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Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers is #1 ranked solution in top Rack Servers. PeerSpot users give Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers an average rating of 8.8 out of 10. Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers is most commonly compared to HPE ProLiant DL Servers: Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers vs HPE ProLiant DL Servers. Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 55% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a comms service provider, accounting for 23% of all views.
Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers Buyer's Guide

Download the Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: September 2022

What is Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers?

PowerEdge R is available in three models and with the following advantages: Entry level is simple, entry level server ideal for businesses just migrating to server usage, advanced is offering more cache and speed, these servers offer more options for processors, expansion and virtualization, Premium create a dynamic infrastructure with flexible workloads from a complete virtualization platform.

Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers was previously known as PowerEdge R.

Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers Customers

NxtGen Datacenter, Medien-Service Untermain (MSU), Exasol, IndigoVision, Dayco

Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers Video

Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers pricing:
  • "The solution's analytics helped to decrease production downtime by at least 30%."
  • "You can't have computed performance without using more power. That said, when I consider the power consumption and performance of the MX740c, depending on how much memory you install on each blade, you get the best bang for your buck."
  • "The pricing is very competitive."
  • "I have no issues with the pricing and licensing costs. They are fine."
  • "PowerEdge pricing is equivalent to that of all the others in the market."
  • "The price is reasonable. You have to pay if you want quality. When we purchase something, we have to do some market analysis, and I haven't seen a significant difference compared to other solutions."
  • Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers Reviews

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    Brian Moreno - PeerSpot reviewer
    Computer Services Manager at Child Parent Centers
    Real User
    Reliable with great support and good analytics
    Pros and Cons
    • "The most valuable aspects include hot swapping and the elasticity as far as being able to scale."
    • "It's more from the pandemic, however, the logistics part of it could be better."

    What is our primary use case?

    The setup is hybrid right now. It was formerly strictly on-premise and we used it for our file storage and for our virtual machines.

    Originally, it was purchased for strict file storage and access on-prem. However, when COVID hit, we ended up purchasing laptops for every single employee that we had. Having to use our new file storage device, which is no longer on-premises as they're now at home, was easy. That's why we went with a hybrid environment. We put a lot of the data into the cloud and backed it up in the on-premises file storage.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It allowed us to move some file storage that we had around. It allowed us to really look into what we had and what we were using. Looking at Apex, it is setting us up for when it will need a refresh or when it is at its end of life.

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable aspects include hot swapping and the elasticity as far as being able to scale. We had a bunch of stuff on an old, existing EMC. The company was unaware that they had to keep the files that they had for so long. We realized that once we were meeting the seven-year mark and we could start purging some of those files, we had to scale down a little bit.

    The initial purchase that we had was a little big, however, as we started adding more users that were working from home and had their own drive, OneDrive, we had to expand it a little bit. Dell was able to ship me bigger hard drives.

    When it comes to running the latest high-demand applications, PowerEdge is good. The VMware that we had was almost end-of-life, so we had to upgrade it and Dell helped out with that quite a bit, putting it on our PowerEdge and assisting us with a lot of stuff that VMware didn’t. VMware just said, "Here. Here's your product. Good luck.” Dell was a lot more helpful. They had a lot of engineers that knew about that service that we were trying to tap into a little better.

    The BIOS recovery was something we used because we had a huge power outage and a power strike when one of our air conditioners had a bad power surge run through it at our facility. Dell helped us rebuild our actual BIOS system in it, as one of the mirror arrays that we were using just wasn't being seen. We were afraid it was a hardware issue, however, it was really a BIOS issue that we couldn't see right off the jump. We’re glad Dell was there to help.

    The solution's analytics helped to decrease production downtime by at least 30%. I'm in Arizona and down in Tucson we don't get that much downtime. We have a lot of battery backups, we have a generator system, and more. However, when it does happen, the analytics of it, as far as the trends on what months the monsoon season hits, it kept all in the logs.

    The system management capabilities of PowerEdge helped increase stack productivity. We've had a little bit of turnover in our system admin department, however, having the ability to go back and look through the logs and see how users ended up using their home drive, their shared files, and their encrypted files really helped out my new guys coming on board.

    The solution's accelerated GPUs help support demanding workloads in our organization. We had a couple of changing workloads due to the fact that when people shifted from home, they were hitting the server from a different angle. They were coming in off a virtual private network instead of being on-premises and the system didn't blink.

    I’m not sure if PowerEdge helped to reduce data processing time in our organization as we don't crunch a lot. We do have a lot of videos coming in and a lot of video editing going on, so in that way, it does help.

    The PowerEdge system management frameworks enable us to progress towards full automation. We knew what we were looking for when we refreshed this last model and we purchased a new server just from the analytics we got off the first one.

    It helps me forecast better. We don't grow exponentially. Teachers are hard to come by, however, some will leave and some will stay. The business models are the same, yet they expect more. Now they want to do a video. They want to capture and record the videos and the Zoom meetings that they're doing, therefore, it's a little different.

    What needs improvement?

    It's more from the pandemic, however, the logistics part of it could be better. Getting an actual bare-bones server was a little difficult when we ordered it in beginning. I'm still waiting on the printers that I ordered last year as well. That's the only thing I would really say and I'm sure it has to do with the pandemic.

    The latency of it is what we're running into, as our teachers do a lot of video captures, video teaching, Zoom, and Teams video conferencing, and their latency is getting worse with the public domain.

