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Everbridge IT Alerting OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Everbridge IT Alerting is #3 ranked solution in top IT Alerting and Incident Management tools. PeerSpot users give Everbridge IT Alerting an average rating of 8.6 out of 10. Everbridge IT Alerting is most commonly compared to PagerDuty: Everbridge IT Alerting vs PagerDuty. Everbridge IT Alerting is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 71% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 15% of all views.
Buyer's Guide

Download the IT Alerting and Incident Management Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: September 2022

What is Everbridge IT Alerting?

Everbridge IT Alerting is a closed-loop cyber security and incident response automation solution that helps organizations respond to IT Incidents faster and improve teams’ response performance by automating communication, collaboration, and orchestration processes for ServiceOps, IT Security Ops, DevOps, and Disaster Recovery Ops. As a FedRamp-certified solution, IT Alerting capabilities include in-depth scheduling/calendars, interactive & analytical reporting, on-call scheduling, automated escalation, response workflow automation, recording, and much more. The solution is offered as a cloud service based on the secure, highly available, resilient, and globally scalable Everbridge CEM platform.

Learn why 5,400+ enterprise customers trust Everbridge (NASDAQ (EVBG)) with their IT Response Automation Management and IT Alerting solutions; visit ITAlerting.com to learn more or request a demo.

Need Integration with your ITOM, ITSM, SIEM tools?

Plug Everbridge IT Alerting directly into your ITOM, ITSM, SIEM, IT Monitoring tools including ServiceNow or BMC Remedy with our certified, two-way integrations and automatically contact the on-call IT team members, launch conference bridges and automatically escalate to the senior personnel in case of major IT incidents.

Everbridge IT Alerting Customers

Choice Hotels, Alexion, Navy Federal Credit Union, EastWest Bank, IBM, Core Logic, Paypal, Charter Communications, Lowes, Express Scripts, Finastra, Worldpay

Everbridge IT Alerting Video

Archived Everbridge IT Alerting Reviews (more than two years old)

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Manager of Incident Command at West Corporation
Real User
Top 10Leaderboard
Stable, responsive and helpful technical support, and the support calendars save us a lot of time
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable feature is the support calendars."
  • "I would like to have a little bit more flexibility in the member portal."

What is our primary use case?

We use this product for engagement to critical outages, so we use the smart bridge functionality. All of our entire support staff is in Everbridge. Anybody and everybody that we need to get ahold of from a production perspective is in Everbridge, and we use it to engage them. This can be both singularly as an individual or as a group, and it has a calendar that escalates up the chain.

If a primary or secondary don't respond within a given amount of time, it'll go all the way up to, in our case, the VP, which is what's required by our organization.

We also use it to send out notifications to support staff, if they have a ticket in their queue that hasn't been assigned to somebody after given an allotment of time. I think it's about 30 minutes. So, if a ticket is sitting unassigned, it'll notify that team saying, "Hey, you've got a ticket out there", and they can actually respond to that particular text message saying, "yes, I accept".

At that point, Everbridge will then tell ServiceNow that this support person has accepted the ticket, and ServiceNow will then assign that ticket to that person. So, they don't even have to log into the system in order to do that.

We also are using it under certain conditions for critical alerts. If we've got a set of alerts set up such that if one of these is triggered, something imminent is going to happen, then it will engage both a SWAT team and my incident command team at the same time, stating that a bridge needs to be set up immediately for this particular issue. Everbridge does all that for us.

It also does incident subscriptions. For example, if you want to be alerted for a given platform, for a given priority, it'll send you a notification saying, "Hey, there's an issue in your platform". We send communications through it, which are self-serve from the business perspective, stating that, again, what type of platform or application that you want to be notified on. If there's an issue in that particular platform or app, you will get the notification, again, that something is going on and all of the details thereof.

It is also selected by priority, so if you want only to know about the priority one, twos, you can select just those. Or if you want to know about the non-majors, threes and fours, you can also opt into those.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the support calendars.

In the past, in my previous company, we actually did a survey and we spent over 45 minutes trying to notify and engage personnel for any given major incident. Everbridge has managed to actually reduce that to under three minutes.

Even in my new company, our engagement time is sitting right around three minutes to engage personnel to a critical outage. This means that we don't have to spend time finding out who the on-call is, or find out what their contact information is. If they don't respond, we don't have to look up their manager or their director or their VP. Everbridge does that all behind the scenes and quickly.

We are just getting into smart orchestration, which I don't have much experience with yet but I am pretty sure that I will be learning a lot about it within the next year. To this point, it has saved us time compared to my previous experience with deployment.

What needs improvement?

I would like to have a little bit more flexibility in the member portal. For example, if you are set up with primary and secondary and those individuals just want to swap, where the secondary will take the primary position, and the primary we'll take the secondary, that's not possible through the member portal. Instead, a manager actually has to go into the calendar itself and do that flip. All other vacations or swaps can be handled from the member portal.

All other vacations or swaps can be handled from the member portal, as long as they aren't on the same day. If you want to swap with somebody next week then you can do it from the member portal, but if you're both working the same day then you can't do that flip.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Everbridge IT Alerting for more than three years. The company that I currently work for has only been using it for about a year.

Buyer's Guide
IT Alerting and Incident Management
September 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about Everbridge, PagerDuty, OnSolve and others in IT Alerting and Incident Management. Updated: September 2022.
635,987 professionals have used our research since 2012.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

They're actually very good at fixing bugs or getting updates because they've made modifications to their calendar, to the escalations to be more flexible. So far they've checked off most of my request requirements on my list.

Considering how often we use it and the number of tickets we send through, it's very stable. The redundancy that they have is good.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We send a lot of tickets through it and I think that it scales well. In one year, we had 243,130 tickets processed by the system.

You can implement what pieces you need. We started out with the API, which is a very simple integration between ServiceNow and Everbridge. Then you have Smart Orchestration, which allows you to have more control on the Everbridge side than the ServiceNow side. This is what we wanted.

Initially, we started out with just engaging for support teams. Then, that has grown into sending instant subscriptions to technical managers and executives, and that expanded into sending communication notifications to the business. From there, it is expanding to opening up a secondary informational bridge that runs in parallel to your technical bridge, all through the same platform. So you've got your business users on one bridge allowing them to not interfere with the technical investigation being held on the technical bridge.

Our communication platform actually starts in one week. We've got it all built out and we activate it next week. But, we are constantly looking at integrating more. So, to spec what we want to do with it, we're at 100%. But, say next month we find another critical alert that we need to have an immediate response on, we'll integrate that into the system.

We're constantly looking for ways to better utilize the functionality of Everbridge into everything that we do.

How are customer service and support?

The technical support is very good. Whenever I've got an issue, I talk to either support or my direct contacts. My Account team on the Everbridge side, along with the person that helped us install, I've got direct lines too and they are very responsive.

Their Command Center, their Service Desk, is also very responsive. You can actually do a ticket online and they usually respond to you within 24 hours that way. There's an 800 number that you can call for immediate assistance if it's something that needs to be done ASAP. They take down the information and do the initial investigation and usually have some sort of response to you.

In my typical case, it's usually by end of the day when I get a response. In some form, either that they're still investigating or that they've found something and are turning it over to level two or something like that. They do keep us informed.

They take every issue you have to heart and dive into it as far as they can. If you don't like the answer they've come back with, they will continue to dig into it, to our satisfaction.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

In my previous company, that's one reason why it took us 45 minutes to engage personnel. It was all manual. At this company, I do not know what they had prior to Everbridge.

How was the initial setup?

I was involved in the setup at my previous company and I felt that it was a straightforward process. The hardest part is actually getting the calendars out into Everbridge. If your support team has a standard rotation, no matter how complex that standard rotation is, it's very easy to build that out in Everbridge.

It's when you have groups that don't have any type of standard rotation. Getting them to move to that when they're used to working off a spreadsheet and they prefer working off a spreadsheet, can be a difficult transition because now they're going to a tool.

The API integration was a little tricky in ServiceNow, but I don't know if that was due to Everbridge or my ServiceNow. We did get it worked out and again when I say it was tricky, it took us an extra a couple of weeks because we found some nuances that we weren't expecting. It took us a while to track that down and get that switched.

Now, going to Smart Orchestration, which is what we are implementing right now, so far has gone much smoother than what the API integration was. Mainly I think because I and my partner have access to actually see what the Smart Orchestration is doing versus with ServiceNow, the admins did that. It was out of our control and we didn't know what was going on behind the scenes.

With respect to how long it took us to deploy, I want to say it probably took about three months. We thought it was going to take us about a month to two months through the API, but it took us three because we ran into a little snag.

In comparison, for this Smart Orchestration, we actually have fewer resources working on it and we've only been working at it for about a month and I'm told that we're just about done. It has taken a third of the time and fewer resources.

In terms of the deployment strategy, we had very similar work streams that we wanted to accomplish through this. We wanted to send engagements under certain conditions, and implement call-outs under certain conditions. In fact, under Smart Orchestration, we have even more work streams going than what we did through the API. I wouldn't say that it was more complex this time around, but it's larger. There are more ways of triggering events through Smart Orchestration than what we set up with the API.

What about the implementation team?

We used an Everbridge consultant to assist us with the deployment, and it was very helpful. This person is very knowledgeable and we had the same one for both deployments. It may have made this deployment even faster because we know each other.

There are 16 of us that are active, using it on a daily bases. My team is eight and the communication team is, I think, six. There are four people who take an administrative role, including myself, my counterpart, and two of my teammates. The administrators can actually go into the tool and work.

From a group manager perspective, I've got just shy of 2,500 people as support team members in the system. I have 259 groups, each with a corresponding administrator to maintain schedules.

What was our ROI?

Well, considering I save 42 minutes per outage, coupled with customer satisfaction, I would say it is well worth the cost to me. It's always an intangible, but I think it far pays for itself many times over, each year.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Everbridge is not an inexpensive tool, but as the adage says, you get what you pay for. Everbridge stands behind its product and in my three years, I think it had issues once that affected my company, and that was only briefly. Considering how many tickets I run through, in my book that is definitely a five-nines type of scenario.

In the past when we initially signed up, SMS was free. However, due to the new legislation in certain countries and whatnot, they had to make some changes to that, so they've gone to a message credit. There is now a possibility that you could incur SMS costs, depending on how often and where you're sending things. Otherwise, their fees are pretty self-explanatory.

The service is subscription-based and you've got two different user licensing schemes. One-way and two-way. One-way is very inexpensive and I don't know the pricing. Two-way is a lot more expensive. Hypothetically, it might be $1 for a one-way license, but it's $12 for a two-way license.

One-way means that you're not in a calendar essentially, I think is the way they describe it. So, you are not being pooled into an outage bridge, which means that you're not in a rotation of some sort. A one-way also means that you're just getting a notification saying, "Oh, Hey, here's an issue that we're going to tell you about," but you aren't going to be pooled into something that says, "Oh, Hey, I want your assistance to resolve this." Whereas a two-way license says, "Okay, hey, here's the issue. I need you on this bridge and you need to be there in less than three minutes."

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Before choosing Everbridge, I looked at others including xMatters, MIR3, and there's another one too and I can't remember the name of it. Ultimately, Everbridge is what we felt fit what we wanted better.

MIR3, which is now known as OnSolve, just wasn't evolved far enough. Their functionality just wasn't anywhere close to what we needed it to be. They did not have bridge functionality. xMatters, at the time, did not either. I'm sure that they probably do today but at the time, xMatters could not stand up a bridge. It would have to be an external issue and we wanted everything under one platform.

There's something different with the calendar functionality, too. But since it was three years ago, I honestly don't remember. In any case, the main parts were the bridge functionality that Everbridge had at the time was far superior to both xMatters and MIR3. The engagement between xMatters and Everbridge was pretty similar. They both were very robust as far as trying to get the people that you want to get.

What other advice do I have?

My advice for anybody who is implementing Everbridge is to do your homework. Make sure you know what you want to implement and why. If you have a clear path forward, then the implementation is pretty straight forward.

Also, if you use Everbridge to help implement, listen to what they have to say. They know the tools inside and out and may have a better way of implementing it than what you might have thought.

The biggest lesson that I have learned from using Everbridge is that doing it manually is a waste of time and resources. It has given my team more the ability to focus on what it needs to, on resolving the issues. This has allowed us to cut our mean time to respond, leading to a reduction in our mean time to resolve. Basically, when you don't have to worry about your people and the escalation going on behind the scenes, it allows you to focus on what really matters in clearing out the outage.

In summary, this is a really good product but there is always room for improvement. In my opinion, they are really close.

I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Chris Quinlan - PeerSpot reviewer
Director Of Service Operations at Finastra
Real User
We have seen substantial savings with its usage as it drives down our MTTR
Pros and Cons
  • "By leveraging Everbridge, with a few clicks of a mouse, we are able to go in and request as many teams as we require to respond to an incident and bring them together to collaborate much faster."
  • "The initial setup was very complex. We did not have a very good experience with our initial deployment. Most of this was due to customizations in our ServiceNow instance."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use case is for us to mobilize and engage our IT workforce in response to either major incidents or critical monitoring alerts that require immediate response. We run anywhere between 150 to 180 major incidents per month. We also use this for our critical ticket management, as well, which is roughly 200 more a month.

How has it helped my organization?

Before Everbridge, it would take us anywhere between 45 minutes to an hour and a half to mobilize our IT resource teams.  This was a manual call tree process where you are picking up the phone and calling everybody one by one. Now, by leveraging Everbridge, with a few clicks of a mouse, we are able to go in and request as many teams as we require to respond to an incident and bring them together to collaborate much faster. That 45 minutes to 90 minutes is now a few minutes up to maybe 15 minutes, depending on responsiveness or if the escalations have to kick in. We have seen substantial savings in manpower and a significant reduction in our time to respond and recover.

