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Oracle Database as a Service OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Oracle Database as a Service is #6 ranked solution in top Database as a Service vendors. PeerSpot users give Oracle Database as a Service an average rating of 10 out of 10. Oracle Database as a Service is most commonly compared to Amazon RDS: Oracle Database as a Service vs Amazon RDS. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 38% of all views.
What is Oracle Database as a Service?
Oracle Database Cloud Service combines the power of Oracle Database, with the unique capabilities of the Oracle Cloud. The service provides a secure, automated data management platform that leverages on demand Oracle Cloud Infrastructure services via a simple web based user interface and RESTful API. Oracle Database Cloud Service provides elastic database services for development, test, and production environments of custom and packaged online transaction processing (OLTP), data warehousing, and mixed workload applications. It enables businesses to reap all Oracle Platform as a Service (PaaS) benefits including subscriptionbased, self-service access to reliable, scalable, and elastic cloud environments and accelerates time to value by simplifying the provisioning and administration of Oracle databases.

Oracle Database as a Service was previously known as Oracle DBaaS, Oracle Database Cloud.

Buyer's Guide

Download the Database as a Service Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: April 2022

Oracle Database as a Service Customers
Solution-Soft, DX Marketing, Suredell and Partners, Frontiers, SettleOurEstate.com, Demand Analysis Ltd, endlich IT & Projekt Service OHG
Oracle Database as a Service Video

Archived Oracle Database as a Service Reviews (more than two years old)

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CEO at QUERIX (UK) LIMITED
Real User
Great security and database system resilience but needs to improve its documentation functionality
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable aspects of the solution are the general database system resilience and security."
  • "Documentation is difficult to find. Since we're experienced with Oracle technology, we have also found many errors in it. Not everything is 100% accurate."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily are using the solution for clients who want to migrate their applications. We have an on-premises version for testing to see how that would work.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable aspects of the solution are the general database system resilience and security.

What needs improvement?

The improvements we require are mostly regarding the documentation and compatibility with other systems or with other non-Oracle technologies. 

Documentation is difficult to find. Since we're experienced with Oracle technology, we have also found many errors in it. Not everything is 100% accurate.

The solution should add functionalities, like database system functions, to speed up the query processing type. Any sort of functions or commands that would give you a faster result would be a welcome improvement. Microsoft Azure, for example, has some building functionalities to fetch big chunks of data and in a very fast way. I haven't seen a similar feature from Oracle. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution since 2012.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is not very good. Oracle's attitude toward customers, with increasing prices and a general lack of recognition of other technologies, is not ideal.

How was the initial setup?

The level of difficulty in the initial setup varies. Sometimes it's very straightforward, but sometimes it is not. 60% of the time it's pretty straightforward.

Sometimes, for example, we might have previously installed the database in the same environment and there were some dependencies left which damaged the next installation because it was not a fresh install. If you want to uninstall the database, the cleaning of the database and everything associated with it gets a bit tricky. There is no automated process for that.

Deployment is quite fast. You can probably manage a deployment in an hour or less.

What about the implementation team?

We're an integrator. We implement the solution for our clients.

What other advice do I have?

We use the on-premises deployment model. We're currently experimenting with Oracle at the moment.

Currently, customers are looking for and experimenting with various databases. The clients that I've talked to have asked about MySQL or Amazon Aurora Database as well Microsoft Secret Server.

In terms of Oracle, what I've heard from some clients was that the cloud database was a disappointment for them compared to the on-premise database. Some of them were regretful about doing that sort of migration. They told me they were over-promised, and the cloud database didn't deliver. The on-premise databases are quite solid, however. They are very good.

I'd rate the solution seven out of ten. 

I'm personally not happy with Oracle, but from a technical standpoint, they have a very solid product.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Ahmed Abdelwahed - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Program Manager at a comms service provider with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Good, reliable product for providing database as a service and helps manage the traffic on the network
Pros and Cons
  • "It is a product brought to you by a company that concentrates only on database solutions, so it is the best at what it does."
  • "The interface can be difficult and there may be so many features that users and even vendors are unaware that they exist."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily use this solution for business applications. I was working for a company and they provided software as a service. We were serving applications to our customers.

For example, we were working locally on a system using Oracle. Then another company would need access to a different application and they would come to us to supply it. As a developer, I was using this solution to develop delivery systems principally as a convenience for our customers.

How has it helped my organization?

It does more of what a company like ours needs because it is a product that knows the business of data and data management.

What is most valuable?

The feature that was most valuable to me in this product — it will be different for different types of users — is that I could develop all the logic inside the database itself. There were no additional integrations.

The solution would also help manage the traffic on the network.

What needs improvement?

I don't believe that any product is a perfect solution. I believe that each product has some minor disadvantage about which customers need to be able ready to work with or workaround. It may not be the fault of the product but lack of compatibility, the preferences of the user or lack of knowledge of existing features. I think these can all be the case in not maximizing what Oracle already has.

