.3.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is a pretty stable tool. I haven't seen many issues, but it's a little bit sensitive towards JVM memory settings and how it is architected. My company had a lot of applications towards implementation and had some performance issues on the database side, so there was a need to adjust some of the parameters and those parameters were not documented anywhere, but once you open a support case with Broadcom, the team will tell you to try certain parameters and changes. The scenario my company experienced isn't exclusively documented, but Broadcom was aware of it and told my company that it was on a case-to-case basis, but Broadcom Clarity PPM is pretty stable.

    How are customer service and support?

    The Broadcom Clarity PPM technical support team was very helpful, though it would depend on the engineer handling the case. Most of the time, I found the support useful. I'm rating support four out of five.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    My company went with Broadcom Clarity PPM because of complex business processes and implementation, and we particularly chose the tool because it was highly customizable. Because of complex and secure business requirements, there was so much focus on security that it was very complicated compared to regular implementation, so my company decided to go with Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is also a leader in the PPM space in the Gartner Quadrant, so my company picked up the top five to six tools and compared those tools, but as Broadcom Clarity PPM was highly customizable, we picked it over the other tools.

    How was the initial setup?

    How easy or complex the initial setup for Broadcom Clarity PPM depends on the client, as my company worked with three different clients. For one client, the setup took two months and that included business processes, but it was a little bit on the simpler side. With heavy implementation, for example, the most recent project my company implemented took one year, but it was not because of Broadcom Clarity PPM. It was because of the client's business processes, security implementations, and a lot of other things that were highly custom. If it's an out-of-the-box setup, it would be completed within one week or so, and people can get started with using the tool.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Licensing for Broadcom Clarity PPM is a bit complicated. I'm not aware of the exact costs because the tool was for everybody's use. There are different license structures for different organizations and Broadcom doesn't discuss licensing right away. You have to reach out to Broadcom and the team will customize licensing for each client.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    My company took a look at multiple tools because one of the clients already had ServiceNow implemented, so adding a PPM entailed a lot of costs, so that was one consideration. The team also considered Micro Focus PPM, but it was lagging in terms of features, so we decided not to use it, plus it wasn't highly customizable. Planview was considered as well, but it was not as customizable as Broadcom Clarity PPM in terms of processes and integration, so we didn't choose Planview.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would definitely recommend Broadcom Clarity PPM to others because it's a time-tested solution, and I've been hearing it for the last fifteen to twenty years. Broadcom is also adding a lot of new features to the tool. The new UI is also very efficient, and though it's still not in its fully mature state, it's pretty usable. I'm advising others to avoid customizing Broadcom Clarity PPM as much as possible and use it the way it was designed, but I would definitely recommend it as it's a good tool, and the new UI is also very efficient. Broadcom Clarity PPM also has an agile model which is a plus, so you don't need separate JIRA or any other integration. The out-of-the-box agile model is pretty efficient to take care of all the agile requirements, so Broadcom Clarity PPM is the only tool that provides that kind of capability to agile as waterfall project management.

    My rating for Broadcom Clarity PPM is eight out of ten, and the reason behind this score is that it's a very expensive tool. Cost-wise, the tool is very expensive and some tools might be able to cater to 80% of the functionality provided by Broadcom Clarity PPM but are not as expensive.

    The tool has a new UI and that is good, but it has a lot of limitations. For example, you cannot access sub-pages on the second level or third level of sub-objects. There are also some technical limitations overall, so on a scale of one to ten, I deducted two points and rated Broadcom Clarity PPM an eight, rather than a ten.

    On the plus side, the solution is highly customizable, and I haven't seen any other tools which are as customizable as Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    My company is a partner of Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
    PeerSpot user
    Kiran  Reddy - PeerSpot reviewer
    Presales Head - Retail & CPG at Infosys
    MSP
    Has great project and portfolio management, and resource management features
    Pros and Cons
    • "It is a scalable, easy-to-deploy, and user-friendly solution for enterprise businesses."
    • "In the next release, I would like to have a little bit more functionality on chatbots in Clarity PPM, especially for support requests, such as for the most commonly used support tickets that people could resolve themselves."

