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Buyer's Guide
Data Loss Prevention (DLP)
June 2022
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Darshil Sanghvi - PeerSpot reviewer
Consultant at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
Reseller
Top 5Leaderboard
Feature-rich, easy to set up, and protects our data against different kinds of loss
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable features are Device Control, Content-Aware Protection, Enforced Encryption, and eDiscovery."
  • "If CoSoSys comes up with a suite of Host DLP, along with Network DLP and SaaS DLP, it will cover all of the aspects of a DLP solution."

What is our primary use case?

We have been implementing and designing solutions with CoSoSys as a part of the Host level DLP (Data leak prevention) solution. Our major cause is to provide a solution to protect data being leaked by their users, knowingly, via any application or software like web browsers, email, SaaS applications, drive, etc., or any hardware devices through MTP/PTP (mobile phones, wifi, USB, cd/floppy, printer, or ay such devices

We have successfully implemented this solution in multiple customer environments, PAN India.

How has it helped my organization?

We have implemented this solution for protecting our data that may be leaked by users for their personal use.

Our concern for data protection came into the picture during the pandemic phase (COVID-19), where users were performing critical business operations from their homes. At that moment, it was observed that data needs to be protected.

We were searching for data protection solutions on Google during the time, where Endpoint Protector popped up. We connected with their team, implemented the same in our environment initially for testing purposes, and then implemented it in our environment and then in our customer's network.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features are Device Control, Content-Aware Protection, Enforced Encryption, and eDiscovery.

Device control is a module of CoSoSys EPP where we get granular rights and controls for protection of data getting leaked from any hardware devices like USB drives, Storage media, Wi-Fi, printers, etc.

Content-Aware Protection prevents users from uploading or sharing the data or files/documents with others through any application or software like web-browsers, email, file-sharing, or remote application software. It can even prevent users from taking and/or sharing screenshots or clipboard data.

Enforced Encryption is used when you want to have only permitted or restrictive devices connecting to user systems.

eDiscovery is another module where an IT admin can find a file/resource/path/folder present in a user's system.

What needs improvement?

As a host DLP solution, it has granular controls and features. It misses Network level DLP and SaaD DLP offerings. If CoSoSys comes up with a suite of Host DLP, along with Network DLP and SaaS DLP, it will cover all of the aspects of a DLP solution.

Various other products provide us a complete suite of solutions covering Host, Network, and SaaS aspects. Examples of these are Forcepoint and Digital Guardian.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been deploying and presenting this solution to multiple customers, since April 2020.

How are customer service and technical support?

There are areas where CoSoSys supports more than other vendors do. For example, they offer support for Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms, which not all of the other vendors provide.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup and installation of the server were very simple.

What about the implementation team?

We implemented in-house using the admin guide that was provided.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

This is a budget-friendly solution that covers all the aspects of host-level DLP.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: My company is providing solutions to customers needing DLP solutions.
Security Architect at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 10
Enables us to search for keywords, a process which is a critical part of our security operations
Pros and Cons
  • "There are effectively two areas of DLP to look at from a technical perspective. One is how it performs the pickup of information traversing the system and the other is how the policy engine, which analyzes the data, works. On the first aspect, CoSoSys is probably best of breed for macOS because they're reasonably well-integrated into the operating system. They're looking at the file system operations level, not at the execution level."
  • "The policy engine could use a bit of work. They're definitely going in the right direction. We've been working with them over the last few weeks to try and optimize that. But it's reasonably clear that they're just not putting as much effort into the policy engine as into other things, like content discovery."

What is our primary use case?

We use it for detecting the traversal of data through endpoints. We keep a multi-tier isolated environment, so we have inner and outer cordons of access control. And over VPN, users could potentially be one of the exfil points, at least the privileged ones with access. Being able to identify when information enters the system and leaves, based on a number of complex criteria, because we work with medical information from all over the world, is the purpose of it in our organization.

The solution is all on-premises. We're a healthcare organization, and that's actually one of the reasons we use it. We can't have a lot of our security functionality in the cloud.