    Buyer's Guide
    Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers
    September 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
    633,952 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used the solution since I've been with the company, probably for the last three years.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability is very good. There were different options that we could have gone to. We could either have gotten smaller hard drives and/or downsized if we needed to. They knew our business model was going to change when the pandemic hit.

    We have about 650 end users on this particular solution and 80% of them are teachers. The rest are administrative professionals.

    Currently, we are planning to put a new server that we have in the mix online and up and running with the PowerEdge server that we have. Now, with Apex and more coming out, we're looking to possibly pivot.

    How are customer service and support?

    Technical support is very good. We had to call Dell technical support when our BIOS got corrupted and they were on the spot. They escalated us to tier two within 20 minutes. It was really quick.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We did previously use a different solution, however, I cannot remember what our large area network's device was.

    Dell came in with a very competitive offer with the first model of storage that we got, so that's what my predecessor went to, and we kept it around.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was very straightforward. We knew exactly where we wanted to put it in our array and how we wanted to set it up, what the power requirements would be, where it would fit on my battery backup system, and the plan for system recovery in case it had to be gracefully shut down. It was super easy.

    When deploying PowerEdge, we didn't get a chance to use the automated server and OS deployment features.

    The deployment was scheduled for six hours and it took three. 

    We actually had to migrate users off of an older version that we had onto the new box that we had. The implementation strategy was all about really getting our users off the box and making sure nobody was trying to access it. After that, it was just migrating users over, setting up the new box, putting it online, and running tests.

    For maintenance, normally we use a server admin, myself, and maybe one other developer that helps us with the syslogs on it. There are probably three of us altogether.

    What about the implementation team?

    We used an integrated reseller for the deployment. They were amazing.

    We had an issue with a brownout or a power strike and our BIOS got a bit corrupted, however, it was nothing that couldn't be recovered on the fly.

    What was our ROI?

    We've seen an ROI. I don't have any details offhand. I know when we first purchased it, we got a pretty good deal on it and we didn't know if it would actually meet end-of-life due to the usage that we had on it. However, it outperformed our metrics.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I'd advise others to use the pro services that come along with it, that are available for purchase with it. It helped us immensely. If you were to extend the service contract and get the pro level, it costs a bit more.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We did evaluate other options. When it's over a certain dollar amount, we have to go out and get at least four bids.

    What other advice do I have?

    I can't remember the exact version we have. We just purchased a new Dell SAN.

    We do not use PowerEdge for artificial intelligence applications yet. We're looking into it. Right now, a lot of the video data capture that we do is with children, school-aged children, and children in a preschool environment. We were thinking the AI might be able to help us where the teacher might not be looking. If they had a camera in the room to capture the relevant stuff that was going on as far as what the lesson plan was about that day, it might be helpful.

    I have not had a chance to use the solution's iDRAC telemetry for monitoring PowerEdge system data and providing analytics, however, we're really looking into that right now. We got the new SAN going in and we'd like to monitor a little better.

    We do not use the solution's CloudIQ for predictive analytic capabilities yet.

    It is a very stable product. It's something that we use reliably for backups. It's something we use reliably for our main server for a long time and we'd definitely buy another.

    My biggest takeaway is it's not as easy going straight to the cloud when you were an on-premises provider. If you are an on-premises provider and you have all your services on-premises, going to the cloud takes a couple of steps. It's not just one big jump.

    I'd rate the product nine out of ten. If I could get the same amount of storage that I got three years ago now, I'd rate it ten out of ten. I'd order it as quickly as I did when we ordered it the first time.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Hybrid Cloud
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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    PeerSpot user
    Danno Johnson - PeerSpot reviewer
    Senior Network System Engineer at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
    Real User
    Good performance, small footprint, flexible, and has a quick support team
    Pros and Cons
    • "The MX7000 gives us the most concentrated amount of compute in the smallest area possible."
    • "On the MX7000 platform, they should continue to release better and faster blades."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use PowerEdge for the virtualization of servers, and it gives us the ability to move server images on and off of the platform very quickly.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The PowerEdge Rack Servers are a go-to for handling high-performance workloads. I've had positive experiences with the amount of computing that it can provide per blade. Currently, the blade that I'm familiar with is the MX740c, which has dual processors and a total of 24 core processors. There are eight of these blades in the MX7000.

    It also provides the ability for networking on the backside, which connects to the mezzanine. I currently use the MX5108, which provides four 25 gigabits-per-second connections to each blade. Each 5108 can provide you with a 100 gig uplink to your core. I currently have the MX5108 connected in two fabrics, A fabric, and B fabric. Both A fabric and B fabric are peered using a VLTI.

    Then, I have the VLTI from the two blades connecting and uplinking to our distribution core. The distribution core is using a leaf spine. With that, it gives me 400 gigabits of uplink and downlink onto the chassis.

    You can't have computed performance without using more power. That said, when I consider the power consumption and performance of the MX740c, depending on how much memory I install on each blade, I get the best bang for my buck. I'm not going to say that it's inexpensive or that it's sufficient. It depends on how hard I am processing, what I am running, how much memory I use, and again, what blades I purchase with the chassis. Overall, it's very flexible, and it depends on what I want to make of it.

    With respect to its performance when it comes to running the latest high-demand applications, depending on my selection of hardware, it should be able to run nearly anything I would want. If I want to run Oracle servers on the PowerEdge blades, for example, then I can do that. They'll run it.

