MySQL OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

MySQL is the #1 ranked solution in top Open Source Databases and #3 ranked solution in top Relational Databases. PeerSpot users give MySQL an average rating of 8.0 out of 10. MySQL is most commonly compared to Firebird SQL: MySQL vs Firebird SQL. MySQL is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 62% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 19% of all views.
MySQL Buyer's Guide

Download the MySQL Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2022

What is MySQL?

MySQL is an open-source relational database management system (RDBMS) owned by Oracle. Before Oracle acquired the product, it was completely free for users. After the merge, the solution started offering paid services with more features, alongside a free version. MySQL can easily integrate with a wide variety of programming languages, which makes it one of the most flexible and reliable products among its competitors. This cost-effective solution helps users deliver high-performance and scalable database applications through several products. They include:

  • MySQL HeatWave: This is an in-memory query accelerator for MySQL. It is a parallel, columnar, hybrid query-processing engine with algorithms for distributed query processing. This database service is used for transactions, analytics, and machine learning (ML). It offers simplified, secure real-time analytics. It can be deployed on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI), Amazon AWS, Azure, and users' data centers.

  • My SQL Enterprise Edition: This edition of the solution includes the most comprehensive set of advanced features, technical support, and management tools. The combination functions achieves security, scalability, reliability, and uptime, while reducing risk, cost, and complexity, in managing MySQL applications.

  • MySQL Standard Edition: This edition utilizes industrial-strength performance and reliability to help users deliver high-performance and scalable Open Transaction Processing (OLTP) applications.

  • MySQL Classic Edition: This is an embedded database for independent software vendors (ISVs), original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), and value-added resellers (VARs), that are developing applications using the MyISAM storage engine.

  • MySQL Community Edition: This is the free version of the product, which is supported by a large active community of open-source developers.

  • MySQL Cluster CGE: This is a distributed database that combines linear scalability and high availability. It offers in-memory real-time access across partitioned and distributed databases.

  • MySQL Embedded: This product offers MySQL as an embedded database and is most widely used by ISVs, OEMs, and VARs. It is utilized for making applications, hardware, and appliances more competitive by bringing them to market faster while lowering their cost of goods sold (COGs).

My SQL Features

The characteristics of each MySQL edition differ depending on what it offers and what clients it is catered towards. But the main features of the product include the following:

  • Internals and portability: These capabilities allow MySQL to work on multiple platforms and provide transactional and non-transactional storage engines. This set of features is tested with Purify, Vilgrind, and a broad range of different compilers.

  • Data types: Due to the flexibility of the data types feature of MySQL, the product is compatible with a very wide variety of data types, including fixed-length and variable-length string types.

  • Statements and functions: This feature allows MySQL full operator and function support. It supports a wide variety of functions and allows users to refer to tables from different databases in the same statement.

  • Security: The security features of MySQL provide users with a flexible privileged password system that enables host-based verification. The product offers encryption of all password traffic when users connect to a server.

  • Scalability and limits: MySQL supports large databases with up to approximately 50 million records and up to 64 indexes per table.

  • Connectivity: The connectivity features of the product allow clients to connect to MySQL using several protocols, providing them with freedom of choice in terms of which ones to use.

  • Localization: Through this feature, the product offers availability to users in many languages. The server time zone can be changed dynamically and allows clients to specify their own time zone for their convenience.

  • Clients and tools: The product includes several client and utility programs among its capabilities.

MySQL Benefits

MySQL brings many benefits to organizations that use it for their data. The most common ones include:

  • Due to its initial open-source nature, MySQL is an easy to understand and beginner-friendly product.

  • The solution still supports an open-source version as well, which means users can download, use, and modify it based on their requirements.

  • MySQL ensures the consistency of data by storing it efficiently and minimizing redundancy.

  • This is considered one of the fastest solutions on the market, a fact which is backed by many benchmark tests.

  • MySQL is very flexible and supports a large number of embedded applications.

  • The solution is compatible with many operating systems.

  • This product offers clients the option to roll back transactions, as well as commit, and crash recovery.

Reviews from Real Users

According to a database engineer at a retailer with more than 10,000 employees, MySQL is a great open-source product that offers great scalability and compatibility.

Yong S., a solutions specialist, system integration, appreciates this product because it has different licensing options and is easy to set up.

MySQL Customers

Facebook, Tumblr, Scholastic, MTV Networks, Wikipedia, Verizon Wireless, Sage Group, Glassfish Open Message Queue, and RightNow Technologies.

MySQL Video

Archived MySQL Reviews (more than two years old)

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goforitandy - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Consultant at Woohoogeeks
Real User
ExpertModerator
Free, cost-effective, with a powerful plethora of tools
Pros and Cons
  • "Like other databases, it has a rich set of functions, such as stored procedures and its own procedural language, which is akin to Oracle SQL. It also has trigger and cursor commands you would expect with a good database language."
  • "MySQL tutorials and guides could be improved. Often they are too complex for someone with no database experience to understand."

What is our primary use case?

It is an ideal database to use online learning environments and SMEs. It works well with  Moodle, the open-source learning solution, and is the defacto standard for that product as Moodle is written in PHP which generally goes hand-in-hand with MySQL. As it is an open-source and free solution it is an economical method of storing important companies or small business data. At the same time, it offers a rich set of functions comparable to other large-scale enterprise solutions such as SQL Server and Oracle. 

How has it helped my organization?

MySQL is easy to configure, use, and implement. It is free, and cost-effective, with a powerful plethora of tools. It has improved my organization for my clients using Moodle and MySQL databases, as problems are usually easier to fix quickly, and the database resources can be optimized, easily. Even though it is not as sophisticated as SQL Server and Oracle solutions, it is the database of choice for most Moodle implementations. It has a history of reliability, which is always useful in a business environment.

What is most valuable?

The Cross-platform support for MySQL is great, as you don't need to worry about which platform or operating system you need to install the platform. This allows for interoperability.

Like other databases, it has a rich set of functions, such as stored procedures and its own procedural language, which is akin to Oracle SQL. It also has trigger and cursor commands you would expect with a good database language.

Views are updateable, which is useful when you need to amend a specific view of data for different circumstances.

It has it's own Data Definition Language (DDL), and provides an Information Schema, to view what is "under the bonnet" of your database.

What needs improvement?

MySQL tutorials and guides could be improved. Often they are too complex for someone with no database experience to understand. 

It is not an easy database to learn for the novice, and very often users need to take a course, employ the use of an online tutor, or IT professional to assist. Also, it is known that it is often difficult to locate guides for specific functions for developers.

It might be good to have some way of creating web services easier, rather than having to write a User Defined Function (UDF) in PHP.

Buyer's Guide
MySQL
November 2022
Learn what your peers think about MySQL. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
655,711 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for about 10 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

MySQL has a reputation for stability, and that is one of the reasons it is so popular. Because it is easily available, just works, and can be integrated reasonably easily into other software, it is often the default platform of choice. 

It has been around for years, and chances are it will be around for the next 10 years or so, as new versions continue to evolve.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

MySQL is scalable for SMEs and works on a number of different operating systems.

How are customer service and support?

I have not had many issues with MySQL in the past, so I rarely use the support service.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used various databases in the past, but for my current business needs, MySQL is ideal.

How was the initial setup?

It was a simple setup, as it was included in the Moodle installation process for implementing learning sites.

What was our ROI?

ROI is not applicable, as MySQL is open source and is free, so you could say it is only the investment of implementing the database in your environment.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Pricing depends on the size of your business. For an individual to SME sized business the MySQL solution should be adequate for your needs. Setup costs are minimal.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Yes, but for Moodle Learning sites, SQL Server is more complex, and is not multi-platform, Oracle is not recommended for Moodle, but the nearest to MySQL is ProstgreSQL. MySQL is reliable and easy to use. 

What other advice do I have?

You do need to have technical knowledge of databases in general, but MySQL is not too difficult to learn if used alongside PHPMyAdmin, but there are other tools you could consider, such as MySQL Workbench.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Senior Data Analyst at Charutarhealth Org
Real User
Easy to set up, stable, and good technical support

What is our primary use case?

We are interfacing it with MicroStrategy. There are ODBC connections. We have 10 to 12 users in our company.

We are assessing the possibilities of moving to the cloud. We are not yet sure if we are going to move to the cloud.

What is most valuable?

The replication feature is the most valuable. We are replicating our servers.

What needs improvement?

It should have some code analytical functions. It can also have a monitoring tool.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for ten years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is stable. We are not dealing with a huge database. Our database is not more than 1 TB, so we didn't find any problem.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I haven't seen a need for scalability.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their technical support is good.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is easy. We are using it on Linux, and our server is on CentOS.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend this solution. I would rate MySQL a nine out of ten. I find it almost perfect.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
MySQL
November 2022
Learn what your peers think about MySQL. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
655,711 professionals have used our research since 2012.
COO at a tech vendor with 1-10 employees
Real User
Cost-effective, good performance, easy to use, and the cross-platform capabilities are nice
Pros and Cons
  • "What I've been most pleased with is the cost point, performance, and ease of use."
  • "The analytics features are in need of improvement."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use case is as a reporting solution, data collection, data manipulation, and similar tasks. We install MySQL on Linux and Windows machines for testing our enterprise application.

We are a solution provider and this product is part of our offering to our clients.

How has it helped my organization?

MySQL hasn't really affected our organization, specifically because we primarily use it in a consulting model.

What is most valuable?

All of the databases basically have the same set of features.

What I've been most pleased with is the cost point, performance, and ease of use.

It is very easy to configure, it's easy to deploy, and it's cross-platform capabilities are quite nice.

What needs improvement?

The analytics features are in need of improvement. They aren't as far along as the capabilities that you have in terms of analytics for SQL Server and Oracle.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for about five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've had no problems with stability and its recovery processing, error processing, and things along those lines have been fine.  We always use Java applications and the JDBC drivers work fine.

I haven't had any issues at all with its reporting or its transaction processing, or anything else. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

For our use-cases, the scalability is fine. We haven't seen any issues and we're processing probably hundreds of millions of rows each day. We're not into the billions or tens of billions, so we're probably a medium-to-low use case.

Most of our instances are single-instance databases, so I haven't had to deal with its clustering capabilities or distributed database feature set.

Our clients vary in size, although we generally operate as a small system inside a major organization.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have never had to utilize technical support. There was never an issue that I had to call in.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I use a lot of databases including MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, and PostgreSQL. 

The performance of SQL Server and Oracle is better than MySQL. The two alternatives have other features, as well.

How was the initial setup?

The initial set up very straightforward. MySQL is easy to deploy and very easy to configure. We can literally bring up instances in minutes.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

This product has a good price point.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We had been on SQL Server and Oracle, and a subset of our customers wanted us to switch and use MySQL. We explored what that transition would take and then implemented it.

What other advice do I have?

My advice for anybody who is looking into implementing MySQL is to start by carefully evaluating their use cases. One of the things that we found is that MySQL didn't necessarily have all of the flexibility for JSON and XML processing at the time. I know that they've improved it, although it's not quite the same as what you see specifically in Oracle. So, the customer has to evaluate that. For straight-on basic transaction processing, it's worked out just as well with few issues from SQL Server to MySQL or from Oracle to MySQL.

For my use, I'm fine with what they have. I'll be interested in what they'll provide in analytics, as well as JSON and XML processing if that's even on their roadmap. For right now, it's really not an impact on my use case.

If I were rating SQL Server or Oracle then I would rate either one a nine out of ten. The only difference is that they do perform better than MySQL, although they don't perform so much better than it's relevant.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Arief Gunawan - PeerSpot reviewer
Product manager at Metrodata Electronics Tbk PT
Real User
Top 10
Has a simple and user-friendly installation
Pros and Cons
  • "The one interesting thing about this product is that it is open source. It comes from an open source product. MySQL has been positioned as open source, but it also provides support."
  • "If the customer is already using or has already used Oracle for a long time they will know the look and feel and the character of this database that can fit into their business."

What is our primary use case?

We sell MySQL to customers who need to build second tier applications, not their core application. For some of our customers, when they are planning to build their second tier application, they will choose MySQL rather than Oracle which is more expensive.

What is most valuable?

The one interesting thing about this product is that it is open source. It comes from an open source product. MySQL has been positioned as open source, but it also provides support. Therefore, for a senior level product like MySQL it is different than a product like MariaDB or MongoDB which are also open source databases but they depend on the community for support. 

People just assume it is less expensive. The product is not expensive. But they also have a strong principle behind data backup and supporting that product. That's why it's quite interesting, because it's open source but it has a principle behind it.

What needs improvement?

In terms of what could be improved, some of the features that Oracle has, MySQL also has. Like if a customer is looking for a high availability solution, a security solution, a monetary solution, they can have all that in an expensive product like Oracle but they can also have it when they're using MySQL.

Every product has their own pros and cons, and also has their own market. So if the customer is already using or has already used Oracle for a long time they will know the look and feel and the character of this database that can fit into their business.

They will not choose MySQL over Oracle if they already know about Oracle. But if they start to build a new application before they are creating a secondary application then they may not be familiar with Oracle and they will try MySQL. Maybe they will like it because they will see that this database also has complete features. If they try Oracle they find the same features but different pricing. In certain things, MySQL cannot have the same benefits as Oracle but for some customers who are already using Oracle, you're not going to move to another product even if it's more expensive.

And MySQL is a cheaper product.

That's why I say that MySQL has many of the same features as Oracle. Both of them have high security.

The customer that comes from a small or medium business will prefer to choose MySQL rather than the Oracle database because they already know that this product is best for their business because it is not expensive compared to Oracle. 

Oracle does have different versions with different prices. The cheaper is called the Standard Edition. And the most expensive is the Enterprise Edition.

MySQL is comparable to the Oracle Standard Edition if we compare peer to peer. But the difference is that the Standard Edition doesn't have features like the Enterprise edition. But the high security and the high probability are not in the Standard Edition. But MySQL will have it. It will have all those kinds of features with a lower price. Because the Standard Edition is more expensive than MySQL.

Every kind of enterprise company has a core application on which their business depends. Mostly they will just choose the Oracle database. Why? Because of Oracle database's capability to handle the big workload for enterprise businesses. I think that will become their priority and MySQL will not be an option for them.