Because of my preference for and knowledge of Toad and the way I work with Oracle, I am not up to date on all of the tools included in this product. But I think if we have all of the features needed as developers already in the product, Oracle will be much better. For example, something very important for all developers that could already be available now in Oracle products is weighting the data. This is a very important technical concern for data centers.

The code that developers use is built up in some instructions, so I need to understand how each instruction is executed and how the current state of the code or data application is affecting the transactions. I found that this type of analysis was difficult in Oracle itself, so I used another product — like Toad — that would give me the ability to debug all the code instruction by instruction to really understand what is going on. It's quite an important feature. If it is available in Oracle now it is not very good or well described. This is a problem that needs a solution.

If it is already there and the vendor does not know about it or understand it, I think there is a big issue. The difference is that to get the most out of the technology, the developers really need to know about the new features and how to find and use them. This is something about Oracle that I think is not very good.

Along with that idea, I think that Oracle might do a little bit improve their interface as it is not very user-friendly and I have heard other developers say similar things. I didn't use myself because it would not help me as much or as quickly as other products to develop functions and to develop other features like reporting. I would have to learn a whole different way.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using this solution for ten years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution has good integration with the hardware and it is a stable product.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

As a transactional database, I think this is quite a scalable product in a variety of ways. 

How are customer service and technical support?

Any time I have had the need to use the technical support, it was at least very good but mostly it was excellent.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I previously used Microsoft and if you compare Oracle to Microsoft SQL server, I believe Oracle is so much better than Microsoft SQL Server that they are not comparable. So, I obviously prefer working with the Oracle product. The reason for the difference is probably that Oracle is basically a database company and they focus on this aspect of their business. Microsoft, having many products, is not so focused on this competition with Oracle and they are more focused on Microsoft NET Frameworks and Microsoft Office. Oracle itself has many products right now, but all of them are database products. This concentration is why Oracle is number one in transactional databases.

How was the initial setup?

I am not the one who would be responsible for these installations alone. I would be doing the development. As it requires a team and customizations, I think it has to be considered somewhat complex to set up if you look at the whole picture. It is not as easy as starting an executable and waiting for it to finish running.

What about the implementation team?

We are a SaaS (Software as a Service) house, so we do our own installation, monitoring, and management.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We are a value add software as a service house so we are not really paying the cost of the licenses, the customer is the one who pays month-to-month. The customer is paying the money for their Oracle database in our case. We only use the product for development and testing to be able to deliver the services.

For the customer, our service becomes an advantage. So the price may seem high, but for them, it is reasonable and not so high as it could cost them much more to deploy separately. The price corresponds to the quality of the product and services they receive in return.

What other advice do I have?

We use the on-premises solution because the customer has to have their own environment. In our case, for our clients, that's one of the big advantages.

A potential issue might be getting used to the Oracle interface. Personally, I didn't use the interface provided by Oracle. In that way, the interface was not a problem for me because I used to use a third-party application like Toad that maybe more people are already familiar with and I think is easy for me to use already.

We are using the same server software application. I don't know if Oracle provided database software and SQL developer or not. But for myself, I needed an application to develop the features and functions on the Oracle Database.

While I prefer and recommend Oracle, many other factors are involved in making decisions. If all the factors are the same and there are no limitations for the cost or other issues for adopting Oracle compared with other products, I think Oracle would always be a better choice.  

A lesson I learned is that you have to always verify the virtual data when you are acting as a software as a service house for the customer. Oracle is part of our winning team. It may not be the only product that we use to achieve the result.

On a scale from one to ten, where one is the worst and ten is the best, I would rate this product as a seven to eight depending a little on how you use it. For us, it is an eight because it is very good at what it does and we use other tools to make it do what we want it to do. We don't fight with the one product to try and make it do everything.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner.
Buyer's Guide
Database as a Service
April 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about Oracle, Amazon, Microsoft and others in Database as a Service. Updated: April 2022.
596,362 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Osama Mustafa - PeerSpot reviewer
Cloud Expert | DevOps | Oracle Consultant at confidential
Consultant
Top 10Leaderboard
Easy to manage and good performance
Pros and Cons
  • "One of the key features is Oracle Database as a Service. We chose to implement it as a service, which provides good performance, for example. Flexibility and other features let us implement database research with the SQL team range of features also."
  • "The direct scaling is a feature that has room for improvement. I would like to see virtual management machines that can scale storage well with zero downtime. The backup option and patching would then be much easier to do."

What is our primary use case?

We usually use the on-premise version, but we have also implemented it on the cloud in three or four projects.

Our primary use case is probably with regards to the ease of management. It actually reduces the cost of the databases. Also, the storage cases we are dealing with are different. It is not just the client. We also use Database as a Service.

How has it helped my organization?

it's save a lot of time, there are no need for example to senior DBA to manage the database which is saved money include to that, this is what we touch in the company.

What is most valuable?