How has it helped my organization?

We operate a Waterfall scene mechanism. We trickle up data from a bunch of different endpoint and network solutions to a central event and processing correlation mechanism. We're able to detect when somebody accesses data internally and correlate that to a DLP event when a file lands on their system. It actually provides a data point within our global view. It's an ongoing operation.

We also use it to monitor all clipboard activity. When a detection occurs, we can generally identify it pretty quickly, but someone would have to be copying some pretty specific data to match the policies we've created. When it occurs, we know. Generally, it's also in the line of business. We have healthcare analysts here, and that's what they do all day.

What is most valuable?

There are effectively two areas of DLP to look at from a technical perspective. One is how it performs the pickup of information traversing the system and the other is how the policy engine, which analyzes the data, works. On the first aspect, CoSoSys is probably best of breed for macOS because they're reasonably well-integrated into the operating system. They're looking at the file system operations level, not at the execution level. Whereas things like Forcepoint are looking at the applications being run and they try to apply policy to that. The pickup paradigm is a lot better than their competitors.

The search for keywords, in our security operations, is critical and we use Endpoint Protector for that. We're a HITRUST-certified organization, and one of the things we need to do is be aware of the movement of personally identifiable health information. Since we work multi-nationally, we have to be able to identify PHI from across different countries and their different medical coding standards.

Another valuable feature is the  Content Aware Protection. We use the device thing to some degree, but it's the Content Aware Protection that's critical for us. That's the aspect of it which is DLP. The content protection engine is what detects the data when it's traversing, and the rest of it is other ways to lock down the system from being able to move data in and out. But the detection aspect of it, that's the really key part for us, because we have to be able to record that, even if it's completely legitimate.

It's quite easy to manage DLP in a hybrid environment because you have the centralized server that receives telemetry from all of the agents. And because that's what's forwarding the telemetry on to subsequent log ingests, you get a single data stream across all of the agents. We also have host intrusion detection, which is backing a lot of this stuff for us. We have full command execution logging in every machine. Every command that is run is recorded. We can cross-correlate very tightly between the DLP and what's being done on the machine itself. That way, we know execution and data movement.

We use the role-based access features, for the teams that administer it, to some degree, because we have an auditing agency that reviews our policy compliance. It's satisfactory. We don't have complex requirements for it. We've got a couple of internal admins with equal privileges and then we have an auditor role. It seems to work fine.

What needs improvement?

The policy engine could use a bit of work. They're definitely going in the right direction. We've been working with them over the last few weeks to try and optimize that. But it's reasonably clear that they're just not putting as much effort into the policy engine as into other things, like content discovery.

It's somewhat lacking in terms of the granularity of the policies that you can create. Because this is a Mac environment, you have slim pickings. You have really good detection mechanisms, like Code42, but a lot of those players don't operate at the medium business size. So, in terms of the market segment, CoSoSys is really the only player that will be able to still effectively pick up on it, so they're the only game in town on policy. They don't really have much competition in this segment.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using CoSoSys Endpoint Protector for two years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability has been quite good. They did have one shaky patch cycle in the last two years, but compared to the ginormous mess in this industry right now, they're definitely doing better than most.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability works for our use case. It's actually quite resource-light for what it's doing. Being an OSSEC author, I'm writing a C application that does a lot of the same stuff for processing of live-streaming, textual telemetry. They did a lot of optimization work to make this efficient. It's an expensive operation, inherently. What they're doing is really CPU-costly. Most of the time they don't match on anything, and the worst thing that an expression engine can do is not find anything.

We are constantly growing. We're probably going to be growing by 30 or 40 percent again this year. We're going to have to bump up our license counts.

How are customer service and technical support?

Our experience with their technical support has been better over the last year. Initially it was a little bit shaky, but they've definitely gotten better. There's always room to improve, but on a scale of one to 10, they're probably at a six or seven. They're doing better than the rest of the industry, like Cisco for example, which is a one out of 10.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not have a previous solution.

How was the initial setup?