But someday I would like to see the enterprise companies changing their mindset. If you are talking about core applications related to the high workload in the future, they can choose MySQL as well. Maybe not now, because right now they still see MySQL as for small/medium business and not for the enterprise business. But I hope in the future MySQL can be seen as on the same level for their database.

That will mean that all enterprise companies can have two options when they are choosing a database solution for their core application; either Oracle database or MySQL.

For how long have I used the solution?

I'm a reseller of MySQL. I've been selling this product for one or two years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In terms of stability I think MySQL is categorized as a stable product. We have customers who are using MySQL as its database as an online application and it's like an online store. So it means that the work is quite heavy but we are using MySQL for it. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In terms of scalability, because the application is online, MySQL grows when their business grows and expands with the system. They may need to add more servers, but when they add more servers it means MySQL also expands.

MySQL has that kind of capability - when the servers grow they have some kind of clustering method or clustering concept, which makes it scalable onto several servers. So it will follow the growth of the servers to cover the business.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have been handling Oracle products for more than 10 years so I know about their kind of technical support characteristics.

For MySQL, when the customer has a problem they get their support from the Oracle portal. That means, the manual of support is online and the customer needs to register on the portal and if they have some issue or some problem using the product they need to create a ticket, and escalate or submit the ticket to the portal. Later on, they will get support from Oracle support which is worldwide.

They have their own SLA for giving support because they apply a severity level depending on how you categorize the error.

The highest severity is severity one. I think there are three or four levels. When the problem is not income to the business, you can categorize as a level three, it's a normal error. But if the error or the condition is impacting the business you can assume that is a severe one. So if you create a ticket and mark it as severe one then Oracle will directly contact Oracle support. They will contact you to help you to solve the problem within five minutes.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is categorized as a simple and user-friendly installation. It is not complex.

I have experience installing Oracle, and if you just do the default install without too many customization, you can finish it in about one or two hours. For MySQL I think it is one hour to complete the installation.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

In terms of license cost, I think the one that we are selling for MySQL is not a perpetual license like we are selling for the Oracle database.

The Oracle database license we are selling is on a perpetual basis. MySQL has that too, but for MySQL we are selling only the support.

That means that the subscription we are selling for one year consists of software support for MySQL.

That's the difference between Oracle and MySQL.

What other advice do I have?

My message to our customers out there is that you want to get a good product. A good product in terms of the cost and an effective solution. But you also need some guarantee that this product will be supported by the principle.

Because there are so many cheaper products out there but they don't have principles to support the product. They rely on the community for the troubleshooting.

So I recommend to the customers to try this product. MySQL comes from open-source so it means it's a cost-effective solution. But the important thing is this product has its own principle that is supporting this product. It means you don't have to worry as long as you have a bit of a principle behind you to cover and support you. So you can use this product with less worry because you have a principle behind you. That is my message to the customers.

On a scale of one to ten, I would give MySQL an eight.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Reseller
PeerSpot user
Computer & Information Systems Manager at a real estate/law firm with 51-200 employees
Real User
Provides a simplistic view for building custom queries and has less performance overhead
Pros and Cons
  • "I like the simplistic view of MySQL to build custom queries and things like that as compared to SQL Server, which seems more cluttered. SQL Server has a query analyzer. MySQL pretty much does the same, and performance-wise, it has less overhead for connecting to our ERP system. It seems more responsive and cleaner. With MySQL, you get what you need without any overbloating, for which Microsoft is known. That's why they have so many constant security patches for everything because there is so much stuff, which degrades performance."
  • "The GUI interface probably can be improved. Let us say I want to see the relationships in the database. In the query analyzer, I would like to go and drop the tables and create relationships between the tables. I haven't found a feature like that in MySQL. It was a shortcoming even in SQL Server. MySQL can have more performance monitoring tools. I know Google has these tools, but within MySQL, there are not that many tools to monitor things like performance and database locking. They might be in there, and I might not be familiar enough to know where they are. I am a pretty new user of MySQL."

What is most valuable?

I like the simplistic view of MySQL to build custom queries and things like that as compared to SQL Server, which seems more cluttered.

SQL Server has a query analyzer. MySQL pretty much does the same, and performance-wise, it has less overhead for connecting to our ERP system. It seems more responsive and cleaner. With MySQL, you get what you need without any overbloating, for which Microsoft is known. That's why they have so many constant security patches for everything because there is so much stuff, which degrades performance.

What needs improvement?

The GUI interface probably can be improved. Let us say I want to see the relationships in the database. In the query analyzer, I would like to go and drop the tables and create relationships between the tables. I haven't found a feature like that in MySQL. It was a shortcoming even in SQL Server.

MySQL can have more performance monitoring tools. I know Google has these tools, but within MySQL, there are not that many tools to monitor things like performance and database locking. They might be in there, and I might not be familiar enough to know where they are. I am a pretty new user of MySQL.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for three months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has very good stability. We haven't had any issues with it.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It has good scalability. You can use the Google interface to build it on the cloud. If you start noticing performance issues or you see it taking up memory or resources, you can add another processor. It is pretty easy to do. Right now, we are in beta. We haven't rolled it out completely to the people.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't had to use their technical support. They have plenty of online resources. If you have any problem, you can just search for it and find the answer. Somewhere, someone has done it before.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

The ERP company that we work with is moving away from SQL to MySQL. From my understanding, it is because of the cost. MySQL is also more streamlined and gives them what they need. 

Even though I am a SQL Server person, MySQL has come a long way from what it used to be. They have made great strides. It seems like Google is moving more and more to it. In Google Data Studio, which gives you an interface to build dashboards, when you try and connect to new resources, you will notice they prefer MySQL on the cloud or a private server. Google is leaning more towards the MySQL side of things, and they make it very easy. It is a lot more work trying to connect to SQL Server. MySQL seems to be the preferred cloud database that people are going for.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. MYSQL installation has fewer options than a SQL Server installation, which has endless options. MySQL installation is more straightforward and streamlined. It doesn't have a lot of extra features. It is just a database. It is a database engine that gives you what you need, and I like it.

I am doing one installation right now on Google Cloud. I am building an instance of MySQL. It is just more simplistic. It is more to the point and what you need. In SQL Server, you need to dive into the endless options, and you use maybe 60% of what is there. There is a lot of stuff that people don't use, which you end up uninstalling because it affects the server performance, and it is a service that you are not even using. There is a full install as well as a custom install with SQL Server. If you go for the full install, it throws everything into the server, and you start noticing performance issues. Then you realize that there are services that you are not even using. Some places don't even use analytics or reporting services.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Microsoft licensing for SQL Server is probably ten times more expensive. I used to work for the government, and I remember when we were looking into upgrading to the enterprise version of SQL Server 2019, the licensing was going to cost 350,000. To get the equivalent in the cloud, it was going to be about four grand to get the same processing power and everything else. With MySQL, it was going to be about 300 for the same licensing. 

Cost-wise, for sure, there is a huge difference. Would you prefer to pay 300 a month or 3,000 to have the same amount of data resources? You might lose a few options that you need, but it isn't worth the price difference.

What other advice do I have?

If you want just a database for data storage, I would recommend MySQL. If you want something that has everything in it, such as reporting services and analytics, SQL Server might be better. Cost-wise, MySQL is almost pricing itself out.

I would rate MySQL an eight out of ten for ease of use, especially for someone who has never used it and implemented it. It was pretty straightforward to implement it. It gives you what you need. It surely provides the basics such as data storage, setting up the tables, etc.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
LeonMofor - PeerSpot reviewer
Ingénieur Etude et Développement / Technical Lead Java at ATOS
MSP
Open-source, easy to install, and has good documentation, but scaling it can be difficult
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable features are that it's free and the documentation is good."
  • "In the next release, I would like to see the scalability features improved to allow you to configure it and reduce the complexity with the configuration, making it easier for the end-user to scale. Make it as simple as it can be."

What is our primary use case?

MYSQL is our main database. We use it for every project.

I use it for storage procedures, SQL administration, and database administration.

We also use it for the development of reports, and projects that are deployed for our customers. It is also used to develop applications.

The majority of companies use it for their development projects.

How has it helped my organization?

It's free. I'm in a big organization, with more than 100,000 employees. If you have to buy a database management system for every project, it would be very expensive. 

Considering the cost-free option, you can use it for POCs,(proof of concept projects), and you can deploy it for customers to reduce project costs. The principal reason is that it is cheap.

What is most valuable?


Mysql is free : it's an open source project, so you can use it with no cost.

Mysql is well documented, and has a big community.

MySQL adheres to the current SQL standard, although with significant restrictions and a large number of extensions. Through the configuration setting sql-mode you can make the MySQL server behave for the most part compatibly with others like IBM DB/2 and Oracle.

There are a number of convenient user interfaces for administering a MySQL server.

MySQL has supported the storing and processing of two-dimensional geographical data. Thus MySQL is well suited for geographic information systems applications.

MySQL supports the ODBC interface.


For client programming you can use, among others, the languages C#, C, C++, Java, Perl, PHP and Python.



What needs improvement?

I would like to see a feature added to be able to handle high availability, which would allow us to scale the database or the system on many platforms.

Scalability has to be improved, as you have only one instance of the application, or two, or more instances at max that are connected on one instance of MySQL.

In the next release, I would like to see the scalability features improved to allow you to configure it and reduce the complexity with the configuration, making it easier for the end-user to scale. Make it as simple as it can be.

Add the possibility to define custom data types 

Add OLAP and backup capabilities

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for more than five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is stable, and in fact, it's more stable than PostgreSQL. Also, recovery is faster.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability is difficult. You can scale it horizontally, but once you have many instances, it is difficult.

You can improve the server, resources that are available, and the processor is good but if you want to scale it on many instances than it is a bit complex.

We use it for customers. We have 10 instances of MySQL independently, on the project we are currently working with.

How are customer service and technical support?

It's an open-source solution. There is documentation available on the internet, that provides enough to resolve issues quickly.

How was the initial setup?

If you are a technician with practice, there is no issue, it's easy to handle. The documentation is available on the internet. You have everything you need quickly if you are autonomous.

It's easy, you just download it, install it and click next until it's complete.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It's an open-source database management system that can be used free of charge.

What other advice do I have?

I am not using the user interface because I'm a developer. Generally, I just try to find how to use the command-line interface to access what I want for the system.

Oracle is still the best, but it's too expensive.

Before purchasing this solution, know the needs of your environment and be sure that you don't have to scale it. If you want to scale it you will require more knowledge on the product and you will need more support for it.

If you have a little project with a thousand users connected to the instances, it will be able to be scaled. But if you are looking to be able to handle large volumes this is not a good solution for your needs.

If am comparing MySQL with other free solutions then I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Google
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
EUC Techical Operation at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Stable, easy to install, and comes with community support

What is most valuable?

I like MySQL because of its community.

What needs improvement?

MySQL doesn't have the auto-clustering and database clustering features that other competitors provide. They can include these features.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for about two years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is really easy to scale. We have around 20 to 40 users who use it regularly.

How are customer service and technical support?

I never interacted with their technical support. If there is any problem in my project, I just look for it on Stack Overflow and fix it easily. It also comes with good documentation.

How was the initial setup?

It is easy to install. The deployment duration depends upon your internet connection. If you have a good internet connection, the deployment would be faster.

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend this product if someone is new to the IT world.

I would rate MySQL an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Haitham Elwany - PeerSpot reviewer
IT Infrastructure & Data Platform Sr. Manager at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Lightweight with good performance, but deployment with clustering needs to be simplified
Pros and Cons
  • "This is a lightweight product that is not demanding on the resources, which is what I think gives it the edge."
  • "The product is a little bit complex and it is difficult to find sufficient documentation."

What is our primary use case?

I am a senior manager of the infrastructure team and MySQL is one of the products that I work with. We use it in an e-commerce portal. The database is light and everything works smoothly.

What is most valuable?

The performance is great.

This is a lightweight product that is not demanding on the resources, which is what I think gives it the edge.

What needs improvement?

We faced some details in clustering, although this may have been because we did not have enough knowledge about MySQL clustering. In general, an easier implementation for clustering would be an improvement.

The product is a little bit complex and it is difficult to find sufficient documentation.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using MySQL for approximately six months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We have not had any problems with stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

MySQL is easy to scale.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have dealt with Oracle support regarding other products such as Oracle Database and Oracle WebLogic. I believe that it will be of the same standard, although I'm not sure.

I am not a technical person but my understanding is that they are competent.

My complaint about them is that when we have a problem, we have to explain the same thing many different times to different engineers. Every time we engage with a new engineer, we have to start all over again. This is a nightmare that we chased three months ago.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

In addition to MySQL, we use Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server.

Oracle is an enterprise-level product but it is very straightforward to install and it has sufficient documentation and guides, which we did not easily find for MySQL.

How was the initial setup?

Implementing clustering depends on a few different layers or different components. The clustering layer handles requests from the applications, and it is all a bit more complex than Microsoft SQL Server or Oracle.

The design, review, and deployment took approximately one week.

What other advice do I have?

At the moment, because of the issue that we are having with the clustering, I may not recommend MySQL. It would first need to have the clustering problem fixed and then have a sufficient deployment guide. 

I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Information Technology Infrastructure Manager at a comms service provider with 201-500 employees
Real User
Feature-rich, cost-effective, and allows us to implement clustered solutions
Pros and Cons
  • "MySQL gives us all of the critical features that we need in a database, but without the costs."
  • "I would like to have features that allow us to jump between the cloud and our on-premises system."

What is most valuable?

MySQL gives us all of the critical features that we need in a database, but without the costs.

The most valuable feature is that we can implement clustered solutions.

What needs improvement?

I would like to have features that allow us to jump between the cloud and our on-premises system.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for about 20 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

MySQL is a very stable product.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I know that it is scalable, and in fact, that is why we chose it. We always have it in mind that in some number of years, you have to scale the solution to something different in terms of architecture.

As it is now, our databases are not big. They are critical, but not large in size. We are not dealing with Big Data.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have never contacted Oracle for MySQL support.

The documentation that is available is enough for my needs.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

This was the first database solution that we used. I have used other database products such as Oracle, for example. Oracle comes at a heavy cost.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

This is an open-source product that can be used free of charge.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

This is the product that was proposed to us and we implemented it.

What other advice do I have?

MySQL is a product that I can strongly recommend. However, it is important for you to have the in-house knowledge to support it. Some level of in-house expertise is necessary, otherwise, you will have to rely only on external opinions. In my opinion, that's not good. Sometimes they have good intentions but don't understand the reality.