One of the key features is Oracle Database as a Service. We chose to implement it as a service, which provides good performance, for example. Flexibility and other features let us implement database research with the SQL team range of features also.

You can meet your principle DevOps needs for scaling.

What needs improvement?

The direct scaling is a feature that has room for improvement. I would like to see virtual management machines that can scale storage well with zero downtime. The backup option and patching would then be much easier to do.

I would also like to implement CDI with Database as a Service.

There is also room for improvement with regards to scalability and availability. The maintenance is also an issue. When Oracle does maintenance, you need to be prepared because everything will be down.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using this solution for six or seven years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very good. It helps make the DBA work much easier, to be honest with you. The features from Oracle are amazing and it adapts multiple delivery models for the database itself.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

You can scale everything fine with this solution.

We only need one person for deployment and one for maintenance.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. You don't actually have to deploy anything in Oracle Database as a Service. It's pretty easy. There is no special requirement to work with the team or anything.

Deployment time depends on the solution you choose because you have virtual machine builds and terminals. If it is a terminal, for example, it will take you between two or three minutes. While the virtual machine will need between 15 and 40 minutes.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The price depends on the solution you choose: standard, enterprise, or high performance. For example, enterprise can start between 0.4 an hour up to 1,800.

Additional fees also depend on what package you choose. Your fees will be different if you choose the standard, enterprise, high performance, or extreme package. You will pay in relation to what option you ask for.

The price is very good if you compare it to other databases.

What other advice do I have?

Be aware that migration actually takes some time. Also, keep in mind what your data size is. If you are going to have a huge database size, just migrate to Database as a Service.

I would rate this as nine out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
MohamedEl Azzouzi - PeerSpot reviewer
Production Systems Engineer at Sofrecom
Real User
Easy to use, scales quickly, and has good support available
Pros and Cons
  • "When we want more information on something that we are using, it is easy to find related topics on the internet."
  • "In the next release, I would like to see a framework for memory management."

What is our primary use case?

We use this solution for multiple databases.

I have written Oracle scripts for operational databases and uploading databases.

Our environment includes a Red Hat server with two storage devices for high availability. 

How has it helped my organization?

I have been able to assist people with technical support remotely.

What is most valuable?

This solution is very stable, easy to use, and scales quickly. When we want more information on something that we are using, it is easy to find related topics on the internet.

We use the automated system for creating tables.

The security system is very good.

What needs improvement?

When we troubleshoot, there are many tools that we need to use. One example is having to look at the system logs. The troubleshooting process should be improved so that we can resolve errors faster. 

Oracle demands a lot of memory and you need to have a strong machine.

In the next release, I would like to see a framework for memory management.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using this solution for one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Oracle databases are stable. It is a very dependable application.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Oracle has many strong features and tools. There are many options and possibilities.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support for this solution is good.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used MySQL and Microsoft SQL Server, and there is no comparison to Oracle. 

How was the initial setup?

I simply followed the instructions on the Oracle website.

The deployment took several months because we have a complex architecture with six thousand servers.

What other advice do I have?

I don't use the management features because I don't work with the GUI. I prefer to use the command line.

Oracle is a very good solution that I would recommend. It is strong software with good support and documentation available.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Ahmad Hida - PeerSpot reviewer
Senior Application Consultant at a tech services company
Consultant
A stable solution with a straightforward setup, even for a non-technical person
Pros and Cons
  • "Scalability is very easy. If you want to, you can make it onto two or three servers, racks, or whatever you want. It's easy."
  • "Some of the technical features could be improved. They have a problem with some of the object types. I think this is one of the issues which is needed to be improved."

What is most valuable?

The stability and the format and the speed of the database are very good. 

What needs improvement?

Some of the technical features could be improved. They have a problem with some of the object types. I think this is one of the issues which is needed to be improved. If they could implement a managing tool that is better than the one they have now, that would be an improvement.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution since 2002.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is very stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability is very easy. If you want to, you can have it scale onto two or three servers, racks, or whatever you want. It's easy.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is not bad. It's not like Microsoft support. With Microsoft support, you can search for answers online and you will find a lot of articles that help with problem-solving. With Oracle, if you open a ticket for technical assistance Oracle's very good and they will help you.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is straightforward. Even if you're not technical, it's possible to set it up.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I didn't look at any other solutions.

What other advice do I have?

I use some other databases, like Microsoft and MySQL, but they don't have the same performance as Oracle.

I would rate this solution eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Rich Niemiec - PeerSpot reviewer
Chief Innovation Officer at Viscosity North America
Video Review
Real User
One of the benefits is the ability to use solutions you're familiar with and leverage the cloud.

What is our primary use case?

The primary use is the leverage DBaaS (Database as a Service) using the Oracle Cloud solution without having to build the database a step at a time.  Getting a pre-built Oracle database can be beneficial for testing for functionality, new development, but mostly the ability to quickly build different sizes of Oracle systems without a large effort.  The ability to resize things is also an advantage over other cloud solutions.  There is also an Autonomous Database.