We just used a Zen appliance, so it was incredibly straightforward; it was effectively drop-in.

Configurations are ongoing. As we get new data in, we do continue to configure. And, obviously, with updates and new features and features being removed, changes are made all the time, but the initial deployment took about half a day.

Our implementation strategy was to understand our data first. We do a lot of in-house software development, so we understand regular expressions, pattern matching, and mechanisms like that; what's expensive and what's cheap. We defined what was identifiable in our data, figured out an identification strategy and policy mechanism first, and then went to implement it across the board. We knew that the number of endpoints we had was relatively small.

In terms of the staff employed in the deployment, we're probably not typical. We hire top-tier talent. Everybody here starts out well into the six-figure range. So it takes one of us to deploy this. We're not your average shop.

In terms of maintenance, there's the occasional update. There is almost no downtime. The hypervisor is more unstable than the VM itself.

We have about 100 people using Endpoint Protector across our organization. It's literally everybody in the organization, including me and the CTO and the CEO. We're all beholden to this. There are no exceptions.

What was our ROI?

You get ROI in the first year. Endpoint Protector is a facet of our visibility into the environment, but it's a daily-use facet. It's like the passenger-side mirror on your car; you use it all the time. You could probably live without it, but you use it all the time. It's a necessity and it's a useful one. It's one that I endorse within our company to relicense every year.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Pricing is quite reasonable. For smaller organizations, it lets them get into the product domain, whereas a lot of vendors won't even talk to them. Endpoint Protector is just about at that sweet spot of being serious enough that you have to budget for it, but at the same time, affordable enough that the value is well worth it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I work across the industry. I've used just about every solution. In the Mac space, CoSoSys is probably the market leader, because of the level of detail that they've put into the platform is very significant. They really did bother to optimize it and to make it run efficiently. A lot of these tools are afterthoughts on Mac and, if they do run at all, they destroy the machine. When you have a bunch of engineers trying to code, they notice.

This solution is right up there with Forcepoint Data Loss Prevention and Digital Guardian, but Code42 Next-Gen DLP is probably the closest comparable thing. But that is not a data loss prevention tool, it's just an identification and tagging tool. But it has a very similar semantic of pickup and analysis. 

Endpoint Protector is in the same market space as Forcepoint, in terms of pricing, but it's an apples-to-oranges comparison. Forcepoint is pretty well-known for having a good policy engine, but their detection and pickup mechanism, especially on the Mac platform, is just not practical. I can walk around it in my sleep. Again, we hire highly-talented engineers who can do the same thing, so if one of them decided to go rogue on us, Forcepoint just wouldn't help.

What other advice do I have?

In my private practice, I work with a lot of other firms, including some design firms that are Mac-based and, as they start to ramp up their security—because they're now becoming vectors of attack into their own customer bases—this product is definitely something that's on the radar.

The ability to lock down a wide variety of USB devices is a secondary thing for us, because we do central policy management through another solution, so we have devices locked down through other policy engine mechanisms. But it is very convenient how CoSoSys has implemented it. That ability is definitely on the list for us but not at the top because for us, for policy regulatory compliance, we have to be able to tell when the data is moving in and out. That's the big thing we look at.

In terms of Endpoint Protector's support for Windows, macOS, and Linux, in our case, Linux is a non-starter. We operate big-data clusters. DLP just doesn't work in that context. The information is broken out into multiple pieces and spread all over the environment and traverses between the nodes as part of computation. DLP can't work in that kind of technique. As far as the Windows mechanisms go, we currently don't have Windows workstations or any Windows assets. I'm a red-teamer by trade, one of the people who gets paid to break into places, and Windows has a shared authentication model, meaning that if I compromise one of your servers or workstations, I can basically move unfettered throughout your network. Our environment is a mix, a heterogeneous environment, so that attackers would have to adapt to every different point they want to compromise.