    Recently, I've seen my use case migrate from the M1000 chassis to the MX7000 chassis. The improvement that I saw was increasing the uplink bandwidth from the M1000, which I was able to get a maximum of 160 gigabits a second, and now my maximum is 400 gigabits a second. I could have selected different switches, but the MX5108 is adequate to provide the uplink bandwidth that I need from the chassis.

    Overall, I've seen an improvement in the network bandwidth, as well as an improvement in the speed of the blades and the processors.

    The PowerEdge has also helped to reduce data processing time in the company, which makes things run better because it's faster to move data onto the blades. It is also faster when it comes to the deployment of computed images. It's hard to pinpoint how much time we have saved because it also depends on the network infrastructure that's in place. In my experience over the last couple of years, migrating from the M1000 to the MX7000 has moved the deployment of images from a few minutes to several seconds.

    What is most valuable?

    The MX7000 gives us the most concentrated amount of computing in the smallest area possible. It also has the ability to provide a large amount of bandwidth to the blades. This is important because it gives the user the ability to move as much data on and off of the blade platforms as quickly as possible.

    The iDRAC telemetry is very useful for monitoring the system and providing analytics. You can use commands from the CLI, you can use scripting, you can use the REST interface, or you can use the point-and-click GUI. It's very flexible. I prefer using scripts because I monitor many blades and many chassis. I can script a lot of my monitoring requirements. 

    The accelerated GPU feature helps to support demanding workloads that we run. For instance, they provide better performance for remote desktop sessions.

    The blades are hot-swappable and in a virtual environment, being able to upgrade your hardware platform easily to better and faster hardware is a benefit.

    What needs improvement?

    On the MX7000 platform, they should continue to release better and faster blades.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been working with Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers for the past couple of years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Stability-wise, this product is solid. We have very little downtime.

    I need to make sure that the images that are running on the blades are reliable, and it provides that. Beyond that, I'm happy with the performance.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Scalability is up to the engineer. It is easily scalable depending on what native architecture you use to connect it all together.

    How are customer service and support?

    I have been in contact with technical support a lot. Sometimes I run into little anomalies that I need an explanation or workaround or fix for, and by bringing it to their attention, they usually get their developers on it and come back with a solution rather quickly.

    I would rate the technical support a ten out of ten. We have really good Dell support.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have worked with other solutions from other vendors, and I like Dell Power Solutions. I worked with them years ago and then went to a different vendor, on a different job course, and in this particular job I've come back to Dell.

    I've got to say that Dell hardware and support are very good, and I'm happy with it.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is straightforward. For somebody with experience with Dell products, to begin with, it's simple. It's no more complicated than deploying the M1000, which was the predecessor chassis to the MX7000.

    I can deploy and network an MX7000 chassis and have all the blades loaded with ESXi within a day. I make use of a lot of my own scripts and usually, I employ a script to mount the ISO images that'll be installed on all the blades through a shell script, and then the script also reboots the blades, and the blades mount the ISO image and install VMware. All of that happens quickly.

    After that, I simply put in the network parameters for the ESXi hosts, add the host to the V-center, and then they're ready to go. I already have some predetermined configurations that I use for the network blades, the MX5108s. I use those as a template for all four blades on the back of the MX7000, and simply paste them in. I can usually have all four blades configured within 30 minutes to an hour.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The pricing is very competitive.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    When you compare against public cloud solutions, having the compute onsite is always going to be faster. However, that really depends on how big of a pipe your institution or your data center has to the cloud. If you have more bandwidth to the cloud and back, perhaps latency will be less but I don't see how it can be faster than having the compute on site.

    What other advice do I have?

    This product has built-in security features, although that's up to the system engineers and network engineers to properly upgrade their firmware. They need to follow Dell's baseline release for the chassis to ensure that the firmware and software for the baseline of the blades and the network cards meet the baseline requirements. If you can match those requirements then the security will follow. It's easier to manage when you're baseline is all matched.

    Overall, this is a good product but there is always room for improvement.

    I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers
    September 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: September 2022.
    633,952 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Imad Awwad - PeerSpot reviewer
    Group IT Manager at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Innovative designs to transform IT and maximize performance across the widest range of applications.
    Pros and Cons
    • "The availability is excellent."
    • "The solution could still use some more analytics."

    What is our primary use case?

    Virtual Environment and performance enhancements for SQL applications and for future VDI implementations.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Performance has been observed once servers have been operational and power consumption has been reduced as well due to the new technology.

    What is most valuable?

    The solution has always had very good performance.

    The availability/scalability is excellent.

    Their technical support is always helpful. They have a very good support timeline that lasts not just a year or two, but even five years down the line. It's a long-term arrangement.

    The solution is highly scalable, with a two-socket server, CPU support, and the M.E.N SST. 

    It can support VDI.

    You can combine these servers. Therefore, not only do they work with virtual environments, you can have them as a Data Analytics server. They can handle a lot of heavy processes. They are one of the main big servers that can handle a lot of things. For example, I'm replacing four servers with three servers, which means I can also reduce the licenses. Instead of buying two licenses, you're buying one license. The lines are reduced to half, and you have a few open managed application that will tell you the health of the server. 

    The content and insights with Dell are great. Whenever something happens to your server and you have the support, they will give you a notification. Whether it's CPU or RAM or the power supply, whatever the issue, they will tell you. You always have a proactive notification on all the servers.

