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Oracle Multitenant OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Oracle Multitenant is #12 ranked solution in top Relational Databases. PeerSpot users give Oracle Multitenant an average rating of 9.0 out of 10. Oracle Multitenant is most commonly compared to SQL Server: Oracle Multitenant vs SQL Server. Oracle Multitenant is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 72% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 30% of all views.
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What is Oracle Multitenant?

Oracle Multitenant - an Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition option – introduces a new architecture that enables customers to easily consolidate multiple databases, without changing their applications. This new architecture delivers all the benefits of managing many databases as one, yet retains the isolation and resource prioritization of separate databases. In addition, Oracle Multitenant enables rapid provisioning and upgrades, and fully complements other options including Oracle Real Application Clusters and Active Data Guard. p>

For more information on Oracle Multitenant, visit Oracle.com

Oracle Multitenant was previously known as Oracle Pluggable Database.

Oracle Multitenant Customers
An Post, National Oilwell Varco, SAS Institute, Sportmaster, Y-Telecom
Oracle Multitenant Video

Archived Oracle Multitenant Reviews (more than two years old)

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Mirko Opacic - PeerSpot reviewer
Oracle Database Administrator at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
User friendly database that is easy for my team to run
Pros and Cons
  • "The feature that I like on Multitenant is the ease - it is very easy for my team to run the database."
  • "This solution is a bit complicated when collecting from containers - that feature should be a bit better."

What is most valuable?

The feature that I like about Multitenant is the ease - it is very easy for my team to run the database.

What needs improvement?

In terms of what can be improved, the interface is ok. I don't know what can be better. I don't see any problem. 

I would say that the portable database should not be open as the default. That causes you to lose time.

I would also like to see an easier way to give answers when I'm working, but I think that is more about my understanding of how to work the container database. This solution is a bit complicated when collecting from containers - that feature should be a bit better.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Oracle Multitenant for less than one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In terms of stability, I don't see any bugs.

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July 2022
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621,327 professionals have used our research since 2012.

How was the initial setup?

Regarding the initial setup, I think some people who are using the Oracle DB find it is easy, not so difficult. I installed it only for a test on a computer, not on a server. 

When I installed it on some machines, it was easy and took one hour, I think.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend this solution to anyone considering it. Oracle is a more automated database. Everywhere now I see more and more automation and it is the best administration. You can always use Multitenant.

On a scale from one to ten, I would rate Oracle Multitenant a nine.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
PeerSpot user
OleksandrDenysenko - PeerSpot reviewer
Technical Director at RDTEX LLC
Real User
A good solution for maintaining and consolidating databases

What is our primary use case?

We are not using this product in-house. We are using Oracle for the implementation of products for our customers.

What is most valuable?

Maintaining databases is a valuable feature for us.

What needs improvement?

It would be beneficial to include this solution with Oracle Enterprise, but Oracle charges additional fees for it. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been working with Oracle for twenty-five years now, but two years with this solution.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This solution is stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

This solution is scalable.

This is a good product for consolidation purposes.

What other advice do I have?

We are currently using many Oracle products for Data Warehousing and Communication, but they are expensive, so we are looking for alternatives.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
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Relational Databases Tools
July 2022
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System Admin at a government with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Enables you to stop and start each application without impacting others
Pros and Cons
  • "The database becomes pluggable. Inside this container is called a pluggable database and each application contains this pluggable database inside Multitenant. We can then share resources like control files, memory, etc. This lets you stop and start each application without impacting the others. This resource sharing is the most valuable feature"
  • "That said, Oracle in general doesn't invest in their UI for any of their applications. If we're talking about the dashboard or other user experience, there is room for improvement. I'm talking about on premises. The cloud version has started to improve."

What is our primary use case?

I primarily tested on the cloud but I tried the on-premises version once.

What is most valuable?

It's about consolidation. They are trying to solve all the issues. Oracle has many solutions for managing resources. For example, if you have many applications to maintain, some applications share the same database. They need to restart, which will impact the other applications. You will have to stop all the services and that adds to downtime.

To solve this issue, Oracle Multitenant provides one container database. It is set up with many databases within each other as in a schema database. You will make each application connected to the pluggable database.

The database becomes pluggable. Inside this container is called a pluggable database and each application contains this pluggable database inside multitenant. We can then share resources like control files, memory, etc. This lets you stop and start each application without impacting the others. This resource sharing is the most valuable feature

If you would like to do this with the older version or another system, you would have to install many databases and each database will get a resource. Then you have to buy resources for the license, CPU, server, etc.