I cannot give MySQL a perfect rating because we don't use all of the features. That said, I can tell you that I am totally satisfied with it. It's a very stable product and it's something that is not difficult to deal with.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Deputy Manager at a university with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
A good tool for learning about networked databases
Pros and Cons
  • "This product is a good teaching tool for students who want to learn about networked databases."
  • "The documentation is pretty weak and should be improved."

What is our primary use case?

I use MySQL to teach students about databases. They implement projects using this product.

How has it helped my organization?

MySQL is lacking some of the features that you find in a commercial product, but it is sufficient for basic functions.

What is most valuable?

This product is a good teaching tool for students who want to learn about networked databases.

What needs improvement?

The documentation is pretty weak and should be improved.

The GUI for PHP MySQL Admin can be improved because it is not very flexible and sometimes difficult to use.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for more than five years.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have experience with other full-scale databases, such as PostgreSQL. For use cases where I need full functionality, I would use another product.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I am using the Community Edition, which is available free of charge.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Patryk Golabek - PeerSpot reviewer
CTO at Translucent Computing Inc
Real User
Top 5
Good beginner base but it should have better support for backups
Pros and Cons
  • "This specific version of this MySQL has been battle tested for a long time. Any issues are known issues and we pretty much don't have any problems when they're in production. So it's very stable."
  • "In terms of what I'd like to see in the next release, one thing that's always missing is dash boarding. There's no real BI tool for MySQL, like there is in Yellowfin and all the different tools that you get. They all have MySQL connectors, but there's no specific BI tool for MySQL. These open source projects have sprung up, but they're more general purpose."

What is our primary use case?

We use multiple models here because we do full development. What we deploy on MySQL is from the Helm chart or it's a Dockerized deployment of MySQL. So we're using the Helm stable chart right now. That's sort of the easiest way to deploy it - to say just one command and it bootstraps your whole database within your classical means or cluster. You can do it locally with mini-crews or developers, for organizational use, or Kubernetes. It's single-node Kubernetes.

Also, you can just deploy MySQL locally with a Helm chart. Regarding production, we have a kind of automated process which is similar to what Spinnaker deploys, with a Helm chart as well as within the cluster. Some other solutions we don't run within the cluster, we use the Cloud version of the database which is Cloud SQL, Google Cloud, and AWS. Those are fully managed ones, of which there are two versions. We have our self-managed version which we run locally and with our DEV cluster and then there is production, as well.

We also use a self-managed version since every cloud provider offers MySQL, even AWS. It depends on the client's needs, how flexible the client is, and also how comfortable they are with MySQL.

We either go with our managed version or the Cloud version. Both are supported because today the Mica server that's actually accessing the database or the piece of software just needs a connection string, it doesn't care if it's running within the Synchronous Cloud. If it's running somewhere else in the Cloud, it's still a private connection on the same network.

So the only differences here are in terms of money costs and whether it's managed or not managed. So for local development, you don't want to have a managed database in the Cloud. You don't need to be tethered to the Cloud, you'd rather just deploy locally. And because we have the same deployment scripts that run locally in DEV and testing, we use the same Helm chart and the same Docker version with MySQL to distribute that through our DEV environment to test the bills and run the test and there is a full QA environment for teaching, as well.

What is most valuable?

I treat these products kind of as a throwaway versus what a DBA would be. From an organizational point of view, it's difficult to actually define the most valuable features because we have so many different databases. For some of them, Postgres for example, which uses MySQL, is just personal preference with is no real difference. Unless you get to really high volumes or through-putting. So in our case, because of legacy reasons, we started using MySQL, which was a popular database. It's not a bad database, so there was no reason for us to change it to the Postgres. We do use Postgres right now for other tools, but for a main database for application purposes, we still stick to MySQL. And I think it's just because of legacy, there's no real advantage of one over the other right now.

We built up the scripts already. Because once you start integrating the scripts into your company, your deployment scripts, test scripts, etc. you just leave it over time because it takes effort to change. But in terms of advantages or features, you can go feature by feature with any database and if you add up the totals, there's no real advantage here between Postgres or MySQL.

What needs improvement?

As for what can be improved, right now we don't use the MySQL cluster. There is a MySQL cluster that you can run in a standalone mode, like a single database or you can do it in a cluster master-slave implementation. The cluster is not the best when it comes to MySQL. That's why we switched to MariaDB. For that simple reason that the cluster there is better. It's more manageable and it's easier to work with.

We decide what to use depending on the needs. For example, if we need to mount something in a cluster mode, we use MariaDB, which again, is a Dockerized solution with a Helm chart as well, and it's very easy for us to deploy and manage, and also to scale when you just increase the number of slave versions. So MySQL doesn't have that great support when it comes to clusters. You can definitely use MySQL for that too, both support clustering, but the MariaDB is better.

Additional features that I would like to see included in the next release of this solution include better support for backups. Because if you go with the MySQL Percona version, it gives you the tools to back it up securely. The vanilla version of MySQL doesn't have that. It actually does have it, but it is just really poorly executed. I would improve the backup system as well as the encryption. To make it smoother right now takes too much work. It should be a little bit smoother to backup the encrypted data the way you want it and have the ability to push it anywhere you want. That is not part of it right now.

Now it is a database, so you don't know what you're going to do with it. It's difficult. You're just going to come up with solutions. But I think you can generalize here and come up with really simple solutions, which we have already in MySQL. That's probably the one thing that I would try and push right now for people to switch. But people are still not biting, because if you go with the managed version, then all the backups are taken care of for you by Amazon or Google or Microsoft. Then you really don't care. But for us, since we're doing it locally, self-hosted, we would like to have better tools for locking up the data.

Right now, one aspect that is also linked to backups is running things in a crosscheck with semi-managed solutions. This requires a bit of a context. Since we're running things within the clustered communities, we're kind of pushing the Cloud into the cluster. We also want to push some of the tools for the database into a cluster, as well. So these are what we call Kubernetes operators. And there's MySQL operators that were first developed by the community. Those kind give you the ability to backup data within the cluster. So now you have a fully managed solution running from your cluster. These are called MySQL Kubernetes operators.

We are looking into those right now to upgrade our solution, which would mean that we can just execute our backup natively within Kubernetes, not via special scripts. This would make it much easier to actually deal with any kind of MySQL issues within the cluster, because it would be cluster-native. That's what the operators are for.

I think Oracle just created a really good one. It surprised me that they have this. It's not because of Oracle, but they got pushed by the community and actually created the MySQL Operator for Kubernetes, and that's what we're moving towards.

This is going to give you an ability to have a cloud-managed solution within the cluster. And then you can ask the MySQL Operator for the database. They'll partition the database and give it to you. So it will change the nature from you deploying it to you just asking the cluster to give you a database. It's a fully managed solution right from the cluster.

So that's what we're heavily looking into right now. We'll be switching to using Kubernetes MySQL Operators. It's a high-availability cluster running within the Kubernetes cluster.

Right now we're pretty good with that. It's working fine. We're trying to find some time to actually release that globally everywhere. That's where I am right now.

But in terms of technology, if you give up Oracle, you just go to a MySQL operator. That's the one we're using, what we're actually looking at - to create, operate and scale mySQL and sell it within the cluster. This idea of having a cognitive MySQL becomes much easier to manage within the cluster, as well. So you don't have to go with the cloud solution with AWS or Google cloud or Amazon MySQL or the Microsoft version.

The Oracle SuperCluster is the Oracle MySQL operator. That's what we we are looking into a lot right now. Mainly because it does backups on demand - it's so easy to backup. You can just tell Kubernetes to backup and you don't have to run special scripts or special extra software or codes to back it up. You can make the backup as you would do anything else. Send a backup or some other data source or insert an Elasticsearch into it here. Just say "Kubernetes, back it up" and you know Oracle has this adapters within the cluster to back it up for you taking increments or different companies. So that makes it really nice and easy to use and to deploy.

With that kind of solution you can ask to class or petition the database how you want. So again, it changed the nature of the kind of push-to-pull second nature system. Are you pushing your containers to a cluster? You just say cluster, "give me a database" and the class gives you the base partition database, creates a database in a secure manner, gives the connection to the database, and you're done. Then you can back it up on a schedule on to any backup switches. It's much easier. So once this goes, it is going to be widely adopted, which it should be. But I think people might not have the tech skills right now. But once it's adaptive, maybe in a few more months, it's going to be the number one solution for everybody.

In terms of what I'd like to see in the next release, one thing that's always missing is dash boarding. There's no real BI tool for MySQL, like there is in Yellowfin and all the different tools that you get. They all have MySQL connectors, but there's no specific BI tool for MySQL. Open source projects have sprung up, but they're more general purpose, like Postgress, a MySQL kind of database, a relational database. I don't see any really nice tool like Cabana for elastic searches that I can tell clients to use because it would be too technical for them. They would have to have more technical engagement with writing the course, drag and drop, and creating a graph like in Power BI where you just connect with DIA.

So I'd like to see the grab and drag and drop tables, nice beautiful graphics, and pie charts. You don't necessarily have that with MySQL like you have other solutions, which are really cost prohibitive for some clients. It'd be nice to have an open source solution for that. Decent solutions. I mean decent that I can take to clients. It's so technical. They want to drag and drop.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL now for five or six years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This specific version of this MySQL has been battle tested for a long time. Any issues are known issues and we pretty much don't have any problems when they're in production. So it's very stable. When we picked simple switch demand, again, these things came up. But it was quickly resolved. So I guess that's the benefit of going with open source and seeing all those problems ahead of time in source code and having the ability to fix them.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Since we have MySQL specifically, and we have to use it in many different environments, dev, testing, and production. All those different people are using it. Developers, QAs, automated testings running against that. In production we have many different users, so we have different meaningful products that are already running. For example, gotoloans.com. It's a loan application site in Canada that is serving a lot of users daily and is backed by MySQL and Elastic SQL databases. So we're using it for high volume and low volume. We have it in many different projects and many different environments.

We use it in different environments, the production also, and many different products as well.

We do have plans to run everything as a cluster, and probably will slowly switch to MetaDB. That is something we're doing right now. We also have plans to switch it to the managed version as well for production deployments, for the simple reason that we're trying to offload as much as we can from the DevOps people. So if offloading that management database from them will help them, then we'll do it.

Also, there are clients that have preferences when it comes to where the database should be running. For example, one of our major clients wants to run specifically in our database because we built it for them and they're comfortable managing it. You're always more comfortable having a managed version. So if you have a small team with a managed DBA, even though it's more expensive and there's always some issues coming up with it, you can just let Amazon manage it for you, and you don't even have to think about it. You could do the backups and if something happens, they can restore it. And you can scale as much as you want, as well.

In terms of cost, there are different flavors of it. It depends on the solution. Locally, as I said, MySQL is going to stay the way it is right now. We're not going to have a cluster version, because for development we just need a database. You need to have a scalable database or clustered.

So MySQL is going to change. We're in the process of transitioning the production versions to cluster versions for some of the projects because they have more volume. We can see that because of the volume of users, and how many queries they do on a daily basis, they would benefit from having a cluster versus a SQL database. So you can have a master to master cluster, which you can have separately. You can actually manage your read and write separately, and then optimize. So you can give more power to people, to certain queries, spreading across the cluster. So all those sorts of things come with the cluster database. That's going to improve performance.

One of the things that we're doing is looking at the short version of MySQL, which is a new thing. This means a shared database. Elasticsearch is made up of shards. This is a different way of thinking about relational databases like MySQL. Traditionally, MySQL or relational databases, have been crafted by having an instance of equal slave to equal master. You have many slaves and many masters, as well. Now the sharding makes the database a little bit different, and it's more usable for us in terms of the way we deploy things. So we're looking right now at MySQL sharding as well, and a few of the different flavors of that so that we can scale it horizontally. Instead of actually creating an instance of MySQL, we can actually spread across multiple different shards across many instances.

And it's also cheaper as well. Once you start getting into the shard world, it's really cheaper to deal with some of these issues, like clustering issues. So it's more cost-effective.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have not been in touch with support because any issues that came up, we really just resolve them because it's open-source, so if you look at the code, then you can solve it. There's also lots of community engagement in these databases. There are millions and millions of forums online. So if there's a problem, everybody will be on it trying to fix it. So there are no real major issues here.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is straightforward because we're using Docker. So we Dockerize not only our database but the applications, as well, because it's really easy to play as a Docker container, and then tour them to the Kubernetes cluster. It's very easy for us to manage it. And also, we have backups on top of that. So we have a schedule, and a job running, always backing up the system with secure backups. So it's actually very straightforward to get it up and running.

Deployment takes seconds. That's why we can include some of the companies, because we figure a way to do it simply, and you don't have to deal with all the complicated SQL servers, and you can bend a lot into Microsoft.

So for us, deployment is trivial, especially when you use the cloud version. For example, for our database, or cloud SQL, again that's trivial, just a simple deployment. You're up and running within less than a minute, five minutes maximum. Locally, people just deploy those databases every day when they build stuff. Again it takes a few seconds to get that going.

What was our ROI?

Since we’re running it ourselves, it's our own flavor of MySQL, for dev, and QA, staging, production environments, that cost is basically a part of their running between this cluster. So I can't give you a fixed cost, but I can give you the cost of the entire cluster. There are many nodes in a cluster, and there's many different parts continuously running it. So to fully utilize the cluster, we put everything in it and just try to maximum each node.

So you can have a MySQL database beside a Java Microservice and Angular applications on the same node, and using the same kind of resources. So it would be difficult for me to kind of break it down. Obviously I'll do a deep dive, and I'll look at it, in terms of, what percentage of the CPU is being used by MySQL.

Now when it comes to the Cloud versions, obviously there's a fixed cost with that. So for example, one of the clients uses our database, they chose to go with the extra large version of the ECQ's, and there's a price for that. And you can just get a price quickly, and there's a whole chart of pricing there.

So that's based on clients and their comfort level. We can tell them exactly what performance we're requiring here, and then say, what is the minimal thing we need here, in terms of CPU resources and connections? So that's what you really need for just a cloud version of it. Once we define that, then we tell the client, this is what you really need. You can get away with a smaller version of the virtual machine by using something bigger. To be comfortable they decide to do it. So I'm dealing with the pricing, and the pricing is transparent.

