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Dustin McVey
BI Data Integration Developer - EIM at a healthcare company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 20
Maintains dependencies and constraints among a large number of workflows and it always triggers jobs at the appropriate time
Pros and Cons
  • "We leverage the solution's native integrations regularly. We have to get files from a remote server outside the organization, and even send things outside the organization. We use a lot of its file manipulation and SFTP functionality for contacting remote servers."
  • "Between version 10 and version 12 there was a change. In version 10, they had each object in its own folder. But on the back end, they saw it at the root level. So when we moved over to version 12, everything was in the same area mixed together. It was incredibly difficult and we actually had to create our own folders and move those objects—like schedules, jobs, user accounts—and manually put those into folders, whereas the previous version already had it."

What is our primary use case?

Primarily, we've been using it in a localized way, but it's becoming more and more of an enterprise tool as the knowledge is shared throughout the team and department. But primarily it has been used for ETL-type work. My team is data integration and we use it to schedule our Informatica PowerCenter workflows as well as DataStage. We also use it for a lot of file transfers, such as SFTP stuff. And we've recently explored some API calls that we can use to interface with Qlik.

How has it helped my organization?

It's really helpful with scheduling and setting up dependencies. I primarily use it with our data warehouse and there are a lot of dependencies. First you have to load XYZ tables before it's filtered and presented in the reporting layer. It really helps to maintain those constraints and dependencies.

We use it to schedule our data warehouse. We use the Informatica PowerCenter tool and we have Oracle's out-of-the-box Data Warehouse so there are a lot of workflows that need to run, either sequentially or that are dependent on one another. ActiveBatch really handles hundreds of workflows on a schedule and it definitely maintains those constraints. I've never seen a failure to trigger a job at an appropriate time. We definitely rely on it heavily in that regard.

ActiveBatch was originally purchased as a scheduler, to enable us to execute DataStage jobs, but once we started to grow, and our use cases started to vary, we realized that we could use the pre-built SFTP capabilities. Previously, we had to code things in our DataStage tool where it wasn't as intuitive. You really had to get into the programming. But a business user can certainly use ActiveBatch to set up an SFTP connection, as long as they have the information. It's pretty easy to do that. Moving SFTP files around is certainly valuable to the business because I work for a hospital. The health system is definitely reliant on the data that we move around, and ActiveBatch really executes the ETL workflows that actually transform and move the data. We rely on it to appropriately schedule and execute those workflows to get the data to the right place.

The solution has become our center of excellence for all things related to automation in our organization. We started with DataStage and then we acquired the Informatica tool and we use ActiveBatch for that. Now we're seeing we can use the scheduling capabilities of ActiveBatch to call our Qlik refresh applications. We're starting to expand ActiveBatch as an enterprise solution and other departments are also finding that they can do all the remote scripting that they used to have to do manually, or that operations would have to do, in ActiveBatch and it will take care of that on a schedule, instead of wasting man-hours.

It also provides proactive error detection, even in real time. Almost all of our workflows have a lot of notifications set up to either email, or page, or create a ServiceNow ticket if there is a failure. We're notified immediately if something's not working as it should. That has prevented problems from becoming fires. If we didn't get those notifications, if our data warehouse was not operating as we expected it to, that certainly would cause some problems. 

In addition, in terms of workflow completion times, I don't know what we would have done without it, as far as scheduling goes. It would probably be a lot more complicated to schedule a lot of our workflows through these other products that are more focused on the data manipulation and are not as concerned with scheduling. So to be able to schedule and set up dependencies has been pretty valuable for us. It has improved our workflow completion rates by five hours per day, because we execute our workflows daily. It has also reduced our man-hours by something like 60 percent. It has a lot of intuitive stuff so that instead of building out code for it, we can just plug-and-play with it. You put in the right parameters and it takes care of it for you.

