IT Central Station is now PeerSpot: Here's why

Amazon RDS OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Amazon RDS is #2 ranked solution in top Database as a Service vendors. PeerSpot users give Amazon RDS an average rating of 9.0 out of 10. Amazon RDS is most commonly compared to Google Cloud SQL: Amazon RDS vs Google Cloud SQL. Amazon RDS is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 68% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 25% of all views.
Amazon RDS Buyer's Guide

Download the Amazon RDS Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: August 2022

What is Amazon RDS?

Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. It provides cost-efficient, resizeable capacity for an industry-standard relational database and manages common database administration tasks.

Amazon RDS was previously known as RDS.

Amazon RDS Customers

Edmodo

Amazon RDS Video

Archived Amazon RDS Reviews (more than two years old)

Filter by:
Filter Reviews
Industry
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Company Size
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Job Level
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Rating
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Considered
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Order by:
Loading...
  • Date
  • Highest Rating
  • Lowest Rating
  • Review Length
Search:
Showingreviews based on the current filters. Reset all filters
Sivashankar Rajaram - PeerSpot reviewer
Principal engineer at a tech vendor with 10,001+ employees
Real User
AWS RDS is fully managed service and few manual intervention also automated by scripts.
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable feature is that it is a fully managed database, where they handle most of the administrative tasks and leaves the users more time to concentrate on business."
  • "It would be helpful if they made it easier to migrate from an existing on-premises solution to the cloud-based service."

What is our primary use case?

We have cloud infra and development teams and my job with this solution is to move them to a cloud architecture, so I create a migration plan for Database from on-premises to AWS Cloud , co-ordinate with teams to host the planned RDS solutions and provide support for post cloud hosting challenges for better customer experience. 

How has it helped my organization?

Few minutes to launch RDS, DR, HA and monitoring configurations which reduced the administrative task and by the approach of pay for what we use reduced the cost. Performance is good when both Web application and DB are in same cloud. Need to be have In depth understanding of cost, else we are in position to pay more, which makes us to think our own DB is better when cost is very huge amount.  


What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is that it is a fully managed database, where they handle most of the administrative tasks and leaves the users more time to concentrate on business.

What needs improvement?

The fact that it is fully managed has some disadvantages, as well. I have worked on SQL Server, Oracle, and other RDBMS systems for more than 20 years. In many of these cases, I have been an administrator and required administrative privileges to perform many of the tasks that I did. As I now work on a fully managed and maintained database, it is taking me longer to figure out how to perform these same operations that I was used to doing on-premises. Essentially, having a great deal of experience as an RDBMS administrator has made it harder for me to move forward when working on a database that is fully managed. It would be helpful if they made it easier to migrate from an existing on-premises solution to the cloud-based service.

Technical support could use some improvement.

Buyer's Guide
Amazon RDS
August 2022
Learn what your peers think about Amazon RDS. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: August 2022.
621,327 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Amazon RDS for five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability of this solution is good. We did have a couple of problems last year when the database was absconded, but luckily we had snapshots available. They take six backups daily and we were able to easily restore. We did not suffer any data loss.

I make use of this solution on a daily basis, especially over the past few years. We are migrating and I do work on the on-premises data centers, which is our core area. But, from a cost perspective, we are working towards hosting our business entirely in AWS.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability of Amazon RDS is very good.

We have between 5,000 and 6,000 users.

How are customer service and support?

We have contacted technical support over several issues and use cases. We build a use case and they suggest solutions. I do like them, but each use case is different and I have seen a lot of room for them to improve over time.

How was the initial setup?

We initially deployed Amazon RDS on-premises, although we are now migrating to cloud-based deployment. Spinning up a task is very easy and there is no maintenance. There are no administrative tasks involved for us because it is entirely taken care of. This includes monitoring and backup, as well.

The length of time for deployment depends on the size of the database. If they say it is one gigabyte then it will take a few minutes.

What about the implementation team?

We have technical people who are certified and handle the deployment in-house.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Good amount of cost reduction in cloud but we need to have well defined monitoring rules to save cost even after hosted in cloud. You can scale-up and scale-down with minimal duration compare to on-prem DB Servers. Which add more cost benefits. 

We can BYOL (Bring Your Own License), if you already purchased for Microsoft SQL Server or for Oracle and use that during RDS launch. 

If you need to reduce licensing cost in database , we can migrate to 3 open source databases in AWS RDS : MySQL, PostgreSQL, and MariaDB.

Amazon Aurora RDS , which is compatible to MySQL Engine and PostgreSQL Engine can be used to get most benefit of RDS managed service with performance and cost since it is AWS native RDS.

What other advice do I have?

We have reached the stage where all of our critical applications are hosted on-premises, and the rest is hosted with a public cloud provider. We found that at one stage, it was more advantageous to store some of our core data in our own data centers and have the rest managed.

My advice for people who are implementing this solution is to keep in mind that they need to redefine their product. It is not just a copy of an on-premises solution. Rather, it is designed with cloud architecture in mind. We use the term Cloud Adaptiveness. This means that before moving, they need to make sure that the architect of that application, the business owner, and the database administrator all realize that they are going to be migrating to the cloud. They will need to make some modifications before it happens. Otherwise, if they try to do it post-migration, it will be more difficult.