What is most valuable?

The automated escalations are the most valuable feature. We program in our escalation chains for each individual IT group. Being able to go out and request a resource from that team, and if they don't respond, that automated escalation makes it very hands off. So, our major incident managers and our network operations center can focus more on the other work that they need to do rather than chasing down those resources. They can rest assured that somebody will be answering.

Another valuable feature is the ease of integration into our ServiceNow platform, where we are doing all of our work between two teams. They are able to make requests from within the tickets that we can manage rather than having to use another portal or logging into Everbridge directly.

Reliability is their biggest value.

What needs improvement?

The IT Alerting portion of the Everbridge platform is built on all the fundamentals set by their mass notification product. Some of the specific use cases for IT response could use a little attention, in terms of changing the default behavior of the application. That would be the number one for me, which I know that they're already looking to address.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using the product for about four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is excellent. In the three years that we've been using it, there has only been one major outage. Even during that outage, there was still limited functionality available. We have definitely seen that since that event, which was a little over a year ago now, they've made some massive improvements to their infrastructure and their highly available environment. There really hasn't been any disruptions since then.

They actually advertised that they improved it. They sent communications to their customer base. They advised them that this was an event that you never really plan for, but it did happen. They made significant investments to ensure that it wouldn't happen again. There has been a series of maintenance to their back-end systems and infrastructure to ensure that they remain more resilient. Since then, we haven't seen a major disruption in service. I would classify it as a very highly available system with minimal disruptions.

They just upgrade their platform continuously, so you're always on the most recent version.

We have a part-time administrator who is doing our day-to-day maintenance. Most of that is more about further enhancements and improvements than about maintenance. Maintenance is very low-key, in terms of an administrator. In IT Alerting, the most complex part is that we have in and around 52 calendars that are being managed for all of our individual IT teams, but we allow the managers of those groups to do the management of those calendars. It's fairly hands-off. There was some work upfront to create some documentation, and we had to train them. That is more of the administration that we have to do now: the upkeep. However, this is more done on a part-time basis.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In IT Alerting, we have around 400 users. In our Everbridge instance, we have everybody in the organization, which is close to 11,000.

When we initially started using the product, we were at around 4,500 users. We were able to more than double that with ease. I know other much larger organizations who are using the platform without issues. In the most recent user group that I attended, they were showing us a lot of improvements on their back-end and database queries, so they could continue to scale. They can pretty much handle any scale that has been presented to them, so far.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is excellent. They certainly have different layers of support based on what you need and what you require. We have dealt with all levels of support throughout our journey with them. Where some of it is just a simple call into their help desk, which is more about basic troubleshooting, basic issues, maybe some how-tos, or some functions that weren't working exactly. This is right through to very hands-on technical assistance to solve some of our more challenging use cases. Where the IT Alerting platform sometimes isn't designed for the specific use case, they have been able to assign us a technical resource to give us a workaround or maybe to champion an improvement in a future release that will give us that function. We have pretty much seen that ongoing throughout our relationship with Everbridge, where they are always looking to make those enhancements or improvements for the usability of all their customers.

Typical upgrade cycle: We make a recommendation for an enhancement or an improvement, because it's not there. It gets entered on the community, where other customers can vote on it, which will push it up the scale. Or, we also have our account reps who will speak on our behalf to their development teams if there's something that we really need. Then, if there is a sense of urgency, that is where those workarounds come in, where they'll work the system to give us a configuration or rules which will give us what we require.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We have used PagerDuty, xMatters, and one that's not quite IT alerting (Send Word Now). These are all products that we have experience with at Finastra.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very complex. We did not have a very good experience with our initial deployment. Most of this was due to customizations in our ServiceNow instance. When we were using Everbridge as a standalone tool, that implementation was relatively straightforward to get some immediate value. When we went to integrate with our ServiceNow instance, we ran into a lot of challenges. 

We didn't have to, but we made the decision to re-integrate at the end of this past year. That reintegration was very easy and seamless. There was a lot of upgraded functions put into the connector by Everbridge, which have been installed in ServiceNow.

The first time around, it took us a couple of months, a lot of headaches, and a lot of effort. Our second implementation was a matter of hours before we were up and running again. It was a massive improvement from our initial implementation. Half of the improvement was the connectivity capabilities and upgraded connector that Everbridge designed and had certified in the ServiceNow Store. The other half of it was the realization that a lot of our challenges the first time around were based on customizations that we had in our environment. What we did ahead of this implementation was return to the out-of-the-box configuration in our ServiceNow instance. This allowed all of that automated connectivity to just take over, so we didn't have to customize or script. It really was just plug and play. Remove the old connector and install the new one, then do a bit of configuration settings and we were good to go.

What about the implementation team?

The first time, we used a third-party to do all the development. That posed a lot of challenges. It wasn't a great experience. It wasn't just because of the challenging environment. We definitely had some challenges in dealing with that third-party organization and the deployment overall.

Initially, the third-party integrator provided us two full-time resources for six weeks since they were doing a lot of scripting, customizations, and development work.

The second time around, based on the simplicity, we were able to secure a resource from Everbridge for about 45 minutes to meet up with our ServiceNow administration team. They were able to do it all on the call in that short period of time.

On the redeployment, since it took hours, we had maybe one person for two days. That would be at most what we probably committed.

What was our ROI?

The end result is that we have driven down our MTTR by an average of about 45 minutes across all major outages. That is very substantial considering the cost of every minute of outage can be thousands of dollars lost.

We are saving probably 100 plus hours of outage time within our customer-facing products per month, which is significant. You can easily put that into an ROI of hundreds of thousands per year.

For other use cases, there is at least another 50,000 to 100,000 dollars a year of savings or cost avoidance.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The annual cost is approximately $125,000 USD but is highly dependent on the number of licenses required.

They are one of the cheapest solutions on the market. We looked at all of the major competitors in the space. Everbridge was one of the most affordable for what they are offering.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We switched mostly because of our internal use cases. Everbridge was the most flexible, in terms of adding on additional use cases for just the base function.  Affordability was a big factor as well. When costing out the solution, they were the cheapest for the IT Alerting portion specifically. However, the biggest thing was the ability to add in those additional use cases.

For example, one of our customer support organizations was paying a third-party service to answer phone calls after hours. All they were doing was answering the call and taking some details, then they were engaging a support team who was probably sleeping at that time. Knowing what the capabilities were within IT Alerting, we said, "We could probably give you a better solution for that. We'll give you an email address that your customer can email directly. Then, you'll just maintain your calendar of support in Everbridge. Then, when your customer emails into that address, Everbridge will call you and tell you that you have an email from your customer that you need to respond to." They were able to eliminate that third-party calling service, which was fairly expensive. There was no additional cost because we were able to capture it within the licenses that we already purchase with the product.

We have about a half a dozen other use cases like that which we've been able to leverage the same platform and same licensing for with Everbridge and realize some savings, giving us better service to our internal and external customers.

What other advice do I have?

It is about ensuring that you have the organizational buy-in from the top down. This product starts with the C-level suite when you're going to implement. We struggled through having to prove that the product was worthwhile before we were able to fully implement across the organization. We found some early adopters within those IT responder teams and showed them that this is a product which would help them as well as help our organization. 

We started out with three or four teams three years ago. Now, it is a standard. The organization realizes that there is value here, and that we are going to continue to use it. We have expanded it to more than 50 IT responder teams across the organization. Now, whenever we find a team who isn't using it, we onboard them pretty quickly, as it is part of the standard.

The product is pretty new for them. We were a pretty early adopter to the product. I don't know where we stand in terms of 10th or 50th (or whatever), but I know that the product itself is only about four years old, from what I understand.

We have already been able to drive a massive amount of value out of it in its current state. Anything else is what I would call finessing, or refinement. Some of that may be specific to my organization and how we use it. We already have a roadmap of how we will to continue to use it, which will be leveraging a lot more automation, but most of that is already ready on the Everbridge side. It's more our ServiceNow instance that we need to prepare for that level of automation.

All of the core function that we are looking for is already there in Everbridge. They have the connectivity into our ServiceNow instance, which is pivotal, so that we can affect workflows to automate our engagements. Today, it's our network operations center and major incident management team who are requesting resources. The intention is to have our ServiceNow instance automatically do that based on defined workflows, so we are taking the human element or delay out of it. Everbridge is already set to allow us to do this.

I would give the product a solid nine because of their support. It is how responsive that they have been between their account management, technical resources, and leadership. They knew that we had a very painful implementation the first time. Therefore, for our second implementation, they were very hands-on. We had a lot of conversations leading up to the implementation about the support that we needed and what our goals were. They were very responsive in providing us pretty much whatever we needed, just short of Professional Services and doing it for us. They were very clear that they could do all of this for us but there would be a fee. However, they are always there to help, which is the biggest thing for me. You almost consider them to be more like a partner than a vendor. If you treat them more like a partner, and they treat you as such as well, then you are likely to have a much more desirable outcome.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
IT Alerting and Incident Management
September 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about Everbridge, PagerDuty, OnSolve and others in IT Alerting and Incident Management. Updated: September 2022.
635,987 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Milton Williamson - PeerSpot reviewer
Data Center Manager at PVH Corp.
Real User
The time it takes to get everybody on a call has been reduced significantly
Pros and Cons
  • "It's very customizable. For instance, if you're going on vacation this week, you go to your calendar and say, "I'm off this week, make the secondary the primary." And that's done on-the-fly. It's very responsive. It's very user-friendly."
  • "What I would like to see is vendor alerting. It's not structured to take into account that users outside of our environment, users outside of IT, may not be in the group. IBM is an outside vendor for us, and we have IBM CEs who come in on a regular basis. If there's a problem, we call those vendors in. That should be tied into the system where we can say that vendors A, B, and C have these users and we want them available to come into the office when there's an issue. We want to be able to alert them in the same way we alert internally."

What is our primary use case?

We use it to alert management of priority-one incidents. The company uses it for global incidents but we have a subset of it for priority-one incidents, to let IT management know what is going on and so IT knows it's priority-one. The future is to let them know about priority-ones, twos, and threes, for the on-call schedule. But right now we're in the priority-one stage.

How has it helped my organization?

For the P1s especially, we had a lot of incidents where we got notifications that things were going down, and just the time it took to get people on the call - the bridge - and to get people to respond sometimes took as much as half-an-hour or 45 minutes. Now it's really down to 15 to 20 minutes. So the response time in getting teams together is much better, much more effective.

At this stage, which is step one - and we're going to try to get better - we have incidents once a week. On each of those incidents we have to do calls on root analysis and why it happened. From that standpoint, we get people on a call much faster to get it resolved much faster. In turn, the calls are becoming less and less. We're down to once a week. We want to get down to once a month.

A better response time helps you learn what's going on and how to prepare for the next time. For example, knowing that in January we had an incident where Asia/Far East went down because the things we were doing at night caused that slowness and lag time, we realized that we if changed things that we do at night in America, we wouldn't have the lag time going on in Asia. We realized that the things we were doing in America were affecting the next day in Asia.

It helps us get everybody involved, the first, the second, and treasury, where normally, to get even one person on the line was difficult. I work at night, from 7:00 PM to 7:00 AM, and that's the hardest time to get somebody on the line and get them actively involved. But they know that when they get that call from Everbridge - and if they don't answer it goes to their home phone, it goes to their cell phone - it is important that they get on. It's not just a call for general information. They know if it's an Everbridge call that it's something very important and that their manager is looking at it. That puts us in a better place. When there is a call, they respond.

What is most valuable?

For us, the most valuable features are the alerting and messaging, SMS messaging and text. We have a 15-minute window to get everything out and open, and without Everbridge we would never make that 15 minutes. Just the fact of who it alerts, and how it gets them on calls, is amazing.

The scheduling calendar is also very helpful and very useful. That's what we're looking to roll out. We have other incidents where we need to get people who are on-call to respond back to us and it's a very manual process right now. We call a person and keep trying until we get them. When we get this feature working in phase two, it will reach out to them and if it doesn't reach the first person it will reach out to the next one. The third call will go to the manager to let the manager know that the first ones haven't answered.

It's very customizable. For instance, if you're going on vacation this week, you go to your calendar and say, "I'm off this week, make the secondary the primary." And that's done on-the-fly. It's very responsive. It's very user-friendly. The guys don't have much training in Everbridge but they know how to go into the calendar, move their name out and move the next person up. It's very good.

The calendar is very dynamic. We use ServiceNow which has a calendar-based program, like Everbridge, but the two are night and day. Everything that I've been diving into with Everbridge is actually better than the products we have out-of-the-box. The calendar in Everbridge is much better. Your contact list is already there and that makes it customizable. With ServiceNow, it's very clunky. It's not intuitive and it's nowhere near as dynamic.

What needs improvement?

What I would like to see is vendor alerting. It's not structured to take into account that users outside of our environment, users outside of IT, may not be in the group. IBM is an outside vendor for us, and we have IBM CEs who come in on a regular basis. If there's a problem, we call those vendors in. That should be tied into the system where we can say that vendors A, B, and C have these users and we want them available to come into the office when there's an issue. We want to be able to alert them in the same way we alert internally. If this contact is not available it would move to the next and the next. It would be great if it could do that.

