Bitbucket Server OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Bitbucket Server is the #3 ranked solution in top Version Control tools. PeerSpot users give Bitbucket Server an average rating of 8.0 out of 10. Bitbucket Server is most commonly compared to Bitbucket: Bitbucket Server vs Bitbucket. Bitbucket Server is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 70% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 17% of all views.
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Download the Version Control Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2022

What is Bitbucket Server?

Stash has multiple deployment options to provide the flexibility your organization needs.

Cloud is a fully hosted service for customers who want to iterate quickly and have us take care of managing the infrastructure.

For customers who need to run our applications behind their firewall, we have Server and Data Center options. Server delivers greater capacity for a larger user base and gives you more control, allowing you to remain compliant with your enterprise IT, security, IP and privacy policies. For our largest customers, Data Center provides all the capability of our Server option, along with high availability, instant scalability and performance at scale.

Atlassian also offers premium support and strategic services for enterprise customers. Technical Account Managers are cross-functional technical advisors providing proactive planning and strategic guidance across your organization. Premier Support goes above and beyond our standard offerings to give you account-wide support from a team of senior support engineers.

Bitbucket Server was previously known as Stash.

Bitbucket Server Customers

Netflix, Nasa, Rakuten, Best Buy, Philips, Nordstrom, Intuit, Zillow, Citi.

Bitbucket Server Video

Archived Bitbucket Server Reviews (more than two years old)

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PeerSpot user
Senior Consultant IT Infrastructure at a tech consulting company with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Users can create their own Git repositories, but it runs its own SSH server leading to certain overheads on the system.

What is most valuable?

The permission system for Git repositories and viewing all contributions to a Git repo are the most valuable features I could think of. In addition, it is really nice that users can create their personal repositories.

How has it helped my organization?

Stash really helped us to introduce a very granular permission system for our software repositories. Furthermore it makes working with Git a lot easier since users can manage most things with a decent Web GUI.

What needs improvement?

It is a Java application and runs its own SSH server, and that means that there is a certain overhead on your system. Besides that, Stash really does what it should do.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for about a year.

Buyer's Guide
Version Control
November 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about Atlassian, IBM, Amazon and others in Version Control. Updated: November 2022.
653,584 professionals have used our research since 2012.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

No issues encountered.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No, although we have a lot of code stored inside our repositories.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Although we have a huge amount of Git repositories inside Stash, we haven't encountered any scalability issues.

How are customer service and support?

Customer Service:

We haven't contacted customer service, so I can't really say how good they are.

Technical Support:

We haven't contacted technical support either.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We used Crucible and Fisheye from the same vendor and linked it to our existing SVN and Git servers. We switched because a normal Git installation doesn't provide a permission system.

How was the initial setup?

Everything was straightforward. Atlassian ships Stash with a decent installation wizard.

What about the implementation team?

We implemented it ourselves.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

To be honest, I didn't find any solution which did exactly what we needed (besides BitBucket Server).

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user212703 - PeerSpot reviewer
Software Engineer at a tech company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Our TAM was able to help us when we had issues with stability and deployment.

What is most valuable?

A direct single contact to Atlassian for needed functionality who can provide Roadmap information and be a voice for our company at Atlassian.

How has it helped my organization?

He helped gather information about how Stash works so that we could make an educated decision on how to handle system administration support – including items like backups, how easiest to grow adoption with limited support staff, and how to consider future integrations between Atlassian tools and our internal tools.

What needs improvement?

More input/visibility to what features are important to other Enterprise customers (without providing enough details to determine who the enterprise customer is). Being able to react if a certain feature is of extreme importance and work to bring more light to that request at Atlassian. i.e. we saw a feature that had been heavily requested by customers that was very important to us and having a TAM didn’t get us much traction on getting this feature.

For how long have I used the solution?

We purchased a Technical Account Management (TAM) in July 2014. 

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

Our TAM was able to help us when we had issues with deployment. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Our TAM was able to help us with stability issues. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues with scalability that our TAM was able to solve. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Yes – We haven’t switched completely but it is starting to gain more traction than other solutions like Gerrit. We have also been using and will continue to use Rally with our JIRA instances.

How was the initial setup?

Straightforward in most ways – install, configuration. Some parts were more complex – SSL, LDAP groups pulled in to manage security in a low maintenance way.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Yes many – GitLab, Gitolite, GitHub, git. Gerrit. We have also been using Clarity, Rally on the ALM side.

What other advice do I have?