Overall, Endpoint Protector really provides what you expect from it. There are no huge surprises one way or another. If you do your research, it's exactly what they say in their advertisements. They are not promising things they can't deliver. It does its job well.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
IT Specialist at TresVista Financial Services Pvt. Ltd.
Real User
User-friendly, simple-to-use interface, good support, and protects us from data leakage
Pros and Cons
  • "The interface is pretty user-friendly, neatly explained, and simple to use."
  • "We are currently facing an issue where it is blocking the Winman software, which is something that we don't want to happen because we use it in our accounts department to pay taxes."

What is our primary use case?

We use this product to protect our Mac and Windows 10 endpoints.

Our main purpose is to block the uploading of Excel and PowerPoint files. We also use it to block USB devices and other peripherals that users connect to the system. 

How has it helped my organization?

This product performs well and multiple things have been blocked by it.

By raising discovered issues with our team members, they are doing their part in terms of resolving them.

Endpoint Protector provides a single platform to support our Windows and Mac machines. We do not have any Linux machines in our environment. Managing DLP for our machines in this hybrid environment is pretty simple, as the product is user-friendly and we can easily find what we need.

The fact that this solution supports different operating systems is very important to us because we want to ensure that there is no data leakage.

We have one or two Macs in our organization, with the majority of people using Windows 10 machines. We haven't seen any difference in the support that this product offers for either operating system.

What is most valuable?

The Device Control feature and tools are very nice. It can also be used for containers. We have blocked multiple financial components using these features and rely on the upload and block policies. For example, we have blocked Google Drive uploads, as well as the upload functionality for other cloud spaces.

The interface is pretty user-friendly, neatly explained, and simple to use.

We are able to lock down a wide variety of USB devices, which is important to us because none of our users can connect a USB drive or other device to the machine. By preventing this, there won't be data leakage. We have experienced this in the past and we are now able to control it through the use of device policies. 

The technical support that they provide works well.

We use the RDP remote desktop option to prevent copy and paste operations to remote systems. If anyone tries to copy and paste between a remote system and a local system then they will not be able to do it. This works well and it makes our operations more secure.

What needs improvement?

We are currently facing an issue where it is blocking the Winman software, which is something that we don't want to happen because we use it in our accounts department to pay taxes.

There is no option or support available for DriveHQ. 

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using Endpoint Protector for between seven and eight years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This product is pretty stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is easy to scale. Across the organization, we have more than 900 users with Endpoint Protector deployed on their machines.

We plan to soon increase the number of licenses that we have. Our intention is to start deploying on our laptops, which will bring us to a total of approximately 1,500 licenses.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have been in touch with technical support and our experience has been pretty nice.

How was the initial setup?

This solution was easy to deploy but it was implemented before I joined the company so I don't know how long the process took.

No major upgrades have been required since I have been working with it.

What about the implementation team?

We have an in-house person who is responsible for servers, and he deployed Endpoint Protector. The process is not complex and only one person is required.

We have three system engineers, three senior system engineers, and one assistant manager in charge of maintenance.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at a DLP product by Forcepoint but our current solution was working pretty well, so we opted not to switch.

What other advice do I have?

This is a product that has improved over time. For example, in the past, there was no option to view the ports that were not added to your list. This is now supported and some of the problems we were facing have been stopped. Another example is that we are now able to block Teams and it works pretty well, whereas, in the past, we could not block uploads or downloads with Teams.

Endpoint Protector has other features that we do not use, such as encryption. Instead, we deployed Sophos Encryption approximately six months ago for this purpose.

The biggest lesson that I have learned from using this product is how to block uploads and downloads, as well as how to lock devices on users' machines. My advice for anybody who is considering it is that it is pretty simple to use. It's a friendly environment and it's easy to block devices, uploads, and other security issues.

In summary, we have not faced many issues with Endpoint Protector and it is fulfilling our requirements, as we wanted.

I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Information Technology Security Engineer at a comms service provider with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
Good cross-platform management and has the ability to lock down a wide variety of USB devices
Pros and Cons
  • "The search for keywords is very important in our security operations because one of the key use cases we had was for the ability to search keyword-based on an internal database of keywords that have been submitted by other project managers within the company that's around intellectual property. The ability to search on keywords was part of that."
  • "I would rate the role-based access features for administrators a six out of ten. There's work to be done on the granularity of roles that can be assigned to an administrator but there is role-based administrator access present. That's why it's not a zero rating."