We have tons of vendors we use from outside of our organization that are not part of the contact list, they're not users in the firm. But if they could be a "vendor contact" and we could scale it the same way we do with individual employees, that would really be the icing on the cake.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've had it for over a year but we went live with it a few months ago.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very stable. We haven't had any problems with the system at all: Getting it in, being able to launch it from mobile devices, from inside the office, outside, websites. Everywhere we go to get into it, it works seamlessly. There has been no downtime so far.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

For us, the scalability is great. We're going to go larger later on, but right now it's working for us. On our scale it does 1,000 of us in IT and for that it works perfectly. As we get bigger and push it out more to more users, we'll find out more about the scalability.

How are customer service and technical support?

We used their consultant, Brandy, in the beginning. Then we started using technical support for lockout issues. What happens a lot of the time is that when you send out an invite to someone to join, they get the invite and wait too long and then the invite expires so they call tech support to get that refreshed. Tech support has been very friendly, very knowledgeable. Aside from lockout issues, we've contacted them for password expiration, for users wanting the Evergreen app for mobile. Some of them can't have it, some can, depending on who they are.

In terms of the lockout, it's fine because you get three attempts to log in and then you get locked out. It changes every 90 days and that's fine for us. That's what we do with corporate, so users are used to it. But that's why we're going to go to single-sign-on, so they don't have to remember that many passwords. When we get there we'll probably alleviate this problem.

Once our people are up to speed with it, they will be able to do it themselves. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

This is our first time using this kind of solution. We were doing it manually before. We were sending out emails and WebEx conferences manually.

How was the initial setup?

In our case, it was taking what we had - because we were using it globally - and making a subset for us for alerting. The Everbridge consultant did it seamlessly. In the first meeting she set up the organization, put us in and gave us admin rights. They did most of the work. The only thing we did was add the contacts. That was manual but not complicated at all.

It took us a week to get the contacts in and the full deployment was done in two weeks easily, including testing and having users going.

The implementation strategy was designed by Everbridge. We thought we could go in and go straight to step one. But there was a lot more design to it. We had to set up the clients first, do the consulting stage, and then worry about how we were going to make a template. We thought it was going to be quick and dirty, but there was actually more of a learning curve for us. We had to set up templates first, learn how to change templates and make templates our own so that, in the future, we wouldn't have to go back and get more training. Instead of turning it around in a week, it took us a month because we wanted to be thoroughly trained in it. Now we do all our own templates, we do our own calls, we do our own updates, we do our own contacts. The month was really good for us. It was slower than we expected, but it really helped us out.

It could have been faster if we wanted things out-of-the-box. It could have been much faster. But we took the initial steps at that time to learn as much as we could so we would be independent. Now we have a much better understanding of what Everbridge does. That time was really important because we also trained our staff. The time was well spent.

Everbridge had an implementation team that worked with our company before our team was in, to set up the national implementation. Then Brandy, from Everbridge, worked with us. We had the day shift which was two supervisors, another two supervisors at night, and two managers. So it was done with a total of six on our side. Those six people are the ones who maintain it.

What about the implementation team?

We worked with one of the Everbridge consultants and she was very helpful. 

What was our ROI?

Our ROI is in the response time. We have a 15-minute SLA that we were never meeting. We were physically not capable of meeting it in a manual environment. We thought it was unheard of to hit that 15 minutes. Everbridge makes it possible. From where we stood, we thought we'd never get to a half-hour SLA. Today it's 15 minutes.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

As far as I'm aware, there are no costs beyond the standard licensing fees.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

There were other options we were looking into besides this. We thought another one we looked into was going to do it, but its alerting system didn't do it. Our new manager came in and had his own options but he never showed us what they were because we were so far ahead with Everbridge.

The main deciding factor for going with Everbridge was the integration we're planning to do with ServiceNow. We knew that we wanted it to work with ServiceNow. From a ticketing standpoint, we have tickets that can now be created in ServiceNow that work with Everbridge. So if something happens it will assign an incident number to Everbridge, and we won't have to do that manually. We were also looking at replacing WhatsUp Gold. The new processes coming into place that should work well with Everbridge also.

The competitors had the same features but I think Everbridge works better because that's what they do. Everbridge is an alerting package so it's more robust.

What other advice do I have?

Take your time and look into the total package. There's so much involved in Everbridge. You think it's just alerting but the scheduling package is really phenomenal and the way it integrates. So take your time and look at it thoroughly and learn the bells and whistles before making a decision to know what the whole package is capable of doing. They also have a bridge process where they set up the bridge for you, where you don't have to use something like WebEx. They can do it internally. We didn't know that at the beginning. Look at the package of all the things they do.

We're going to integrate it with ServiceNow. That's going to be important. We haven't used single-sign-on with it, but that's something we'll be looking for later and I don't know how good it is. I would like that to work seamlessly. We don't have single-sign-on right now. Each person logs on with their AD account individually when they go into Everbridge. Single-sign-on is available but we weren't focused on that at first. We were focused on getting the alerting system working. Now that we have that working, we're going to go into the next phase of alerting with the calendar and single-sign-on. It will make it easier for people using it to be able to sign on once.

We have 450 users on the IT side. Globally, there are 15,000 but we're only in charge of the IT side. There are 1,000 people in IT, but right now 450 are in Everbridge.

I would rate Everbridge at ten out of ten.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Ruben Boiardi - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Consultant at SELF
Real User
Integrates with Remedy OnDemand, eliminating the need for manual call-outs when incidents are logged
Pros and Cons
  • "You can configure the tool to escalate if no action is taken within a certain time period. That avoids sending off an alert that nobody deals with and where nobody knows that nobody has dealt with it."
  • "You can program in rotations, shifts, and scenarios of different kinds and it allows you to page multiple people, or people in sequence, or a group of people simultaneously."
  • "The feature that xMatters has that Everbridge doesn't have, or has in a limited way, is a method of funneling some alerts, as an FYI, to other stakeholders who are not necessarily prime actors in an incident."

What is our primary use case?

We have a ticketing system, Remedy OnDemand, a fairly large IT shop, several thousand servers, about 900 people or so working in IT, about one-third of them are doing support in one way or another or having to deal with incidents. So the use case for this tool was to notify teams or individuals that there was an incident in progress that they needed to attend to. Usually, it was for incidents that had the kind of priority that needed immediate attention.

Natively, Remedy will send out an email. But if you need to get somebody's attention because a server is on the brink of falling over, that doesn't cut it.

Our use case was essentially incident notification.

I was there to transition to the tool. I did all the use cases for it and then I handed off the reins of power to my successor.

How has it helped my organization?

For us, having a quick response to urgent events - events that were not necessarily critical but that could become critical if not dealt with urgently - was important for us.

Prior to having a notification system in place, we either had to have an operations person checking all the queues in Remedy or someone subscribing to emails from Remedy and then doing manual call-outs to people at 3 am because a server died.

We had a fairly sophisticated ticket flow. We had a monitoring system with an events co-relation and event management system that would then automatically create incident tickets. The incidents tickets, based on their level of urgency, would then be channeled out through the Everbridge IT alerting platform which would then trigger off escalations based on the urgency of the incident. For example, if there was a P1 incident where the data center was down, it would escalate much more quickly than if there was a P3 issue that you needed to look at quickly to avoid a P1.


If we were to compare no IT alerting to IT alerting of any kind, the latter makes a significant difference. In our case, we used to have real, live operators who would call people out. Now, the operations staff is there just to manage some escalations but it really removes the human from the equation, from the moment of detection to notification. 

Before, we'd have a human looking at a console of some kind and that person would then have to look up a contact list to find out who was the owner of the alert, find their number, call them and, if nothing happened, figure it out, and say, "Okay, I've got to escalate." They would then have to call the second person in line, and so on. It was not really a manageable situation. Having an alerting solution connected to our ticketing system made the flow much more effective and really did improve our overall response time and uptime.

What is most valuable?

There are quite a few valuable features. In terms of the general notifications, one of the things that was interesting and good is that you can configure the tool to escalate if no action is taken within a certain time period. That avoids sending off an alert that nobody deals with and where nobody knows that nobody has dealt with it. 

You can program in rotations, shifts, and scenarios of different kinds and it allows you to page multiple people, or people in sequence, or a group of people simultaneously.

Another good feature Everbridge has is deduplication. We had cases where everybody on a team had the same phone number. Maybe they were passing a cell phone around. When the tool sees that, it doesn't call the same phone number 15 times. It will call it one time, because it will see, as part of the list of devices and device hours, that it's a duplicate.

Once your users are defined, you can pop up a map and draw a circle on the map and notify everybody within that area. That geo feature is really useful if you have a particular incident where there is a protest on the street, a building on fire, a Hazmat spill. These are all scenarios that I've lived through.
It was crucial at that time to have a solution where one could say, "Let me draw a radius around the impacted building and have everybody in that radius contacted." That was a huge win.

What needs improvement?

The feature that xMatters has that Everbridge doesn't have, or has in a limited way, is a method of funneling some alerts, as an FYI, to other stakeholders who are not necessarily prime actors in an incident. For example, you have a support team that supports critical application X, and you have somebody who is actually the application owner. The application owner normally does not normally get called out in the middle of the night to let him know that his application is down, unless it's super-critical and it's going to stay down. But they would be receiving a copy of the notification that was sent out so they'd know that something happened overnight, or that something is happening right now.

For how long have I used the solution?

Less than one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's been performing like a champ. We haven't had any outages. I had lunch with my buddies last week, and there has been nothing significantly wrong. It's been flowing like it should. 

The old 2012 solution was using somewhat dated technology and it was starting to choke on a regular basis. We really didn't want that with the volume of incidence tickets that we were generating.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We didn't have any scalability issues with it. I don't have a comparison point, but it easily handled everything we threw at it.

How are customer service and technical support?

Everbridge's tech support was really excellent. They were on the ball, they had answers to our questions. They made things happen that they probably hadn't done beforehand. I found them really collaborative and very much a pleasure to work with.

I found Everbridge to be very responsive during the implementation phase, and post-implementation, whenever we had questions, we were able to reach out either via our managed service provider or directly to Everbridge. As a longtime tech guy - I've got over 30 years in the business - they were really a blast to work with. It's always great to work with people who are competent and who have some kind of empathy for your reality.

I'm not sure if I was dealing with US people, Toronto people, or overseas people. There were a lot of people from different places coming onto phone bridges. At a certain point it was hard to tell who was a managed service provider, who was Remedy, who was Everbridge. It was just quite the multinational effort.

It could have been a real horror story, and it turned out very well. We were starting to have doubts at one point, and then they called in the cavalry. We had a few extra resources. And things went off pretty much without a hitch.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before, we were using xMatters, which is another notification tool, a very old version that was resold to us through a managed service provider. Our xMatters solution was hosted by them and it was at end-of-life. It was the last xMatters on-prem offering back in 2012 or 2013.

When we migrated we looked at different solutions but the Everbridge solution was the most cost-effective at the time. It didn't have, from my perspective, any other clear advantages over xMatters, over PagerDuty.

In our environment it made financial sense and, with the templates, it made operational sense. It worked just fine. It was surprisingly, blazingly fast. The throughput was pretty incredible. The time from when the incident system - the ticketing system - poked Everbridge to say that there was something going on, until Everbridge starting to notify, was very short.

I wasn't even aware that Everbridge was doing an IT alerting product up until last year. I had always known them to be a mass-notification type of company. It was actually a smart move on their part to leverage their mass-notification capability - which, by definition, means you're alerting a whole ton of people in a very short period of time - into an IT alerting product.

In the past, that's where we would run into issues with our on-prem xMatters installation. Sometimes, when there were too many alerts, a lot of queuing would happen. I didn't see any instances while I was there - and we did tests with a lot of events - of much queuing happening on the Everbridge side.

I don't really consider Everbridge to be a relatively new product. Everbridge had an alerting product beforehand. All they did was enhance their alerting product and add functionality required for it to become an IT alerting product. But they started off with a really good base. They managed the transition to an IT-alerting product fairly gracefully.

How was the initial setup?

The setup was straightforward once you understood that it is a different paradigm. When you're used to things being a certain way - if you're used to Windows and you switch to Mac you have a little bit of an adjustment period and then things become intuitive. It was the same here. There's nothing inherently overly-complex about the tool itself. But if you're coming from another tool with a different underlying paradigm, you do have to wrap your head around some different concepts. It took a while to catch on to how to properly use the tool and to convey to Everbridge what exactly we were expecting as a result.

The deployment took about two months.

There were a lot of steps in there including a massive cleanup of the old notification system, so we wouldn't transport garbage into the future, a migration of over 1,000 users, which is quite a bit, all the technical onboarding that had to happen for people, so that they'd know how to use the new tool, exposure to the new functionalities. The training was done simultaneously with the integration of the tool. We had a Dev, a QA, and a Prod environment. We ran it through its paces in all three to make sure it worked out. 

The project took longer because the biggest problem was deciding on the tool. But once the tool was decided on, it was about a two-month effort to convert.

 The actual technical implementation strategy was really just making sure we were passing the right variables and tweaking templates until they were just so.

What about the implementation team?

We used our managed service provider, and we had people from Everbridge and Remedy directly involved. But we did not have any third-party consultants.

Considering the knowledge of the people who were involved in the implementation from the Everbridge side, the transparency with which they worked with us, and the rapidity of the responses and corrections or modifications or tweaks, it was really a very pleasant experience.

What was our ROI?

It replaced something that was already doing a very similar job, so the ROI is hard to quantify. We already had something that notified people. Compared to having nothing, the ROI would have been substantial.

But let's look at it this way: If you have 1,000 users and you're paying $25 a head, you're paying $25,000 per month. If you have access to metrics on incident management and how much it costs a large organization to deal with a major incident, having a notification tool in place reduced our number of major incidents by about 20 percent, year over year.