    Security and BIOS are very good. Previously, BIOS was just a plus for the team to have on the server. Now, BIOS is more into Cyber Security and has the intelligence to recognize what is being loaded before going to the main OS. There's artificial intelligence integrated into these servers and the insights are one of the main reasons that they'll provide you with a good service, and offer you some visibility on the server. You feel safe. The server won't let you down. With the notifications, you can always handle things before they become a bigger problem. 

    What needs improvement?

    The company needs to invest in more marketing exposure. Users need to know that Dell servers compete with HP Servers. in the region, the Middle East, many more companies work with HP. They could change this.

    The solution could still use some more analytics.

    It would be helpful if we had the power of an open managed application. It should be more hands-on in terms of how are you going to manage your server. In order to do that, you need more visibility into the health of the server itself.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been dealing with this solution for around a year. I used to have HP servers, as well, however, now I'm working with Dell again.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is extremely scalable, and it's easy to do so as it has a two-socket server and CPU support, etc. It offers quite high performance for easy scaling down the road.

    You don't just buy a server for one service. You buy a server to take advantage of several services in your environment, and so, it helps that it can scale.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've personally never worked with technical support directly, however, it is my understanding that technical support is excellent. They offer long timelines, so you don't just have technical support for, for example, the first year or two. They continue to work with you even years down the line. They're very fast and responsive and their head in Lebanon is very good. 

    Support is one of the main reasons we considered as well, as we know that if we have any critical issues, we won't have problems getting the answers we need. We get the answers we require either the same day or 24 hours. It's great.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We did use a different solution, HP, and now we are returning to Dell. Part of what played a major factor is the support for AMD CPU's. Since Dell EMC supports the AMD, there also were internal considerations as well to take them on.

    HP is one of the main competitors in the Middle East. They compete head-to-head with Dell EMC also, and HP servers have some things that are better than Dell EMC. Dell has older technology. They're catching up, however, with artificial intelligence, analytics, and reporting, they're catching up.

    They are pretty close in style and substance. Therefore, whichever gives me a better price will be the one I choose.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was very, very easy. 

    There's nothing to work with on the server itself. 

    You just handle the configuration, and you do some EFI configuration. In the last stage, you're going to install the operating system so that it is a fast service. It depends on the disks you put in. At the server level, so it doesn't have that much configuration. It's just installing Windows and any operating system. Then you build over that.

    Except for the Bios updates and the drivers and the compatibility issues, you don't have any problem with compatibility.

    What other advice do I have?

    There are certain components on other solutions that I need to check with Dell. Dell was very good before and always is in the performance, availability and support. That said, our region in Lebanon, had some problems with the distributors and the people who are licensed to sell Dell products. It's been about five years now, and it's now official that everybody can partner again with Dell. You don't have to be an experienced partner, per se. 

    Before, it was being controlled by one partner. Nobody is able to bring in Dell, and this partner had control for all the prices of all the support and everything. However, after merging with EMC and after having so many partners, its become more exposed to the market. Many partners that were struggling to sell Dell EMC servers and storage, as well as laptops and everything, are able to do so. 

    This is the main reason why we have returned to Dell. We know about them. They offer very good servers and they are one of the leaders in the market. Dell and HP are leaders now in the servers. For this season, we reconsidered having their Rack Servers. This is the only reason we're going now to Dell servers. 

    With Dell, if a company is considering their work environments and they're considering Data Analytics and Big Data, etc., yes, why not to go for the Dell server. They have an extremely scalable infrastructure designed for Big Data and they have the processes and ERP system that needs a lot of power. The Rack Servers, the PowerUp servers, are very good. They are recommended by many people worldwide.

    I'd recommend organizations consider these servers. Dell also has a full portfolio of products that work together in harmony. Whatever you need, Dell likely has a solution for you.

    Overall, I would rate the solution nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Microsoft Azure
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Tim Villa - PeerSpot reviewer
    IT Manager at Jones-Hamilton Co.
    Real User
    Top 20
    Are powerful, don't break, and have great security and performance
    Pros and Cons
    • "Dell PowerEdge servers are powerful. They don't break, and I love that. In my career of over 30 years now, all the Dell servers we've ever used out of the box have never broken."
    • "Dell needs to focus more on SMBs, helping us get the most out of our products. For example, at events, there should be very specific SMB sessions where there are Dell technicians, engineers, and Dell executives meeting with us and finding out what we need. Dell is big on promoting the fact that they're part of our team and that they want to be our partners, and I would like to see them actually partner with us. Do it less with the big Fortune 500 companies and do a little bit more with us SMBs."

    What is our primary use case?

    The ones we just bought are going to be hypervisor servers, and we have an on-premises Exchange that is running on a PowerEdge server.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The hands-off demand of the servers and the fact that they're not constantly a thorn in my side has been a big factor. They're running, and I don't have to worry about them. That is the most valuable part about it.

    There is no downtime with these servers, and the system management capabilities of PowerEdge have helped increase staff productivity.

    PowerEdge has, without a doubt, helped to reduce data processing time in our company. Every time we get a new PowerEdge server, we definitely notice an impact on the SQL databases that are part of our ERP. I do have users come and tell me that they've noticed that things have sped up and that even simple file searches are faster.

    What is most valuable?

    Dell PowerEdge servers are powerful. They don't break, and I love that. In my career of over 30 years now, all the Dell servers we've ever used out of the box have never broken.