What is our primary use case?

Our primary use case is for data loss prevention. 

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features are:

  • The OS platforms that it is capable of running on.
  • The ability to detect source code as well as file types for the policies. 
  • The SIM integration. 

These were identified previously as key features in a DLP program and Endpoint Protector had them. They are a business need.

The granularity of the policies that you can create is pretty good. I would give it an eight out of ten. It's very granular, but there are still more possibilities for granularity. There's still work to be done, but it's very granular.

Endpoint Protector offers the ability to lock down a wide variety of USB devices. That is a key feature. It was one of the main features we were looking for.

We plan to use the EasyLock USB-enforced encryption app to automatically encrypt confidential data transferred to USB storage devices. 

I would rate the versatility regarding the exit points an eight out of ten. The exit points are pretty diverse, cover the majority, and are constantly updated, but there are still some application types and categories that we would like to see in there. They are responsive to our feature requests and are quick to add applications to the list and categories to the list of exit points.

The cross-platform management is good. I understand that there are some features that won't exist because of the technical limitations that are presented based on Linux, for instance, versus Windows. There are some things you can't do in Linux that you can do in Windows. EasyLock, for example, is a technical limitation that they have because of the nature of Linux. There's work to be done there but I understand why there are technical limitations.

We use the clipboard granularity feature to monitor copying and pasting to specific exit points in a limited capacity. It wasn't one of the main use cases, so it hasn't affected our DLP implementation too much.

The search for keywords is very important in our security operations because one of the key use cases we had was for the ability to search keyword-based on an internal database of keywords that have been submitted by other project managers within the company that's around intellectual property. The ability to search on keywords was part of that.

What needs improvement?

Endpoint Protector provides a single platform to support Windows, macOS, and Linux devices. There is some improvement that is needed there. The policies must be created per OS and in a large deployment with the diverse OS platform use case which can get a little bit unwieldy. Room for improvement there could be a way to clone a policy and map the old policy to the new policy on a new OS. Right now, you would just have to open it up on two different screens and map it manually, but a way to clone it to a new OS and map the differences or map the similarities would be room for improvement.

I would rate the role-based access features for administrators a six out of ten. There's work to be done on the granularity of roles that can be assigned to an administrator but there is role-based administrator access present. That's why it's not a zero rating.

We would probably make better use of tier1 support texts and give them granular abilities within the user interface to help us administer it and then move it to a different tier 2 tech support if the role-based permissions were more granular.

A feature request would be treating a deny list as an exit point. We'd also like to have the ability to tie an allow list to a group rather than a policy so that the allow list follows the group of users or computers. Whatever policy they hit they're always allowed certain URLs. That would be a nice feature for management purposes. 

It could also use some minor UI improvements. There's a little bit of inconsistency in the UI that takes some getting used to.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using Endpoint Protector for about four months in production. Before that, it was about six months in the POC environment.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Due to the diversity of our use cases, we found a few stability issues during the POC and pilot phases. We weren't too concerned about it. Endpoint Protector has given us wonderful attention and they've considered us a partner in developing our product. The stability issues were resolved quickly.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability needs some work. There's probably a better way to manage policies. We only have 30 policies or so, but if we were to get into the hundreds of policies, it would be the way it's presented in the UI. That part could use a rework. 

In terms of scalability as far as deployment, there are no issues there. Policy creation is the only issue. Determining the effective rights of a machine needs some work. Needing to run a report every time is a bit cumbersome. An easier way to see the effective rights of a user or computer without having to run a report would be nice. Those are all scalability issues because as you get more complicated and deploy it out to more users and computers, those types of issues start to manifest.

It requires more administrators than we have due to the complexity that we have. We have two dedicated administrators and we're rolling it out pretty slowly. It depends on how fast they want to roll out. A team of five or so would, with one architect and two tier 1 and two tier 2-type support folks would probably do it for a deployment our size. The admins are IT security engineers.  