It's helpful when you can notify and have solid proof of notification. Then you have accountability. What was particularly interesting was that the gains were seen because people were then able to be notified of things that were urgent but not a P1 yet, still at a pre-impact level. The classic example would be a disk that is filling up. You've got a critical app and if the disk fills up, you're toast. Monitoring picks it up, creates a ticket, dispatches it off to a team, the team gets notified. If nobody responds within 10 or 15 minutes, it gets escalated. So for sure, within half an hour, somebody would look at it. Just doing that greatly reduced the number of disk-space incidents we had.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

In terms of additional costs, I was just the guy who was the pain in the back, telling them, "No, we need this functionality. You forgot this. These are the use cases that need to be represented." But apart from the integration costs and, obviously, using resources from Remedy and using resources from Everbridge, regarding licensing costs we just had that flat fee. Once we integrated it was just a standardized fee.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Our need was very unsophisticated in the sense that we wanted to notify a predefined set of people based on predefined criteria. Within Everbridge you could accomplish that using something called templates. It had an automated flow-through.

What xMatters has that Everbr201ge e doesn't have is something interesting called a subscription, where you can get an FYI notification of an event or incident based on matching keywords or other elements of the message.

We did a quick market scan and we saw PagerDuty out there, xMatters was out there. I don't remember if there Opsgenie was available at the time. But there were a bunch of them that all seemed to coalesce around the same price point and, for whatever reason, Everbridge came in as less expensive and they did integrations with Remedy OnDemand.

That was good for us because in a large shop with a good flow of incident tickets, for the people who are resolving these things it becomes cumbersome to take notifications, log in, go into the ticketing system and assign the ticket to themselves, and then work on the problem. With the Everbridge integration the person who acts on the alert becomes the owner of the ticket and the ticket changes status. That facilitated the visibility of how the incidents were being handled at the bank.

We also needed device discrimination based on severity of ticket, time discrimination based on the severity of ticket, and impact of ticket. You're not going to page out somebody for a low-level event.

What other advice do I have?

My chief advice would be to know your use cases. A tool like Everbridge can do just about anything. All of these tools are very powerful tools. Start small, pick something that is attainable and that you can measure, and then build from there. Sometimes people try too hard to do everything at the same time, to implement every possible functionality on day one. It never works. 

Also, if you have a poorly defined use case you have a problem. The tool itself is good but, while Microsoft Word is a decent tool, it doesn't make me a writer. That's how I see Everbridge. It's a decent tool, but it doesn't mean that it makes you an alerting god if you don't know how you want to use it and how you plan to use it or what your expected results are. 

You really have to think through the process, the whole process. We're lucky that our incident management processes were defined. People knew what to expect. I had some very specific use cases. I needed shifts, I needed rotations, I needed device discrimination, depending on the type of alert. I needed targeted escalations. I needed escalations to our NOC for certain types of events. All of these things had to be figured out beforehand. If you discover them as you go along, it impacts the design. If you're designing for a fuzzy need you're going to have a bad time when it comes down to implementation.

In terms of improvement in remediation time, we had already seen that. Our use case was the same use case we had before. 

It was the primary means of notification for our ticketing system. In terms of incidents coming from automation, from monitoring, in any given month there would be 6,000 to 10,000 tickets, depending on the month and what happened.

Something to know about these systems is that once they're configured, they're pretty much set-and-forget. After that, it's just add a user, remove a user. It's very rare in our specific use case that we'd have to change a template.

In terms of IT alerting, I'd give Everbridge a solid eight out of ten. I'd give it a nine if the subscription functionality was a bit better. It's lightweight from an end-user perspective. It's not overly busy. It's straightforward in the way it communicates and it's heavily customizable.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Emily Caldwell - PeerSpot reviewer
IT QHSES Business Manager at TechnipFMC
Real User
We are able to do incident messaging for emergency notifications
Pros and Cons
  • "With SaaS, we can implement in other regions without having to physically go to there."
  • "The response time is real-time alerting. It is very helpful, because it makes things a lot easier. All we have to do is put a circle around a geo-fence and shoot off a message."
  • "The company would like to have super detailed analytics, as we integrate this with our security software."
  • "I would like them to add GPS going forward."

What is our primary use case?

It is for our Global Security Operations Center (GSOC). We use it for its functionalities. It is a part of our alerting systems. Because it's a global company, we have a GSOC and some of the functionalities that we use it for are tracking security threats, monitoring, and notifying our staff and contractors. We also use it for emergency response usage.

The product started off on-premise, then was migrated to a Software as a Service (SaaS) infrastructure.

How has it helped my organization?

We are in the process of automating a lot of our processes. Because it has a SaaS version, the APIs are easily integratable, and we are able to consolidate functions and vendors. This saves money, because of the downturn in the industry, as everybody is penny-pinching these days. We are able to find ways to cut back. This product is very helpful with that since it is a good tool for consolidating functions for security purposes and all of the security functions that the GSOC needs.

What is most valuable?

  • It is easy to integrate. APIs connect to it. Because it is easily integratable with other software that we use, even homegrown, it does save money.
  • With SaaS, we can implement in other regions without having to physically go to there.
  • We monitor all our security threats globally on our big video wall, which is great visually. 
  • The response time is real-time alerting. It is very helpful, because it makes things a lot easier. All we have to do is put a circle around a geo-fence and shoot off a message. For vessel support, they can be notified if there is inclement weather close by.
  • We are able to do incident messaging for emergency notifications. We are able to monitor our security alerts. We are able to link all of these functions together. 

What needs improvement?

I would like them to add GPS going forward. I think they may be working on this, but it is not implemented yet. We want to be able track our shipments, people, and every asset in real-time. With global positioning, especially in oil and gas, we might have a fleet in a pirated area (with active shooters) and have to move fast in situations. We need to know where our people are, how to locate all our assets, and secure them, regardless if they're people, places, vessels, or structures.

The company would also like to have super detailed analytics, as we integrate this with our security software, e.g., camera systems. We want to see ant walking on the ground type of detail. That is the pinpoint analysis that we are looking for in this solution.

For how long have I used the solution?

Three to five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is good. Right now, it is a great product. We are just trying to enhance and automate it as much as we can. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability is pretty good. We haven't had any issues.

Our GSOC is using it right now, which is give or take 20 people. However, it rotates and shifts personnel, so they are not using it all at once.

How was the initial setup?

It probably took a few months to deploy because we go through tests and configurations before going live. We have to test it out in different environments.

What was our ROI?

This product has helped us save $200,000 from being able to get rid of vendors and consolidate functionalities to doing incident reporting. 

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Director - IT at a tech consulting company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Integrates with our CMDB and enables us to quickly identify target audiences for messaging
Pros and Cons
  • "The most important feature, from our perspective, is the integration with our ticketing system. That eliminates wasted motion and time in drafting and sending and finding the right distribution list."
  • "There is some room to improve the initial-rollout functions which are a little bit painful."

What is our primary use case?

We use it to consolidate and remove a lot of manual processes from the enterprise notification space.

How has it helped my organization?

What it allows us to do is integrate with our CMDB. Within our CMDB, we have everything including the ownership, from the executive level down to operational. It enables us to quickly and easily identify who the target audience is through the subscription model that is embedded in Everbridge. It helps with targeted communication and accuracy and timeliness. On average, it saves us roughly five to seven minutes, when we compare all of the manual processes we used to have versus using the tool as integrated into our ticketing system. We send about 15 to 20 of these broadcast messages per day, on average. So the time savings are definitely substantial.

What is most valuable?

The most important feature, from our perspective, is the integration with our ticketing system. That eliminates wasted motion and time in drafting and sending and finding the right distribution list. It's all integrated with the ticketing system, so from the ticket itself, we manage all of the notifications that we send. We're able to manage an incident within the confines of the ticketing system at something like 70 to 80 percent accuracy. The integration feature with the ticketing system is of extreme value.

What needs improvement?

Everything could always be a little bit easier, a little bit faster, but I'm not sure that I can really name anything else off the top of my head.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We haven't had any downtime-type problems. At some time within this calendar year, there was a temporary outage for a few minutes of some function within the system, and I'm not even sure it was one that I leverage. I get notifications from them through their communication systems telling me what the statuses are of the various components of the system, and I don't recall any point where the system was unavailable in its entirety. The stability has been excellent.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability seems to be very robust. When I look at not just what we're doing with it but what it can do, if we were to put the proper amount of effort behind some of the integrations, the scalability is good.

I'm looking at changing a number of things in 2019 and there will be opportunities for more integrations so that we take better advantage of the platform. From a scalability standpoint, that headroom is there. It is just up to us to identify those opportunities and take advantage of them.

How are customer service and technical support?

Everbridge's tech support is amazing. I've been in IT for the last 20 years and I've had a lot of interaction with a lot of vendors for a lot of reasons. The Everbridge team is head-and-shoulders above virtually all of them. Their technical account manager is nothing short of amazing. They spend the time to build the relationships, which I really like. They visit every so often, we have quarterly meetings, we have weekly meetings. They're very responsive. They're really fantastic in that way.

That can be the most valuable aspect of choosing a vendor. The fact of the matter is that you can use a lot of different systems. There is always competition out there. Some do some things better than others and there are little nuances to all the systems. But at the end the day, personally, I'm not a transactional person. I like to build those relationships and build on them and I think that shows in the platform.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We had a conglomeration of a number of tools that were similar in that space but they were not being used anywhere near the way we're using Everbridge now. They were mostly for disaster-recovery types of functions. But we did not use them anywhere near to the same extent as we are now using IT Alerting. We eliminated all of those tools, as far as I know. Some of them were homegrown escalation and on-call type tools. Some were third-party competitors to Everbridge, and we eliminated all of those and consolidated on this platform.

The need for an improvement over what we had was self-evident for an operations person: What was efficient and what wasn't. We could see, fairly easily, what was taking more time than it should. If you're technologically savvy and you know what an automation opportunity looks like, it presents itself.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was more complex than I anticipated. Initially, we were using their UI to send our notifications. It wasn't quite integrated with the ticketing system yet, not at phase one. Phase two was the integration with the ticketing system. All of the required data integrations and the normalizing of the data and customizing it for our needs and purposes took more time than I anticipated. Perhaps that was just me, but I was anticipating that it would be a little bit less difficult than it turned out to be.

From phase one where we were using their UI, until we had phase two, which was the initial deployment with the ticketing system, it took about three to four months.

Our implementation strategy was to take a phased approach to get us to our end goal with the integration and our notifications. We had specific business goals: the original deployment, the creation of the templates, and the basic operating model of the system, through to the integration and, now, to the improvements that are in the future-state of the platform. Next is leveraging some of the features within the system that are more intelligent. For example, when you send a notification you could have it posted to the application. There are a whole bunch of more advanced functions that we're still working towards.

One of the other problems we had, which we did not anticipate, was: If we send out a notification to everybody in the enterprise, that's a significant number and, technically, those messages source from "not your domain." There had to be some fine-tuning to make that work in light of things like the spam, IronPorts, etc. on the front-end servers, the mail servers. It took a little bit of work to get that the way we needed it to be.

Including the developers on the ticketing-system side, the deployment took six to eight people on our side. They made the majority of the decisions and handled the testing and implementation. The phase we're in now is more of a business-as-usual release cycle and enhancement type phase. It doesn't require the density of attention that it did.

What about the implementation team?

We used the Everbridge TAM for most of it and then our own ticketing-system people and our own resources.

What was our ROI?

We definitely have seen ROI. When we have an incident or an outage, we can focus on what we need to do, which is fix the problem, instead of finding forms and sending emails and cobbling together inefficient manual processes. The ROI is clearly there.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at xMatters and at Send Word Now. We also did an internal proof of concept to spec out what it would cost to develop our own system and run it, but for the cost we were looking at to develop it and implement it and run it on a daily basis, it was more cost-effective to use a third party.

This was something that I had actually been working on for a number of years before we adopted Everbridge. I had any number of sessions with some of my operations partners in the company where we would sit down and do a bake-off among those competing tools. As I said, there are nuances to everything, but at the end of the day, we decided we like the Everbridge user interface better. There were some other smaller decision points. Some of it was around cost, but ultimately it was the user interface. And certainly, some of it was due to the people at Everbridge. They were excellent.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be: Do your homework. It's a matter of looking at your specific needs. To me, it's like buying a car, it's the fundamentals of the system. Does it do what you need it to do, what's important to you? And look at what the future capabilities of the system are. That's part of it as well.

My team, IT, uses the system on a day-to-day basis and the others who use it are the developers on the ticketing-system side. Our team is using it for IT support and I have about 50 or 60 individuals who are working in the system and using the integration, 24/7 and 365. But there are other slices of our organization, which are not IT, that are using it for communication. There's Customer Operations and Field Operations and others that are also using it for similar purposes but different use cases.

In terms of usage, it's integral. We use it many times every day, all day. The various organizations within the company are using it every day for communication and coordination. There are other integration possibilities in some of the existing features that we're not taking advantage of. And in the future state of the platform, there are some interesting possibilities that I see with integration with our monitoring tools and some of our other services and applications.

Everything really seems to integrate pretty well. The support from Everbridge is really excellent. When we want changes or we need improvements, we get those fairly quickly and they're very communicative with regard to the product's platform itself and the enhancements. They seem to be looking very intently at the future to see the space grow and what it's going to evolve into. They're doing a pretty good job with that.

They have helped us with some of the moving parts of the integration with the ticketing system. There are enhancements we wanted with the mobile app, any number of changes with integrations and APIs. We've actually had a lot of improvements to it, even in the last year since we deployed it.