    On top of that, when we had an air conditioning failure and I came in after a weekend, the temperature in the server room was 110 degrees. Inside the cases themselves, it was over 220 degrees. The only thing we lost was a backplane on one of the servers. This alone speaks for the durability of the Dell servers, and we've never gone away from Dell servers ever.

    They are fantastic in terms of performance as well.

    As for PowerEdge's approach to security, I would rate it very high. The tools provided by Dell update the BIOS and everything else, and the software is running on the server at all times. It is proactive and alerts me. It's taken a load off of my shoulders compared to how it was 20 years ago. I would have to go to their site and find out what was new. Now, I can just go to the computer or the server, and right there, it will tell me what needs to be done.

    The security is pretty strong. When we use ethical hackers to hack us, the Dell servers are never the issue.

    In terms of power consumption, I have no complaints at all about PowerEdge Rack Servers. My server room's APC, which is a battery backup system, is a full-mounted rack. It handles all the power coming from all our PowerEdge servers. We have never once had to scale it up at all in the almost 20 years that I've been working with them. It's moving technology in and out nonstop, and it shows you that these servers are fantastic. They don't really shift that much in power needs.

    What needs improvement?

    Dell needs to focus more on SMBs, helping us get the most out of our products. For example, at events, there should be very specific SMB sessions where there are Dell technicians, engineers, and Dell executives meeting with us and finding out what we need. Dell is big on promoting the fact that they're part of our team and that they want to be our partners, and I would like to see them actually partner with us. Do it less with the big Fortune 500 companies and do a little bit more with us SMBs.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been working this solution for the last 17 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    For stability, there's really no other product that I would trust.

    How are customer service and support?

    Dell's support, throughout the years that we've used it, is typically fantastic, but, again, because the PowerEdge servers are so durable and good, I haven't used them as much. When I've had to contact them for other issues, they've resolved the issues within a week, if not a day or two.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is pretty straightforward. It's out-of-the-box, and I've never found a snag or anything like that in the process.

    We deploy everything by hand; everything is manual.

    It doesn't take that long, and we can even do it with our laptops and desktops. We do not do any ghosting or imaging, and a server usually takes me a day at the most, while I really take my time with it and get all the updates in.

    What about the implementation team?

    We do it ourselves, or we have one consultant that we use if it's something that is out of our wheelhouse.

    What was our ROI?

    Every time I don't have to work on something and my servers are just running without an issue, that is a return on investment for me. The fact that my coworkers and owners are never complaining to me about things being down all the time is the biggest ROI there is.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I have no issues with the pricing and licensing costs. They are fine.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I looked at HP, and in a previous job, I've actually worked on HPs. I didn't love the HP servers. Even more so than the hardware, I couldn't stand HP's service and support. They're really bad.

    When it comes to servers, Dell would be my first choice, and IBM would be my second choice.

    We have one other server that is an IBM i-series server. (It used to be called AS/400.) If I were to compare it to the PowerEdge servers, there really is no comparison. It's a monster of a machine, and we have a lot more problems with that than we do with any of our Dell servers. Plus, it's finicky. The performance on it is questionable. You have to really baby it a lot more than the Dell servers, whereas the Dell servers are those that are the set-it-and-forget-it type. I work far more on issues with my applications that are running on the Dell servers than I ever do with the actual Dell servers themselves.

    I would consider Dell and HP in the same area, whereas I look at IBM as being more specific. My only experience with IBM servers has to do with the AS/400 i-series Power9 line. Those are built specifically to house an ERP, whereas the Dell and HP servers are built to handle everything you need.

    When it comes to the servers, I trust Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers. They're who I'm going to stick with. I don't consider HP to be a realistic competitor.

    What other advice do I have?

    If you are comparing Dell against anyone else, just get Dell PowerEdge. It's not even a question. The servers don't break, and they don't give you issues. Your applications are going to cause enough problems for you as it is, and you don't want the hardware they're sitting upon to also be another issue. After all, the servers were 220 degrees during an air conditioning outage and still churning and not causing problems!

    If I were to rate Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers on a scale from one to ten, I would give them a nine.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
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    Senior Manager of IT at a tech vendor with 5,001-10,000 employees
    Real User
    We utilize them heavily, 24/7, and they never stop; very reliable
    Pros and Cons
    • "The management portal is essential because it gives you a lot of flexibility. You don't have to be at the location to manage the server. You can power it on and off remotely or start an installation remotely. All you need to do is connect it to the network and you can do things from thousands of miles away."
    • "While I wouldn't call it a problem, physically mounting the servers into the rails that come with the servers can be a challenge. They could be engineered to be a little bit easier to use. It's not that significant, we can manage it, but you need at least two people to do it together because they're a bit heavy."

    What is our primary use case?

    We mostly use them for managing our testing environment. They manage a different brand of blade servers, not Dell, but the Rack Servers powered by Intel are monitoring and managing the queues that run the tests. Developers are submitting tests to the system 24 hours a day, and nodes on the blade servers run the tests. Our PowerEdge servers manage the test queues.

    What is most valuable?

    The management portal is essential because it gives you a lot of flexibility. You don't have to be at the location to manage the server. You can power it on and off remotely or start an installation remotely. All you need to do is connect it to the network and you can do things from thousands of miles away. That is essential when working with data centers. You don't want to be there but you want to have full control remotely.