I have all the separate pricing for the databases as well. And from that, you can figure out what the cost is.

There's no licensing fees here because it's open source. So the only fees are really just for using the Cloud resources, even if you go with managed or non-managed, you're still using the Cloud resources. You can be more frugal if you're running it yourself, versus what Google or Amazon will do for you. It'll be a little more pricey to go with them, but because it's a  managed solution, you do have that peace of mind, because they're managing it for you. You just connect with it and just talk with it.

But in our cases, we deploy it, we manage it, we back it up, we do all that stuff. So there's more work that we have to do, but a lot of time we eat up the cost because it's not an expensive thing to do. So it can be more cost effective running within the Coud, than in a non-managed version, self-hosted version. 

At the end of the day, Google and Amazon are still making money, because it doesn't matter if you're running it yourself or it's managed, it's still using the Cloud. It's the same CPU and same RAM. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

So we jumped from version 5.6 to 5.7. That's not the latest version. The latest version is 5.8. We didn't move to eight for the simple reason that there's lots of code-based on 5.7 and there's no incentive for us to change right now. So a lot in the industry have not migrated to version eight yet. Oracle is having difficulty committing people to actually go with that version right now.

MySQL has been battle-tested for years and years. So people were comfortable from 5.6 to 5.7. It wasn't just a minor change, it was actually a major change in terms of the databases. Now, once Oracle started managing MySQL, they didn't do a good enough job. That's when MariaDB was invented when they jumped from version five to eight.

There wasn't enough confidence in that. Because there's so much time invested in it. Because MySQL is not just MySQL, they give it in a cluster mode, when you have huge databases with lots of master-slave nodes. So it's just not a trigger for a DBA to move to a new version that hasn't been battle-tested like their 5.7.

So 5.7 is a good database. That's 1418 right now or something like that. I think that's the one we use in production. So for most DBAs it's difficult for them to change. Also with Google and Amazon, you can choose not to go back for 5.7. It is very easy to create a fully scalable solution with 5.7. So, there's no incentive for people to actually switch.

What other advice do I have?

The biggest lesson I would tell others is regarding the backups. Once you start doing it yourself, backing up becomes a thing. When we sign up the clients, we'll give them a set amount of backups daily and we always give them a little verbiage about how much data can be lost if the thing goes down.

Or for example, if you get hit somewhere, what is the last backup you did? How much are you willing to lose? Backups can become quite complicated, and that's something that you have to manage yourself. We have to come up with clever solutions to do runs within our Dockerized environments in production, which you usually don't get from the community. So we have to do it ourselves.

That became a thing quickly once we started going. But that was years ago. We resolved these issues on the way and we are still making them better over time - how we back up the data, the business, the compliance, where did the issue live, who should have access to that? All that stuff.

So backups are usually the thing that people don't think about. And that can bite you in the ass kind of quickly.

On a scale of one to ten, I'd probably give MySQL a seven. There's definitely room for improvement here in terms of tools that come with the product, the way we deploy it, and the way we back it up. In essence, it's a good beginner base. It's just, the tooling around the database needs a little bit more work. You just need to be fair because it is a good database. It's also an open-source database. You know you can get commercial products that Percona for a commercial version of MySQL or Aurora database MySQL. So if you go with that, then you would probably give a much higher score because you really don't see it at all. It's just close your eyes and click a button and it's there. You don't have to touch it at all.

For us, since we deal with it every day and try to compete with the companies, the small DevOps team tries to be as efficient as they can, and sometimes you have to build too many things around the solution.

The commercial products only have that because they put 20 to 30 people on JSON and they can give it to you faster. That's what Google can do because they're good at the tooling around the database. In the current requests of the work, MySQL Workbench is the default tool to interact with the database. Again, MySQL Workbench is an open-source tool that it gets directly from Oracle. It's okay. It's not the greatest. It gets the job done. It's not a finesse tool. It just gets the job done.

If you hide it behind a main service and you don't see it, it's great. You're good to go.  People talk about Amazon RDS and how great it is. But that's a managed product. If you peel the layers and look at the SQL in there, they put a lot of work around that. It's fully scalable. The money used and the way they restructured that SQL database to actually give you that performance took a lot of work for the AWS people. So they're not going to share that IP with you. And they're definitely not going to release it because other people can pick it up, like Google. Then Google has Cloud SQL, as well. So they also have a MySQL version in there and they don't show you how the backup is, or how they actually manage it or scale it. You don't get that information.

So that's the trade-off between managed and non-managed or self-hosting. It's always that kind of battle, that fight. It depends on the money, depends on the client. If it's for a healthcare issue or one of the hospitals, you just have to decide what they want, what's the best for them and how they're going to be protected. So there are many variables that come into play. It depends on your use case. In general, it’s a good database, I have no problem with it.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
CEO at a computer software company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Offers valuable security features and has good connectors and backup features
Pros and Cons
  • "Apart from the features that are in the enterprise part, we find the database to be valuable. The connectors and the backup features are valuable as well. We use the basic database. We don't really use the extra features. Our clients like the security features in the database."
  • "Oracle should start putting in some of the enterprise features in the standard feature. There are some key features that should be part of the standard."

What is our primary use case?

The main reason that customers pick MySQL is that it's cost-efficient.

What is most valuable?

Apart from the features that are in the enterprise part, we find the database to be
valuable. The connectors and the backup features are valuable as well. We use the
basic database. We don't really use the extra features. Our clients like the security
features in the database.

What needs improvement?

We would like to see more security.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for three years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

My customers haven't mentioned having any problems with stability. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability is good enough.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't contacted Oracle in regards to MySQL but I have contacted Oracle support for other things. They're okay but from my end, the problem is that they're not proactive. From one to five, I would rate them a four. 

There's a lot of documentation on the Oracle support portal even though you must be contracted customer. There is also a lot of support information on the community portals and google search in general. This is the reason we picked MySQL from the rest.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup isn't so complex. You have to get a lot of support from the
community. From my end, it's not so complex. You should consult with the
community.

What other advice do I have?

My experience has been open-source. Oracle should start putting in some of the enterprise features in the standard version. There are some key features that should be part of the standard. Things like replication should be part of the standard version as opposed to it being in the enterprise version.

I would rate them an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
PeerSpot user
Business Intelligence Manager at a translation and localization position with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Enables us to query and analyze data types and data structures within the database itself but the UI should be improved
Pros and Cons
  • "The initial setup was pretty straightforward. I would have worked with our IT team in terms of the initial setup."
  • "I find the Microsoft solution a bit better. But mostly in terms of the UI layout, I would say. I just find it a little bit more efficient."

What is our primary use case?

I'm not involved from the database side as much. I primarily use it for reviewing the data structure as the architecture before I build a data model in our BI tools.

General querying is pretty much what I do, and also analyzing data types and data structures within the database itself. I review the data structure within them. And I use that to build the data model, which we have in our reporting environment. That's primarily all I use it for.

What needs improvement?

What it would compare it to, from my point of view would be, Microsoft SQL Studio. I find the Microsoft solution a bit better. But mostly in terms of the UI layout, I would say. I just find it a little bit more efficient. But to be honest, I can work equally as well with both.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been working with MySQL for two and a half years. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We haven't experienced any issues with scalability.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't directly contacted their technical support. 

I haven't gotten feedback from the IT team.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was pretty straightforward. I would have worked with our IT team in terms of the initial setup. In terms of connecting to the database and to the data sources, it is pretty straightforward.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate MySQL a seven out of ten. 

To make it a perfect ten, they should improve the UI. It's got quite a narrow range, and there's a lot more obvious to the database side than what I deal with. The UI is not quite as sharp I would say as the Microsoft solution. In some cases, I find that there are better shortcuts available in Microsoft solutions.

If I was choosing, I would probably lean towards Microsoft. That may be just a purely personal preference. My use of MySQL has primarily been from a data integration point of view, a data architecture point of view, and reviewing the database itself, and the data structure, data types. In my role, I don't define data and I don't build the database, I'm purely on the interrogation and the analytics side. I probably would find the Microsoft solution slightly better. But MySQL does absolutely provide what I require from that point of view. So I would recommend it, yes.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user1282806 - PeerSpot reviewer
Infrastructure Platform Engineer at a cloud provider with 51-200 employees
Real User
Free to use, stable and scalable
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution is free to use, which is its most valuable aspect."
  • "From a user perspective, the initial setup could be simplified a bit."

What is our primary use case?

We are an IT services provider, so the solution is for our customers. I can't answer for the customers in terms of how they use it. 

Typically, customers are running applications that need to connect MySQL and to store some of the data.

What is most valuable?

The solution is free to use, which is its most valuable aspect.

The interface is quite good.

The stability and scalability are very good.

Overall, it's an excellent solution. We don't have to implement anything else.

What needs improvement?

We haven't noticed and features that are lacking.

From a user perspective, the initial setup could be simplified a bit.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution since 2000. It's been about 20 years now since I first was introduced to MySQL.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is good. Neither we or our clients have had to deal with bugs, glitches or crashes. Everyone's been satisfied with it. Stability is one of its best features.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability of the solution is good. We haven't had trouble scaling at all.

How are customer service and technical support?

We're using the community version of the solution. I don't have any complaint with the level of support, however, it is online and there isn't a support line.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup isn't always straightforward. Sometimes it is complex. For example, if you are doing a database expansion. For database expansion, you have to configure it and you have to know SQL quite well. You have to juggle a few things, which makes it complicated. However, from an IT perspective, it's a good tool, so it's worth the effort.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution doesn't cost anything to use. It's absolutely free.

What other advice do I have?

We are IT services provider, and provide this solution to our customers. It's typically installed on a dedicated server.

When we are working with it, we are doing SQL queries, and on top of that, we are using MySQL to do some reporting as well. It does what we want it to do and our clients are also happy with the results they get. It's a fine solution.

I'd advise those considering working with the solution to be patient.

We don't have any partnership MySQL. We are mostly a Microsoft partner. We mainly use the solution because of the community and the SQL server that's different from Oracle's server. From time to time we have to use MySQL.

I'd rate the solution eight out of ten. From our perspective, it's free to use, it's stable and it's fast and scalable. It makes it a good option for many organizations.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
JohnMitchell - PeerSpot reviewer
Head Of Information Technology Division at a construction company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5
Easy to use with a straightforward setup but requires better replication
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution is very simple. It's easy to use. That's the most important feature."
  • "The replication needs improvement. It's becoming a native cloud product like Oracle DB or Cockroach DB."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily use the solution for the many small applications we use. However, we do not use it with our enterprise-level applications.

What is most valuable?

The solution is very simple. It's easy to use. That's the most important feature. 

We do have it supported by various programs we run with it.

What needs improvement?

The replication needs improvement. It's becoming a native cloud product like Oracle DB or Cockroach DB.

For how long have I used the solution?

We started using MySQL in various products about 10 years ago when it was still an independent community product.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution has proven to be quite stable. We haven't experienced any bugs or glitches.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

According to our experience, it's not really an enterprise tool that you can easily expand and scale the way you can with, for example, Oracle. It's good for small to medium-sized applications. It is not ideal for very big applications.

We have a data center that uses the application and it isn't very heavy on traffic. It basically runs on its own. We only use it occasionally. It's like a co-operation management system.

We do plan to increase usage, but we plan on looking at different databases. We're in the process of researching how scaling up would work. Chances are, we'll need to move to a different platform.

How are customer service and technical support?

We've never been in touch with technical support. For us, so far, things have been working perfectly so there hasn't been a need to.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

This is the first solution we've used. We don't use any other product. It's very popular with the in-house program, as we advised them to stick with this application.

How was the initial setup?

We've used the solution for ten years and the setup hasn't changed much over time. It is, more or less, simple when you compare it to other databases. 

Deployment takes less than an hour.

It only takes one person to maintain the solution. The individual doesn't have to be an engineer. They just need to be a support person.

What about the implementation team?

We don't need a consultant for the implementation. This is used by someone in our company that uses databases and has an average knowledge of the product. We don't even need a vendor. We can handle setup ourselves at this point. It's not like Oracle or other products that can be quite complicated.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We use the community edition of the solution.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We didn't evaluate anything before choosing this solution. However, there are a few new products coming up that are growing in popularity and we will need to research them. Products like the Cockroach DB, Nuo DB, etc. are on our radar to be evaluated in the future.

What other advice do I have?

The most important thing other potential users need to do is to look at the use cases for this application and to evaluate how it's able to handle heavy loads, etc. Users should evaluate how it handles high-traffic. They'll need to ask themselves: is the solution usable for my applications? 

I'd rate the solution seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Partner at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Reseller
Has the ability to run on any operating system

What is our primary use case?

We utilize the DB as a data-repository solution for our front-end applications. The solution gives us the ability to run numerous instances on various geographical cloud servers.

How has it helped my organization?

Yes, MySQL has improved numerous processes; it has given us the ability to create applications without absorbing major costs.

What is most valuable?

  • Its ease of use
  • It's secure.
  • It's fast.
  • It has high-end processing.
  • It can distribute across clouds.
  • It has the ability to run on any operating system.

What needs improvement?

  • I think a better front end would be a better solution (web application front end, similar to what Red Hat is doing to Fedora). 
  • Another nice solution for MySQL clustering would be the use of Webmin. 
  • Also, security measures could always be improved, and the clustering process could be enhanced as well. I recommend using UFW, iptables, and firewalld.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution works extremely well. It is easy to install and works on any platform. The price is good because we utilize various versions of the software/DB.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

If the user sets up DB up using MySQL Cluster (creates a grid type of design), then we find the solution from a hardware perspective using NVMe, NVMe-oF, 10GE network connections, and 32-100GB of DDR4 memory (dependent upon customer requirements). 

Scalability can be initiated using high-speed connections across IPv6 connections (IPSec AES-256 ESP/AH VPN connections without purchasing VPN concentrators — this can be done at the network layer).

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We use various versions, but most of the time this is based on the client's requirements.

How was the initial setup?

After the initial training, the installation worked pretty well. I would suggest setting it up in a lab. This gives the user room to test the installation and configuration process. It is recommended to use PhpMySQLadmin — (https://www.phpmyadmin.net) — after the installation process is completed.

What about the implementation team?

It was implemented in-house. Most of the applications are tested in our cloud and on-premise servers.