I would rate it a good, solid eight out ten. I'm not going to give anything a ten ever. There is some room to improve the initial-rollout functions which are a little bit painful.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Director with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Automated escalation has eliminated our error-prone manual process
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable feature is automated escalation, as it eliminates a manual process which is prone to errors."
  • "The integration with other solutions needs improvement... Due to issues with the libraries provided by Everbridge, we have not been able to integrate IT Alerting with our incident management tool."

What is our primary use case?

We use it for technical engagement and stakeholder communication during major IT outages.

How has it helped my organization?

It has made the technical engagement process more efficient, going from approximately five minutes to generate a page down to 30 seconds.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is automated escalation, as it eliminates a manual process which is prone to errors.

What needs improvement?

The integration with other solutions needs improvement. I am not at liberty to share the name of the application/vendor we are trying to integrate with, but I can tell you that it is our incident management tool. Due to issues with the libraries provided by Everbridge, we have not been able to integrate IT Alerting with that tool.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Everbridge has been able to deliver in accordance with their SLAs.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scaling can be a tedious endeavor if users and contacts are manually created.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is excellent. They routinely answer problems on the first call.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I’m not at liberty to name it but, the previous solution required us to manually look up and engage. This was time-consuming and prone to errors. Those are the reasons we switched.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward as we had a consultant with us. The consultant was helpful. There was a lot of prep work that we could and should have completed prior to the consultant arriving onsite. Had we known to do this, it would have made the engagement more productive.

The deployment took approximately two weeks. Our goal was to configure the teams we engage most often. Those 30 teams represent 95 percent of our volume.

What about the implementation team?

A consultant was used, and the experience was very positive.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The current pricing model is adequate. We feel that the pricing model for our IT Alerting solution is competitive with similar solutions on the market.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did evaluate other options but I'm not at liberty to comment on them.

What other advice do I have?

My advice is to leverage any of the integrations you can. In addition, do the prep work, including creating contacts, users, and groups, prior to the consultative work provided by Everbridge.

We have over 500 users, a majority of whom are group managers along with some organizational and account admins. We have two FTEs supporting Everbridge and their roles range from configuration management, to vision and strategy, and vendor relations. The product is used extensively, with roughly 25,000 messages sent through the tool annually.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
David Valerius - PeerSpot reviewer
Communication Manager at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Simplifies on-call schedule creation and management, and allows us to focus on restoration rather than on calling people
Pros and Cons
  • "Our performance showed us that, for major incidents, we spent over 40 minutes just making manual call-outs. That is why we implement the tool in the first place and that time has been cut down to two or three minutes."
  • "It's a lot easier to create and manage schedules, especially in comparison to the on-call scheduling creation in ServiceNow. That has always been something of a bear to operate. We've found it's a lot simpler in Everbridge."
  • "With their templates, you can only have a maximum of three phases: new, updated, and resolved. It's not always that easy when we open up a call, that we identify who we need, page out, and we're good. A lot of time it requires multiple page-outs. Being restricted to those three phases, there's no way to say, "I want this variable to be persistent, and this one to not be." ...I would like to see a bit more flexibility and tighter control over the templates and the variables you can create."
  • "They still have a limitation due to their partner, I believe it's Twilio, where, if you're on an incident call, there is a four-hour time limit. We often have calls that go over four hours in length so people have to drop and rejoin to reset their four-hour timer. It's a minor inconvenience, but it's not ideal."

What is our primary use case?

Our use case is using it to reduce the time to assemble everyone, especially when reacting to major incidents, and to reduce the time spent doing manual call-outs and engagements in the course of them.

The background, and why we looked into getting a tool in the first place, is that when we were engaged on an incident and it rose in severity or the scope of impact broadened, there were many different checkboxes that we could check: "Okay, now we need to re-engage this person, this person, and this person." Also, just in the average incident-information process, we needed additional speed in getting people engaged, rather than manually looking up the on-call information to see who's engaged or on-call. We would have to manually call them and possibly get voicemail and have to try the second number.

We use it for every bridge call that we host and every engagement of an on-call group that we need. We use it multiple times a day, every day.

How has it helped my organization?

Our performance showed us that, for major incidents, we spent over 40 minutes just making manual call-outs. That is why we implement the tool in the first place and that time has been cut down to two or three minutes. We've had tremendous gains on that.

It's a lot easier to create and manage schedules, especially in comparison to the on-call scheduling creation in ServiceNow. That has always been something of a bear to operate. We've found it's a lot simpler in Everbridge.

It enables everybody on our team to focus on their primary responsibilities, driving toward restoration, instead of being distracted by manually calling folks.

What is most valuable?

Creating the templates and being able to create my own variables are helpful features.

Their latest features are going to allow me to be a bit more flexible with using Everbridge for internal communications. We started using it for internal incident notifications a few months ago, and having that group lookup, allowing me to create a relation between a property and a variable in the template, and who should be contacted as far as a group in the organization goes, is going to allow for some nice self-service for our internal folks when we transition to a different Everbridge organization for our internal coms.

What needs improvement?

With their templates, you can only have a maximum of three phases: new, updated, and resolved. It's not always that easy when we open up a call, that we identify who we need, page out, and we're good. A lot of time it requires multiple page-outs. Being restricted to those three phases, there's no way to say, "I want this variable to be persistent, and this one to not be." Everything that you select will be brought over as you continue. In our environment, as we have many different call-outs that have to happen, even though they are incredibly simple to select and execute now in Everbridge, it is quite the long list. I would like to make it a bit easier and more intuitive. I would like to see a bit more flexibility and tighter control over the templates and the variables you can create.

Also, they still have a limitation due to their partner, I believe it's Twilio, where, if you're on an incident call, there is a four-hour time limit. We often have calls that go over four hours in length so people have to drop and rejoin to reset their four-hour timer. It's a minor inconvenience, but it's not ideal. That is pretty persistent with any IT alerting partner you go with.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We've been using it for a year. There have been a couple of instances of our encountering some weird issues with the calls being dropped, or people not being able to hear. That was more towards the beginning part of our go-live. We ended up identifying it through troubleshooting with Everbridge and Twilio and different networks. It was an issue with an AT&T circuit somewhere. They were kind enough to give us a different set of bridge numbers so that we were going on a different path. Since going to those numbers, we haven't encountered that same sort of instability or call-quality issues. 

Other than that, occasionally a service advisory will go out from Everbridge where a certain communication path is having issues. But those are typically quickly resolved. We are pretty comfortable with the stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We've had no problems with scalability. We brought in Everbridge shortly after we had bought another company and started merging together into a new, unified company. That, obviously, brings some substantial scaling challenges. But we've encountered no issues with adding many, many more users to the system over the last several months.

We only have a couple of hundred people directly interfacing with Everbridge, maybe a few hundred. But as far as the users we're communicating to, it's a few thousand and that keeps increasing as we progress.

How are customer service and technical support?

Everybody I've dealt with at Everbridge tech support, barring one individual on their staff, has been pretty nice to work with. They're knowledgeable, they're helpful, they want to assist. There have been a couple of times that it's been challenging to get the escalation that we were looking for. We were hoping to get some more urgency, especially when we were first going live, with the instability issues we were seeing. It took a little longer to get that escalation that we were looking for, but once it happened, we certainly got the amount of attention that we needed on the issue. For the most part, after that experience, it's been pretty good.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were not using a different solution previously for IT alerting. The on-call schedules were managed and stored in ServiceNow. As I said, the reason behind getting IT Alerting was that everything was manual. We weren't using a competitor like PagerDuty or xMatters.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup really depends on the environment you are operating in. They can easily integrate and do imports from an HR system and from ServiceNow and from many different applications. They do have a lot of good options that you can easily get things set up with. For internal reasons we couldn't do it, but I definitely saw that the ability was there to do it. I would call it straightforward.

We did the deployment in under a month. It was a pretty aggressive time frame.

We didn't really have an implementation strategy. We were focused on getting the users that we wanted to bring over from ServiceNow identified and on marrying up that data with what was going to be in Everbridge. You can pass that information along through the API connector. We ended up just doing an export and then manually uploading it to Everbridge.

It was a matter of identifying who was in the system that we needed to get in there as a contact. From there, our strategy was to get meetings scheduled with the high-level folks who pass information down through the disparate on-call groups that they're in charge of, so they could let them know what changes were coming.

One big part of the overall strategy was having executive backing, because going from one organizational culture, where folks are used to having a certain amount of time to respond to a bridge call, to Everbridge, where we wanted to have the system escalate, and escalate quickly - since when we engage those folks on a bridge call, it's because we're losing money and our customers are losing money - you have a lot less time to respond to a call before it escalates. Obviously, people who are living on-call schedules are not going to like that kind of news. If you don't have that executive backing, then people aren't going to be as quick to adhere to the new organizational culture of, "you need to be on a call within a few minutes, if we start paging you." There would be no more of this, "I'll be there, when I can, in 15 minutes."

What about the implementation team?

We had our integration consultant from Everbridge on hand. There were no third-parties.

What was our ROI?

We have definitely seen ROI, not in terms of dollars and cents, but the mean time to restore from major incidents has been more than halved in terms of duration. Being the company we are, in the financial world, and with how many transactions are processed through us in a second, the potential financial savings from even just a minute of reduced outage time can be substantial.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

For the one-way license, which refers to someone is just on the receiving end, it's very affordable. I was actually surprised that it was a really good price. The two-way license, like for an on-call resource who is actually going to be in a calendar and be paged, it is a bit more expensive, but for the gains that we've realized, it's certainly worth the price.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at MIR3 - they are called OnSolve now - and we looked at xMatters. MIR3 just didn't check enough boxes. It didn't seem like a good solution for storing and managing and quickly engaging people on bridge calls. xMatters and Everbridge seemed to have a better, more intuitive user interface, more robust options, better reporting options, and more flexibility.

What other advice do I have?

Get that executive leadership backing, and make sure that you're not just going to use Everbridge to page out to people in a different manner. You should look to set that "timer" pretty low on bridge engagement and get people used to responding and getting on bridge calls immediately, because every minute of an outage is lost money.

Determine up front if you are going to do the group integration from whatever application you might be looking to do the user-sync with. If you are going to have an application with on-call schedules maintained, such as Service Now - as I believe there is an option to turn on group sync - be careful about turning that group sync feature on. User sync is pretty straightforward but we were warned against using the group sync feature for various reasons, even from within Everbridge.

Our users are support staff, on-call resources, on-call leaders, incident commanders, communication managers. There are a couple of senior leaders who know how to use it, but it is mainly incident management and communication management.

Our deployment team was just a handful of folks. We needed a little bit of partnership from our ServiceNow folks to get the API into place. You could go with a half-dozen people on the integration. For the maintenance aspect, it's even less than that.

There are four of us who administrate the tool. I'm the communication management piece of it. My manager handles major incident and critical communications, so he's incident management as well, and he does a lot of admin work in it. Our project manager is the incident commander and communication management.

We have support staff who don't have the rights to kick off Everbridge to automatically engage people, but they'll still access the Everbridge Member Portal to manually look up resources and call them for lower-priority issues. We use it pretty heavily right now and we are definitely looking at other ways of utilizing the tool. We expect it to increase pretty substantially, as we go forward.

One of the big things that we're looking to do is integrating it with event monitoring. We're looking to further reduce the mean time to assemble for major incidents by bypassing the current process. Currently, event monitoring takes in a ticket and it gets assigned to a queue in ServiceNow where an agent will see it, and they'll call out the support person. That person will say, "Okay, well we need a bridge call for this." What we are trying to do is identify, with the various application support teams, among the events that are creating tickets, which ones are deemed "critical" that could be a precursor to a major incident. We want to identify those and create incident conditions in ServiceNow that will engage an Everbridge template to get the incident management team engaged right away, rather than waiting on those manual actions to happen. We're still in the early stages of that, and we are looking to increase that sort of usage for Everbridge to gain more efficiencies.

Some of them are live right now. We call them the "Everbridge critical alerts" and we have many that are already in production. We are looking to expand that even more.

I would rate Everbridge IT Alerting at eight out of ten, overall. It's a very powerful tool. We've made a lot of efficiency gains but there are definitely things that, from an enhancement standpoint, we would like to see added to the tool. The progress on that hasn't been as quick as we'd like. Its been pretty slow going.

With what we already have in place, it's enabling us to do a lot. I absolutely love having the tool. I would not rate it as a ten out of ten, but they're definitely heading in the right direction. From what I've seen, as far as what they are planning on having, I would say it could be a ten out of ten this time next year, if things go well in year-two. But for year-one, I would say it's an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Senior Analyst at a retailer with 10,001+ employees
Real User
The rotation and replacement options save our managers a lot of time
Pros and Cons
  • "The rotation and replacement options save our managers a lot of time."
  • "The rules option has been helpful, as we can adjust the conditions in the template."
  • "Explanations are limited to 500 characters in description fields."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use case of how we started using the product was to add contacts to Everbridge as if it was an Active Directory. We have logins for manager and member portals. The manager portal gives total access and member portal is given to everyone with partial access.

We also use it to send out communications, such as emails, during major incidents from our command center. We have expanded its use as an emergency notification tool.

How has it helped my organization?

The rotation and replacement options save our managers a lot of time.

What is most valuable?

When scheduling, it gives us the option to amend times or replace someone (with an explanation). 

The rules option has been helpful, as we can adjust the conditions in the template.

What needs improvement?

Explanations are limited to 500 characters in description fields.

While the reporting is good, we are having a problem with one particular report which is creating a large manual process for us.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We don't have stability issues.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have been able to expand the tool and are planning to take it to the store level.

In our organization, we have 390 management users currently. We are looking to add 250 more. We have requested to have 650 management user licenses in the future.

We currently have 9000 member users. We are looking to add another 3500 member users, so we have requested 12,400 member licenses.