This is the main feature they use this solution for. Of course, if you get a cloud database service, they may not give you a dedicated database. If so, they will provide a pluggable one for part of the container like virtualization or clone. You can use this solution in that way also.

According to my point of view, this is the main feature with 12c compared to 11. It is called 12c for the cloud since they are preparing to move more to the cloud.

In the cloud, you're sharing resources. Not every database has a high load, so they distribute resources from one controller to this pluggable database.

They are sharing resources because there are usually wasted resources otherwise. There are companies that check the vitalization of your server, memory, hardware, and infrastructure. You will find that 70% or 80% of your resources are wasted.

What needs improvement?

I'm not using it in production yet. It's easy to test a product. You can test it, play with it, and use the trial, but to put it into production is another story. 

That said, Oracle, in general, doesn't invest in their UI for any of their applications. If we're talking about the dashboard or other user experience, there is room for improvement. I'm talking about on-premises. The cloud version has started to improve.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The latest release is not as stable for anyone that has experience using the previous solution.

No one was using the latest version. Everyone was going to the previous version. For example, the latest version now is 12, so I'm going to work with version 11. I would then continue to work with the previous version until the stability of the new product is better, then we migrate or upgrade to that. This is the golden rule. If you got only this from me, it's enough.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support takes a very long time and they aren't so cooperative.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

When I was upgrading from version 11 to 12, the budget was limited, so I didn't get the latest version for production.

For me, I will go with it if I have the budget. Some features are nicer than before, but at the end of the day, you always have a limited budget. I prefer to upgrade and get specific hardware when possible. In the end, you will have to make a compromise. You will not get everything you would have liked to have.

What other advice do I have?

I will give it an eight out of ten. The feature set is good, but Oracle is too complex. Anyone that has experience with Oracle knows that their product design or idea may be very good, but when you go to work it will take you hours because it is very complex.

Nothing is complete. I know that when I work with them I'm stuck with the product. Oracle is tough to implement and get it utilized for everything, but once it's implemented, it becomes stable. They give you a lot of promise, but you will face a hard journey when working with this product. It's not an easy product.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PatrickKuria - PeerSpot reviewer
Enterprise Systems Engineer at Sybyl
Real User
Feature-rich, secure, and easy to install

What is our primary use case?

We are a solution provider, and we have implemented this solution for our customers.

One of the use cases is in a banking institution, with an on-premises deployment.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features are the speed and ease of use.

This solution has more features, for example in security, than competing products.

What needs improvement?

The user interface for this solution can be made better.

This solution is a little bit pricey. It costs a lot of money.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for approximately four months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This is a stable solution.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

This solution is scalable.

How are customer service and technical support?

Oracle support is ok, although I have not needed to contact them for this solution.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have also used MySQL, but this solution has more features, tools, and is also more secure.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup of this solution is easy. For us, it went fine and took about thirty minutes.

One person is enough for deployment and maintenance.

What about the implementation team?

I deployed this solution for my customer.

What was our ROI?

With respect to ROI, it is too early to say.

What other advice do I have?

This is a solution that I recommend.

I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner.
PeerSpot user
it_user522261 - PeerSpot reviewer
DBA at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Streamlines the cloning of databases and environments for us, takes half the time

What is most valuable?

It's very helpful for cloning. The pluggable databases and everything works super easy, because we clone the databases every week. This saves time and effort.

How has it helped my organization?

In the past it would take about five hours for us, on a weekly basis, to clone one database or one environment. Now it takes less than two hours. It saves a lot of time over the weekends. Got better things to do!

What needs improvement?

I can't think of anything right now, I've been pretty content with what we have.

For how long have I used the solution?

Less than a year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's pretty stable, pretty strong.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We are all stand-alone right now. We are not interact, so I'm hoping, with the kind of product Oracle comes up with, that it will definitely be scalable.

How are customer service and technical support?

I would rate technical support at Oracle a three out of five. They're good, but not good always. It's about finding the right, knowledgeable person to talk to.

Response time is not that great. You have to say, "My production system is down." Sometimes we escalate it to our Account Manager, who's tied up with the Oracle Account Manager. Sometimes the escalation is needed, especially when it's rough. 

But I'm happy. Not overly happy, but happy with the support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

It was all a manual process. 

How was the initial setup?