We have definitely been able to re-assign staff to more value-added activities as a result of using ActiveBatch. Something that has been very valuable for us is that we have been able to build our solutions in a way that, if they fail, ActiveBatch actually tries to restart them itself, without any manual intervention. If that fails it goes to our operations team. Before, that was something that our ETL or data integration team had to handle ourselves. Being able to push those issues to ActiveBach and to the other team, it has really saved us a lot of time.

What is most valuable?

We do a lot of very specific scheduling. You could do it as simply as, "Hey, run this every day at six o'clock," or you could do something like an exact date and exclude bank holidays. It has a very robust scheduling aspect.

We use a lot of SFTP stuff. With version 11 and version 12 they came out with a managed file transfer. They have a lot of pre-programmed "job steps" so that you don't have to develop custom code. You can just say, "Copy file. SFTP file." They build up a lot of the common uses that you would be looking to develop yourself.

We leverage the solution's native integrations regularly. We have to get files from a remote server outside the organization, and even send things outside the organization. We use a lot of its file manipulation and SFTP functionality for contacting remote servers. 

ActiveBatch also has a lot of pre-built looping structures, reading files, looping-if-branch; basic programming concepts are pre-built for you and robust. That's definitely nice.

It's very easy to use. I was self-taught before any training was available for our company. It's very easy to learn to use yourself. I have a technical background but even some of our business users, with some light training, would be able to navigate and use the tool very easily. Things like the copy files or move files are very intuitive.

It's extremely flexible. In addition to that pre-built functionality and the ability to create API calls, it allows us to create our own service library. That wasn't default but they said "Hey, we have this package where you can build your own library." It also has some different scripting of job steps. If I want to use PowerShell to achieve something that might not be out-of-the-box, I've been able to leverage that utility to achieve whatever we're looking to do. If there's a problem that needs a solution that may not be available in our ETL products, my first go-to is ActiveBatch to do some scripting.

What needs improvement?

Between version 10 and version 12 there was a change. In version 10, they had each object in its own folder. But on the back end, they saw it at the root level. So when we moved over to version 12, everything was in the same area mixed together. It was incredibly difficult and we actually had to create our own folders and move those objects—like schedules, jobs, user accounts—and manually put those into folders, whereas the previous version already had it. They did allow us to filter so that we could see things, but that was not nearly as effective as what we had become used to having.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using ActiveBatch Workload Automation for three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very stable. Any of the issues that we tend to see are related to the product that ActiveBatch is trying to talk to. For example, we use the web service for our Informatica tool, and issues we see are on the PowerCenter side, not the ActiveBatch side.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I know it has features for scaling, so as we continue to build it out as an enterprise tool we're able to use what they call a Virtual Root. The team using it doesn't see everybody else's work, they only see what's relevant to them. That's really neat. 

We went from one team using it to some four or five teams using it now. The other teams are just starting, but I don't see any collisions. It's easy to grow.

We have about 30 users of the solution, including developers, solution architects, operations, trainers, administrators, and data modelers.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their support is good. For every support question I've raised they've had very responsive teams. To date, we haven't submitted an issue that they haven't been able to correct or provide some sort of solution for.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before ActiveBatch, as they created jobs, they used our DataStage tool as the scheduler. That functionality was within the product.

How was the initial setup?

I was involved in the deployment of the current version. We originally had version 10, but within the last year we upgraded to version 12 and I played a role in that. From my perspective as a user of the application, it was very seamless, especially moving our existing workflows. We needed to keep them running on the new version and the backward compatibility was spot-on.

That upgrade process took about three months but that was not a dedicated, focused effort. There were a lot of other variables.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend taking the time to understand the different objects and features so that, as you grow as an enterprise, the architecture is already in place and you're not figuring it out as you go, like we did.