What was our ROI?

60% ROI (There are DLs — direct labor costs and overhead costs, but once it is set up, we image the configuration and deploy our designs in docker).

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I would suggest testing MariaDB before jumping in. This will give the user the ability to test the DB before using it. It is very easy to set up. MariaDB is free, and licensing is based on GNU.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

N/A.

What other advice do I have?

I would suggest running tests against MySQL, MariaDB, Oracle, PostgreSQL, and MS SQL to determine which one best suits your needs (cost, development, and integration should all play in your decision-making process).

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Manzeel Uprety - PeerSpot reviewer
Co-Founder at Mero Reading Room
Real User
It has a remote access feature to manage the database from a remote location
Pros and Cons
  • "It creates a unified view of the entire architecture and performance factor, helping to manage the network more easily."
  • "It has a remote access feature to manage the database from a remote location. This enables in-work collaboration."
  • "The only service which could be improved is its usability. The entire user experience needs to be revamped to meet the 2018 design standards."

What is our primary use case?

I used it to obtain insight into the entire network and the resources being utilized. The current GUI lets us see the traffic happening east to west and the total bandwidth consumed by it.

How has it helped my organization?

  • It provides visibility, where something was either broken or in pieces only.
  • It creates a unified view of the entire architecture and performance factor, helping to manage the network more easily.
  • It has a remote access feature to manage the database from a remote location. This enables in-work collaboration.

What is most valuable?

I have found the following features valuable:

  • NetFlow of the whole system
  • Information flow and scaling
  • Communication between multiple collaborators and stakeholders
  • Its user-friendly features.

What needs improvement?

The only service which could be improved is its usability. The entire user experience needs to be revamped to meet the 2018 design standards.

For how long have I used the solution?

Less than one year.

What other advice do I have?

The overall service is great. 

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
it_user793887 - PeerSpot reviewer
User at Micro Focus
Real User
I use the tool for various purposes but sometimes the functionality is limited and I need to use other tools instead

What is our primary use case?

I use MySQL for employee service in an OLTP database.

What is most valuable?

I use MySQL for various purposes. Sometimes I have used MyISAM as a storage engine rather than InnoDB.

What needs improvement?

When working with a cluster wide, I have to use the MySQL cluster version.

For how long have I used the solution?

One to three years.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

The 5.7 version has very better performance improvement over the previous version.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
QA Lead at a logistics company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
Allows us to share virtually created database instances
Pros and Cons
    • "I feel that some tools which make it easier to create queries or make it easier for other functions would be really interesting to see."

    What is our primary use case?

    I'm a tester, an optimization tester. It's basically when the developers have the back-end in SQL. We go and test it out for them and check that the table updated correctly, and we do something on the front-end.

    How has it helped my organization?

    To give you an example, initially we didn't have a database server as such, and we had to make use of some database. Now we use something where we can share the instances of the database which were created virtually, which is a very good feature, which I felt has improved our organization.

    What is most valuable?

    The most important features would be querying, the query language where you have the data definition or data modification language, as well. In some cases, we have to create our own tables for testing purposes. In that case, having SQL Server is much easier compared to what's available.

    What needs improvement?

    I feel that some tools which make it easier to create queries or make it easier for other functions would be really interesting to see.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Pretty much since we have our own in-house SQL branch, the administrators are there, so they take care of the stability with the product. As far as I've seen, there really hasn't been much of an issue with stability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

     It's pretty scalable.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't contacted them, so I have no experience with them. We generally have an internal team which would work on it. So our point of contact is an internal team, rather than going to MySQL.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I've used a lot of different solutions. MySQL is one of the top among them. Usability and scalability are some of the reasons we went with MySQL.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was pretty straightforward. No hassles with the setup. 

    Usually the setup is done by the IT admin guys, but it was pretty straightforward. The IT admin guys had to come in and give us the rights to install it.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I'm not sure about pricing, I don't deal with the pricing. It's an organization decision.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    There were many options.

    What other advice do I have?

    No one tool fits the bill for every company. Do a feasibility study, and get to know what is can do before going in and developing.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    IT Manager
    Real User
    Performance, stability, and free version are key for us

    How has it helped my organization?

    Web portal database.

    What is most valuable?

    • Free usage
    • Performance
    • Community

    What needs improvement?

    Scaling.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There have been some problems with big table operations.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Some problems with big table operations, and a struggle to keep the servers responding in peak situations.

    How is customer service and technical support?

    I don't have enough information about it, as I normally look for community support.

    How was the initial setup?

    Straightforward, and and easy to run.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Can range from free to quite expensive, depending on the environments and requirements, so better to really set goals ahead of setting it up.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    SQL Server, Oracle XE, MariaDB.

    What other advice do I have?

    It is a stable, reliable, and powerful solution that is quite suited for small to medium organizations and/or projects.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Information Technology Technician at a tech vendor with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Since it has many integrations to web applications, it is very easy to install and deploy

    What is our primary use case?

    We use MySQL and MariaDB for most part of our mission critical applications

    This as it is so simple to integrate with web applications, and other well known applications.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Since it has many integrations to web applications, it is very easy to install and deploy open source web applications.

    What is most valuable?

    How it uses clustering.

    The API's to PHP, ruby, perl, java, python, and many more high level programming languages makes it easy for us to deploy new features fast.

    What needs improvement?

    How to scale out with shard clusters.

    The way how to handle replications needs to be improved, as we noticed that there are some performance drop of (using only one core for example)

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Yes, the binary log replication process in a cluster environment has issues processing data as fast as it arrives.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    A 10 out of 10.

    Technical Support:

    A 10 out of 10.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We have been using many different types of databases, and will most likely use this one for part of our systems, as it is has so much integration.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was easy.

    What about the implementation team?

    We implemented it in-house.

    What was our ROI?

    Free.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Be sure to take backups of the solution, as this will check that the blocks are okay.

    We decided to use "DB Protection for MySQL" as it has options to perform block level incremental forever, and integrates well with Spectrum Protect.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Yes, we checked MongoDB, PostgreSQL and MariaDB.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Haim Tzadok - PeerSpot reviewer
    Co-Founder/CEO at Grigale LTD
    Reseller
    Dramatically improved use for several of my customers, better ROI for me

    How has it helped my organization?

    It dramatically improved use for several of my customers.

    What is most valuable?

    This depends on my customers' use.

    What needs improvement?

    SQL and NoSQL use.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    When configured correctly, no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    When configured correctly, no scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Very good.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    MySQL Support Services by Percona. I switched to Oracle MySQL services because of a better ROI.

    How was the initial setup?

    There is no obvious answer. It depends.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Depends on the customer's needs. 

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    MariaDB, MySQL Support Services by Percona.

    What other advice do I have?

    Stick with the source, stick with Oracle MySQL as the leading vendor for MySQL technology.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Oracle Gold Partner and MySQL top reseller in Israel.
    PeerSpot user
    Muhammad Nurazhan Moin - PeerSpot reviewer
    Senior Web Manager at a university with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    Support for enterprise-grade features like clustering, Sharding, in an open-source solution
    Pros and Cons
    • "Support for enterprise-grade features like clustering, master-slave replication, even Sharding (to some extent) which is an advanced feature."
    • "It would be helpful if there were a graphical user interface to administer, configure, and tune it."
    • "If it had something similar to Microsoft’s DTS engine then it would be the best database system out there."

    How has it helped my organization?

    Due to the open source licensing model, it has allowed small businesses like ours to adopt enterprise-grade database systems without incurring significant licensing costs.

    What is most valuable?

    • Open-source
    • Multi-platform
    • Lightweight
    • Simple to set up, configure and tune
    • Support for enterprise-grade features like clustering, master-slave replication, even Sharding (to some extent) which is an advanced feature

    What needs improvement?

    It would be helpful if there were a graphical user interface to administer, configure, and tune it.

    If it had something similar to Microsoft’s DTS engine then it would be the best database system out there.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    For the scale at which my systems are operating, the software is stable. We are at most dealing with less than 10 million rows of data across all tables, and concurrent connections under 200 at our peak loads.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    No scalability issues at the scale at which my systems are operating. One thing I did encounter with an earlier version of MySQL 5 – the mysql process will not automatically use available CPU cores on the server, even if it was a dual or quad core CPU. I was troubleshooting a scalability issue when I saw this, it maxed out just a single core and left the other three (in my quad core CPU server) idle. There was a specific condition / trigger that will make the mysql process span the other available cores (I can’t recall now but a quick googling likely will uncover this).

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We did not subscribe to professional support from MySQL AB or Oracle. However, the wealth of community support is outstanding. Most of the issues faced could be resolved by knowledge shared by the MySQL community.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I’ve used SQL Server and Oracle for database systems. SQL Server is an excellent solution, in particular the DTS (Data Transformation System) which is not available for MySQL. Switching to MySQL for two reasons: 1) licensing costs 2) the application supports MySQL primarily, and has poor support for SQL Server.

    How was the initial setup?

    Very easy to set up, relatively easy to configure, tune, and use the conf file, as long as you are comfortable mucking around in Linux conf text files and working from the command line (I am).

    You could use the installer which would be the easiest way, but setting up by hand is not too difficult either – instructions can be found online and following them step by step usually works fine.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    MySQL Enterprise Support is not cheap, though might still be cheaper than Oracle or SQL Server. They may not have local support depending on where you’re based, but there are many smaller agencies out there that will readily provide support. You’ll need to spend some time looking around.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I’d been using other database systems like Microsoft’s SQL Server and Oracle Database before trying out MySQL. There are forks of MySQL maintained outside of Oracle, like MariaDB and Aurora (by Amazon Web Services). I have not really tried them but I don’t expect very big differences; in fact, for most use cases you may not observe any difference. There would be the few unique features in MariaDB and Aurora that are not present in the original MySQL feature set (I know there are but don’t remember the specifics).

    What other advice do I have?

    As long as your application supports it well, and you are familiar with the scaling options and its limitations, you can’t go very wrong with MySQL, as it is a very mature product by now. If you are fairly competent with servers and databases you could start off without subscribing to Enterprise Support, and may be able to get by quite well. If things get more complicated, or scalability starts to become a problem, then you may consider paying for help.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Director at RC Ghosh Group of Companies
    Real User
    ​We use it for enterprise data storage as well as part of the back-end of websites and web applications
    Pros and Cons
    • "​The most valuable feature of MySQL is the informative error outputs of command line interface.​"
    • "​We use MySQL for enterprise data storage as well as part of the back-end of websites and web applications.​"
    • "Setup is easy. MySQL of various flavours has community editions to easily test, deploy, and run.​"
    • "​MySQL needs improvements on its diagnostic features.​"
    • "​MySQL is not easily scalable on cost effective consumer grade hardware.​"

    How has it helped my organization?

    We use MySQL for enterprise data storage as well as part of the back-end of websites and web applications.

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable feature of MySQL is the informative error outputs of command line interface.

    What needs improvement?

    MySQL needs improvements on its diagnostic features.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    MySQL is not easily scalable on cost effective consumer grade hardware.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I would rate technical support as a 10 out of 10.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Not applicable. No previous solution.

    How was the initial setup?

    Setup is easy. MySQL of various flavours has community editions to easily test, deploy, and run.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Enterprise editions and support are definitely needed for the heavy users who need direct support. 

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    No.

    What other advice do I have?

    One should ensure the availability of proper hardware before any optimization attempt from the software level.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Head of Business Technology at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    A large amount of software modules and plugins for rapid application development are possible. However, it does not stand out regarding scalability.
    Pros and Cons
    • "A lot of the software components have been trialed and tested for often more than 10 years."
    • "The main advantage is the very large user base. This enables users to fix about any issue by answering any question."
    • "It does not stand out regarding scalability. When the company size increases, the user base having actual experience with (very) large MySQL solutions is reduced."

    What is our primary use case?

    Small to medium-sized business usage. The main advantage is the very large user base. This enables users to fix about any issue by answering any question. From a technical viewpoint, MySQL is on par with the other open source database solutions.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Due to the large user base, a large amount of software modules and plugins for rapid application development are possible. From an operational viewpoint, this is also a very big advantage.

    What is most valuable?

    The large user base and the amount of available plugins and modules. A lot of the software components have been trialed and tested for often more than 10 years. It is rock solid from that viewpoint.

    What needs improvement?

    It does not stand out regarding scalability. When the company size increases, the user base having actual experience with (very) large MySQL solutions is reduced.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No, it is rock solid.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Yes, other solutions have better features and better performance.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Not applicable.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    No.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is very easy with very good online support.

    What about the implementation team?

    Implementation was done in-house.

    What was our ROI?

    Not applicable.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    When you know the setup will continue to grow, make sure you have the paid support. 

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    MariaDB/Galera.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    ERP System Analyst at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
    Real User
    MySQL? Sure, but what is the best config and how to optimize for best performance?

    We could write books about MySQL and every book could have a different focus: setup, optimization, backup, etc.
    So, this review will be about sharing some of the experiences that I have had.
    So, MySQL is probably the most used RDBMS for web applications.
    The server is really easy to install, literally a straightforward installation.
    It is very fast and stable and at the same time not resource hungry compared to some other RDBMS products.

    For smaller projects, you will not even need to do any "after install" tweaks or configurations, just install and you are ready to go.
    Nevertheless, for some more demanding projects, you will need to investigate and optimize your setup to fit the requirements.

    What is the best configuration for a MySQL server?
    There is no single best configuration. There are many of them, depending what is MySQL used for. E.g., it is not the same as having it installed in a shared hosting environment or as a dedicated instance to just one application. Having 1000 of users using a few hundred different databases or having 20 users using one database.
    Is it gonna be an OLTP or OLAP, do you focus more on writing or reading? I will not dive into this, as there are many other articles covering this in a much better way than this article. 

    But, starting by selecting the adequate storage engine MyISAM or InnoDB, defining the maximal number of connections, all the buffer and caching settings, limit on open files, table caching, etc. is always a good approach.

    You will need to sit down and write down all the requirements known to you and then aligned to those, start configuring your server.
    A very handy tool to investigate your server's setup and performance is the MySQLTuner.pl script. It can be used as a starting point to investigate your server setup and increase performance.