    What is our primary use case?

    The solution is mostly used for strategic portfolio management and is more focused on resource management, demand management, and a little bit of financial management.

    It differs from client to client for the financial management aspect.

    What is most valuable?

    The features I find most valuable are definitely project and portfolio management, and resource management. Those are the most commonly used features for most of the customers we work with.

    What needs improvement?

    Mostly, the collaboration could be improved as well as a little bit on the data analytics part. This is based on feedback coming from the customers. I don't have any issues with the tool, but these are the use cases where clients will probably want to see some more advanced features, and the feedback has actually gone back to Broadcom also. We work closely with them, so I think they are aware of it. Broadcom is working on those features, but compared to other PPM tools, those are some of the areas that PCR can definitely be improved upon.

    In the next release, I would like to have a little bit more functionality on chatbots in Clarity PPM, especially for support requests, such as for the most commonly used support tickets that people could resolve themselves. That's an area customers ask the most about. That's the common feedback, based on questions from them.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been working with Broadcom Clarity PPM for close to ten years now. We are using version 16.1.9 currently, and use older versions for on-premise customers who have not upgraded to the latest version.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I would rate the stability a ten out of ten. It has high availability, and we haven't seen any issues with the availability of Clarity PPM.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I would rate this solution a nine-point-five out of ten since it's highly scalable. We have some customers who have close to 45,000 users already, but larger clients can have between 8,000 to 9,000 users on average. Our clients are enterprise businesses.

    How are customer service and support?

    I would personally rate the customer support a ten out of ten, but there are customers who face issues.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?


    How was the initial setup?

    I would rate the ease of the initial setup around nine out of ten. It's a friendly tool and I think people find it more familiar compared to other PPM tools.

    We initially deployed Clarity PPM on-premises, but 90% of our customers are on the cloud, and we still have a few legacy customers who are in the process of migrating to the cloud from an on-premises setup.

    Typically, with out-of-the-box features, it took maybe two to three months to deploy, but we have a larger and complex implementation, which can take twelve months.

    What about the implementation team?

    The solution was implemented through our in-house technical team.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I would rate the pricing around three or four out of ten because it is decently priced. The solution is price-sensitive depending on the region, and customer-to-customer pricing, so it is very flexible.

    The license is a fixed cost and is renewed yearly. Service costs are minimal since they depend on support or developmental cost, and are a component of the licensing cost.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would rate the solution a nine out of ten. I rate the solution highly because we sell Broadcom licenses to most of our customers, and if somebody would ask us for the best PPM tool, Clarity PPM would be one of the top two tools we would recommend to the clients.

    Most customers find the solution user-friendly in terms of deployment and scalability aspects, and integration into the larger ecosystem. In terms of licensing aspects, the support aspects, and the support provided by Broadcom, I think they find it's very easy to work with compared to other PPM vendors, not in terms of the product, but in terms of the overall support and response times. And there's enthusiasm to take the proper feedback and incorporate it back into the system.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Amazon Web Services (AWS)
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
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    PeerSpot user
    MohammadJarrar - PeerSpot reviewer
    Senior Clarity PPM Technical Consultant at Al Rajhi Bank
    Consultant
    Top 5
    Fast, scalable, and stable PPM platform that promotes productivity, and offers good technical support
    Pros and Cons
    • "Broadcom Clarity PPM is a high-value product that helps users become productive. It's a very stable, scalable, and fast platform, even from a self management perspective."
    • "The Broadcom Clarity PPM dashboard needs improvement , because it's too slow. The look and feel of the platform, including its UX, also need some enhancement."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use Broadcom Clarity PPM for business. We have many types of business cases which have to be approved, then once approved, we move them from idea to business case to project. We use the platform for different projects.

    What is most valuable?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is a high-value product. It's amazing, and it helps us become productive. It's a nice product. It's helpful, and we can do a lot of things faster through Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    We also love that the platform is scalable and very stable. We have trust in it, even from a self management perspective.

    Easy to enhancements for any requirements In Clarity PPM environment VS other platforms.