How has it helped my organization?

I think some of the biggest benefits is if there's a consolidation potential, or putting things up in the cloud where I can consolidate many databases into one. Also a location potential is helpful; if I have customers in Germany and China and in the U.S. but my IT is located in Chicago, I could go to the Oracle Cloud and now maybe I can put replicas using Oracle's multi-tenant database. The cloud makes this a lot easier to actually do a clone of a pluggable database, but I could just take that pluggable database and clone it to China. I can clone it to Germany and then I could have one here in the United States. The data is closer to the person. There's also EU privacy laws that I have to keep and it makes it a lot easier to secure things in one location as well. Careful though, some laws require you to take responsibility for what you put in the cloud.  We also benchmarked Oracle ADW vs. AWS Redshift & Oracle was much faster.

What is most valuable?

Being able to go to go to the website: cloud.oracle.com/tryit and get $300+ in free trial credits is a great way to explore the technology (you can also go to cloud.oracle.com/database to just try database as a service (DBaaS). The cloud is something accelerates efforts to interface with Big Data and IOT, but it takes an educated buyer to implement the right pieces at the right time. The cloud gives people the ability to leverage big data from non-Oracle sources including Hadoop and Hive, quickly deploy a development test or simple application, and to leverage the interfaces to other companies and to use mobile apps. I think the downside is it's causing people pain as it compresses how fast they need to learn about it and effectively move the parts of their system that are better suited in the cloud. I think that's the biggest issue right now. Some of the features that are out there for database as a service on the cloud, if you want to have an encrypted backup in the cloud or a test database, it's nice to have a backup that's offsite or a system where you can test new features. Are you going to put your backup in a lock-box at the local bank or are you going to put it on some other cloud? With Oracle, you can send it with RMAN encrypted backup straight to the Oracle Cloud and it's there when you need it. If you had to fail-over for some reason when you use Oracle Cloud, and you have an Exadata in-house, Oracle has an Exadata in the cloud that you could fail right over to (this allows either a CAPEX or OPEX financial event). Maybe you have some big data where you don't have enough servers and you know exactly what you want hardware wise, well, you're familiar with that Exadata performance so you know exactly what you're going to get in the cloud since the hardware is similar to what you have on-site.

What needs improvement?

Features that people want the most are already there. One of them is Oracle In-Memory which allows you to put things in a columnar data store in memory with Oracle's 12c (12.1.0.2+). You could have an in-memory database. You could have columnar data, which is compressed and in-memory (in the in-memory column store) or if you're doing transactional data, it's in the buffer cache (memory) so it's very fast to do that transactions. It's a different memory area altogether. When I look at the cloud, you'll need In-Memory more, because you're going to be dealing with larger volumes of data. The second feature that helps is multi-tenancy; Oracle already has this as of 12c Release 1. It is the ability to clone and move things around and maybe do an exchange partition (PDB - Pluggable Database) with one of your vendors or one of your customers out there (given security needs are met). Non-PDBs (or not using multi-tenancy is being deprecated).  Leveraging and testing new features of 12.2 is also beneficial.  Oracle 18c will be beneficial with Snapshot Carousel, PDB switchover,  In-Memory External Tables and Polymorphic Tables.

I think the way that Oracle and other vendors can move people quicker to the cloud is by educating people on the capabilities of the cloud and some of the benefits of the cloud. I think as customers and vendors out there and partners of Oracle look at providing solutions for the cloud, I think people will be more likely to go there, but what I think right now is the biggest hesitancy is there are a lot of other cloud providers don't have any of the features Oracle has. Oracle must let people know that if you have on-site Exadata, now you can have Exadata in the cloud. Easy to move. You've got a lot of data you want to archive? You can move it to a slower, larger server or a faster, smaller server depending on what you want to do. Just the capabilities that they have in-house or in the cloud. Some cost more than others, so effective planning is one big key to success. The cloud is gaining momentum, but the key to success is evaluating it fully and using appropriately.

For how long have I used the solution?

Three to five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I did an estimate of all the servers that are out there and Google is obviously very large. Amazon Web Services is very large but if you take Oracle's cloud, which is over 1 exabyte now and then you take the compression that you can do with Oracle, it's actually, probably the largest cloud that's out there right now (many Exabytes). From a scalability standpoint, as big as the world is, as big as you can think, that's how large you can scale your applications.

How are customer service and technical support?

Oracle's technical support has almost every answer just by searching their support system. I always find what I'm looking for and more.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I think everybody knows that they need to move from on-premise to the cloud. They know the cloud is what's coming next. They know it's way to quickly interface with social media with Big Data very quickly. I think their hesitancy is: where does it fit? Give us the opportunity to do a hybrid cloud so that our staff can be up to date on exactly how this works and I think then they'll move there faster. There are other clouds with MANY hidden costs.  Please hire an expert to consult when evaluating hidden costs on the cloud.  Viscosity North America pays particular attention to these hidden costs.  Viscosity also has an Oracle vs. AWS whitepaper on our website.