    Sometimes, although your server is configured properly, you might experience a slow performance, especially on a shared hosting server. During my career as a system administrator in a hosting company, we have monitored our MySQL servers and tracked the performance. Often, in such an environment, it might happen that you have a "running away" query, eating up your resources or causing performance issues. In such a case, database optimization is required, rather than server a config. A good example for this is having a well-visited web application with many concurrent users. Often on such an application, there are queries which run more frequently than others.E.g. presenting top 25 products in a web shop by using a query similar to this: 

    SELECT p.name, c.name
    FROM product p
    LEFT JOIN category c ON ( c.id = p.category_id )
    WHERE p.new_product='1'
    GROUP BY c.name, p.name
    ORDER BY p.name ASC
    LIMIT 25 ;

    Such queries will run very fast if the database itself is optimized. But otherwise, they can run really slow and cause high CPU utilization or in worse case a bottleneck and slow down the whole server. You don't need to have millions of records, this can happen even if you have only a few hundreds/thousand records in your database. In such case, you need to identify these "slow queries" (you can log slow queries) and then investigate the database they are referencing. Often it's about missing indexes on columns involved in GROUP BY, ORDER BY or WHERE clause.

    Backup? Of course, you already have the backup in place and it's running, at the end we are talking about the database. There is always a backup policy when a database is involved. Many use MySqlBackup command to schedule a "hot backup" of a server. Although it works in 99% of cases, please consider having a mysqldump running in parallel. Why? It might happen that you have a corrupted InnoDB tables and you are backing them up. By the first server reboot, it might lead that you lose data.

    When databases are involved, it is always good to have the data backed up in a flat structure if possible, if we are not talking about huge databases and the dump would consume too much time. This gives you the ability to import the data in a new instance, if you face any scenario where you have issues with corrupted storage engine and cannot recover from that.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Software Architect at a tech consulting company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Offers a simple DBMS solution with a very low hardware footprint. Only one of the engines supports ACID transaction control.

    What is our primary use case?

    Primary DBMS solution for web apps developed on either ASP.NET MVC or Zend / PHP for customers.

    The community version of MySQL only offers simple backup and restore tools, but it is OK for many web dev projects for customers that want a low budget solution.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We do software development for our customers on both Windows and Linux. Since these tools are available for both Windows and Linux, we can leverage the knowledge of these tools for development on both platforms.

    What is most valuable?

    We design web solutions for customers with PHP (Linux) and ASP.NET MVC (Windows). MySQL offers a simple, no frills, but effective DBMS solution with a very low hardware footprint. Since it has no licensing fees, it offers great TCO for our customers.

    What needs improvement?

    Only one of the engines, InnoDB, supports ACID transaction control. The best performance engine, MyISAM, has no transactional control support.

    It would make a lot of sense to include one engine that offers both very good overall performance and transactional control support.

    All versions of MySQL, including the Community Server version include in its design as a Pluggable Storage Engine Architecture.

    This architecture allows for the support of multiple options of Storage Engines, so, a software architect can design a sofware solution with MySQL based on a specific Storage Engine that is capable to cater to a particular type of storage use case requirements, like for instance, web applications with heavy read workloads and moderate write workloads, or intranet desktop applications with heavy write workloads.

    Depending on the version of Community Server installed is the list of available Storage Engines: All it takes is the execution of the command SHOW ENGINES to retrieve the list of installed Storage Engine plugins.

    When you create any given table in MySQL, you have the option to select what Storage Engine (among the engines available) will be applied to said table. If this option is no explicitly mentioned at the end of the "CREATE TABLE" command, the current default storage engine will be assumed.

    For web apps with intensive read workloads and moderate write workloads, the engine that offers a good overall performance is the MyISAM engine, but this does not support ACID transaction control, and it uses a table-level locking mechanism (thus, from a performance standpoint, this is not proper for apps with heavy write workloads).

    The InnoDB engine uses a record-level locking mechanism, so, it is proper for apps with heavy write workloads. It also supports Isolation Levels, which is important for applications that have many clients doing read and write operations concurrently.

    The other storage engines offer support for very specific use cases, like for instance, flat file tables (CSV engine) or memory-only tables (Memory engine).

    Getting back to the InnoDB engine, it offers features that are similar to the database engine in SQL Server, and according to some of benchmarks that we have run, SQL Server Express provides overall better performance than MySQL Community Server with InnoDB tables.

    My "Room for Improvement" comment is that it would be great if in the future Oracle were to provide with the Community Server edition a version of InnoDB with better overall performance, while still requiring a small hardware footprint.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    As with any good DBMS, MySQL requires periodic DBA maintenance. If you leave a MySQL database with no supervision of a DBA for enough time, files become too fragmented and they may turn corrupt beyond rescue.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The version of the product with free licensing does not offer stellar scalability support. We only use these tools for solutions that do not require such a level of scalability.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The version of the product with free licensing only offers community forum support. Because it is a very popular product, there are many free resources on the internet to search for solutions to most issues.

    This kind of "free support" is OK, because we do not use these tools for mission critical solutions.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    For Windows development of non-critical solutions, we previously used SQL Server Express exclusively. However, now we use either SQL Server Express or MySQL, depending on the customer. We have not switched from SQL Server Express to MySQL.

    How was the initial setup?

    The admin tools offered by MySQL Workbench are very good. For an experienced DBA, it is rather easy to setup a (MySQL) server for development, testing, pre-production, or production environments.

    What about the implementation team?

    Implementation was done with in-house team.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    With no licensing fees, the business opportunity is great for both the customer and an ISV like my company. This is the case, as long as you use these tools for non-critical solutions.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We did evaluate other solutions, mainly PostGreSQL, which is also a very good product.

    We run a benchmark comparison first, then we run a small lab with the development of a small solution with both toolsets (MySQL and PostGreSQL).

    In this development comparison, we found that the winner is MySQL. MySQL toolset for development offers much more coverage for both PHP and C# development.

    What other advice do I have?

    Most small and medium enterprises require many non-critical solutions. They clearly they do not have large budgets for these kinds of solutions, so it makes a lot of sense to consider MySQL as a good option for this kind of development.

    The advice is to make sure that it works for your company and for your customers.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Senior Application Programmer/Analyst, Team Lead at a university with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Its strength is in the fast connection, query and insert performance. The weakest link is replication.

    What is our primary use case?

    Used as a data store for RESTful web services and other web applications. Was deployed to store RSS feeds, and for 100 joomla instances. 

    How has it helped my organization?

    MySQL is widely supported. We were able to integrate it with several different projects using various different programming languages with no issues.

    Worked with Java, Perl, PHP, C# and C code. 

    What is most valuable?

    MySQL’s strength is in its fast connection, query and insert performance. I’ve benchmarked MySQL against several NoSQL and SQL databases and found it to be faster for getting lots of data inserted quickly.

    What needs improvement?

    The weakest link is replication. MySQL’s replication is touchy and doesn’t support master-to-master setups.

    MySQL’s replication was implemented by playing back SQL statements getting executed on the master database node. That means if a slave node gets behind, it has to catch up by running every SQL query that has executed on the master. When the slave gets too far out of date, it is unable to catch up because the replication log is lost. 

    Master to master replication is used to allow writes to either node in the cluster (INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE).  Since MySQL does not support this, you can only safely send SELECT queries to slave nodes.  If you run an insert, update or delete against the slave node, then it is out of sync with the master and may break if a later replication event comes from the master on the same table.


    For how long have I used the solution?

    More than five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I’ve had an issue where an InnoDB database grew too big and got corrupted. I was unable to recover it because there was not enough space on the server either. Be sure to have enough space.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We did encounter some scalability issues as it has limited clustering support, it requires scaling up rather than out to some degree. Of course, you can have read replicas. It also has a fall-off on performance with very high workloads, but it takes awhile to get there.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    MySQL has replaced Microsoft SQL Server in several cases. MySQL is easier to manage and much more cost-effective.

    How was the initial setup?

    The security model is different than the other databases.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    There are tuning and monitoring benefits for people who purchase MySQL rather than using the free version.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Looked at Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL

    What other advice do I have?

    The porting code to or from MySQL is not that complicated, but the date type/format and functions are the biggest hurdles. Handling booleans data type is less efficient than the BIT type in the SQL Server.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user755103 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Open Source Database Consultant
    Vendor
    A high level of support due to a lot of documentation and expertise in the world

    What is most valuable?

    • Vertical scalabity on hardware
    • Better hardware usage
    • Access performance
    • Addressing consistency, scalability and performance issues

    How has it helped my organization?

    Storage and searching quickly on data is no longer an issue facing us using Excel.

    What needs improvement?

    Hardware scalability and parallel treatment can and will be improved in the next few years.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    For 15 years now.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No, there are only strategies applied by a data scale interval (less than 200 go, less than 1 to, and more than 15 to).

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Always due to architecture, data storage, and data requesting irrelevant strategies.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    High. There is a lot of documentation, a lot of expertise, and a lot of projects in the world.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We switched to a different solution because of data access issues, speed, and consistency.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Don't use the license version. Open source is enough.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    There are a lot of alternative to paid features. It's very hard to find support for this feature.

    What other advice do I have?

    You will have a lot of work, but you will also avoid a lot of issues due to product immaturity on the database market.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner.
    PeerSpot user
    Vendor
    Helps to achieve stability. Needs to improve the system so it won't lose data.

    What is most valuable?

    Usually, we use the application for our team to ensure the data is correct.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We majorly use the application now. We can use MySQL to read for our select queries. This helps us to achieve stability.

    What needs improvement?

    In MySQL, you can only have one master. The master's scalability was always a problem.

    The cost towards the locking and the patent. What happens, we will be running the MySQL network, and what happens sometimes in some cases, the master go down. Thus, we have to theoretically play the whole thing. The chances are quite high that you are going to lose some important data.

    If we can make them implement the system so we are not losing our data, then magically you could say the system would be better.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    12 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No. Not on the MySQL site.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    No. Not so far. I didn't see any problems in its scalability.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We are using the community portal technical support, but when we are reaching them, the support is always awesome.

    I can give them a 10 out of 10. The best.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Yeah, we used to cheat off MySQL. But in the end, it was somebody else's design. So, we migrated to MySQL. We just migrated from there to here.

    How was the initial setup?

    It always depends on the use case. The first case was complex where we ended up rewriting all of the test code better than MySQL.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    It always depends on the scenarios of the requirement - what all the current scenarios come from. Are these application teams or is that someone who is just getting the product? If someone majorly bunt because they don't want to use a single point of data, we may end up choosing any other solution.

    Usually, we would pick a MySQL because of our DBS, because we know how we can boot up or pick on a use case.

    What other advice do I have?

    You just need to identify why and what are the requirements. Also, you need to listen to news feeds regarding the features you are getting into and the features you will to use from it. Take the time to identify and understand.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Data Scientist / Consultant with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    You can build data models both on-premises and on the cloud

    What is most valuable?

    • Open Source (It’s free)
    • One can easily find help on the web

    How has it helped my organization?

    You can easily build data models both on-premise and on the cloud.

    What needs improvement?

    The work bench has some bugs that are mostly GUI related.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I did not encounter any issues with stability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I did not encounter any issues with scalability.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I use the community version. There are ample “Open Source” resources on the Internet.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used Microsoft SQL and Postgres.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    IT Consultant, Business Owner, Lecturer at a tech consulting company with 10,001+ employees
    Consultant
    It offers all the features of a RDBMS system, including monitoring tools, backup and recovery, high availability and easy migration from other databases.​

    What is most valuable?

    MySQL is an Open Source RDBMS, which means you keep your costs low, as long as you don’t need to have support and/or you have your own MySQL expert. However, MySQL also offers the enterprise edition for users that would like support and more advanced features.

    When it comes to features, MySQL offers all the features of a RDBMS system, including monitoring tools, backup and recovery, high availability and easy migration from other databases.

    How has it helped my organization?

    For any web project today you are going to need a database system. If you use any Content Management System, MySQL is most of the times the database of your choice.

    MySQL is easy to use, most developers have experience using it and it is an Open Source, cost-effective solution.

    What needs improvement?

    Although MySQL should cover most of the needs of an average user, there are constrains that need improvement.

    For example, MySQL doesn’t support check constraints. MySQL’s performance is not optimal on subqueries and can significantly increase the server load for database intensive applications.

    Another issue is the ineffective table manipulation during multiple transactions which result in implicit Commits.

    Finally, since MySQL is now part of Oracle, and Oracle already sells their own databases, changes and bug fixes have significantly slowed down for obvious reasons. Oracle cannot improve MySQL too much, since it will then compete with their commercial database systems.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have been using MySQL either through custom projects or through CMS, for more than 15 years now.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We haven’t encountered any serious stability issues with MySQL.

    However, as with all systems, you need to keep your database “tidy”, making sure to optimize it, clean it and avoid corrupt files.

    For critical projects, it may be wise to have redundancy by having two servers synced all the time.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Most scalability issues with MySQL can be simply resolved by adding more memory, optimizing settings or moving to a better server.

    Of course, if you are talking about 40-50TB of data, or critical applications, then you will probably need to move to a more commercial database, such as Oracle.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We haven’t used the enterprise edition of MySQL, since most of our projects do not require such support levels. Most issues are handled by our developers.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    MySQL has been the only solution for all of our web projects.

    How was the initial setup?

    Setting up MySQL is simple, however, optimizing it requires some experience which is also based on the demands of each customer.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    When we started using MySQL, it was more or less the best Open Source RDBMS for web projects. Today, you have multiple options, such as PostgreSQL, SQLite and MariaDB, therefore the choice for a newcomer should be based on their project needs.

    What other advice do I have?

    For us, MySQL is the choice for all of our projects. It is simply to use, supported by all content management systems and, of course, Open Source.

    We haven’t had any major issues, and since we have now developed MySQL technical skills and custom libraries, there is no reason to move on with a different RDBMS, unless circumstances change.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Software Development Manager at a tech services company
    Consultant
    It's good and affordable​

    What is most valuable?

    It is free and bundled with cPanel.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Cost effective.

    What needs improvement?

    Not at the moment in my current work environment.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Two years, began when I started at my current workplace.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    So far, so good due to limited clients at the moment.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    So far, so good due to limited clients at the moment.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    There is no technical support since it is a CE.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    No.

    How was the initial setup?

    Straightforward.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It's free.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    No, because this is bundled with cPanel.

    What other advice do I have?

    It's good and affordable.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Powerbuilder Consultant at a government with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Vendor
    Relational databse that can be used with PHP, Python, and Java.