I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Gurudeva Kalledevarpurada B - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Solution Architect at SEARCHING
Real User
Leaderboard
Helps to scale your database by providing Read Replicas, reducing transaction time
Pros and Cons
  • "It makes it easy to administer the database. It helps to scale your database by providing Read Replicas, which reduce transaction time. It is highly available and durable which helps in disaster recovery and management."
  • "The Amazon RDS engine could provide features for additional databases, such as Db2. It could also provide support for other databases, such as NoSQL databases, DynamoDB, and Apache Cassandra. They could all stay under one hood."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use case is when you have to host your application on the Amazon cloud and your application uses database. Amazon RDS supports the following database engines: Amazon Aurora, PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB, Oracle Database, and SQL Server database. Amazon provides AWS Database Migration Service to migrate your existing databases to the Amazon cloud. It automates many aspects of database management viz hardware provisioning, database set up, database patching, and backups, which frees your database administrator to focus on important tasks. It also saves on the DB licencing costs.

How has it helped my organization?

It makes it easy to administer the database. It helps to scale your database by providing Read Replicas, which reduce transaction time. It is highly available and durable which helps in disaster recovery and management. 

It is also secure. You can build your own VPC and host the database inside it, which will produce robust security. You still need to follow the principles of security as highlighted by Amazon. 

What is most valuable?

Most useful is its availability to support multiple databases, such as Aurora, MySQL, Oracle, SQL Server, MariaDB, and PostgresSQL. Your application can use multiple databases as required. Combine that with the Automated CI/CD tools, this makes it easy to implement the microservices architecture, which is the need of the hour for web based applications. The capability provided by the RDS to automate a portion of the RDBMS tasks, such as backups and performance tunings for multiple database engines, helps to save on DBA time and cost.

What needs improvement?

The Amazon RDS engine could provide features for additional databases, such as Db2. It could also provide support for other databases, such as NoSQL databases, DynamoDB, and Apache Cassandra. They could all stay under one hood.

Another improvement that Amazon could do is to market their product so that more customers can use it. With Microsoft having its own cloud Azure hosting SQL Server databases and Oracle coming up with its own cloud, there appears to be more competition. As more customers move to Amazon cloud, it will increase the utilization of the RDS, then more customers will be able to harness the power of Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS).

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution since 2015 on my consulting projects with a variety of clients.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This Solution is very stable, as many customers have witnessed. Responsibility to set up the Amazon VPC, servers, and RDS does take work. This requires a solid AWS (infrastructure): Administrators and networking team. They need to work with the AWS team, following the stringent security guidelines that will help to build stability for the solution. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Amazon Web Services is built for scalability. RDS is designed with scalability in mind.

How are customer service and technical support?

It is available. You need to negotiate and engage their services.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Earlier, we were using traditional on-prem databases. The need to switch to Amazon RDS has been due to a variety of factors. One such factor is the need to move the existing applications in our data center with variable demand utilization and pre-installed servers and databases to applications migrated to Amazon Web Services cloud. Along with migrating applications on servers, we also need to migrate databases. With the added power of supporting multiple database engines as well as automating many functions of DBAs and releasing the DBAs to focus on essential tasks, this has made it easier to switch to Amazon RDS.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup will be complex. You and your team need to understand the complexities of setting up IAM, security groups, AMIs, VPCs, autoscaling/loadbalancing, and RDS, then plan for multiple availability zones for disaster and recovery. You also need to set up an infrastructure admin and infrastructure support team who will work closely with the AWS team. You do not want your entire development to get involved with setting up the infrastructure. Your administrators and infrastructure team need to set it up, then guide the development team on how to utilize the infrastructure.

What about the implementation team?

The initial vendor team could help to set up the infrastructure, team organization, etc. Then, your in-house team can carry out the administration and support work as well as the day-to-day tasks, such as providing access, helping developers make changes, uploading to the infrastructure, performing the migration, deployment, etc. The vendor team needs to have certified, experienced consultants to set up the infrastructure.

Work with Amazon Pre-Sales team and have them present their products to your organization. They will help you to arrive at building a business case, PoCs, SLAs, contracts, etc. You will also need to set up a product support team along with the migration, deployment, and core AWS Infrastructure Administrator teams who will be essential to the success of the project.

What was our ROI?

This is where the product stands apart. You do not need to set up thousands of servers, hundreds of database, and hundreds of DBAs. You need to set up a minimal infrastructure. There is no need to pay upfront the cost of an entire data center. It is pay as-you-go. Therefore, you realize the benefits and scale up/down as needed. Amazon will provide the required capacity. This will help you to realize the ROI quickly, which helps you to keep on growing.

This has helped reduce the cost at the same time increasing the agility of the organization. Some thing which would have costed millions of dollars and nine DBAs could easily be replaced by Amazon RDS.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

By using a combination of Reserve Instances and On-Demand pricing, you can reduce the cost.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

The main reason to migrate to the cloud comes from moving the underutilized. Variable demand applications moving to the cloud benefit from a cost savings as well as when they move from data center maintenance to building the core business capabilities. The application migration and database migration to AWS also provides an added advantage.