The ability to automate predictable, repeatable processes is something that we haven't leveraged as much. It's the Heuristic Queue Allocation where it can schedule and manage execution of workflows with whatever resource is available. With that said, I do notice that it does track, by default, the average run time and how long jobs run. There are some default analytics that it provides.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Production Control Manager at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Saves us a lot of money by not having to do the work manually
Pros and Cons
  • "ActiveBatch can automate predictable, repeatable processes very well. There is no real trick to what ActiveBatch does. ActiveBatch does exactly what you would expect a scheduling piece of software to do. It does it in a timely manner and does it with very little outside interference and fanfare. It runs when it is supposed to, and I don't have to jump through a bunch of hoops to double check it."
  • "The reporting needs improvement. There is a real need for the ability to generate audit reports on the fly. It needs to be a lot easier than what I can do right now. This is a major item for me."

What is our primary use case?

We provide parking enforcement support for cities around the USA. So, if you are a municipality, then you may have a contract with us. We would provide you with services that would range from parking enforcement to tollway enforcement. It really depends on the end user and what the community's business is.

All of our automation runs through ActiveBatch. We have probably close to 2,500 jobs running each day that provide support for different municipalities around the US. All of our clients' data comes to us via a scheduled set of file movements within the arrangement of ActiveBatch. At midnight, every night, we get every ticket that a municipality issued in the last 24 hours, then we put that into our database so the municipality can ensure that they get that money collected within a reasonable length of time for collection purposes.

Each community has its own set of required rules that have to be followed, e.g., what kind of delay can happen before you make sure you collect on the debt from the citizen for having had a parking violation to when the next time you are going to go out and try to double check if they have not paid their fines.

It is deployed via our own internal network connections. It is a locally-sourced platform for us. We don't have a lot of really complex job flows. It just isn't the nature of our business, because you can't really take municipalities data someplace else. However, our data is shared in a data center in Wisconsin and a data center in Indiana, thus our data is in both locations every day.

How has it helped my organization?

ActiveBatch supports 250 municipalities around the USA for parking enforcement. In addition to that, there are almost another 200 that we support. They just go out and find out who owned the vehicle that had the violation, whether it be a toll road violation or a parking violation. There are a lot of moving pieces which are supported by ActiveBatch every day.

What is most valuable?

The combination of time scheduled events to running the import of data into our in-house databases is always critical, and that happens every day. Critical individual pieces for us are timed events.

ActiveBatch can automate predictable, repeatable processes very well. There is no real trick to what ActiveBatch does. ActiveBatch does exactly what you would expect a scheduling piece of software to do. It does it in a timely manner and does it with very little outside interference and fanfare. It runs when it is supposed to, and I don't have to jump through a bunch of hoops to double check it.

What needs improvement?

The reporting needs improvement. There is a real need for the ability to generate audit reports on the fly. It needs to be a lot easier than what I can do right now. This is a major item for me.

We are starting to look at doing tablet and mobile device support. An easier interface to set that up would be nice. However, at the same time, part of that is my own firm's requirements. It is not easy internally to support signing up and configuring remote access, if anything, making that easier would definitely be a plus.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using ActiveBatch since 2012, and I have been part of the company since 2014. So, we have been using it for a reasonable length of time.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I find the solution very stable. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I run jobs across two domains, all US time zones, and I have not found an issue where I couldn't run a job across a specific time zone yet. So, I think it's pretty scalable. It does what I am looking for it to do every day, and I have not found an issue where I couldn't do something. I don't have to chase after anybody to help me figure out, "How do I make the software do X, Y, and Z?"

A team of four of us, including myself, configure and monitor the software. I can't tell you how big the IT team is that supports the agents, which is how ActiveBatch runs, but there are a number of folks in that position. As a firm, we are not very big in numbers, but we respond pretty quickly if there is a problem somewhere internally that needs to be looked at and something has to be jumped on.

I find ActiveBatch very user-friendly and responsive. We are a pretty small company, as far as numbers go, and if it couldn't support what we're doing, then I would find another solution.

How are customer service and technical support?

If I have issues with it, then Advanced Systems Concepts, Inc. (ASCI) has been very supportive with assisting us. They would jump in and help resolve the issue very quickly. They have been a joy to work with. I really haven't had any major issues with them. I have always walked away with, "Oh, here's the solution for the immediate problem." From my standpoint, that is always what I am looking for first, so I have been very happy.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have been involved in automated scheduling software since 1989. I find this to be the easiest product that I have ever used, especially compared to Robot Schedule and CA AutoSys as well as an in-house scheduling software that I had designed and developed at one time.