    What needs improvement?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM has some areas for improvement, particularly its dashboard, because it's too slow. The look and feel of the platform need to be enhanced. The UX or user experience of Broadcom Clarity PPM also needs to be improved, e.g. sometimes when you need to do something on it, you need to click three or four times for the action to go through, instead of clicking just once.

    An additional feature we'd like to see in the next release of Broadcom Clarity PPM is being able to communicate through the dashboard. If the dashboard enables us to communicate and shoot the message there, that would be amazing.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using Broadcom Clarity PPM for 10 years, and I'm still using it, as I'm a technical person.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is very stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is a scalable platform.

    How are customer service and support?

    The Broadcom Clarity PPM technical support is good. They always reply back to us. Support for the platform is amazing.

    How was the initial setup?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM was really smoothly to install. There were no challenges with its initial setup. The deployment took three days. The installation of the software only took a little time, e.g. three days, but we spent two to three years with the configuration.

    What about the implementation team?

    We used an external team for the implementation of Broadcom Clarity PPM, particularly just for them to give their inputs. We used Ignite as the third party.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM costs us $500K, and that's only for the installation and kick off within the first year. For each succeeding year, it'll cost you $200K.

    What other advice do I have?

    I have experience with Broadcom Clarity PPM only. I have no experience with Jira.

    We have 800 users of Broadcom Clarity PPM within the organization.

    We have one guy: a business analyst, and he's in charge of handling and maintaining the project and Broadcom Clarity PPM itself.

    Everyone in the organization is using Broadcom Clarity PPM now, so there's no need to increase usage, e.g. all our departments including top management, even the CEO, uses the platform. We can approve, reject, and do things on the platform. We monitor each project and dashboard through Broadcom Clarity PPM, e.g. every PM on the CapEx project has access to the platform.

    The advice I'd give to others who are looking into implementing Broadcom Clarity PPM is that they need to be agile. They need to be flexible.

    I'm giving Broadcom Clarity PPM a rating of nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Service Delivery Manager at Syntech
    Real User
    Top 20
    Useful portfolio functionality, stable, and scalable
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable feature is the portfolio functionality because we have the ability to work with different scenarios and many kinds of financial management. We can integrate with ERP, and with other solutions from third-party vendors. The financial model in Broadcom Clarity PPM, it's the most valuable aspect."
    • "The solution could improve the way the workflow is developed. I think they could be more dynamic because they are in a way static. They're very powerful, but they don't have any interaction with end-users."

    What is our primary use case?

    There are many use cases for Broadcom Clarity PPM. We have worked with large telecommunications companies, enterprises projects, and maintenance projects. We provide ideas with the life cycle management, then we convert the idea to be used in Broadcom Clarity PPM.

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable feature is the portfolio functionality because we have the ability to work with different scenarios and many kinds of financial management. We can integrate with ERP, and with other solutions from third-party vendors. The financial model in Broadcom Clarity PPM, it's the most valuable aspect.

    What needs improvement?

    The solution could improve the way the workflow is developed. I think they could be more dynamic because they are in a way static. They're very powerful, but they don't have any interaction with end-users.

    In a future release, I'd like to see more stable chargeback procedures, because they are not as synchronized as they should be. Sometimes they do not provide real-time information. We have to use another solution to receive this information.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used Broadcom Clarity PPM since version 8. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is scalable because we can use it to do a lot of things in the area of organization. This is was the main solution for many enterprises to manage projects, financials, portfolios, workflows, and to manage all the integrations.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is easy, but it could be better. It could be more intuitive because there are a lot of configurations that must be done manually, such as environment variables. If there could be a wizard for the users to use it would make it easier for the users and administrators.

    What about the implementation team?

    We can deploy the solutions with two or three consultants for large organizations and if you want you can train them to do the maintenance.

    What other advice do I have?

    Technically some procedures are difficult, such as day-to-day queries, because they have their own structure. It's not a common structure for everyone. You should know the SQL  language to understand all the queries, this should be universal, it is a necessity.