How was the initial setup?

I thought it was very easy to setup database as a service (within hours - the second one will take minutes) for testing new features and familiarizing yourself with the flow of things.

What about the implementation team?

We brought a customer that was not in the cloud, all on premise and we put their EBS finances into the Oracle cloud and all their manufacturing was still on site. They were multi-currency. They were multi-country. Initially there was a lot of education that needed to happen. The more education you put forth at the beginning edge of that project, the more likely you're going to be successful in the middle of that project, but cloud projects tend to be shorter in duration and then when you get to the end of that, there's a lot of questions on things that people could do that they couldn't do before they got to the cloud. The 'what ifs' we'll say. What if I could extend my data to all these data sources with big data? Well, they never asked that before because they never could do it before. Now that they're in the cloud, their whole world opens up to what the capabilities are for their company itself. Some of those discussions are interesting after the fact.

What was our ROI?

It really depends how this is measured.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

There are different prices for different architectures - plan wisely and ensure that you look at all the pluses/minuses of each provider!

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Some of the criteria for when you're evaluating a cloud, to me, number one is cost, but after that it's SLA (Service Level Agreement - from the cloud provider). Is my data going to be there? Consider a credit card company. They have seven seconds until they're paying some other company because they didn't do the transaction fast enough. Usually it takes them one second to approve your transaction so time and speed is probably the most important thing.

What are some of the criteria people should be looking at? First of all is SLA. Will it be up? The second isL is it going to be on hardware and software that I'm used to? I have a tech staff of 100 people, are they going to be able to do their job when that data's in the cloud? Just being familiar with things. Can it scale? Is it large enough?

What other advice do I have?

Read my 12cR2 book on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Oracle-...

How would Oracle rate on a scale of 1 to 10 with cloud solution? I think it depends absolutely on which Oracle cloud solution it is. Some are 10 and some are lower. It depends which architecture you evaluate.

Many people are looking at it now. The main key is get educated. Understand what's out there. I did three sessions at Oracle OpenWorld and Java World in 2017, all of them have cloud. I will do many at Collaborate earlier this year (April 2018) and all of them will have cloud. Why? Because I know it's important and where many things are going to some degree. Whether people are using the 12c database, 18c database, that's one of my talks, I know it's important to be ready for the cloud (the 11g database is also available on the cloud). How you would migrate each database and what multi-tenant does to assist you in that process is an important feature of Oracle. I also have regular sessions on the Internet of Things (IOT) which talks about all these devices that are going to be integrated with your database and big data and obviously cloud plays perfectly to that one.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We're platinum partners.
it_user622242 - PeerSpot reviewer
Sub-Manager IT Infrastructure at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Improves client satisfaction by decreasing their problems
Pros and Cons
  • "Improves client satisfaction by decreasing their problems."
  • "I would like to see a better dashboard for the storage. It need to be more complete overall."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use case is transaction services of the bank. The performance is amazing. It is very good for the all-flash disk.

How has it helped my organization?

  • More SLAs for the clients; better performance in our transactions for clients.
  • Improves client satisfaction by decreasing their problems.

What is most valuable?

  • The performance
  • The opportunity for recovery

What needs improvement?

I would like to see a better dashboard for the storage. It need to be more complete overall. At the moment, it is basic. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is very good. There have been no problems.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is good. There have been no problems.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have had no issues contacting technical support. We use the Chilean and US support offices, and they respond quickly.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We had Hitachi storage, but the performance and the support were very bad.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was easy.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at Dell storage, but we chose Oracle due to its performance, security, and scalability.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend the solution. It is quite complete and very good.

Most important criteria when selecting a vendor:

  • Recommendations
  • Performance
  • Stability.
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user432795 - PeerSpot reviewer
Managing Director at CarajanDB
Vendor
Data Guard is best DR solution but licensing is a nightmare
Pros and Cons
  • "Not only does it provide a mature, reliable solution for DR. It also helps if application owners need to look into data which is a couple of hours old, using Flashback Database on the standby database."
  • "Data Guard is the best solution for Disaster Recovery."
  • "My favorite option – Multitenant – should be available for some pluggable databases in all editions, without any fee."
  • "An 8GB download for software is far too big. Nowadays it should be possible to simply use RPM packages on Linux/Unix."

How has it helped my organization?

Not only does it provide a mature, reliable solution for DR. It also helps if application owners need to look into data which is a couple of hours old, using Flashback Database on the standby database.

What is most valuable?

Data Guard, because it’s the best solution for Disaster Recovery.

What needs improvement?

The licensing is a nightmare. Tons of options which need to be licensed individually, and no real offering for VMware or other Hypervisors.

And my favorite option – Multitenant – should be available for some pluggable databases in all editions without any fee.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No stability issues at all.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

RAC is not a real scalability solution, so instead of scaling out I prefer to scale up.

How are customer service and technical support?