Are you looking for someone who can help your strategy for deploying one or more Atlassian products, then I would go with TAM. If you need more support for running the Atlassian products (issues, outages, performance), then Premier Support is the route to go.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Version Control
November 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about Atlassian, IBM, Amazon and others in Version Control. Updated: November 2022.
653,584 professionals have used our research since 2012.
it_user208317 - PeerSpot reviewer
Project Manager at a tech company with 51-200 employees
Real User
With premier support, we like that we receive a timely response and have assigned representatives.

What is most valuable?

Horizontal scalability & high availability are the most important features that we are looking forward to from the Stash DC. With respect to the premier support, timely response and the fact that we have assigned representatives is great.

How has it helped my organization?

The premier support has helped Cisco in mitigating risk and reducing cost.

What needs improvement?

Will let you know in a couple months. Still in the process of evaluating the product.

For how long have I used the solution?

We use Stash Data Center and Premier Support. We have been using it since January 12, 2015.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

None, so far.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Testing under progress.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In production, we still have the single instance of the product and it has scaled pretty well and no major issues reported thus far.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

Very good but I have some feedback with respect to the support.

1) Currently, we have a limitation of 3 resources for interacting with Atlassian support. It would be nice to increase it to 5-10 because we have to internally depend upon identified users to communicate to the Atlassian. Or else, have this support aligned to the Cisco mailer alias so that multiple users within Cisco will be notified and can use the same user name to raise support requests with Atlassian.

Technical Support:

Very good but would be good to have a user interface in Atlassian.com to manage the users at our end instead of having to communicate each time to the premier support to manage users.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We are still using SVN but we moving toward git because of the flexibility it provides.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Nope, our engineering wing had done some analysis and they suggested Stash. Hence, we directly jumped in.

What other advice do I have?

If folks out there are looking to move to a more agile approach for development, Agile Jira + Bamboo + Stash DC will definitely be a great way to go since these systems seamlessly integrate with each other. Premier support is definitely recommended.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
it_user204945 - PeerSpot reviewer
Systems Architect at a comms service provider with 501-1,000 employees
Vendor
Stash provides us a simple and good management interface to give product teams a self-service, scalable solution.

What is most valuable?

  • We selected Stash primarily because we believe it has the most potential to become the best product available, not because it was the best product available at the time. Since 2013, Stash has been significantly improved in many ways such as the introduction of Pull Requests, demonstrating that this belief in the potential continues to be valid.
  • We like that Stash has a full development staff behind it, and that Atlassian is investing in using Stash internally, as this ensures that Atlassian is committed to the development of Stash to become the best solution available.
  • We like that Stash uses the Atlassian Plugin Framework. We have had success extending all Atlassian tools using custom plugins both that we have written in-house and as well that we are using from external 3rd parties. This gives us some flexibility to complete features that are important to us that are either not shared by other Atlassian customers, or where the feature has not yet been prioritized by Atlassian.
  • We like the simple per- 1000 user pricing. Although, per-user pricing might be preferred, the per- 1000 user pricing is still competitive with other commercial source management solutions. And, the pricing based upon # of users instead of amount of server hardware allows us to the flexibility to invest as much as we want into infrastructure without being penalized for having a faster system by being forced to pay more for a higher level of service.
  • We like that Stash is supported under Linux. Linux is our preferred server platform.
  • We like the LDAP authentication and directory integration. This allows us to integrate with the corporate directory and define access using the corporate directory accounts.
  • We like that Stash supports both SSH AND HTTPS. There are use cases that are best fulfilled by either mode. SSH is a best choice for automation and access for a single user. HTTPS is best for more ad-hoc clones, including to work with shared clones owned by a shared or service account where multiple users may be authorizating operations done against the same clone.
  • We like both the Fork model (most users work in private forks) and the project branches model (everybody works in the main repository). Different teams have different requirements and expectations around how a source management system should ideally work. One model doesn’t fit all product teams.

How has it helped my organization?

Our use of Stash is still limited (500 users or less). There are certain functions still missing that are needed to scale it out to a wider set of users and product lines. The primary benefit being realized today, is that Stash provides us a simple and good management interface to allow us to give product teams a self-service, corporately supported, horizontally scalable, Git hosting solution that integrates with other important tools for our company such as JIRA.

What needs improvement?

Key areas of improvement that I would like to see are:

1) Stash Data Center provides horizontal scaling within a single data center (i.e. low latency between components, components share a database and backend storage). Stash Data Center is missing “remote site” capabilities – whether more like a Git CDN where it can cache content at the remote sites, authorize the fetches from the central site, and then serve locally at LAN speed, rather than WAN speed, or whether like Stash Data Center horizontal scalability, but allowing long-distant (higher latency) links, and separate database and backend storage that is local to the site that it is hosted at.