How was the initial setup?

I was not involved in the original setup.

What was our ROI?

We support an awful lot of clients. I look at what happens within our scheduler every morning for a review, and it is running 2,500 different workflows that probably have on average seven to eight job steps. On a normal day, I may have five that I have to worry about. If something went wrong, then I may have to rerun a job from earlier on, but that's it. There are not a lot of failures in the product.

We run an awfully lean group to accomplish all the work that we have to do. So, there is not a lot of extra time spent running a job. The job runs when it was designed to run, and that's pretty much every day. It does save us a lot of money, certainly more than doing it manually.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

The decision for ActiveBatch was already in place when I joined the company, and there hasn't been any movement to go outside to some other solution.

What other advice do I have?

Jump in and really look at what you are looking at, i.e. don't be afraid to question the vendor, and say, "Can it do this? Can it do that?" So, when you make the decision to use the software, you have done your due diligence and this solution will work for you. I personally think far too many people jump into the decision to buy an automated software piece without really understanding what they are asking it to do. You really have to know, "What am I looking for this software to do for me?" If you don't do that, you are probably going to find yourself unhappy at some point in time, saying, "Well, this really isn't what I thought I was getting." Then, that will end up being your own fault: The more effort you put in ahead of time, the better off you're going to be. Know ahead of time, "What am I going after here that will work for me?"

I may not know when a client municipality is going to deliver a file to us. So, a lot of our jobs run as events, not by time. In other words, it may run at three o'clock tomorrow morning or may not run until five o'clock the next morning, because the municipality wasn't ready to send us the data yet. It is a combination of what we have scheduled, as opposed to what we react to when a file is delivered to us.

I would rate this solution as an eight and a half (out of 10).

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Learn what your peers think about ActiveBatch Workload Automation. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: January 2022.
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Georg Johansen
Operations Manager at Statkraft AS
Real User
Top 10
Our business users are able to set up and maintain their own jobs
Pros and Cons
  • "We use the main job-scheduling feature. It's the only thing we use in the tool. That's the reason we are using the tool: to reduce costs by replacing manual tasks with automated tasks and to perform regular, repetitive tasks in a more reliable way."
  • "It could be easier to provide dashboards on how many jobs are running at the same time; more monitoring."

What is our primary use case?

Most of the jobs are for the automation of processes, but we also use it for IT operations, including monitoring. We execute over 20,000 jobs daily.

It's moving data files and doing a lot of calculations in hydrology and the like. The business users are maintaining their own jobs, setting them up, configuring, and maintaining them. They only contact us, in IT,  if there are any problems. 

ActiveBatch is completely on-prem but the rest of our organization has many different kinds of infrastructure and locations, both in the cloud and in 16 countries. We have about 4,000 employees.

How has it helped my organization?

The automation has saved us many hours although I can't say exactly how many.

We're able to create workflows without coding.

I would imagine it has also resulted in an improvement in workflow completion times as well.

Our IT organization is using it for monitoring. We get information by running checks using ActiveBatch to obtain information to provide to the monitoring systems. It helps us keep systems up and to receive early warning about problems.

What is most valuable?

We use the main job-scheduling feature. It's the only thing we use in the tool. That's the reason we are using the tool: to reduce costs by replacing manual tasks with automated tasks and to perform regular, repetitive tasks in a more reliable way.

It's quite customizable because it supports many different platforms and technologies, and it covers almost everything we need to set up different jobs in our environment. We are using it mostly for our Windows and Unix servers and we are using different triggers, for example, Apache ActiveMQ. It is used by many different applications and systems. We use various databases, including Oracle, SQL Server, Microsoft, as well as Active Directory.