Very poor.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have always used Oracle Database.

How was the initial setup?

Back in the early 90s, set up was difficult. But now, it’s straightforward using the graphical interfaces. But there is indeed room for improvement. An 8GB download for software is far too big. Nowadays it should be possible to simply use RPM packages on Linux/Unix.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

There should be a standard way to license the database in a virtual environment (e.g. VMware) and there should be a low-end version (like Standard Edition One) again.

What other advice do I have?

Before starting to look for the high-end solution (Enterprise Edition) you should consider using Standard Edition Two. There is a great chance that it will be sufficient, and gaps can be filled with third-party products like Dbvisit Standby for Distaster Recovery.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Oracle Gold Partner.
PeerSpot user
Cloud Architect, Oracle ACE, Oracle DBA at Pythian
MSP
Enables us to consolidate many databases without any change to the application
Pros and Cons
  • "The Oracle Multitenant feature of 12c is awesome. This feature enables us to consolidate disparate databases under one container database and eases manageability of the databases. It also allows us to scale."
  • "Some bugs could be fixed. There have been some internal software bugs, just like any other newly released software. These bugs gets fixed by patch updates from Oracle on regular basis."

How has it helped my organization?

Many databases can be consolidated without any change to the application.

What is most valuable?

The Oracle Multitenant feature of 12c is awesome. This feature enables us to consolidate disparate databases under one container database and eases manageability of the databases. It also allows us to scale.

What needs improvement?

Some bugs could be fixed. There have been some internal software bugs, just like any other newly released software. These bugs gets fixed by patch updates from Oracle on regular basis.

For how long have I used the solution?

Three to five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

No stability issues.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

No scalability issues.

How is customer service and technical support?

Excellent.

How was the initial setup?

The planning phase was bit complex regarding what to consolidate, but implementation was straightforward.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Check Oracle support.

What other advice do I have?

I rate it a 10 out of 10, due to the scalability, flexibility, and cloud oriented approach.

Plan well and it should be fine.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Oracle Partner.
Syed Jaffar Hussain - PeerSpot reviewer
CTO at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Reduced the number of traditional storage/server architecture

What is most valuable?

  • Resource elasticity
  • Rapid provisioning
  • Automated centralized management of all DBs
  • Measured services, etc.

How has it helped my organization?

  • Technically, apart from the cost reduction, it reduces the administration overheads.
  • Scale-up and scale-down resources, as per the demand to ensure the major business, do not impact performance issues.

What needs improvement?

  • Reduce the licensing cost further.
  • Stronger security

For how long have I used the solution?

Over one year now.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

Challenges faced when migrating the on-premise database to cloud, especially VLDBs.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Mostly with the internet availability and speed. Nothing really with the stability of the DBaaS.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Not anything we have come across.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

Satisfactory.

Technical Support:

Satisfactory.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Most of the DEV/UAT/TEST were on-premises, which moved to the cloud with consolidation.

How was the initial setup?

There were technical challenges configuring the connectivity, moving the data, etc.

What about the implementation team?

Installation was through a vendor.

What was our ROI?

Reduced the number of traditional storage/server architecture. More productivity and quick provisioning of the database helped moving the application to production quickly.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Oracle licensing is expensive compared to other competitors, such as AWS and MS Azure.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Yes. AWS and MS Azure.

What other advice do I have?

Any DEV/UAT/TEST environments are really candidates to go for cloud and ensure you fully utilize the flexibility of cloud technologies.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Robin Saikat Chatterjee - PeerSpot reviewer
Head of Oracle Exadata Centre of Excellence at Tata Consultancy Services
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
You can run it on the Oracle public cloud.

What is most valuable?

It provides the ability to run from a simple schema base to a real application database, including the option to run it on the Oracle public cloud. In cases where the customer has an issue with data locality or privacy, the option to seamlessly switch to a Oracle public cloud machine in the customer's own DC makes this the most flexible cloud solution.

The automatic inclusion of all database options in Enterprise Edition (EE), Extreme Performance and Exadata cloud service make this product very attractive.

How has it helped my organization?

Previously, when proposing cloud solutions for Oracle database to enterprise clients the lack of a viable high availability solution was often cost prohibitive. Oracle offers this as a standard option. With Active Dataguard freely available for Extreme Performance, there is no enterprise cloud service catering to the Oracle database that can match this offering

What needs improvement?

Currently, there is no simple method to modify the orchestrations on which the compute hosts are based. Hence, unlike the IaaS Oracle services, in cases where there is a need to make certain changes to the service, such as adding an IP network or a GRE tunnel, it requires specialized skills from the backend. However, we expect with the rapid pace of innovation that the feature to modify advanced aspects might be added on the fly in later versions.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been experimenting with the solution for just over a year now and we have clients that are going live on the system as I write this.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

We saw some minor hiccups to do with networking and connectivity. We also were utilizing the Exadata database cloud service for one client and faced some issues with the cloud tooling. One minor problem was if we created a database of a particular name in capitals, deleted the database, and then tried to recreate the same database but with small letters, the cloud tooling would not allow this. We raised the issue to Oracle, who provided a fix and will incorporate this in the next version of the Exadata cloud tooling.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

On the whole, the system was very stable. We only faced one unexplained hiccup, when a server was rebooted and we were not able to track down the root cause.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We did not face any issues with scalability. We are using Oracle OTD for high-availability scale out, which was initially active-passive but later an active-active solution was provided.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

We have had very responsive customer support. On several occasions, the Oracle Cloud A-Team directly came on the call with us to help resolve issues.