    What is most valuable?

    • Relational database (Although it's not 100% compliant with Standard SQL)
    • Performance
    • Open Source
    • Ease of setup and use
    • Ease of use with PHP, Python, and Java

    How has it helped my organization?

    Using MySQL helps to keep the costs down. With immense material available on the web, training is easy too.

    This is the de facto DB for web development with PHP. If you worked with LAMP environment, this was the M in it (others being Linux, Apache Tomcat and PHP). With open source products, development was a breeze. Overall, this is a boon to small to medium database applications.

    What needs improvement?

    The simplicity of the product lets people abuse it. I've seen so many people create tables and add indices in PHP code. Some of these web developers only know some things about the database.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for about eight years.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We did not use a different solution for the applications that use MySQL. I mostly use Oracle for larger, enterprise software.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was straightforward. There are a number of Open Source tools, including Toad and MySQL Workbench which helps with configuration and use.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    This started as Open Source project under Sun. With Oracle acquiring Sun, MySQL is now owned by Oracle (not the community). Oracle promised to keep it open sourced, but the community is not convinced. So, there is a branch that's called Maria DB that's slowly taking over in some Open Source projects.

    That being said, it is still an Open Source product and it is free to use under GPL license. This means you can always, get community support. But, if you want Oracle's support, that is not free.

    If you use it in enterprise applications, you may have to purchase commercial license from Oracle. Here is a couple of links that discuss various options:

    http://white-paper.b-lay.com/o...

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse...

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated MS Access, SQLite, PostgreSQL, FireBird, and Oracle.

    What other advice do I have?

    This is a relational database tool for small to medium sized applications. However, this didn't start as a Relational DB, so if you want a truly Relational Database for an Enterprise, similar to Oracle, you may want to look into PostgreSQL, as well. However, MySQL is still a very good database for internet based applications.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Systems Administrator at Nubity Inc. at a tech services company
    Consultant
    Think about the size of the database

    What is most valuable?

    Easy:

    • Installation
    • Customization
    • Use

    How has it helped my organization?

    Data is:

    • More ordered
    • Reliable
    • Available in time and form

    What needs improvement?

    Scalability: In large databases, they become slow.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    12 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Yes. In large databases, response times are high.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    10 out of 10.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used this solution, but changed for another because the database was very large.

    How was the initial setup?

    Configuration was easy and with much support material.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    No.

    What other advice do I have?

    Let them think about the size of the database.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Developer at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    ​It’s been used as the main databases for a lot of the developments we have done

    What is most valuable?

    • Compatibility
    • Stability
    • Maintenance

    These are very important points to keep in mind while deploying consumer facing products, it has to work.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It’s been used as the main databases for a lot of the developments we have done.

    As for special features it offers, I wouldn’t say there’s a key one, but I do appreciate the stability it has.

    What needs improvement?

    • Real-time
    • Event driven results
    • Geolocation data
    • Non-text storage

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Over five years now.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No, I’d say this is the best.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It’s not easy to scale horizontally, don’t think it was ever meant for it. Lacks ease of installation and continuous usage.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Not applicable.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    No, in fact, I switched away from it in new developments.

    How was the initial setup?

    It’s very straightforward, really easy to install. Configuration is easy to understand and to change.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Since Oracle bought MySQL, I’ve seen a slow development. I would recommend the community server if you have to have MySQL, but I wouldn’t license or purchase it.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Antonio Arcucci - PeerSpot reviewer
    CEO at a computer software company with 1-10 employees
    Vendor
    We can now have many standalone databases where every developer can perform local tests

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable feature is the fact that the product is cross-platform, because it reduces server TCO, for my small company. This is very important.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Without MySQL, we used a single centralized database.

    With MySQL, we can now have many standalone databases where every developer can perform local tests.

    What needs improvement?

    Improvement areas are Security and ORM, for example:

    It may be interesting to check the user-level access rights at the row level and a robust support to JSON model object (like NoSQL database).

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used MySQL for 12 years, since 2005. I chose it after using MS SQL for years. It is more suitable for the projects that we make.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No, never.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Yes, the many index restrictions in case of partitioning the tables.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I do not know yet. I've never used technical support services, only the community

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Yes, I first used Microsoft SQL Server, then I went to MySQL because the cost is lower.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is straightforward, especially in a Windows environment.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    There is no cheap commercial license for standalone applications.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Yes, I have evaluated other database solutions. I have evaluated PostgreSQL and MongoDB.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Charlita Dalebjörk - PeerSpot reviewer
    Charlita DalebjörkActing CFO with 1-10 employees
    Real User

    Thanks for a good review
    Many developers wants to have micro servers with micro sized databases. But that doesn't necessarily means that these micro sized databases will be a unique MySQL instance.

    it_user702249 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Web Developer at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
    Consultant
    The most valuable feature is its graphical interface which allows us to do the database administration

    What is most valuable?

    MySQL is strongly recommended for web applications and LAMP architecture systems. The most valuable feature of this product for me is its graphical interface which allows me to do the database administration easily. Another important feature is its reliability, the decent performance, and the fact it is an open source product.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It gives us the opportunity to create backups of our databases easily and loop through them with minimum effort.

    What needs improvement?

    I think that the stored procedures and the development tools to write and debug large queries could be improved.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used MySQL for about 10 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no issues with stability.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There was no issue with scalability.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We have not used technical support. The community is large enough to find the solution when something comes up.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We used many SQL database solutions like PostgreSQL and SQLite and NoSQL databases like MongoDB. The choice depends on the project.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was straightforward.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I think that the Open Source product would cover the needs of most projects. In some cases, the advanced features are needed. They could use the enterprise edition, which is reasonably priced.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We have evaluated and used different products like SQLite. It depends on the requirements and the needs of the project.

    What other advice do I have?

    I believe that it is the ideal solution for a variety of projects with a small learning curve compared to other solutions. It allows you to be efficient quickly.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Director of Information Technology at a tech services company
    Real User
    Several unexplained crashes caused dissatisfaction from users

    What is most valuable?

    Installation, because in a few seconds, the product was up and running.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It was the first step of the Service Desk.

    What needs improvement?

    ITIL implementation:

    GLPI has a poor ITIL implementation in the sense that not all ITIL processes are implemented, e.g., no Service Catalog is present.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used this solution for two years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Yes, several unexplained crashes caused dissatisfaction from users.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Yes.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Zero. No support at all. Only forums with no response.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have not used a solution like this before.

    How was the initial setup?

    Straightforward.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It was open source and license-free.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    Yes, but commercial ones (ManageEngine, EasyVista, Remedyforce).

    What other advice do I have?

    Not choosing an open source software for this kind of solution. Now, we are looking at ServiceNow Express.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Member of Technical Staff at a tech company with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    Allows us to maintain very large tables without jumping through the hoops.

    What is most valuable?

    Simple syntax and simple administration are the most valuable features.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It allows us to maintain very large tables without jumping through the hoops that are required by the commercial products such as Oracle.

    What needs improvement?

    Multi-master replication could be a bit more reliable.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Counting the earlier versions, we are using this solution for over ten years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Compared to the other database solutions, there were no stability issues as such.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Sharding is relatively straightforward.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We run the Community version, so technical support doesn't apply.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We tried Oracle for a while but it was too much of a resource hog.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We looked at Oracle and PostgreSQL.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    SENIOR DEVELOPER at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    During the billing process, if one server fails then we switch to the other transparently.

    What is most valuable?

    The multiple engine replication is the most valuable feature. This neuralgic process for billing needs high availability and that is where we need this robust, but simple solution. If one server fails, we switch to the other transparently.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It facilitated fast processing of the millions of records for billing of the the call detail records in the Telecom company. The company needed to recover calls, in addition to immediately detecting frauds in the telephone calls so as to block the line and generate large losses. With the help of stored procedures, functions and triggers, we created an engine to recover most of the calls with a single transaction. Thanks to MySQL.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There were no scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I would rate the technical support as a five out of 10.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We were using PostgreSQL. The reason why we switched to this solution was that of the easy administration.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup was easy.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Senior Production Support Engineer at a tech company with 501-1,000 employees
    Consultant
    Simple to use with excellent performance

    What is most valuable?

    MySQL is very flexible, has excellent performance, and it's simple to use.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Once we needed to use a database to distribute a product for my company and we chose MySQL, it was easy to use and it is very small, but powerful.

    What needs improvement?

    Maybe the way to build clusters needs to be improved. They could also improve the installation process.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I been using MySQL for nearly seven years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There were some scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I would give the technical support an eight out of 10 rating.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We did upgrade the version with improvements to the product.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup was complex in the cluster installation.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    MySQL is one of the best database options. The Community version is great.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We used Oracle and SQL Server, but their prices and licensing were so expensive.

    What other advice do I have?

    Using MySQL could be an excellent option for you.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user703740 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Software Engineer at a tech company with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    Improved our internal procedures by providing high performance, ease of use and cost savings

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable features are:

    • MySQL Database Servers

    • MySQL Connectors

    • MySQL Workbench.

    How has it helped my organization?

    MySQL has improved our internal procedures by providing high performance, ease of use, and cost savings.

    What needs improvement?

    Security in the data files needs manipulation.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There were no scalability issues.

    How is customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is excellent.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup was really straightforward.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    According to the specific business and technical requirements, you can choose your MySQL Edition that you wish by consulting the official site.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We looked at the Microsoft SQL Server.

    What other advice do I have?

    It can benefit any business by a straightforward way of implementing and using it.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    IT Manager at a retailer with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Online backup can be implemented by activating a temporary storage and introducing Percona innobackupex

    What is most valuable?

    This product is valuable because it is used in production environments. Online backup can be implemented by activating a temporary storage similar to the Oracle's flash recovery area and introducing Percona innobackupex. This is possible from version 5.6.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It permits services such as data warehouse and retail.

    What needs improvement?

    The online backup needs to improve.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for 15 years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We did encounter stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There were no scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Not applicable because we don't purchase commercial support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We switched due to cost saving reasons.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup was of medium-level complexity due to memory parameters.

    What other advice do I have?

    Compared to PostgreSQL, it has an online backup feature only with the extension of Percona innobackupex.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Academic application support at a university with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Vendor
    Owing to its speed and stability, we use it as the data store for most of our web applications

    What is most valuable?

    Speed and stability of the MySQL DB are the most valuable features since we use it as the data store for most of our web applications.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Before we used MySQL, we used to access the data used for the dynamic web pages directly from our enterprise data stores and that was a massive performance bottleneck. With MySQL, the data can be accessed much faster. This allowed us to create more complicated web systems, such as the corporate message system and a credit card paying system.

    What needs improvement?

    From where we are, most of the improvements are being handled. With the new improvements that were introduced in MySQL 5.7 and with the testing that we have done to this point, we are looking at updating our web development environment to make better use of the new features.

    With the push from MySQL to implement database engines which can provide the same functionality as PostgreSQL and MongoDB, we are looking at application development that leverages this functionality on our current MySQL production database. Seeing that MySQL can provide noSQL document storage the same way MongoDB can and still have a SQL data source next to it creates the possibility of using the best features of both to achieve the desired application result without changing our current infrastructure drastically.

    It must be noted that we are still in the process of experimentation to find the best ways of utilizing these data technologies in our current enterprise applications, but not having to move to other database providers to have the functionality means we can experiment without the need to change our base processes. So when I say that the improvements are being handled the MySQL development team have given us access to functionality which we started to look at about two years ago.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for around seven years with upgrades.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We did experience a few scalability issues, but we decided to rather go for a bigger server than creating a cluster and that worked out very well.

    How is customer service and technical support?

    The technical support is very good

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup was very straightforward since the out-of-the-box MySQL's performance is already very good.

    We had to do some tweaking over time, but nothing too major.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The enterprise version has a number of extra components that makes it worth the price, but if all you want is a stable DB for web applications, then stick to the open version.

    We use enterprise because we use the PAM connector and the DB firewall, if you are looking at the pricing for implementing a separate data firewall, it is more than what you will pay for this solution.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    There were not a lot of other options open to us.

    What other advice do I have?

    Ensure you know what you want to use it for and make sure it is the right fit for the job.

    Do not allow developers to tell you what your DB should look like, as that is the best way to performance problems. Use the MySQL Workbench and MySQL Monitor.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Intern at a tech vendor with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    It is used for many projects and easy to access. Needs to get more solid for my company to rely on it.

    What is most valuable?

    It is Open Source and easy to access.

    How has it helped my organization?

    My company does not use MySQL. However, it is often used at universities and is suitable for beginners. It is used for many projects.

    What needs improvement?

    From the perspective of the company, you can count on reliable Microsoft SQL or Oracle. If MySQL gets solid, it will be a good solution.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for around two to three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There were no scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    There does not seem to be any technical support for MySQL.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have used MS SQL and Oracle. However, now I have no money and am using MySQL.

    How was the initial setup?

    Encoding problems were always complicated, but nothing else.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    If you have money, it would be better to use Oracle.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I thought about other Open Sources, but I chose MySQL, which I have already used.

    What other advice do I have?

    MySQL is a good choice for startups and beginners.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    DevOps SRE at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    ACID attributes are the most valuable feature. It does not understand the clustered model.

    What is most valuable?

    ACID attributes are the most valuable feature, as data reliability is a top concern.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The backend of the production traffic happens at this level.

    What needs improvement?

    The dynamic scalability, clustering, dynamic replicas safeguard against failures, ease of setup and use all need to be improved.

    • MySQL was originally meant for a single server; now with the 5.7 version, they have introduced the multi-master model but it is on the user to ensure that there is no conflict of data. Also, to add/remove a server from the cluster requires downtime and MySQL won't scale load on its own as it has scaled up/down (the load distribution has to be done on a separate layer).
    • MySQL does not understand the clustered model, it is not aware of others in the cluster and won't act as a player in the cluster.
    • Data corruption or two different updates to the same record are not sorted in the replicas and needs manual intervention.
    • The cluster setup is complex and so is its maintenance.
    • It is not equipped to take advantage of the Cloud (AWS, Azure etc) and their pricing models (go as you use).

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this solution for two years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We have seen the corruption of data in replication when used with filters and also, with the growing data response time dwindles.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    A lot of manual effort is needed to scale the solution; a lot of room for improvement is there.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup was of mid-level complexity.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It is a GPL license, only the support is priced but as there is a good community so buying support is optional.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I wasn't involved as this predates me at the organization, but today if this re-happens MySQL won't be the best choice.