It took a while for us to get it, because of the new technology, but once we got the whole of it, it's pretty straightforward.

They didn't send a team. Everything's money. If they send people, it is money, and I work for the government, and we don't have that much money lying around, so it wasn't easy.

What other advice do I have?

It's a pretty good product. Go for it.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Principal Global Database Architect at a leisure / travel company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
We can reallocate resources among databases as needed, dynamically, without restarting.

What is most valuable?

1. The ability to create multiple databases without using any additional memory and CPU, and reallocating resources among these databases as needed, dynamically, without restarting.

2. The marriage of snapshot technology with this alleviating the need for additional storage for the containers.

How has it helped my organization?

Database development along several parallel projects used to be nightmarish when trying to keep the various tracks of development separate in a single database. With this, it is really easy to spin up a container for each project and then combine that in a separate container as needed.

What needs improvement?

The ability to integrate with every feature of Oracle Database as, for example, it doesn't currently work with Audit Vault.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used it for three years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

No

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

There have been no significant issues.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have had no issues with scalaing it.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

In the beginning it was a challenge, like any new product with teething issues. It has been much stable since.

Technical Support:

Oracle Support is relatively unprepared for this. It have improved; but it still has a lot of room for improvement

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We used to use virtual machines. However, in VMs, we couldn't allocate resources dynamically and resources (CPUs, memory, etc.) are fixed at creation time regardless of the demand. In the multitenant solution, the resources automatically adjusts to the demand, if available. For instance, in a VM solution, CPUs of VM are fixed; so if a database running in one VM needs more CPU cycles and other VMs are relatively free, the demanding VM will not get the spare CPU cycles even though they go to waste in other VMs. In a multitenant solution, the virtual database will get the spare CPU cycles if no one is using them.

How was the initial setup?

It's very simple to install.

What about the implementation team?

Inhouse.

What was our ROI?

That is confidential.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Since there is no additional cost for one PDB in a CDB, you should always create a single PDB in a CDB even if you plan on using only only one database. This allows you to practice management of this option and develop expertise in it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

There is no equivalent product, and the closest are virtual machines; but as I mentioned earlier, VMs are truly not substitutes.

What other advice do I have?

Definitely consider this for non-production databases. Create multiple PDBs for development, QA, etc. which lets you test multiple projects in their own independent environments without additional CPU, memory or storage.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
it_user521733 - PeerSpot reviewer
Manager - Oracle Apps DBA and SAP BASIS support at a tech vendor with 10,001+ employees
Vendor
We are using it for consolidation projects. We no longer have to co-locate databases on servers and create a lot of VMs.

How has it helped my organization?

We have been working on consolidation projects. Earlier, as anybody else did, we were co-locating databases on servers, creating VMs. Now, we have moved away from that and gone to creating multi-tenant databases, so that we can consolidate. Predominately, we are using it for consolidation projects.

What needs improvement?

Even though we say Unplug Plug Upgrade is a very good feature and it does work, we are seeing that sometimes it takes longer than what we expect for larger databases. Secondly, it does have that prerequisite of first upgrading in place to 12, and then you migrate. If you have a lot of non-multitenant databases as a source, the process of making them into multi-tenant databases is sometimes a bit longer and tedious, especially if you are at the pre-12c version. That's the only place where I would see if they can directly convert maybe an 11g database to pluggable 12c. That would be great. Right now, we are upgrading in place to 12c, non-multitenant, and then making it ready for the plug in.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using it for close to two years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has been pretty stable. We have not found any issues in terms of ease of implementation, as well as mainly performance. We are not seeing any issues.

Of course, we have been a bit cautious, moving non-production databases first, in terms of consolidation. Nonetheless, we have found it pretty reliable, so we have now gone ahead and started using it for production databases.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I feel that it is a scalable solution, but we have not reached that stage where we will start choking on the capacity. We have not reached that 255 in one, single container database, but I hope it will not choke. We have not reached that stage yet where we are reaching that limit.

How are customer service and technical support?

Support is hit or miss, depending on who you get on the support line. I've been working with Oracle for a long time, since the 1990s. I'm pretty familiar with Oracle support, as it is with other products.

Overall, I would say this product itself is so stable that you don't require a lot of support. However, support is always a question; sometimes, you get phenomenal support. It depends on who you get. We have a lot of expertise internally, so we don't really require that much support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

As I’ve mentioned, we are long-time Oracle database users. The predominant driving factor was to find something that would get rid of creating a lot of VMs and co-locating databases. This was really an ideal solution for us. We didn't really select the product, the product selected itself.