    Another valuable feature is that it's a Dell and that means it's a reliable product.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers powered by Intel for the last 10 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It has performed the way that we expected it to with no technical problems. I don't recall any problems with the server itself that required us to call support or get replacement parts. It does what we expect it to do.

    It's stable. It's working 24/7, 365. We don't ever stop it. We have two offices in Israel, and each has two PowerEdge Rack Servers. They're monitoring our testing environment and that environment is running 24 hours a day, so the servers are very heavily utilized.

    We usually keep them for four years or stretch them to five years with a warranty extension. We wreck them and have never had to deal with any problems. The PowerEdge servers we have are the third generation that we purchased for this specific role. I'm assuming the integration team that requested these models specifically is satisfied with the outcome.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We got them in a configuration that hasn't required us to make any changes in terms of scalability.

    How are customer service and support?

    Dell's support works. Here in Israel, Dell works with a third party that handles the contact with the customer. I don't recall if that third party handles servers, but in general, a lot of improvement is required there.

    We are a corporate environment. When I call Dell support and give them my credentials or customer number, I expect the guy on the other side to understand who he is talking with. He should immediately see that I have at least 500 laptops, desktops, and more than 1,000 Dell monitors. I'm not just a private customer calling from home. I expect the service to work accordingly. 

    Don't ask me, "Did you reboot the machine?" or "Did you update?" We only call Dell support when we cannot solve the problems ourselves. By the time we call, we have done all the testing and all the updating. We have done everything on our side and that's when we need professional, technical support. But when we call them here in Israel, we get what seems like very consumer-oriented customer support. There is a lot of room for improvement in this area.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Neutral

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We had HP ProLiant in the past, but we haven't used them for quite a while. Our entire organization is using Dell for end-user machines, laptops, workstations, and desktops. The PowerEdge Rack Servers powered by Intel deliver what we need. It's easier to work with the same vendor and have a unified environment.

    How was the initial setup?

    While I wouldn't call it a problem, physically mounting the servers into the rails that come with the servers can be a challenge. They could be engineered to be a little bit easier to use. It's not that significant, we can manage it, but you need at least two people to do it together because they're a bit heavy. You have to slide them exactly into the rails. It's a little bit challenging, but not serious.

    From unboxing it to preparing the rack and sliding the server into it, connecting everything, and powering it up, it takes about 30 minutes or so.

    Integrating it into a particular environment is very simple. We set up an IP, connect it, and install a server operating system. It's a very rapid process. Within about an hour, it is up and running in the environment.

    What was our ROI?

    In terms of handling the evolving needs of high-performance workloads, you get your money's worth. When you buy something, you need it to perform and deliver and these servers do that. It's a very good product.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    PowerEdge pricing is equivalent to that of all the others in the market. We always try to get a better price, but I don't see any problem with the pricing and licensing of Dell's servers. It's not the case, when I compare them to other vendors, that they are extremely more expensive or that the licensing is much more complex.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We looked at HP and Supermicro. We went with Dell, in part, because we are a Dell shop, but price was one of the most critical aspects. We also looked at what we needed to gain from the server. When we connected all these factors, we decided that Dell was the best solution for us.

    What other advice do I have?

    Before you approach procurement, you should know exactly what you are looking to get out of the product. If you're looking for a reliable vendor and performance, have all your information ready first. Then check the pricing and make sure that you have the budget. It's not like buying a PC for your home. It's a professional server and it costs. You'd better have all the information beforehand, and then you can evaluate whether the purchase of a PowerEdge is suitable for your requirements.

    We don't use Dell's OpenManage console. When we need to make changes that don't directly apply to the operating system but to the server itself, we only go into the iDRAC management interface and do it from there on.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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    Architect with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Cost-effective, reliable, and helpful management frameworks
    Pros and Cons
    • "PowerEdge helped to reduce our customer’s data processing time."
    • "We do encounter power supply failures from time to time."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for compute servers. We use them as compute servers to run our virtual machines on-load, mainly on VMware.

    What is most valuable?

    The R6 series has been very valuable as it's more cost-effective and it has a lot of features. Based on the requirements, we found the R6 Series would be best suited for our customers. Reliability-wise, it's also great.

    PowerEdge is for handling the evolving needs of high-performance workloads, including VDI, AI, and SAP. We did run PowerEdge servers with virtual workloads, especially on VDI. We realized that SSD is necessary, especially with VMware vSphere platforms as the IO requirements are quite high.

    In terms of security, there’s been no issue from our side. In terms of BIOS, it is secure and we can go and log into BIOS to change certain settings.

    PowerEdge is good for energy consumption. PowerEdge Servers run on optimal voltage. Compared to other competitors or other brands, the power rating is great.

    We use iDRAC for many years already. It's an item we need to buy. We’ve had no problems so far. We use it for monitoring purposes to configure SNMP and the servers.

    PowerEdge analytics helped to decrease production downtime.

    The data points I’d draw attention to for potential customers depend on how much the customer is going to spend. If there is a certain budget, we would plan around their budget. In terms of analytics, most of the time, our monitoring service is able to collect the data metrics already, so having PowerEdge analytics is a complement to our existing monitoring system. While it's good to have, it depends of course on the customer's budget. If their budget is small, we will take away analytics to save costs.

    PowerEdge helped to reduce our customer’s data processing time. In fact, they were getting a lot of data from here, from their data processing. We also partner with some Big Data Analytics which run data points. In terms of PowerEdge, it's running fine except for certain power failures from time to time. In terms of how much they’ve reduced the data processing producing power, I don't have the metrics to comment on.