How are customer service and technical support?

I would give their support a ten out of ten. I have nothing but good things to say about them. They have good availabliity. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We supplemented our current DLP. The current DLP we had was within the Google Suite and Proofpoint through email. So we supplemented our DLP program with an endpoint solution, which was Endpoint Protector.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. It was just an installer that we sent out through our configuration management software and once machines got sucked into that, we were able to group people through active directory sync.

We're a big company with over 20,000 endpoints. There were about eight months of POC and pilot. After the POC and pilot, we were able to deploy it to 20,000 endpoints in about two months.

What about the implementation team?

CoSoSys helped with questions we had, but it was all the internal workforce that did the deployment.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We also looked at Forcepoint, ObserveIT, Digital Guardian, SecureCircle, and CoSoSys. ObserveIT hit a lot of our requirements, except it couldn't do any blocking. All it could do was monitoring and warning. Their approach was a bit different. I don't think SecureCircle was a mature enough product for what we needed.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to do an extensive test on the DPI and detour features to make sure they're compatible with your environment before deploying to the whole company. Do an extensive pilot with all features turned on, and then evaluate the results based on performance decreased and accessibility restrictions or limitations. Deep packet inspection tends to break some of the internal capabilities.

I would rate Endpoint Protector an eight out of ten. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
IT Manager at a marketing services firm with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 10
Helpful support, intuitive interface, and it effectively protects our confidential graphics files
Pros and Cons
  • "The software is easy to use and the dashboard is intuitive."
  • "It would be helpful if they offered discounted pricing for long-term contracts to serve customers who are interested in committing for periods of three years, five years, or longer."

What is our primary use case?

We store graphics files on our computers and they are confidential, so we implemented this product to block all of the computers from being able to send the data outside of our organization.

We use it to block USB ports so that people cannot connect an external hard drive, flash drive, or anything else that people can use to take files off of the system. Essentially, it blocks data transfer.

How has it helped my organization?

We only have two policies. The first is to block everything and the second one allows for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections.

This product does give us multiple choices for blocking data exit points. Without giving specifics, I can say that I know we have better security because of it.

We have Mac and PC machines, and it is very easy to manage both types. There is no noticeable difference in features between Mac and Windows machines.

We use role-based access for administering this solution, but as we are a small company, it is only insofar as having an administrative role that can perform any of the functions when needed. Some people can unblock certain policies, but we have a single administrator that can do everything.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is blocking data transfer.

The software is easy to use and the dashboard is intuitive.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Endpoint Protector since I joined the company five years ago. I believe that they were using it for one or two years prior to that.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Stability-wise, it is very good and very safe. It seems to work fine.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have approximately 117 endpoints and for the time being, I don't think that we will be expanding. We already have all of our computers.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have not used technical support often, but every time I have, it was perfect. They have good support and they have helped me very well.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Several years ago, we used ESET but we found that it only logged the files that were transferred via the ports. This was not what we wanted to do, so we canceled the license and implemented Endpoint Protector instead for blocking the ports.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

When I last renewed the license it was for a two-year term, and they gave me the second year at half price. It was a very nice gesture. Normally, I renew my license annually and I was happy to get a discount for committing to two years. There are no costs in addition to the standard licensing fees.

It would be helpful if they offered discounted pricing for long-term contracts to serve customers who are interested in committing for periods of three years, five years, or longer. I have been with the same company for five years, it was installed when I arrived, and we are going to continue using it in the future. Perhaps after a company has completed their first year, they should propose longer contracts to them.

What other advice do I have?

My advice for anybody who is considering this product is that if they want something to protect data on both Macs and PCs then this is a very good choice. I have never worked with a product that is this easy to use.

In summary, this is a good product and for now, I think that it has everything we need. It seems to be a perfect match for us.

I would rate this solution a ten out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Buyer's Guide
Data Loss Prevention (DLP)
June 2022
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