How was the initial setup?

Initial setup and configuration is so simple; one of the simplest things to do. There are no issues configuring multi-tenant; very simple set up.

What other advice do I have?

Go for this. As far as this product is concerned, we are happy with this product. Definitely, if you solve the licensing part of it, the product, capability-wise and features, is phenomenal. There's no question about that. I would wholeheartedly recommend this product to anyone.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user432795 - PeerSpot reviewer
Managing Director at CarajanDB
Vendor
It’s easy to clone an existing database in the same CDB into another CDB running on premise. ​The main area for improvement is regarding backup and recovery.

What is most valuable?

The cloning features are outstanding. It’s easy to clone an existing database in the same CDB into another CDB running on-premise or even to a CDB running in a private or public cloud. This opens new doors database consolidation with an easy deployment or change of the underlying hardware.

How has it helped my organization?

I’ve created tons of scripts for my customers to deploy databases, set up RAC instances, and Data Guard configurations. To verify such a script takes weeks and is very error-prone. Now, I’m able to set up a database once and just add pluggable databases to it with a single command. That’s incredibly useful and, in addition, there is no longer a need for virtualization as you can simply run one CDB with more than 100 pluggable databases without the need to change your hardware.

What needs improvement?

The main area for improvement is regarding backup and recovery. Today, it’s difficult to set a pluggable database to a former point in time because flashback pluggable database doesn’t exist. Another important feature will be to support multiple character sets in one Multitenant database.

For how long have I used the solution?

I’ve been working with this feature since 2012 while it was in beta. I’ve done some installations, but the installation rate is not that high yet because they are a bit worried about the changes in the architecture.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

There are some issues when you use Multitenant with Oracle Managed Files. Unfortunately RMAN duplicate does not take care of the parameter create_file_dest.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Over the past few years, the stability of the Oracle database has improved with every new version, even though the new Multitenant database is a dramatic shift in the architecture, I did not encounter many issues with stability except some with naming conventions and commands. It isn’t simple to plug in a PDB in a database where it already belonged to, but you must first drop it – no DBA likes the command “Drop Database.”

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I compared the performance of a CDB with 10 PDBS with 10 distinct databases, and the Multitenant databases in total run much faster.

How are customer service and technical support?

5/10 - They need to improve the customer experience as there is not yet a high enough number of implementations of the Multitenant database in production.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Some of my customers are using virtualization (mainly VMware), while others are running up to 20 databases on one server. Two of them have consolidated their schemas into two big databases. The reason for all of them is to make better use of the hardware. Virtualization is nevertheless a waste of space because every guest has its own memory allocated as well as its own software stack with OS and Oracle software. Running many databases on one server has huge impacts on the availability, especially for maintenance and consolidation on schema-level, which will even make maintenance worse. This is because you need to find one window where you can patch your database for all applications – that's a lot of discussions. So for all of them, we are now testing and implementing Multitenant database.

How was the initial setup?

You need to understand the concept of Multitenant database because it’s a massive architecture shift. Your scripts might no longer run and you need to change the monitoring. As I said, some namings are little confusing (like Container can be named as PDB or CDB while CDB stands for Container Database). You can unplug a PDB but can’t plugin a PDB (you need to recreate it in that event). But if you get that, it’s easy!

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Oracle needs to increase the implementation rate and really allow their customers to get some benefit. I would like to allow a maximum of four or five PDBs per CDB for every customer for free (and not limited to Enterprise Edition, but for Standard Edition two as well).

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Oracle database is the best you can get, and before there was no alternative to Multitenant database except Virtualization.

What other advice do I have?

You need to test it. It takes some time to get familiar with the functionality, but then you will see how beneficial the option is. A DBA will save a lot of time managing databases – even more because with Multitenant it’s easy to define Application DBAs so that you can offload the nasty parts, like user management or tablespace management to the application owner.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We're partners.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Cloud Architect, Oracle ACE, Oracle DBA at Pythian
MSP
I have found that its top-down approach from container database to the pluggable database is seamless, logical and gets aligned to business rules pretty easily.

What is most valuable?

I have found that its top-down approach from container database to the pluggable database is seamless, logical and gets aligned to business rules pretty easily. This is very valuable for our business.

How has it helped my organization?

I have used it for various clients and it's been working like a breeze. Its very beneficial.

What needs improvement?