2) More access control capabilities including granular access, and ability to do such things as enforce the use of Pull Requests for all merges.

3) More process enforcement capabilities, such as ensuring that particular people Approve a Pull Request before it can be Merged, or that a JIRA is associated with the Pull Request before it is allowed to be merged. In the mean-time, it looks like we will need to implement this for ourselves.

4) Missing commit graph feature should be integrated into main product.

5) Missing statistics and graphs similar to what Crucible provides.

6) Large file support. I know this is a Git architecture problem. However, I think the community needs to solve this problem, and having a hosting solution like Stash may offer options if the community could agree on what the solution should be. For example, I believe Mercurial support for big files is often done by treating large files as links to a central resources for the file content, and then the file content is downloaded on demand. Perhaps a type of light-weight clone where large file versions can be downloaded on demand only.

For how long have I used the solution?

Stash since June, 2013. Stash Data Center since December 13, 2014.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

I have not yet deployed Stash Data Center. We are still using a one-instance Stash. But we plan to use Stash Data Center soon.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

Mixed. We’ve experienced really great Atlassian support from several years ago. As Atlassian grew, we have noticed a reduction in consistency of how issues are resolved between products (i.e. JIRA vs JIRA Agile vs Confluence vs Crucible vs Stash), as well as in terms of how they get handled for the same product. For example, sometimes when we open support.atlassian.com they will tell us that bugs should be reported on jira.atlassian.com. Other times, we’ll open a bug on jira.atlassian.com and the issue will be prematurely closed with a support request opened. It can be intimidating for some of our staff who are just trying to figure out what the right thing to do is. For myself, I’m very comfortable wording the requests appropriate for support.atlassian.com or jira.atlassian.com and making the right call, and I only rarely need to escalate in some way in the form of a complaint. Other examples have to do with the resolution of issues, whether sometimes a user will provide a work-around or even a solution, such as a few times I received Crucible patches to fix my problems, whereas other times very simple issues would sit on jira.atlassian.com for months or years before getting attention. I realize it is difficult to run a larger company consistently, but unless you know what the problems are, you can’t work on improving the situation.

Technical Support:

Mixed. We’ve experienced really great Atlassian support from several years ago. As Atlassian grew, we have noticed a reduction in consistency of how issues are resolved between products (i.e. JIRA vs JIRA Agile vs Confluence vs Crucible vs Stash), as well as in terms of how they get handled for the same product. For example, sometimes when we open support.atlassian.com they will tell us that bugs should be reported on jira.atlassian.com. Other times, we’ll open a bug on jira.atlassian.com and the issue will be prematurely closed with a support request opened. It can be intimidating for some of our staff who are just trying to figure out what the right thing to do is. For myself, I’m very comfortable wording the requests appropriate for support.atlassian.com or jira.atlassian.com and making the right call, and I only rarely need to escalate in some way in the form of a complaint. Other examples have to do with the resolution of issues, whether sometimes a user will provide a work-around or even a solution, such as a few times I received Crucible patches to fix my problems, whereas other times very simple issues would sit on jira.atlassian.comfor months or years before getting attention. I realize it is difficult to run a larger company consistently, but unless you know what the problems are, you can’t work on improving the situation.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Some of the product teams ran their own Git servers… either an anonymous “git” daemon, or one of them may have set up something like Gitorious. We didn’t have an official instance running anything until Stash.

How was the initial setup?

Stash was easy to set up. Stash Data Center still TBD.

What was our ROI?

This has not been calculated yet. To some significant degree, we are looking for improvement in designer productivity and capabilities, particularly when it comes to our use of free / open source software that is published using Git such as Linux, and a reduction in cost compared to solutions such as Perforce and ClearCase that we also heavily rely on. Stash is still a bit of an experiment to us, although it is a successfully running experiment, and more teams are looking to switch and migrate from either Perforce or ClearCase.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I considered using Gitorious and a few other options. However, they were clumsy to set up and I didn’t feel they would give us what we need in the long term, so I quickly aborted once I discovered that Atlassian Stash was available in 2013.

What other advice do I have?

Learn Git, and learn how the Stash developers intend for you to work with Git. It is a lot easier working with the system as it is intended to be used, then trying to use Git just like you would use another system such as Subversion, Perforce, or ClearCase today.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
it_user205335 - PeerSpot reviewer
it_user205335Release Engineering Software Engineer at a tech services company
Consultant

I concur Mark. I really like that we can open branches from JIRA issues directly into Stash. That integration makes it easy to work with.

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