How are customer service and technical support?

We would like the tech support to have better response times. Since we are looking at going global, they have told us Everbridge has told us that they are working on the issue.

Overall, their responses have been good.

I personally would rate the technical support as a 10 out of 10.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Previously, we were using xMatters, then we moved on to Everbridge because we thought there were some limitations xMatters when we used their templates and there were a lot of delays with sending out notifications. We also did not feel that xMatters product was user-friendly.

How was the initial setup?

Initially, we thought it wasn't complicated. However, we did have some issues with stability and had to reach out to the support team. Later on, it wasn't difficult.

The deployment took about three to four months.

We have four team members on our Everbridge team.

What was our ROI?

It saves us a lot of time.

What other advice do I have?

It is the best tool that I have ever used.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Management, IT Infrastructure at a pharma/biotech company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Streamlines the notification process and auto-generation of incident tickets has saved us a lot of time
Pros and Cons
  • "Valuable features include having the Calendar built in. That allows for on-call rotation to be set once and left alone. Also, Slack Integration enables us to have all the information from an incident and discussions documented through Slack, without input."
  • "Email Ingestion - Having the ability for ticket generation to auto-generate an incident through Everbridge has saved my team hundreds of man-hours it would have taken to manually create them."
  • "An ability to get to the database that houses our information would be great. Currently, we are at the mercy of Everbridge and, if they do not have the function built, we cannot gather the information that we would like."

What is our primary use case?

Incident reporting, mass notification to all offices and employees.

How has it helped my organization?

This product has allowed the teams to focus on troubleshooting rather than dealing with the administrative task of having to notify individuals or groups about incidents. This has saved man-hours and has already paid for the product.

What is most valuable?

  • Mass Notification and Conditions - This streamlines the process of notifying the proper people of an event without team members having to look up who they need to notify. 
  • Calendar - Having the Calendar built in allows for on-call rotation to be set once and left alone.
  • Slack Integration - Being able to have all the information from an incident and discussions documented through Slack, without input, is a great asset.
  • Email Ingestion - Having the ability for ticket generation to auto-generate an incident through Everbridge has saved my team hundreds of man-hours it would have taken to manually create them. This aspect has been one of the driving factors in continuing to utilize Everbridge and finding all the new ways the tool will help with day-to-day operations.

What needs improvement?

An ability to get to the database that houses our information would be great. Currently, we are at the mercy of Everbridge and, if they do not have the function built, we cannot gather the information that we would like.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I have never experienced a stability issue. We once had an issue with the built-in conference bridges. After troubleshooting, we were able to determine the issue was on our internal PBX system and not Everbridge.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

So far, no issues with scalability. Anytime we have a request for a function, they work at meeting that request and eventually get it to us.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is great when working with our direct account representative. Sometimes, when using the email support, there is a communication breakdown and it can take a while to get issues resolved.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Our previous solution was to get on the phone and on email and try to remember who needs to be notified. We switched to this product to assure standardization of notifications and to create groups of people who need notifications.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. My team and I did a lot of research and prepared what we knew we wanted, upfront. This enabled the onboarding process to go quickly and smoothly.

What was our ROI?

The number of man-hours saved, and the standardization of notifications in mass form, have paid for product time and again.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did not evaluate other products, as this product met all our criteria. We have had companies come to us since the implementation of this product, companies which offer the same types of services. None of them has been able to show us theirs is more robust or worth moving to.

What other advice do I have?

Prepare ahead of time with your vision of what you want from it. We were able to start implementing the tool on the very first visit with our account representative, saving time and money.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Manager at a transportation company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Email integration enables our staff to send alerts from other programs using email triggers
Pros and Cons
  • "The email integration, the ability to launch from other programs using email triggers, was the primary reason we got the solution and it's been really helpful"
  • "An incident management feature would be nice because, as it stands now, you select different items when you're filling out a form to launch a notification. If those were more conditional it would help. Right now it just puts out whatever you put into the form, whereas, if you could specify a "yes" or "no" and it would input a different verbiage, that would be nice to have, instead of having to spell out all the verbiage."

What is our primary use case?

We use it for the email integration portion.

How has it helped my organization?

We've created fake units in the CAD system and, when activated, it sends an email to Everbridge. That has allowed the dispatchers to send out quick notifications. Before, they'd have to log into Everbridge, find the right thing, fill it out - do the full Everbridge thing - which always got deferred to later because they were busy doing other things. By creating the fake unit in CAD to trigger the email integration, all they have to do is assign a unit using the system they're already working in and it will send out the raw information from the call. That's been helpful so that the command staff gets quicker notifications of things.

The initial reason we got it was the lightning protection integration. We had a guy struck by lightning at the airport about a year and a half ago. Our lightning system was going off but this provides an extra layer of protection. With it, all the people who have signed up for that notification automatically get an Everbridge notification on their phone as soon as the thing goes off. They know, "This is active, I should do something about that," instead of relying on the horns and sirens that the lightning system uses. It's hard to quantify. We haven't had anyone struck by lightning since, but we hadn't had anyone struck by lightning before either. It is just an extra way for our tenants to be able to be in the loop on what's happening.

The lightning integration has been really helpful, especially for our maintenance department. It was intended for tenants and stakeholders. But the maintenance department, because they're out in the field all day, their director said all their work phones get it, no matter what. Before, they were running around trying to find people to tell them, "Lightning is on," to make sure they were shutting down. Now, everybody out there in the field who has a phone, and almost all of them do, immediately knows the lightning system is active and that they need to shut down.

What is most valuable?

The email integration, the ability to launch from other programs using email triggers, was the primary reason we got the solution and it's been really helpful. We've been able to integrate our CAD system into it using it. The CAD system is kind of old and it doesn't like to talk to things so the integration is useful.

We also have a lightning protection system and were able to integrate it using email. The lightning was our main purpose for upgrading to IT Alerting but we have found other uses for it since then.

What needs improvement?

It does have a pretty steep learning curve, especially if you're trying to parse information, instead of just sending it raw. Learning the Regular Expression language, to try and get it to pull out what you want, is a pretty steep learning curve upfront. The steep learning curve is specifically for IT Alerting, its features. And, for the API integrations, you've got to know how to write the REST API code if you want to use them.

The Everbridge system itself was fairly straightforward to learn.

An incident management feature would be nice because, as it stands now, you select different items when you're filling out a form to launch a notification. If those were more conditional it would help. Right now it just puts out whatever you put into the form, whereas, if you could specify a "yes" or "no" and it would input a different verbiage depending on the case, that would be nice to have, instead of having to spell out all the verbiage.

The only thing our users want, because they work 12-hour shifts and it times out if they're not using it, would be to stay logged in for at least 12 hours before it times out. The max is eight hours right now.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We haven't had any issues with stability. For the product as a whole, we have had one delayed notification and we've had the product for two and a half years now. We called support on that one and found out they were having a nationwide problem but it was fixed within two to three hours. They sent out a root-cause analysis a couple of hours after that, explaining to us what happened. They're pretty responsive.

That's the only delay we've had since we've had the overall Everbridge product.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In this budget cycle, we just purchased some more seats for notifications and we're trying to get all of our in-house staff on it. It was pretty simple. We called them, we told them what the deal was. They were willing to work with us, to work with it in the budget cycle process. As far as scaling up and working within the budget cycle, they understood all that and were really helpful in getting it worked out.

How are customer service and technical support?

We don't have that many problems with Everbridge. The couple of times I've had to engage with tech support they've gotten right back to me, helped me figure it out. Even the one time it was something I was doing wrong, they were able to point me in the right direction and get me squared away. They replied quickly. I don't have anything bad to say about them.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were using CodeRED. We needed some of the functionality Everbridge had that CodeRED didn't have. CodeRED was fairly solid and was a heck of a lot cheaper, because we were piggy-backed on with our Sheriff's Office. But the functionality of the internet management portion of Everbridge outweighed the cost difference.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was pretty straightforward. Everyone on the implementation team had a good understanding of it and, once Everbridge turns it on, they let you play with it, so that's good. And then they sent out a team to do training. We had a pretty good handle on it, so the training was more addressing our questions. They turned it on about a week before the training crew got out here, to let us start messing around in it. We were able to figure it out, so by the time the training crew got here, it was more like questions and answers, except for our PR staff who hadn't played with it at all. They got a full top-down, step one, step two, training, whereas the Admin folks got a bit more Q&A. They were really adaptable to what were trying to do.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We thought the base product was pretty reasonable. It can pricey once you start adding stuff on, but that's the same with anything. We have scaled up almost every year. We bought the base, 500 contacts, the thing they sell to airports, in our first year. Then we got the IT Alerting because we needed the email integration stuff and some of the scheduling features. This year we've gone up another step in contacts, from 500 to 1,000. We're investing in the system.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We were okay with CodeRED. The user interface was kind of clunky for how we were using it with the dispatchers. But that was more because of how we were doing it. For some of the commands, at the time, they didn't want electronic-sounding messages so they were making the dispatchers verbally record every message. Once we went with Everbridge, we got the command staff to be okay with electronic sounding messages; Everbridge is reliant on electronic messaging. Before, for whatever reason, they wanted voice messages and that's what CodeRED did really well. But it required a dispatcher to record it and it was a whole thing. Once we got everyone convinced that text messages are reliable, and that they'll get an email if the text message doesn't work, that there's an app - all that - it was a pretty easy sale after that.

Also, CodeRED called everything you had at the same time. With Everbridge you can have it switch methods every five minutes. CodeRED was "call everything, every time." It called your house phone, your cell phone, your work cell, your personal cell, your dog's cell, your cat's cell, your wife, your daughter. It called them all, all at the same time. That's why it was called CodeRED, because your whole house went on fire. IT Alerting can be set to call just one phone at a time. That was a big sell too.

What other advice do I have?

Dig into the resources they have, like Everbridge University. Don't rely completely on the on-site training because it's only one day. The best way to learn is by doing. You need to get in there, push the buttons, pull the triggers, etc. My advice would be, when they turn it on, get in there and put in a couple of contacts and start sending messages, to get used to the interface. Take their online stuff, use all the resources they give you. Don't just rely on that one day of on-site training they provide, that's not going to do it for you.

You can go into Everbridge University and type in, "I want to know how to do 'x'," and there will be modules on how to do that. You can watch the courses and it gives you enough to get in there and start figuring it out. There is also an interactive user community.

We haven't gotten much into the API stuff. We need to. We're starting to use scheduling a little more. With our police and fire department and the air-com staff, the staff that I manage, we're trying to get more people involved with it. Because the scheduling is its own thing and it doesn't integrate with how they schedule their staff, it's been a little difficult getting them to stand that up. But that's more just trying to find someone there who is willing to keep that schedule in Everbridge up to date so we can make sure we're not waking up people who shouldn't be woken, and that we're alerting the people who need to know. That's what we're focusing on now.

We like it. It works great. If you ask the dispatchers who do 90 percent of the launches, it's leaps and bounds better than what we were doing before. Back then, they were having to call in and type in all these codes and verbalize the messages. If they misspoke they had to hang up and start over. It was a giant pain. With Everbridge, it's just fill out the form. If "x" is happening you click on that form, you fill it out and hit Go and it goes. You don't have to worry about whether the right person will get it because that's all been pre-programmed. They really like the ease of use.

This has been one of the better products that you buy off the shelf because it just works. With almost everything you buy that requires as much customization as something like this does, you're going to have problems, but we've had very few with Everbridge. It just works.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
David Paul - PeerSpot reviewer
Lead Pipeline Designer/GIS Specialist at a consultancy with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
It just runs. We have not had a single outage.
Pros and Cons
  • "The system has a lot of great features and they keep adding to it."
  • "It just runs. I do not think we have had a single outage; nothing. There has not been a single issue with it in the time that we have had it running. It just works."
  • "The most important features are the scheduling capability and the integration with ServiceNow."
  • "I swapped two people's weeks, and at least from what I saw, I had to do each day individually. It would be nice if I could swap two people's weeks without having to do it each day."

How has it helped my organization?

We went from a manual email system to an organized responsive automated system. It was able to improve our efficiency and improve everyone's responsiveness, because people were not responding to emails. 

It also improved our ability to capture everything in tickets, whereas before, emails and tickets were rarely, if ever, getting created.

What is most valuable?

The most important features are the scheduling capability and the integration with ServiceNow. The ease of putting in a replacement person who will cover for you, or if you want to switch with two people, this is very easy to do. It is very easy to capture the calendaring and make sure everybody is aware of it. There is ability for it to communicate back and forth with ServiceNow and our ticketing system. This is much easier and more real-time in its capturing what is happening when a ticket opens, a ticket is accepted for work, and it is closed out.

There is also the application that you can install on your phone, which the engineers really like. If allows you the flexibility to choose: Whether you notify your home phone or your cell phone, and whether you get a text first. You get choose in what order, so the flexibility for each engineer is very good.

What needs improvement?

I swapped two people's weeks, and at least from what I saw, I had to do each day individually. It would be nice if I could swap two people's weeks without having to do it each day. There may be a way to do it, but I just didn't find it, so I did it day-by-day. This would be a neat feature to have. 

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It just runs. We have not had a single outage; nothing. There has not been a single issue with it in the time that we have had it running. It just works.

The best thing I could say about any system is that it just works. That is the highest compliment that anyone can give to a system. It is one less headache that I have because I know that it is up and running.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We are not a heavy usage, enormous company, but I see no limitations to the scalability of it. You could use this if you were a small company, and you could use this if you were a 4500 person U.S. company or a 200,000 person global company.

I could see how it would scale up very easily.

How are customer service and technical support?