It needs to have some more granular control over IO resource allocation.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using it for the last two years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

We've had no issues with deployment.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We've had no issues with the stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

There have been no issues scaling it for our needs.

How are customer service and technical support?

Oracle Support is always helpful and reliable.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I was using the same resource manager in Oracle 11g.

How was the initial setup?

The learning curve is a bit steep for Oracle RDBMS 12c Multitenant Option when it comes to resource management, but once you get the hang of it, it's simple.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It is worth every penny of investment.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

It naturally aligns with other Oracle product so there was no need to evaluate other products.

What other advice do I have?

Test and test it again. Make sure it aligns with business rules.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Technology Leader Oracle / Senior Consultant at a tech consulting company with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Offers better isolation of namespaces, resources and credentials.

What is most valuable?

The plug/unplug is the great feature, that doesn't even need the Multitenant option. Oracle introduced Transportable Tablespaces in 1999 to move physically the user data, but metadata was still imported though Data Pump. Pluggable databases go beyond that; metadata is also transported because each PDB has its own SYSTEM tablespace. This is the faster data movement and allows copy-on-write snapshots.

What needs improvement?

Multitenant is just at the beginning in 12c R1. More features have been announced for the next generation, such as the online unplug/plug. That goes far beyond what transportable tablespaces do because they require the source to be read-only.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been working with Oracle Multitenant since 2012, and am in the beta program for 12c R1. 12.1 has been released, but very few customers are using Multitenant in production, and it is still in adoption phase.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

Multitenant is easy to implement as it is the default, but what is not easy is that a few administration habitual procedures and scripts may have to be updated. This is why it is not yet deployed widely on production. It is in the learning phase for most customers in 12c.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Let's be clear, Multitenant architecture was a big change introduced in 12.1 and came with bugs and features that were not yet implemented. Stability and full feature coverage will come with future release.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability of Multitenant architecture comes with the Multitenant option. You need Enterprise Edition plus Multitenant in order to have multiple pluggable databases managed by the same instance. Without the option, and in Standard Edition, you can create at most one pluggable database in a container database (CDB).

How are customer service and technical support?

Good when we can provide a reproducible test case

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Without the Multitenant option, consolidation is often done at server level with virtual machines, or with multiple Oracle instances in the same physical server. However, there are still a lot of resources that are duplicated for each database: software, memory, processes and system dictionary. The other option is schema consolidation, one database hosting multiple application, but isolation is not as good as pluggable databases.

What about the implementation team?

Oracle Multitenant setup is not complex but can change the way the DBA interacts with the database. Some DBA scripts must be adapted. However, with the multitenant option, further administration is simplified. Once backup and HA has been defined for a CDB, new pluggable databases benefit from it without additional configuration.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I'm a good advocate of schema consolidation, but lot of applications make it impossible to do because they use fixed schema name, or public synonyms, for example. Multitenant offers better isolation of namespaces, resources and credentials.

What other advice do I have?

You need to learn what changes are needed with multitenant architecture. Start to use it on a test database.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We are an Oracle Platinum Partner and provide consulting and training.
PeerSpot user
it_user436125 - PeerSpot reviewer
Lead Product Dev at a tech company
Vendor
It allows a container database to hold many pluggable databases.

Improvements to My Organization:

It's a really great new option for Database 12c. I think there's huge potential because it allows a container database to hold many pluggable databases. I love using it, even though there's not much information out there about it. People will realize how good it is at adopting databases without application changes.

Room for Improvement:

Oracle has a lot of work to do with Multitenant because it's a new feature. For example, it prevents you from actually using it if your database has certain features that it doesn't yet support. We'll have to wait and see if the next release fixes some of these issues.

Use of Solution:

Multitenant came out with Database 12c release 12.1, which was about two years ago. I've been using it since then.

Deployment Issues:

We've had deployment issues because it's so new that there are some features of our database that aren't supported.

Stability Issues:

It's stable, but it takes a lot of time to adopt all other products to use it as well. It's sad that Oracle's killed off some support for Multitenant with some features, such as Streams, CDC, and others. Release 12.2 covered some of the gaps, but feature releases need more coverage.

Scalability Issues:

Release 12.2 has really improved on scalability. If you put 250 pluggable databases on one machine and the resource manager isn't up to par, you can't really move it around much.

Initial Setup:

It was a fairly straightforward initial setup. We didn't have much trouble with it.

Implementation Team:

We implemented it ourselves.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partners
PeerSpot user
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