    PowerEdge systems management frameworks enable us to progress towards full automation when it comes to managing PowerEdge. We find it very useful in terms of automation, the setup, and configuration, as it does offer setup and proper checks. With the servers, we just need to set our black bar and then push down the setup and configurations box into PowerEdge and we run after that.

    What needs improvement?

    We do encounter power supply failures from time to time, however, in terms of operations, the production uptime, the production is not affected, and the SLA is still within the stipulated time.

    In the future, we hope that the noise level will be lower.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used the solution for quite a long while. Likely, it's been more than 10 years.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We've had no issues with scaling so far. We have been using PowerEdge for years and we are able to scale well. For networking, we need to build the network to scale, and it hasn't been a problem.

    How are customer service and support?

    Dell support is responsive. They dispatch an engineer on-site to help us within their SLA plan. They are very good so far.

    That said, we would appreciate it if the engineer came down with the parts beforehand so they can resolve hardware issues on the spot.

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We deployed many series of PowerEdge for many years. We also used other vendors, including HP and Cisco among others. I would say that in terms of reliability, they are a bit better than Dell in terms of power supplies. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The deployment time depends on the size of the setup. So far, we haven't had any problems with the setup.

    What about the implementation team?

    We engage with vendors to do the setup as unboxing PowerEdge and mounting them onto racks. This is especially true if we are talking about hundreds of servers.

    Dell can actually do everything in their staging environment, in their warehouse, before shipping everything to customers. We've been quite satisfied with Dell's level of service so far.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The product meets our requirements. Cost-wise, certain configurations in PowerEdge maybe cost a bit extra. Especially the SSD drives.

    The cost will increase if we go with the rack-and-stack approach.

    What other advice do I have?

    We are partners with Dell.

    We use the R series, namely R620, 630, then after that 720, 730, and with the XD series as well. We deploy them in data centers. Inside the data centers, there are systems as well as cloud systems; typically the deployment is hybrid.

    We don’t use Dell's cloud view for predictive analytics.

    I can’t speak to PowerEdge's accelerated tuning in terms of helping to support demanding workloads. We have not used GPU yet.

    I'd advise new users to go ahead and assess PowerEdge. Of course, companies need to get their representative to send some metrics, especially the MTBF or certain components on Dell products. We realize that the power supply may be a weak link when running high loads constantly. In terms of other components, there are no issues. 

    I'd rate the solution nine out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Hybrid Cloud
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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    Field Solution Architect at a financial services firm with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Very scalable, delivers on promises, and offers good terms
    Pros and Cons
    • "The solution delivers what it promises. You look at the specs and it delivers them."
    • "Until they get new technology and density, it would be nice to see four nodes in a one-year package instead of a three-year package."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily used the solution for the servers. It's a node among many in a multiprocessor, supercomputer environment. It's a very verified application. The customer uses a lesser file system, which means that one file system is shared among the entire installation. You're not going to see that very often in your career unless you're in that business. It's a multi-node, high-performance computing file system. It's Linux based.

    What is most valuable?

    It fit the requirements of the client, that's really all that it was for us. It could deliver the IOPS and the local storage that was required. It could have been anybody else, Lenovo, IBM, HP, etc. We were Dell's number one reseller in Canada and probably worldwide. We got very favorable terms and that also helped with the decision.

    What needs improvement?

    The only way you could improve it is, for the purpose of HPC installations, is IOPS and the only way to improve it is to get a more powerful machine to deliver more IOPS. Basically, you need more CPUs and you need more RAM and you need a faster backbone. We were running on 100 gigabits Infiniband.

    Until they get new technology and density, it would be nice to see four nodes in a one-year package instead of a three-year package.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I'm recently retired, however, I did work with the solution on one of my last projects which lasted a few months.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution delivers what it promises. You look at the specs and it delivers them. If it doesn't deliver you move onto another model.

    There's really nothing special about it, and Dell doesn't make servers that are any better than anybody else's. The prime reason we chose it is that it delivers what it promises to deliver in terms of IOPS and the price right for us because when you're a platinum level reseller for a server company, they will give you very favorable terms especially in this time of a pandemic, hardware sales are down across the board for the entire industry.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It's very scalable. That's the whole idea. When you want to add more computation power to the platform you just throw in another act of compute nodes and storage.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've never used technical support. Out-of-the-box it works, and if it doesn't, then the client deals with it directly. The equipment is sold to them so they own the serial numbers and they own the service contracts, so if anything went wrong during the installation the client would take care of them, not us.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We've worked with HP, Cisco, Lenovo, and IBM in the past. We always choose the solution that makes the most sense for our clients.

    How was the initial setup?

    We handed over the complete installation in September. We started in August. It takes time. You're coming into an empty room. You have to have power, you need the AC for the equipment there that has to be moved out. It takes time. The racks were pre-populated in Toronto and shipped to Montreal, and then in Montreal, they were set up and powered. We had liquid cooling and radiators on the rear of the cabinet for the heat.

    We've done many of these installations, and it's pretty routine. There's nothing complex about it. The complexity is mostly that there are so many key parts in terms of getting it delivered on-site. There are so many parts from so many different vendors and there are penalties if you don't deliver on time. Nobody wants to pay penalties.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I didn't deal with the pricing, and therefore don't know the exact costs. 