    I would recommend to those that want to implement this solution is to understand all the project management terms that are related to large projects, such as time management, financial management, and resource management. It is important for the solution to be deployed by people who know all these management roles and are familiarized with these types of solutions.

    I rate Broadcom Clarity PPM an eight out of ten.

    I rate the solution an eight because there are more solutions on the market that are easier to manage.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    PeerSpot user
    Fabio Nicida - PeerSpot reviewer
    CEO at Agila Tecnologia
    Real User
    Top 10
    Helpful support, flexible, and highly reliable
    Pros and Cons
    • "Broadcom Clarity PPM is robust and flexible, and all the functionality sets are in one place."
    • "Broadcom Clarity PPM should improve how the reports are being generated and contracts management."

    What is our primary use case?

    We have some deployments of Broadcom Clarity PPM on the cloud and others on-premise.

    We have many use cases for Broadcom Clarity PPM. We have some customers that are in government, they use it to manage IT projects. We have other customers that are from the petrochemical industry, they use the solution for investment management and capital management.

    What is most valuable?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is robust and flexible, and all the functionality sets are in one place.

    What needs improvement?

    Reports generated through Jaspersoft could be more integrated into the solution. Today, by default, users must navigate out of their context to run a report or a consultant must create a special portlet to bring reports into context. This could be an OOTB functionality. 

    There should be support for contract management. Clarity manages all kinds of investments very well, but there is no native functionalities to manage contracts between the companies regarding these investments. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Broadcom Clarity PPM for 17 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM is stable.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability of Broadcom Clarity PPM is good.

    We have approximately 10,000 people using this solution.

    How are customer service and support?

    I rate the technical support from Broadcom Clarity PPM a four out of five.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup of Broadcom Clarity PPM is complex.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    There are different licensing models with Broadcom Clarity PPM. With the software as a service model, you pay as you go, and if you are on-premises, you can buy a perpetual license and an annual fee for maintenance.

    I rate the price of Broadcom Clarity PPM a three out of five.

    What other advice do I have?

    For people new to the solution, I would advise them to keep it simple and start using default functionality.

    I rate Broadcom Clarity PPM a nine out of ten because it has a lot of functionality, is very flexible, and is highly stable.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
    PeerSpot user
    Nishant Rao - PeerSpot reviewer
    Practice Head - Wipro Digital - PPMS at Wipro Limited
    Real User
    Top 5
    Beneficial multi-road mapping, responsive support, and high availability
    Pros and Cons
    • "Broadcom Clarity PPM's most valuable feature is the plenty of modules, such as portfolio, project, resource, and time."
    • "Broadcom Clarity PPM could improve by adding advanced reporting in the tool. There are a lot of out-of-the-box reports, but I would like to see more advanced reporting."

    What is most valuable?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM's most valuable feature is the plenty of modules, such as portfolio, project, resource, and time.

    What needs improvement?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM could improve by adding advanced reporting in the tool. There are a lot of out-of-the-box reports, but I would like to see more advanced reporting.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Broadcom Clarity PPM for a few years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM has high availability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability of Broadcom Clarity PPM is very good.

    How are customer service and support?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM's support has a very large team, larger than Planisware when it comes to technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have used other solutions other than Broadcom Clarity PPM, such as Planisware. Broadcom Clarity PPM is better than Planisware because they have the multi-road mapping feature. This feature gives clients very good visibility on what needs to be done and what will happen in let's say two or three years.

    How was the initial setup?

    Broadcom Clarity PPM takes a couple of days to implement.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The price point of Broadcom Clarity PPM is less than Planisware. If a customer comes to me, and the cost is the main parameter for the selection of a tool, then I'll recommend Broadcom because cost-wise, they are less than other solutions.

    If you have to train a consultant, certification costs around 3000 euros and Broadcom Clarity is only $250. There is a substantial difference.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would recommend Broadcom Clarity PPM to others.

    I rate Broadcom Clarity PPM a nine out of ten.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free Broadcom Clarity PPM Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
    Updated: June 2023
    Buyer's Guide
    Download our free Broadcom Clarity PPM Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.