Technical Support:

The technical team from the vendor side was quite knowledgeable and we were able to resolve some network routing issues quite quickly.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We have used other cloud providers. However, they did not have a true high-availability cloud solution. The second issue we found is that I/O bandwidth was comparatively variable on the other cloud providers and we could not scale easily beyond a few terabytes without facing I/O bottlenecks.

How was the initial setup?

Because we had taken training on the platform, it was very familiar for us. However, it would not be so easy for someone implementing this from scratch. We would recommend going with an experienced managed service provider.The platform provides surprising flexibility for something that is billed as platform as a service.

What about the implementation team?

We are ourselves a cloud service provider team that implemented for several customers.

What was our ROI?

This varies across our customers but they all are seeing benefits over their erstwhile in-house solutions.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The cloud option provides a lot of benefits for Oracle shops, as it reduces the upfront costs and converts the licensing costs to a running cost.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have utilized other cloud and hosted platforms such as Azure, Macquarie Telecom, Verizon, Xerox, etc. However, this option was superior for Oracle Database hosting.

What other advice do I have?

This provides an enterprise-class cloud solution that can scale to terabyte-sized databases in the cloud without having to compromise.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We are an Oracle Diamond partner.
it_user452340 - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at Miracle Finland Oy
Video Review
Consultant
As opposed to on-premises, I can scale up and down as needed. It's a convenient solution.

What is most valuable?

Easiness, that's number one for me because I use the cloud for testing purposes. When I present about database things because I do a lot of presentations and I like to test on the cloud. This cloud is everywhere so when I'm presenting here in US, I have the same cloud available that I have in Finland where I prepared my presentation. It's very easy and very convenient. I use Oracle Databases.

How has it helped my organization?

What is the best place for an Oracle database if it's not the Oracle Cloud? If I take any of the other clouds that wouldn't be the same. Of course the best is the Oracle's original cloud.

What needs improvement?

I think most of the customers are hoping for having 24/7 kind of support for if anything happens during the night, they will fix it without you knowing it. Of course there will be an extra cost for the customer but it shouldn't be too much. That's what I think most of the customers will be happy with. You don't have to have your own operators to look after your operation system and the databases and so on and Oracle would look after all that. They have those services but I think they're a bit expensive at the moment.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I think scalability is the top thing here because you are just able to scale up and down whenever you feel like it. You can't do it on premises.

How are customer service and technical support?

Nobody is ever happy with support with any vendor so if I would say I would give them the score five, everybody would be laughing. There is no support that is 100% good. Usually it's been after it's been down or something like that. If I find a back or an error or something like that, I might need to contact somebody to fix it but I've had very good support by friends who work for Oracle. Not the official channels has been very efficient so all my problems have been solved.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Usually it's a long process so it starts when you realize that the hardware you have is going to be obsolete and you start your process there. You know one year from now I have to do something, I have to buy new hardware, I have to do something. That's usually where the process starts and then you start thinking should I buy a new hardware or should I go to the cloud.

What about the implementation team?

It's the same as you're changing from one machine to another machine, it's just the same. You're just changing from one machine to a cloud. We did that for one of our customers and it was very, very easy and simple.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Reliability I will say that's the most important thing and what I learnt today from the keynote was that people are afraid about security and especially about the vendor security. I think that's something that you should really look at when you are choosing your vendor. How are they taking care of your security? Because you have all your valuable data in that cloud, you don't want anybody to go and mess with it.

What other advice do I have?

Rating: I'm a Finn, I never give ten for anything. I would say seven or eight which is very good for me. There's a lot to improve yet but I think it's getting pretty good already. Let's say eight, I'm in a good mood today.

I would start with a test database. I would go with them to cloud first to get the experience because most of the people are afraid of the cloud. They don't know what to expect and how they juggle things and so on because they're used to see the computer, touch them and know exactly what is where and what kind of block you have in your computer and so on. So it's very scary to let somebody else take care of that things. The first step would probably be give your test databases to the cloud and see how it works and realize that actually now you have time for the real job instead of doing constant upgrades and so on. I would start with the test database to get experience and the touching feeling of how it is.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We're a gold partner.
it_user452346 - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Manager with 501-1,000 employees
Video Review
MSP
We're looking forward to using it more to take our on-prem database backups to the cloud.

What is most valuable?