    However, they would compete with pricing on the market. Even if HP made an equivalent platform, and they do, we wouldn't get good terms. They're all pretty well in the ballpark range in cost and the variation. The list price might be 10%. They know what the competition is doing so they don't want to price themselves, the values, off the list of potential. If I'm looking at servers that deliver so much IOPS and they price themselves out, HP knows what Dell is doing and Dell knows what HP is doing.

    What other advice do I have?

    My company partners with Dell.

    I'm recently retired, however, I did most of the infrastructure, backup storage, and high-performance computing. I was in pre-sales. I was a solution architect. Therefore, I'm not an end-user.

    We only used Dell for the servers. We used Seagate for storage. They have hard drives. They've been in the hard drive business for 40 years.

    My biggest piece of advice for those considering the solution is to make sure they are delivered on time. When clients are spending $50 million for an installation and you say it's going to be ready September 15th, it better be ready September 15th. One of the main reasons stuff's not ready is because parts are missing. That means you can't deliver a complete solution. If you're missing a box of spare hard drives, they're just spares, they're not preventing the installation, however, they're missing, and therefore you haven't delivered the product.

    Overall, I'd rate the product ten out of ten.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
    PeerSpot user
    Professor at a university with 1-10 employees
    Real User
    Processes massive data sets and improves the performance of our targeted workloads
    Pros and Cons
    • "We were running out of memory, and that was the first time we heard of a solution that supports a terabyte of core memory. That was the primary reason we got the first box. We've stayed with it since then because we have so many Dell workstations."
    • "Capacity and performance could always be improved."

    What is our primary use case?

    I work at a university in a research environment. We use PowerEdge powered by Intel servers to run geophysics simulations that stay in the system for a long time. The servers are used to image and process massive data sets. We develop code that requires a moderate amount of power, so that's why we use the racks. 

    We currently have between five to ten units, but some of them are down. It's mostly graduate students and a few faculty using them, and we primarily run Linux. The built-in security features aren't really an issue because everything is behind the university's firewalls. We don't have to worry about it because they have a dedicated IT security department. We can dial in from the outside, and we have all kinds of VPN solutions.

    The university provides us with batteries and power supplies. They often run for more than a year without any failures, so power isn't a problem. 

    We are working with Intel's Xeon scalable processor, but I'm not sure which models we are using. We typically buy the most advanced processor available when we purchase the racks. 

    At this time, we have no plans to switch to cloud servers because it's not as comfortable as having an on-premises rack. Also, there are some security restrictions associated with some of our applications, so we can't transfer the data to the cloud. We work with a lot of data, so we prefer local resources because of the security and the speed. 

    It does the job for us. We know it's not a high-end product, but it's good enough. We are looking at getting another box. The next series should be 940. The step is not as big as we expected after having the 930 for several years now. We're thinking about getting another one from Dell, but I'm waiting to see what will be available. We are looking for a 4U rack, fully loaded with CPUs and disks. And we have a disk farm outside that we connect to the server, so we can store a lot of data locally. 

    How has it helped my organization?

    We've had no problems with high-performance workloads on our Dell racks. We use the standard software like Intel compilers plus our in-house code, OpenMP, Pilot Processing, and MPI. Intel's Xeon processors improve the performance of our targeted workloads, which is crucial for us. 

    We buy the strongest CPUs and run the Intel compiler. We usually run heavy code, so we're working on traditional software languages like Fortran and C. These are heavy applications that run on this cluster.

    What is most valuable?

    We started working on Dell servers more than a decade ago. I think it was the 910 version, and its main advantage was the ability to load a lot of in-core memory into the box. It's irrelevant today because everybody can provide as much as they want, but we had memory issues in the beginning. 

    We were running out of memory, and that was the first time we heard of a solution that supports a terabyte of core memory. That was the primary reason we got the first box. We've stayed with it since then because we have so many Dell workstations.

    Dell servers are easy to use. We've never had a problem. We do more hardware work with workstations, including adding and replacing cards. It's easy compared to what we used to do with screwdrivers years ago. 

    What needs improvement?

    Capacity and performance can always be improved. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Dell servers for nearly 15 years. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    PowerEdge servers powered by Intel are highly stable. Some of them have stayed on for two years without ever rebooting. Usually, they only reboot for maintenance or something happening in the building, but it is not due to a failure of the machine. Stability is essential because we have jobs that sit on the system for a couple of days.

    How are customer service and support?

    I haven't used Dell's technical support much. Usually, when I have a problem, we search online for a solution. Sometimes we use the Dell knowledge base or community groups, but we rarely need to contact someone.

    How was the initial setup?

    Deploying the PowerEdge Rack Servers wasn't a problem. We just plug it into the rack with help from the university computer center. They let us know where to put it and connect it to the required network.

    We take care of all the software, like the operating system, permissions, local security, data access, etc. This is all Linux-based, and we have experience, so it's straightforward. For maintenance, we use Dell's OpenManage console a little to tweak the configuration for performance, but we generally set up the system and let it go. We only update the operating system once a year and upgrade the environment.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The price is reasonable. You have to pay if you want quality. When we purchase something, we have to do some market analysis, and I haven't seen a significant difference compared to other solutions.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I'm used to Dell equipment, and the local network is mainly based on Dell workstations connected to the servers. The other servers are usually IBM and HP. I haven't seen any major difference that would justify switching to other vendors.

    What other advice do I have?

    I rate Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers nine out of ten. 

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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    Updated: September 2022
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    Download our free Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.