What other advice do I have?

For new/existing customers building new products, such as Ola, Uber, or Swiggy, instead of building their own data center first and launching the product which involves massive costs, AWS offers a better quality solution if they are unsure about whether their product will succeed in the market. They can build the product, start making money, and utilize the pay-as-you-go model. Then, they can scale the product depending on demand utilization. That appears to be the best business case for Amazon Web Services.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Amazon RDS
August 2022
Learn what your peers think about Amazon RDS. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: August 2022.
621,327 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Sr. Database Architect at a comms service provider with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Good overall features, a good community version, and an easy initial setup
Pros and Cons
  • "The provisioning is much faster. You don't have to prepare hardware or install software. You just need to create an instance and you have a database."
  • "A lot of the features are disabled by default. The solution should enable more features. I understand this could cause challenges to management for many clients using RDS, however."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily have many tools, including Jira, that are currently using RDS. It's mainly used by developers.

How has it helped my organization?

The provisioning is much faster. You don't have to prepare hardware or install software. You just need to create an instance and you have a database.

What is most valuable?

The RDS is a community version, so there are many common features that are basic. It's not an enterprise version, but all the features are very good overall.

What needs improvement?

A lot of the features are disabled by default. The solution should enable more features. I understand this could cause challenges to management for many clients using RDS, however.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for less than a year, but some people on my team have been using it longer.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability os really good. I like it.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We haven't expanded on the solution, so I'm unsure about if it would scale well or not. We have a bunch of teams using the solution in the company, but they're small.

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't contacted technical support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We are currently using a lot of other solutions as well. We have Oracle, we have PP2, and MySQL. We have a secret server as well.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is straightforward. Deployment took about ten minutes.

What about the implementation team?

We handled the deployment ourselves.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We use the community version of the solution. I believe we only pay for the storage, but I'm not sure how it works exactly.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We didn't evaluate other solutions before choosing RDS. Since we're using everything else that is Amazon, it seemed like an obvious choice.

What other advice do I have?

We're currently expanding multiple versions of the solution. We use the cloud deployment model and most clients are also in the AWS environment.

I'd advise others to pay attention to the sizing, You don't want to over or under-size.

I'd rate the solution eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Cloud Architect, Oracle ACE, Oracle DBA at Pythian
MSP
Provides deployment and on-demand database-as-a-service.

What is most valuable?

RDS provides deployment agility and an on-demand database-as-a-service for MySQL, Oracle, and SQL servers.

With RDS, everything is turnkey and always available. For example, due to the inherent multi-availability zone feature of AWS, there is no downtime at all and you can count on AWS RDS to always be available.

How has it helped my organization?

For many of the Pythian customers, one salient benefit, among other benefits, is the option of spinning up a new instance whenever it is needed. Now it can be done with a few clicks, without much ado.

What needs improvement?

RDS doesn't have shell access. This could be beneficial, especially for Oracle databases.

One benefit of having shell access with RDS is that DBAs or developers could keep their own existing scripts. Especially in the case of non-enterprise versions, there is always a need to dig into performance issues and their troubleshooting. So shell access could be very handy in that case and in some other cases.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using AWS RDS for the last two years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We have not really had stability issues.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is good and prompt.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

For many clients of Pythian, it’s an amalgamation of on-premises and cloud. Pythian enables its customers to reap the benefits of both worlds.

How was the initial setup?

With the expertise and experience of Pythian, the initial setup was a breeze.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Read the fine print carefully and always engage experts to carry out migration.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did not evaluate any alternatives.

What other advice do I have?

Having your database on RDS doesn't mean that you don't need a DBA anymore. Mission critical and important databases must be handled by a DBA, even if the database resides on the cloud, like RDS.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user422652 - PeerSpot reviewer
DBA at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Infrastructural issues are handled automatically. Some database components are not available, including RAC.

Pros:

  • Very easy to start with. No need to mess around with OS requirements.
  • All infrastructural issues are handled automatically; backups, patching.

Cons:

  • Some features are disabled, like running "alter system/database". There are Amazon alternatives, but it is not transparent to the application. When migrating an existing application, it should be adopted. Also, using these Amazon alternatives produces "cloud-lock", since they exist only in AWS.
  • Some database components are not available. Most remarkable is the absence of RAC.
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user422652 - PeerSpot reviewer
DBA at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Consultant
A valuable feature is the easy creation of new databases. Migration to RDS using the default tools is complicated.

What is most valuable?

  • Easy creation of new databases
  • Maintenance is fully automatic (backups, monitoring, and patches)

How has it helped my organization?

We are using it as shared QA environment.

What needs improvement?

Migration to RDS using the default tools is very complicated.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have used this product for one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We have not had stability problems. It is much more stable than a standard datacenter.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

This had the same scalability issues as Oracle databases on premise.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have never needed technical support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not have a previous solution.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very simple.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I am using BYOL.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated Oracle database on-premises on Amazon EC2 and on Oracle Cloud.

What other advice do I have?

It requires time to adapt to the idea that you do not have any access to the O/S.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user