So from the database perspective, we usually are talking about three important things. So the obvious ones are the multitenancy in the pluggable databases. The second category, I would call it performance, making sure that we are getting the right value from the databases in terms of data access. And the third one is obviously the security. So, we are more interested in implementing solutions that, we are actually excited to see Oracle come in with release two with all the issues we have, from 11g and on. So, 12.1 is there, but we want to see what's coming up in 12c at release two, and we are really excited about multitenancy. The whole security aspect, and then the performance as such.

How has it helped my organization?

So from the cloud perspective, I think there are too many vendors out there. One of the things we are excited from the Oracle perspective is their ability to take us off of our backups, the database backup. Using that, they can take us to the cloud and we want to try that out, mostly on their test end, as of now. And once we see how the ROI is, and what kind of a performance we are getting and then also check on how the security is, then we might probably consider going a little bit deeper into low-level production applications, all the way into the business applications.

So right now we are evaluating their trial period with Oracle on migrating in their databases, and we are also excited to use some of their backup and recovery solutions, which basically, you take your database and you run your backups, right now it is running on your local disk, but then we are configuring that to go into the cloud. So one of the cool features we are using from Oracle is the RMAN. It takes a second set of channels, and just take it as a destination and that goes into the cloud. So we can restore it at the same time from either of the options, on-prem or from the cloud. So we are excited to see how that works, because that is something that Oracle has recently come up with.

What needs improvement?

So we want to see, obviously, besides Oracle databases, what other databases can be provisioned and integrated in the cloud. So if I have to have an application running off of a non-Oracle database, and I have an application and the database running in cloud, which is an Oracle, I want to see if I can integrate them through what kind of a web service, how can I transfer the data? How do I move my processes without having to come back into my on prem and then go back into the secondary cloud? So those are some of the integration points I'm looking at.

And the second important thing I'm looking at is, the overall governance. How Oracle can provide their cloud control and give use the ability to manage the on prem and the off prem cloud services, combined in a single view.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

So obviously we did an ROI analysis and a TCU. So, we have seen that the cost is definitely a factor. And security is more important, so that's why we did not press the button on the production yet. So we are piloting with the non-prod to see what kind of security we're going to get, what kind of threats are we going to be exposed to. And once we are satisfied, once we get our sign-off from the management, we might probably pull the trigger. But we are in the evaluation period.

What about the implementation team?

Onboarding: so the Database Cloud, the way we have seen is, so you have a cloud control and you go in and, based on your subscription, you actually get the environment. So once you get the environment, you generate the security keys to establish the network connectivity between the on prem to the public and once we have the provision done, then you can actually encrypt the data on the source side, and move them into the cloud through their cloud control utility. So that's how we migrate them. Now, we haven't done a lot of the big databases yet. So we are piloting on the small ones. So, so far, the pilot ones look good which are close to about 300 to 400 GB databases. But we want to see how that goes with couple of terabytes of databases.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Scalability is number one. Data transfer is number two. And security actually tops, on top of that. And the ability to move the workloads between on-prem and off-prem. So that's one of the big things you are looking at, and if we don't like things, and if you want to push back, and we want to come back to our on-prem, what options do we have? So, can we migrate easily from a public cloud to a private cloud and private cloud to an on-prem cloud, and vice-versa. So, having that ability is a big thing, because we don't want to invest in something where we go to the cloud but we don't know how to come back. So we don't want it to be a one-way street, we want to choose a product that can give us an opportunity to not only go into the cloud, but also in a worst-case scenario, come back out.

So initially we started with Amazon. We tested a little bit, but the security was a big thing for us and the way they handle security is a little different I don't necessarily say it is wrong or bad, it's just that I was not very comfortable having the keys being shared versus in Oracle, the security keys are owned by the customer which is us, as opposed to with the vendor, and that was a prime difference for us. And second thing was, Amazon cloud is more on the infrastructure provisioning and metered. They don't give a database as a service. They do have some options, but being an Oracle customer, we know what Oracle can provide, which is totally a value-add kind of a service, with a lot of different shaders, compared to the others like Amazon or Rackspace or a hundred different partners. But I think it's because we are very close with Oracle, we can see how they can give us those value add services.

What other advice do I have?

So the Database Cloud on Oracle right now, I think it's there, but there is some room to grow. So I wouldn't give them 10 yet. I would hold on to that. Probably eight would be a better option. But I want to see the growth in terms of, not only on the vertical side, I want to see the horizontal growth, in terms of how they can leverage, as I said earlier, integrating with other systems. So, if they can grow both horizontally and vertically, then probably I can give them a 10. But at this time, they are not there yet.

So I would say, anybody who wants to get into the cloud, evaluate your options. Check out your dev and test environments first. Check out your backup as a service, because it's very easy. You just have to set your targets and push your database backups. So try with those two first, and see the difference, and compare that with your other vendors. And see what kind of a response latency you're getting from the cloud. And make the call. I mean, that's what I did, and it was clear.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We're partners.
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Updated: April 2022
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