Tech support is excellent. They are very responsive. We are able to reach them very quickly. On a scale of one to 10, I would give them a 10. They are very quick about getting us answers when working with us.

Their account team is excellent. Their marketing team is excellent. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We had a very manual system where we alerted everyone to all system alerts.

With Everbridge, we were able to set up a schedule where only people on call get notified, so everybody was not getting emails and having to somehow wake up in the middle of the night.

We were also able to split out our system alerts so we now have five-minute system alerts that the infrastructure team likes to see. However, we do not need to open up a ticket and have an engineer react to it. We have a separate one now where after 30 minutes, it creates a ticket and alerts an engineer to investigate. 

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very straightforward. The configurations took us a day and a half to be completely set up. We saved the last half a day in case we ran into problems. After, a year or two of using it, never found a problem. Therefore, it was very easy to set up.

What about the implementation team?

Their support staff and the installation/professional services team were great.

When implementing, talk to your account team and work with the installation team. Make sure you have a plan as to what you are looking for and work closely with the Everbridge team. They will get you where you need to go.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Their pricing is a good value and very reasonable. They are very upfront about their pricing. There is nothing confusing about it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We were looking for an IT alerting system. A couple of my peers gave me a couple of different suggestions. I believe I might have met them originally at the ServiceNow Knowledge Conference, and we looked at a couple of other systems along with this. We had a team of people who reviewed different options and functions that each system had. Out of that evaulation, we selected Everbridge.

We evaluated PagerDuty as a potential option. However, the system feels like it is stuck a bit in the past.

What other advice do I have?

I am pretty happy with the way it works. We are very happy with it. We have not made changes to it because it just works.

It does what it says it does. The application works. They have a long history, but the system is advanced and modern. It has a lot of great features and they keep adding to it.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer:
PeerSpot user
it_user741570 - PeerSpot reviewer
Office of the CIO, Service Excellence at a agriculture with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Gets the right parties to the table at the right time - our mean time to restore has diminished, saving us money
Pros and Cons
  • "Even in the first few months, we realized some of those benefits around shortening the time to resolution."
  • "It helps to pull the right people in very quickly, through a collection of utilities where you can say, "I want to notify more than one person at a time. I want to escalate at my discretion and via rules within the system.""
  • "A key area for improvement - and I think they are working towards these things - is analytics. If I want to do sophisticated reporting and analysis of the data that's being captured in IT Alerting, at the moment, the reporting interface is immature."
  • "Their integration capabilities are still progressing, but not quite where we'd like to see them yet. They're moving there with that orchestration capability where they're seeing the potential of an API-first mentality. So instead of trying to build custom connections into everything, you open up APIs to allow other systems to talk to IT Alerting and allow IT Alerting to talk to other systems. There is room for improvement, but they get it."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use is to engage, to notify, and engage IT team members when an outage is underway. We do use it for proactive notifications, but our primary use is to communicate with support-group team members when we need to get their attention and fix a problem.

Some of the features we were looking to achieve included proactive notifications, for a situation where we might have a database server that has 50 databases on it. That means if I shut down that database server for patching, all 50 of those databases are offline and multiple applications, anywhere from 50 or more, are also going to be taken offline. We use this Everbridge IT Alerting tool as a "polling" product to reach out to the stakeholders of those 50 databases and give them five options of day of week and time of day, and say, "We have to shut the server down. You get to have a voice in when we do so to minimize the impact on you as a business stakeholder." We've been leveraging the product to do some of those proactive outage notifications and polling capabilities as well.

We are also striving to integrate it with other parts of our IT operating ecosystem. We already use it to communicate when a monitoring alert triggers one of the reactive notifications, and we are seeking to implement more of a full loop between that event and an incident being opened in the service management system. We're not quite there yet, but we're walking in that direction.

How has it helped my organization?

What we were looking at was: "How do you shorten the time to restoration when a crisis is occurring?" That's really the key benefit of the out-of-the-box Everbridge IT Alerting functionality for us.

In terms of improvements to our organization, we're still on that journey. I've used the terminology with our friends at Everbridge a few times, where I associate this with the traditional "crawl, walk, and run" metaphor. One year ago when we launched, we were barely crawling. Then we started crawling fairly quickly. I would say we're now in the "toddling" stage where we walk, but we don't walk all that well yet. For us, it is a continual improvement journey. 

We are anticipating that over the next 12 to 36 months we're going to go from toddling to walking very upright and then into running.

Organizationally, we have gained some benefits already. Even in the first few months, we recognized or realized some of those benefits that I described above around shortening the time to resolution. 

What we envision getting as an additional organizational benefit is system consolidation. For example, we've got four different systems today that contain some of the data and capabilities that Everbridge can very naturally accommodate. We just haven't moved there yet. Over time, we'll see some reduced cost in infrastructure, reduced cost in application maintenance and complexity, some improved consistency across these procedures as a result of using one system versus many. This should contribute to further reducing the time to restore service. In the end, we get benefits adding up over time, where time to restore gets better and better, and our ability to leverage the platform in multiple ways gets better and better.

What is most valuable?

The engagement component is the most valuable, and what I mean by that is, if I were to send out an alert notification to a half-dozen people when a major IT crisis occurs, what I want to be able to do is remediate the issue as fast as I possibly can. For the sake of the business, I want to minimize downtime. What we were seeing in our prior systems, in our prior procedures and capabilities was that it would take quite a long time to get the right people to the table, making the right decisions to restore service.

One of the key drivers for us, and this is still one of the key benefits for us, is that Everbridge IT Alerting helps to pull those right people in very quickly through a collection of utilities where you can say, "I want to notify more than one person at a time. I want to escalate at my discretion and via rules within the system." It enables you to pull all the people into these bridge calls.

Let's say for example you have somebody in a group who is not online, but they are the on-call primary. The first iteration of a notification might go to them, but I can - depending on the nature of the issue - send a communication to the entire group under the anticipation that the primary on-call might not respond first. 

What needs improvement?

In recent weeks we've been talking to Everbridge about leveraging some new functionality that they're demploying right now around orchestration. Imagine a full, closed-loop event remediation: auto-remediation. A server throws an alert. We catch it in our monitoring tool. We page or SMS text, using Everbridge IT Alerting. A group member receives that text and responds to the text with "Option One." Option one can say, "I want to go ahead and execute an orchestration that will automatically stop and restart the services on that box or even reboot the box." That would, again, further reduce service restoration time, and significantly reducing the manual engagement of logging a ticket, logging onto the box, restarting the box or the servers or services manually. All of that can be done through automation. We're not there yet, but that's what we're talking about right now, as a part of our next wave of moving along the crawl, walk, run journey.

In terms of what could be improved, almost always, there is something that could be improved. I've been in this industry long enough to know that there is no perfect system. All the good ones still offer opportunities for getting better. I think if you were to look from their point of view, they would also see themselves in a crawl, walk, run journey. They may be further along in their walk, but they're probably not in the "Olympic sprint" or "Olympic marathon" stage yet. They've got lots of potential, room for feature enhancements, improvements.

A couple of key ones might include - and I think they are working towards these things - analytics. If I want to do sophisticated reporting and analysis of the data that's being captured in IT Alerting, at the moment, the reporting interface is immature. They're very helpful. They get it. They're listening to us, but it's weak. It's growing. It's getting better. Reporting and analytics would be one space. 

Their integration capabilities are still progressing, but not quite where we'd like to see them yet. They're moving there with that orchestration capability where they're seeing the potential of an API-first mentality. So instead of trying to build custom connections into everything, you open up APIs to allow other systems to talk to IT Alerting and allow IT Alerting to talk to other systems. There is room for improvement, but they get it. They're listening in that space, too.

Sure, there are things they can be doing better, but in partnership with them, us among other customers, I think we've got their ear, and they're being very proactive about listening.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We have encountered some issues with stability. The shorter answer is, "Yes, it's stable." 

The longer answer would be, we've had a couple of outages, and we had some very deep discussions with Everbridge on the fact that I can't alert people of an outage in my environment if I'm having an outage in their environment. That's bad, and they know it. They recognize it. They acknowledge that. 

We did have one problem within the first 30 to 60 days of going live where we had a day-and-a-half outage of the platform, and frankly, that's unacceptable. They heard that from us very directly. Since then, they've mitigated that by expanding their architecture and changing the method of their architecture to be more highly available and robust on their side. 

Since then, the stability has been top-drawer. We've had a few minor issues around things like messages not being delivered. Part of it is our expectation, that they deliver every message, 100 percent, 24/7, but I also absolutely recognize that we are literally all over the globe. We're everywhere in the world today as Cargill footprint. That means we're trying to deliver messages in near real-time, 20,000 miles away under infrastructure circumstances that could be very poor. It might be in a third-world nation. It might be in a place where there is no cellular signal or their cellular partnerships are not as well-built or professionally associated as in some other parts of the world. So sometimes, messages don't get delivered, but I would say that is a very rare challenge for us. Everbridge, along with any other service provider in their space, will have to face those once in a while, and I think they're very good at running interference with those "edge" connection points that are difficult to navigate. They're very good at it. Occasionally, we see a message dropped or a message not delivered, but it is rare, and I think they are doing everything they can to handshake with the providers around the world in a way that continues to minimize and, maybe someday, eliminate those one-offs.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I think scalability was part of that architectural review we did about a year ago where, when they encountered that outage. One of our challenges to them was, "If you're a cloud-first solution yourself, how do you not build your platform to be highly scalable?" Literally, spin up, spin down, any time you want or any time the demand suggests it.

Initially, the scalability was good but not great. Since then, I think it now borders on great. They've learned some lessons. They've restructured their platform a bit, and it is highly scalable. I've never seen a performance problem.

We have about 155,000 workers around the globe at Cargill, and there are maybe 5,000 who log in with some regularity to the platform to do message queuing or message sending or message response or self-service profile updates; I can log in and change my cell phone number, or specify that I want to use my cell phone as my primary and my work phone as my secondary. That capability has never been met with any comments from our community saying, "It doesn't perform well."

How are customer service and technical support?

Their first-line tech support is good, but I think their method of providing support deserves some very real consideration. What I mean is, when I spend X dollars buying a product, our expectation for support is very high. I want you, as a vendor, to support your product 24/7 and give me appropriate response windows. If it's not urgent, I'm okay with you not being imminent, but if it is urgent, I want you on the phone right away.

They've pushed a Professional Services model where they're saying, for you to get this kind of attention or support for either "How do I" questions or "What could we do a little differently?" or those kinds of things, they're suggesting we buy a bucket of Professional Services hours. I've resisted that from day one, and I have not yet given into that request because my perspective is, I already paid you for that. I bought the licensing and I bought support as a percentage, if you will, of the licensing price. That's what maintenance is for.

To me, Professional Services is more an act of deeper consulting where I might say, "I want to actually go build an integration that's not leveraging your API strategy or methodology, so it's going to need some custom development work," or something like that. I get that. That's a pretty classic Professional Services engagement. But to hear, when I call you and ask a question like, "Well, how do I do this?" an answer like, "This is why you should buy a bucket of Professional Services hours," it feels a little "game-y" to me. I don't really like that. I'm working with Everbridge on that, too. I think that they're still wrestling with what their support model looks like internally and what their Professional Services business strategy is. I think they're trying to work their way through those growing pains themselves, but my gut reaction is, it's not a great start to say, "In order to support you, you have to pay me more."

Their technical skill on the support side is good. Their model is a little bit shaky.

I realized this, sadly, after the sale. I think it's partly because those same growing pains were part of what they were going through as a part of our normal sales cycle discussions. So they never put on the table that to get really top-level support, it will cost you more, until after everything was already deployed. We were probably well into our first quarter of deployment when the suggestion was, "I think you should buy a bucket of hours." It caught me, quite frankly, by surprise because I felt that we should have been talking about that during the sales cycle.

They're going to find us really reluctant to write another check for what we would consider standard practice for product support. We have a very good relationship with Everbridge, so I would not want to send the wrong signals. I think they'll be very open-minded to hearing that kind of feedback. I don't know if they'll back down completely from their business position on Professional Services and support, but it's certainly going to be a conversation I'll continue having with them.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We had an incumbent solution that had been in place for about seven years. The principal reason for switching was that the incumbent was losing momentum in the marketplace for traditional IT communications and engagement, to get people to the table and fix problems. The incumbent was slipping in the market. They were not putting money into R&D. They were not developing their platform at the same pace that some of the natural competitors were.

We did look at them as a part of our solution-selection activity. We absolutely kept the incumbent in the ring and had great conversations with them about what's missing and what they were going to do next. In fact, they were acquired by another company during those solution-selection discussions, and we were very uncertain about whether or not the acquiring company would invest or ingest. Would they swallow this thing up and sort of bury it under the rug, or would they invest in making it be a more competitive product? 

I think, in hindsight - it's been over a year since we made this selection and about a year since we deployed IT Alerting - I'd say that the casual observation would be that the incumbent did not gain any ground. If anything, they may have continued to lose some ground. For us, it was, "You don't have the feature functionality that we really want, and you're not really making progress towards that in your own market space." Whereas Everbridge and a couple of others were providing some good indicators that they were stepping up their game as opposed to backing off their game.

How was the initial setup?

I wasn't actually doing the install, I was leading the program and working very closely with the folks who were administrators of the tool. The feedback I got was that it was actually very intuitive until you'd get a little bit into the weeds. Some of the complications of the environment resulted in a few challenging topics. They weren't showstoppers. We never felt like we couldn't keep the ball rolling

It was a little bit of both. The initial response felt very reasonable, very intuitive to the extent it's possible, but it's a sophisticated enough system that there were parts of it where you scratch your head and you say, "Well, where do I go for this? How do I log in and change the administrative configuration of group names?" That sort of thing.