We are at the beginning of implementing agents in our Azure cloud. We haven't used that part very much yet but it will be used. We are moving more and more systems from on-prem to the cloud, so it will increase gradually.

What needs improvement?

It could be easier to provide dashboards on how many jobs are running at the same time; more monitoring.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using ActiveBatch for at least 10 years. We're on version 11 but we are planning to upgrade to version 12 in a couple of months. 

I'm not an end-user, I'm just responsible for making sure it's working. I troubleshoot if something is wrong and I do upgrading and installing.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's pretty reliable. If it's organized and configured in an optimal way it works pretty well, but it requires a lot of planning. For example, you have to make sure that end-users don't have too many privileges because they can mess things up. It's very important to plan carefully before implementing.

We have had some issues in one of our installations in Germany, but they are still on version 10, which is quite an old implementation. They will replace that with the new version 12 in the near future.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is quite good. You can add more agents. We haven't had any performance problems or issues with it.

The number of jobs and the number of applications that take advantage of ActiveBatch are growing constantly within our company. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Other than scheduling in Windows, I don't think our company had a previous solution.

How was the initial setup?

ActiveBatch was already implemented when I came to this company, but I have been here for a couple of upgrades.

Some parts of the setup are straightforward and some parts are more complex. The main features are pretty straightforward to set up but when it comes to the features that require an internet information server, it's a bit more tricky to set the secure connections and certificates, etc. We struggled a bit with that but we had good support from the vendor. They were able to make it work.

The implementation itself doesn't take a long time, but it takes a lot of planning: Security, execution agents, and the like. 

There are two of us who work with ActiveBatch maintenance, but it's not a full-time responsibility. We have between 100 and 200 people who transact with it. Some of them have read-only access so that they can view the jobs.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I also have experience with CA Workload Automation. It has been some years since I worked with it but it's the same concept and the same features but doing things in slightly different ways. 

What other advice do I have?

Start with a simple, small version and try some simple tasks to see how effective it is.

Using  ActiveBatch I have learned that the potential for reducing costs using an automation tool is huge, and that when the business becomes aware of it they really embrace the product.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
BhaskerChittibabu
Manager at a financial services firm with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Useful prebuilt jobs, stable, and scalable
Pros and Cons
  • "One of the most valuable features of this solution is the versatility of the prebuilt jobs."
  • "Any product is going to have some room for improvement, no matter what. I see the company has already ventured into AWS and they're constantly trying to improve the managed file transfer which they have recently improvised. I think they bought a software called JSCAPE and they're trying to improve it, which is good. I am not sure if JSCAPE would be part of the base product but currently, you have to buy a separate license for it, which doesn't make sense. If it was Microsoft, ServiceNow, or integrating with other software vendors, I would understand but JSCAPE is now in-house and I'm not sure if they can justify having a separate license for JSCAPE. I would probably expect them to be packaging JSCAPE into the base product. They did switch over from a perpetual license model to a subscription model, which hurt the company a little bit. Nobody is offering the perpetual model anymore. As long as the transition is fair for both the companies, I think it should be fine and not burn us out."

What is our primary use case?

ActiveBatch Workload Automation is a standard scheduling tool that you have on the market. The ultimate goal is to run everything powered through ActiveBatch Workload Automation, but we are always constantly trying to move from our legacy processes, which always takes a lot of time and effort. However, all of the new processes we are focused on implementing through ActiveBatch Workload Automation.

What is most valuable?

One of the most valuable features of this solution is the versatility of the prebuilt jobs.

What needs improvement?

Any product is going to have some room for improvement, no matter what. I see the company has already ventured into AWS and they're constantly trying to improve the managed file transfer which they have recently improvised. I think they bought a software called JSCAPE and they're trying to improve it, which is good. 

I am not sure if JSCAPE would be part of the base product but currently, you have to buy a separate license for it, which doesn't make sense. If it was Microsoft, ServiceNow, or integrating with other software vendors, I would understand but JSCAPE is now in-house and I'm not sure if they can justify having a separate license for JSCAPE. I would probably expect them to be packaging JSCAPE into the base product. They did switch over from a perpetual license model to a subscription model, which hurt the company a little bit. Nobody is offering the perpetual model anymore. As long as the transition is fair for both the companies, I think it should be fine and not burn us out.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using ActiveBatch Workload Automation for a few years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

ActiveBatch Workload Automation is scalable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability of the solution is good.

How are customer service and support?

The technical support was difficult if you wanted to escalate the issue, it takes a little bit longer to escalate. Their service model does not allow for everybody to be on the hotline all the time. I understand that, but unfortunately, with a production system, that's what it is. If there is a bug, you want that hotline as soon as possible, because we don't know the impact of it. If it can widespread, if there is an issue, or if it's contained within one or two jobs. Luckily this has not been the case. 

It's all same architecture and framework of which you built upon several things. If there's a problem with it, you want to know it way before it impacts the other jobs.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I like ActiveBatch Workload Automation's licensing model because they're not holding you down on an agentless model or agent model, where every server needs to have an agent. That's the main selling point of the solution and I hope they stay that way.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I have evaluated other solutions, such as Control-M.

What other advice do I have?

I rate ActiveBatch Workload Automation an eight out of ten.

I rated ActiveBatch Workload Automation high because the licensing model is way better than other solutions, such as Control-M or other companies that charge a lot more. I like their agentless model because most of the scheduling companies put in the rules saying, that for each server you touch, you need an agent. Otherwise, they cannot communicate, and will not work. This is a large advantage for ActiveBatch Workload Automation their Agent model is great.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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DBA at a venture capital & private equity firm with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Good support and the scheduling works well
Pros and Cons
  • "From a scheduling point of view, it is pretty good."
  • "The interface is not that user-friendly and is a little tough to navigate."

What is our primary use case?

I am the administrator handling all of the ActiveBatch-related activities. It is used for all of our processes, scheduling, and basically all of the automation.

What is most valuable?

The schedule is good because you don't miss any issues. Let's say you reboot the server and there are still things pending, they will resume. From a scheduling point of view, it is pretty good.

What needs improvement?

The reporting needs to be made easier, such as by including a dashboard. As it is now, I have to go to each and every folder in order to see the reports. If I had a higher-level view, such as Tableau-based reporting, then it would be very useful. Right now, it is built-in with the existing GUI and it is very limited. If they were to detach that and provide the data with a template report then that would be the best way to go.

The interface is not that user-friendly and is a little tough to navigate.

In the future, I would like to see support for mobile alerts so that we don't have to log in to find out whether there is a problem.

I would also like to see more support for cloud-based environments. For example, we might want our workflow to include Snowflake from Amazon. So far, all of our work is on our on-premises servers, whether it is moving a file or running a database. We are now extending out and would like to use ActiveBatch to bring in more controls. Examples include using Snowflake or Redshift in my workflow. That would be very helpful.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using ActiveBatch for approximately 13 years, since 2007.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Overall, it is quite stable. Over the years, we have had very few issues with stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Our company is small, with perhaps seven or eight people using ActiveBatch. We have hundreds of jobs running and we haven't had any problems. The scheduler continues to do its job.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is pretty good.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very straightforward and never gave me a problem.

What about the implementation team?

The setup and maintenance are done in-house. We have overnight support group from India and they manage the nightly processes using ActiveBatch.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We are currently paying a yearly fee, although they are greatly increasing their prices and changing to a subscription-based model. Currently, we are paying approximately $7,000 yearly, which includes support.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Before choosing ActiveBatch, we looked at a couple of products and run a pilot with Control-M. 

What other advice do I have?

We look at different products and this is definitely a very good one. I do not have much familiarity with the cloud-based solutions but on a Windows platform, this one is pretty good.

Overall, this is a good product but there are a lot of improvements that can be made to the interface to make it more user-friendly. Also, if I were rating the reporting then I would only score it a six and a half. Finally, we do need a solution that can reach out to cloud environments.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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