That's where some of our initial Professional Services help came in. We did pay for the implementation Professional Services. That was worthwhile, it was appropriate to do that, and they helped a lot. Wherever we did find some of those points of confusion, those were good learning experiences for us. They were good usability conversations with them.

They continue to develop, and they're very good at taking feedback from their customers and figuring out how, or if, to include that feedback in future releases. And their release cycles have gotten faster. When we first signed up with them, they were probably doing two a year, and now I think they're closer to four a year. And some of what we fed into them is already making its appearance in their code base.

What was our ROI?

One of the things we were attempting to measure when we established the program is time to restore service. One of the things that IT Alerting helps us do is bring an IT service back online faster than we did before. One of the ways it does that is by getting those right parties to the table at the right time. Our mean time to restore, or mean time to repair, has diminished by a couple of percentage points, saving the company upwards of hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. That was one of our key measures going in, and it's been demonstrable so far.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

For us, the pricing is a good value. I can't say whether or not their list pricing looks favorable to everyone who's checking, but I can say that the process of sourcing and procurement with them was very professional, comfortable, and friendly. The negotiations were done well on both sides, and in the end, I'd say the price was very effective.

My suggestion would be, do your homework. If you know what the marketplace will support, I think it is fairly traditional. Not every market or every product fits this, but it's pretty normal that list prices are designed to be discounted. Very few, especially on the enterprise scale, are going to pay full sticker price for a software product. So do your homework, know where the discounting can get you, and know what you're willing to pay. Because if you say, "This has a value of X for me as an organization," if you articulate your position well, you have some very real opportunity to get either close to or at what you perceive to be the real value of the product in your negotiations. It's never an easy step but, done well, I think that people will find that Everbridge is a great listener and is willing to meet in the middle.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We also looked at TelAlert and xMatters.

We went through a pretty traditional solution-selection activity where we prepared and documented our requirements for the market leaders and included our incumbent, an existing solution that was doing some of what Everbridge does. In the end, one of our key selection criteria was relationship, and Cargill and Everbridge already had an agreement in place for their business continuity product, non-IT, which is used to do things like notify employees when there is a weather event or a security or concern, a risk event in a particular region of the world. We were already using that product, and it was an Everbridge relationship that was already in place. One of our deciding factors was, "How strong is that relationship?"

What other advice do I have?

Scope the project well. What I mean by that is, don't bite off more than you can chew, but don't do less than you need to do. Scoping it well means that you've identified the happy medium of, "I'm going to get great value to start, but I'm going to get more value as we continue to grow into the solution." That's the approach we took. We said, "Hey, if I can get the 80/20 rule applied, where 80 percent of what we're expecting to get out of the gate is achievable in our first deployment, that's pretty solid." If the other 20 percent isn't crucial - figure out how to prioritize what you do need and what you don't need - it's okay to let it go. 

Part of what we saw with our own project was the danger of scope-creep, where we said, "If our first objective is a like-for-like replacement of the incumbent, then be prepared to sacrifice some golden opportunities if those golden opportunities will cost us time and money that we don't have right now."

If we said, "Implementation date is an important milestone and cost of implementing is an important measurement," then I need to measure inside of those scoping guardrails. Don't do more than you can handle, but don't do less than what you need. I think we accomplished that pretty well. I think we sacrificed a couple things that several of our stakeholders would have loved to see out of the gate, but it would have cost us time and money that we weren't really prepared to spend.

I would start out with rating this product at eight out of 10 because there is always room to improve. I'm not sure I'd rate anybody a 10. I've been in this for a long, long time. I don't know that I've ever seen a true knock-your-socks-off 10. But this solution is a solid eight in that they provide the core functionality we were always interested in obtaining, and they are very engaged at the table in discussing how they get better and how their getting better can help us get better.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
it_user875763 - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Manager, IT Operations at a hospitality company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Streamlines our incident management, helping decrease resolution timeframes
Pros and Cons
  • "Valuable features include incident management and ease of integrations."
  • "It could use more enhancement type integrations, but no improvements to functionality are needed."

What is our primary use case?

Escalation and incident management.

How has it helped my organization?

We have been able to quantify improvements in escalation and time to resolution. It has decreased timeframes and improved resolution by 35 - 40 percent.

We used to have one individual handling a call, along with other duties. So at times, they would have to step away from those other duties to handle the call or reach out to someone else. This solution has allowed them to be on the call for questions, while still being able to escalate outward.

What is most valuable?

  • Incident management
  • Ease of integrations

What needs improvement?

It could use more enhancement type integrations, but no improvements to functionality are needed.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No issues with stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues with scalability.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is helpful.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not have a previous solution. We were looking at solutions to allow us to better streamline escalation and incident management between teams.

How was the initial setup?

Straightforward. It is software as a service. We had a brief setup and training session.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Pricing is reasonable, based on different customer types.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

What other advice do I have?

The service and support teams are very knowledgeable and willing to work with you on improving overall functionality and enhancements.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
it_user873429 - PeerSpot reviewer
Sr Systems Administrator at a pharma/biotech company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Rigorously reaches out to stakeholders, saving us time when working on an issue
Pros and Cons
  • "Powerful conference bridging that rigorously reaches out to stakeholders, which saves time working an issue. The mobile app provides ease of use for our resolvers and mobile push has proven quick and reliable. It also gives us flexibility around creating sometimes complex shifts within an on-call calendar."
  • "One thing that could be improved would be to enable the mobile app to more easily display published calendars via the Member Portal. Currently, it is quite difficult."

What is our primary use case?

Alerts from our monitoring system to hit on-call and our help desk to create on-call bridges.

How has it helped my organization?

We have been somewhat able to quantify the benefits. Users like the ease of use via the mobile app. Also, the simplicity of the on-call process is encouraging stakeholders to use the product rather than to try to call someone directly.

What is most valuable?

  • System availability
  • SaaS solution, so no infrastructure
  • Mobile app

Powerful conference bridging that rigorously reaches out to stakeholders, which saves time working an issue. The mobile app provides ease of use for our resolvers and mobile push has proven quick and reliable. It also gives us flexibility around creating sometimes complex shifts within an on-call calendar.

What needs improvement?

One thing that could be improved would be to enable the mobile app to more easily display published calendars via the Member Portal. Currently, it is quite difficult.

For how long have I used the solution?

Less than one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No issues with stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No issues with scalability.

How are customer service and technical support?

Tech support is excellent; very responsive and they provide good follow-up.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did use another product previously and we switched because Everbridge met our requirements. In addition, our Global Security team was using the Everbridge Mass Notification product, so going with it created synergy.

We selected Everbridge through a PoC process performed early in 2017.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very fast with the controller coming online almost right away. The implementation team assisted us in onboarding our users and calendars. The complex part has been in transitioning our user community to the new system.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Get a clear idea of the number of users (those that manage calendars and/or initiate incidents) and use SSO which greatly facilitates adoption.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

What other advice do I have?

Any new system will create adoption challenges, especially if you are migrating off another platform. Emphasize the benefits of moving to it (SaaS, the mobile app, ease of use, system stability) and be sure to conduct both formal training and close follow-up with users.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
it_user862560 - PeerSpot reviewer
ITSM Process Manager at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Gives us the ability to contact the correct people via rules, based on conditions
Pros and Cons
  • "People are able to join a bridge with one press of a button. It gives us the ability to contact the correct people via rules, based on conditions."
  • "The ability for members to change their schedules, and change the person their swapping with, could use improvement. The GUI is a little tough to navigate. It's not very straightforward when someone is trying to change schedules."

What is our primary use case?

IT incident management.

How has it helped my organization?

It's now a little quicker to get folks together on a bridge. It has enabled us to have quicker times to resolution.

What is most valuable?

The ability for people to be able to join a bridge with one press of a button. It gives us the ability to contact the correct people via rules, based on conditions. 

What needs improvement?

The ability for members to change their schedules, and change the person they're swapping with, could use improvement. For two people to swap, both people have to log in, as you can only update your own schedule with a member account.

Suppose I am swapping with Bill for the day because he is sick. It makes no sense that both he and I each have to update the schedule. He has to go in and put me as a replacement for him. Then, the day he is taking for me, I have to go in and put him as my replacement.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's pretty stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's scalable.

How is customer service and technical support?

The tech support is great. They're almost always able to solve my issues pretty quickly.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was probably somewhere in the middle, between straightforward and complex. I think the some of the harder parts were the importing of all the data.

What other advice do I have?

Definitely use the rules and conditions so you can contact the right people for different outages. The GUI is a little tough to navigate. It's not very straightforward when someone is trying to change schedules.

It's very accurate and, once you get to know it, you can make it meet your needs.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
it_user860868 - PeerSpot reviewer
Director Of Operation Risk Management at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
We have been able to use it to track and verify that people are on the bridge
Pros and Cons
  • "We have been able to use it to track and verify that people are on the bridge."
  • "The ability to not have to worry about the IT alerting and calendar resources. I would like it to be simpler in the sense of a different cost structure."

What is our primary use case?

For IT alerting, we are using it for incident management for severity 1 and 2 type call-outs. We are using the calendar for on-call rotations, and we have configured call trees within the calendar to page out based on system and business impacts. 

How has it helped my organization?

We have been able to use it to track and verify that people are on the bridge. It has also made it much easier when you have one touch to join the bridge, and we have been tracking our resolution time, which is now shorter. This is partly because of Everbridge and it being easier to get people on the phone. Also, we are able to escalate and track resources throughout the incident process.

They have improved our ability to be flexible in the way that we are setting up our calendar and structure. We can use it for individual call-outs versus an incident versus being able to run a test, etc. 

What is most valuable?

You can build consistent templates. They give you a couple of different phone numbers, so if you have more than one incident (which we have had), you can page out to different people and have people run different call bridges from that point. 

The other thing that I personally like is the flexibility that we have to do updates four times a day. We do not just do it once a day or once a week. We do it four times a day. If somebody changes their phone number in the middle of the day, we will pick it up and be able to make sure if they are on call that night that we can call the right number. This configuration has been good for us.

What needs improvement?

The ability to not have to worry about the IT alerting and calendar resources. I would like it to be simpler in the sense of a different cost structure. 

I would like to see: When employees move locations, how does it correct in the system (Everbridge) versus PeopleSoft (which we also run)? I need to check on this functionality.

For how long have I used the solution?

Less than one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We have never had any issues with stability. 

From a functionality standpoint, we have been able to go in there, run things, and do things. We have had great success. We have written a white paper about the fact that we had 49 people trapped in Puerto Rico with the hurricanes. We have used it for more than 500 different notifications, tests, etc. I think the way it is configured and setup has been fairly successful.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We are growing with mergers. We have added approximately 500 people over the year. We are merging with some other divisions and had no problems with scalability. We have consistently grown under PeopleSoft.

How are customer service and technical support?

My biggest compliment is we have great account management people that help us out. We have been able to turn the tool over to IT people that have never used it, and they have been able to run it with minimal help or support. 

We still work with our implementation manager, who has been extremely effective, very consistent, and spot on. I have opened up about 10 tickets with approximately seven of them being very positive with quick turnaround, the support being knowledgeable, and knowing the answer. In maybe just one instance, a person did not listen very well, then I ended up calling our implementation manager. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did have a previous solution, but they were bought out. I used this solution for a couple of years.

How was the initial setup?

Since I have already done the setup with our competitor, I pretty much understood the project.

What about the implementation team?

We hired Everbridge to be on site for three days. This was very helpful, because of our resources were strained. We got Everbridge in a room and the project got done, versus trying to string it along. Therefore, I thought the implementation was actually good. 

The implementation was simple. They have Everbridge University online. They have videos and a help desk which will be able to help you if you choose. They have multiple ways to get you to the place where you are looking to be.   

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

They are one of the top three most expensive products. I also understand if you are going to use them for IT alerting, it is worth it. They are competitively priced, but the IT alerting is the differentiator. The way that they market it and push it out. That is their premier function. 

Their call structure is based on how many people are IT alert people and who is on the calendar, and the cost will be driven by those numbers versus if you are using it for the non-IT alert. As you look at the competition and other vendors, make sure you truly understand your cost structure with them.

When we did our contract, we did a three year contract with fixed pricing. We locked in the pricing for three years. As we have grown, we locked in pricing for additional units of employees. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We went through about an 18 month RFP process. We issued it to 10 different organizations. We narrowed it down to the top three. We did demos and brought in our senior IT people to participate in the demos from that point.

There are only one or two companies that can even come close to the detail requirements of IT alerting, like Send Word Now and Text Matters, their systems do not come close. They are cheap knock offs. We did demos with them, priced them out, and while they were cheaper, they did not have the scalability and quality that we were looking for, and that is why we eliminated them. 

We also evaluated xMatters.

What other advice do I have?

  • Continue to do detailed RFP requirements.
  • Know how to differentiate solutions and what you are buying. 
  • Demo it and make sure that it meets your requirements and integrate it with your tools and systems. 

If you buy it and don't install it (or you don't install it right then), you are wasting your money. I am assuming that if you are going to invest a couple thousand dollars a year, easily, if not more depending on the size of the organization. 

The tool does not change the process. It facilitates the process. Don't expect the tool to solve the business process. 

They truly take security very seriously on passwords and make you change it frequently. 

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Download our free IT Alerting and Incident Management Report and find out what your peers are saying about Everbridge, PagerDuty, OnSolve, and more!
Updated: September 2022
Buyer's Guide
Download our free IT Alerting and Incident Management Report and find out what your peers are saying about Everbridge, PagerDuty, OnSolve, and more!