    What other advice do I have?

    Do your research and make sure for your use case that MySQL is the best choice, before making any commitments.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Telecommunications Engineer at a comms service provider with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Offers SQL Merge, Replication, and Views. I would like to see additional side management tools and IDEs.

    What is most valuable?

    • SQL Merge
    • Replication
    • Views
    • Stored Procedures
    • Triggers
    • Cursors

    This is just like the enterprise grade Oracle DB. MySQL now supports replication (master-master or master-slave) of our DB to support our company's multiple geo-locations and PoPs.

    It supports the original Oracle SQL operations such as Merge, as well as the creation of Views to your tables. This brings additional convenience to our organization.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The main benefit for us is that it's totally free, unless you need to pay for support.

    What needs improvement?

    I would like to see additional side management tools and IDEs.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I used this current version for one year. I used previous versions for over ten years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no stability issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There were no scalability issues.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We didn't need any technical support. I would guess that Oracle support is top-level.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We did not use a solution prior to this one.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was straightforward, user-friendly, and easy. In most cases, if you use the Linux-based versions, it comes as a standard Linux package. You can get it installed by using AptGet, Aptitude, or Yum.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Just pay for any license if you need some enterprise support for your project or any additional support tools that Oracle ships with the enterprise version. During the development stage of your project, you can just use the free community edition.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We evaluated MSSQL, Oracle DB, Informix, and MariaDB.

    What other advice do I have?

    Go with the Linux version. It is more stable and manages the system resources better.

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We are partners, developing applications together.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    DevOps Lead Engineer at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    It is open source and AWS provides a managed solution. I would like it to catch up with proprietary technologies.

    What is most valuable?

    It is open source and AWS provides a managed solution.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Amazon has come up with Aurora, a MySQL hybrid that has helped us get up to speed without actually thinking about MySQL underlying optimizations.

    What needs improvement?

    Catching up with proprietary technologies like Oracle and PostgreSQL is the challenge right now.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have used this solution for over four years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There have been no stability issues yet.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We code for horizontal scaling and hence the only thing that becomes important is the number of connections. The data can be easily replicated in real time on Amazon replicas themselves. We have a dynamic solution to read data from replicas and not from a master instance. That is how we scale.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I would give technical support a rating of 10/10.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We did not use a different solution before.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was straightforward.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Keeping something similar to AWS, and as easy as Amazon, will be the best thing for any small business like mine.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I did evaluate other solutions, but MySQL stood out because of its ease of use. Perhaps my prior experience has made me be biased towards MySQL.

    What other advice do I have?

    Until you have expertise in data migrations and what you are doing with data, MySQL can be really easy and dangerous at the same time. MySQL doesn't give you a warning about data truncation if data types don't fully match. Be really careful on that front.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user130032 - PeerSpot reviewer
    CEO at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    SQL capability, functions and ease of optimization.

    What is most valuable?

    SQL capability, functions and ease of optimization.

    What needs improvement?

    Software and web development.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    15 years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    No issues.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No issues.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Manageable.

    How is customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    Used open source and never needed customer service.

    The product is quite mature.

    Technical Support:

    NA

    How was the initial setup?

    Straightforward.

    What about the implementation team?

    In-house.

    What was our ROI?

    Good.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The open source product is good. If you want advanced features go for the enterprise edition.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Rehana Parvin - PeerSpot reviewer
    Database Administrator at a recruiting/HR firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    It is easy to understand the inner picture of the database from the EER model.

    What is most valuable?

    The EER diagram is the most important feature for me as the EER diagram can show the inner picture of the database, such as the relationship between the tables very easily. We can also add, modify or delete EER diagrams very easily.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The user friendly interface which is easy to interact with such as creating backups, tables, views, and the EER model.

    What needs improvement?

    It has lot of options to interact with. Sometimes it is hard to find the appropriate options quickly. They need to add descriptions somewhere as to where a user can go to find the proper menu easily when required. Another problem is that since all the databases can be seen and operated together, it’s possible to make mistakes such as dropping the wrong database.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have used this product for two years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    There was no issue with deployment

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There were no issues with stability

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There was no issue with scalability

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    The level of customer service is good. I understand sometimes they need to transfer the service to a knowledgeable person, so we need to have patience and explain the same problem several times.

    Technical Support:

    The level of technical services is good. I understand the product is technical, so sometimes the reported problem requires more investigation.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I used phpMyAdmin. It is also a graphical interface but you have to buy the product while MySQL Workbench is free.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is very straightforward. I didn’t face any problem at all.

    What about the implementation team?

    I did the installation.

    What other advice do I have?

    This product is good as it is a graphical interface. It's easy to do all MySQL database administration very easily. You just need to play around to be more familiar with it. The MySQL Workbench interface is well prepared to design a database including EER diagram, create table, and view very easily. The EER diagram allows the user to completely understand the database design, which is very important and useful for the people who are involved with the database. It’s easy to understand the inner picture of the database from the EER model.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Haim Tzadok - PeerSpot reviewer
    Haim TzadokCo-Founder/CEO at Grigale LTD
    Reseller

    Workbench is the original GUI for managing MySQL databases it allows to:
    * Manage DB - it allows to administer a DB. (by creating a connection to a database).
    * Model DB - It allows you to model your database using EER diagrams to represent tables and link between tables. EER diagrams can be transformed to a schema by creating SQL script from the EER diagram. EER diagram can be also produced from an existing DB, by connecting to a database and performing reverse engineering.
    * Migrate DB - It also allows you to migrate from another DB to MySQL

    PeerSpot user
    Senior Staff Engineer at a tech vendor with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    It provides a low-cost, high-availability solution without complex active/standby management using Linux HA. It should provide detailed debugging with transaction IDs at the application level.

    Valuable Features

    This product’s most valuable feature to me is active-active (multi-master) cluster support for MySQL.

    Improvements to My Organization

    We have been using the multi-master solution from the Percona cluster. It seems to work as expected.

    We use it as an embedded component of a solution we sell. It has provided a low-cost, high-availability solution without complex active/standby management using Linux HA.

    Room for Improvement

    It should provide detailed debugging with transaction IDs at the application level to understand deadlocks, especially under bursty workloads.

    It should also provide partitioned tables and a clustered index, like Oracle, to take advantage of inherent parallelisms in the application domain.

    Scalability Issues

    It does not scale well when there are concurrent requests. Making changes to binlog and transaction log settings improves scalability at the cost of reliability.

    Customer Service and Technical Support

    It has decent support.

    Other Solutions Considered

    This product’s active-active cluster feature was the reason for choosing it.

    One of the reasons PostgreSQL was not considered – a decision taken before I joined the company - was its lack of mature multi-master cluster support. It also lacked other popular ports (e.g. MariaDB, Percona, etc. in MySQL).

    Other Advice

    Ensure that it meets your scaling needs, and has features for handling parallelism in the application.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user436011 - PeerSpot reviewer
    IT Director at a energy/utilities company with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    We chose to run JD Edwards on it because of the availability of resources for it in our region.

    Valuable Features

    MySQL database is the database on which we run JD Edwards. You could run it on Unix or you could run it on Oracle or something else. Our choice was to run it on MySQL because of the availability of resources in our area. There are more MySQL database resources available around Houston than there would be those that are familiar with, say, Oracle Database.

    Improvements to My Organization

    The availability of resources for MySQL has been the biggest benefit for our organization.

    Room for Improvement

    I'd like to see Oracle provide more certification for it.

    Deployment Issues

    We've had no issues with deployment.

    Stability Issues

    It's pretty rock solid and we've had no issues with instability.

    Scalability Issues

    We're able to scale without issues.

    Customer Service and Technical Support

    I cannot tell you when the last time was that I had to call about support for MySQL. It's really rock solid.

    Other Advice

    Choose your database based upon your ability to be able to hire people and support the product, like supporting JD Edwards with a MySQL database. Not everyone can work one database with JD Edwards as well as they can another one. So just make sure you've got the compatibility and skill-set.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user2652 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Project Manager at a non-tech company with 10,001+ employees
    Vendor
    Popular
    Highly recommended open source database for small/medium sized organizations

    Pros:- 

    1) MySQL is an open source database under the GNU General Public License, that means developers can use it at no cost as long as the associated projects are also open source. 

    2) MySQL is ideally suited for small/medium sized organizations for faster performance. 

    3) MySQL can be used in client/Server architecture as well as it can also be embedded in standalone applications. 

    4) MySQL is fast, east to use, highly extensible, lightweight, scalable, and reliable database. 

    5) MySQL supports clustering in the network for redundancy. 

    6) MySQL provides flexibility to modify environment variables/kernel settings to limit the amount of memory usage for increasing performance. 

    7) MySQL is strongly recommended for web applications, middleware and LAMP architecture systems. 

    8) MySQL can be integrated with ldap to provide centralized authentication. It can also be integrated with LAMP/WAMP, web applications and number of programming languages. It is widely used for phpadmin and wordpress. 

    9) MySQL is platform independent and can be run in mixed OS platform like windows, linux, ubuntu etc. It gives compatibility even over different OS during backup and restore. Data can be backed up from one OS and can be restored on other OS.

    Cons:- 

    1) MySQL can be integrated with ldap, however, it is very complex, tedious and time consuming. 

    2) MySQL support is available through communities like other open source projects which means that it is sometimes scarce and hard to find. 

    3) MySQL doesn't have some of RDBMS features like foreign keys, transaction, rollback and subselect. 

    4) MySQL also doesn't have tablespaces, role management, snapshots, synonyms and packages. 

    5) MySQL uses both InnoDB and MyISAM, however, it gives slower performance when using InnoDB as compared to MyISAM for using simple queries due to complexity of InnoDB. 

    6) MySQL does not provide good development and debugging tools, so it’s cumbersome to write large SQL statements.

    Alternate Vendors:- Oracle, DB2, Sybase, Postgres, Informatica!!


    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user2652 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user2652Project Manager at a non-tech company with 10,001+ employees
    PopularVendor

    I have researched more on the pros and cons I listed and modified them accordingly.

    See all 2 comments
    PeerSpot user
    Software Tester & SQA at a manufacturing company with 501-1,000 employees
    Vendor
    The InnoDB database allows us to store and execute procedures and roll-backs.

    What is most valuable?

    I couldn't name just one most valuable feature. You can use it under different cases, but most of the time I needed the database as a part of my project. I think, in one moment you will prefer the InnoDB database, so you can store and execute procedures and roll-backs.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Again, I couldn't name an positive aspect precisely. Maybe, the fact that using MySQL and Java gives it a big portability and, at the same time, short time responses within your product (my case). This could come from the DB side. It also allows for easiness of finding interaction tools with MySQL.

    What needs improvement?

    None that I can name. At the moment I worked with MySQL, there was nothing I couldn't do with the product.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using it for four to five years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    There were no issues with the deployment.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It's a pretty stable product for what I needed it to do.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    There have been no issues scaling it.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Being a community product, you can find solutions all over the internet. It's not a specific support department.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    There was no solution in use previously.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was quite easy. The product comes with an installer. It can be complicated to configure the MySQL server, but with a little attention, all goes well.

    What about the implementation team?

    It was done in-house.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It's free.

    What other advice do I have?

    It helped me within my projects. For a free product, it works very well and it's easy to use and configure.

    Don't try the most sophisticated products, that have big names, and cost a ton. Just try this product if you need something cheap and reliable. I don't think it will disappoint, at least not in my case.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Junior Technician Intern at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
    Consultant
    The privileges and command line features are the most valuable to me. But, you do need to have experience with SQL to use it.

    What is most valuable?

    • Privileges
    • Command line

    How has it helped my organization?

    I don't have any as this was my first time using it.

    What needs improvement?

    I think it is where it needs to be. MySql PaaS. But, you do need to have experience with SQL to use it.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used it for 12 months.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    There were no issues deploying it.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It has been perfectly stable for us.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We've been able to scale it without issue.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    4/10

    Technical Support:

    7/10

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    MS Access. It wasn't compatible with my project.

    How was the initial setup?

    It was a straightforward set-up.

    What about the implementation team?

    We used an in-house team.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We also looked at Microsoft SQL Server.

    What other advice do I have?

    Experience with SQL is vital. It is simple to learn and use.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Expert Advisor at a mining and metals company with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    This database enabled us to web present our content in a cost efficient way.

    What is most valuable?

    At this time, pricing and footprint.

    How has it helped my organization?

    This database enabled us to web present our content in a cost efficient way.

    What needs improvement?

    I am not up to date on this issue.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    At the time pricing and footprint.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    This was the IT consultant's task to solve.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No issues encountered.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Not really, as our DB was small. With time, we got version issues, as our DB engine was so old and not updated.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    I've never used it.

    Technical Support:

    I've never used it.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    No previous solution was used.

    How was the initial setup?

    I don't know as we had consultants.

    What about the implementation team?

    Consultant team.

    What was our ROI?

    We installed it under another now-obsolete license form (free on Linux).

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    No, as it was required for a CMS we implemented.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Software Developer at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
    Consultant
    It tends to perform better on Linux and other UNIX-like systems, but it needs support for foreign keys.

    Valuable Features:

    • Excellent performance, mainly due to the format of its default table, MyISAM - low disk space, CPU, and memory
    • Flexibility offering multiple variations such as Berkely DB , InnoDB, Heap and MyISAM
    • Reliability. Although the system runs on Windows without flaws, it tends to perform better on Linux and other UNIX-like Systems.
    • Availability
    • Open-Source System, open storage database engine
    • Used by many websites (e.g. LinkedIn, Facebook, Verizon, and PayPal)
    • It's inexpensive when compared to other common databases like Microsoft SQL Server.
    • As a developer myself, I enjoy using it at no cost as long as the associated projects are also open-source.

    Room for Improvement:

    • Limited storage capacity
    • Support for foreign keys
    • Stored procedures
    • The biggest disadvantage of MySQL is MyISAM system, which doesn't support well transactions (lack of efficiency)

    Use of Solution:

    Personally, I've been using it for over 10 years, and professionally for three to four years.

    Deployment Issues:

    I had no problems deploying it.

    Stability Issues:

    With each release of MySQL Server was useful for any little problems that users detected, so I would say it's quite stable.

    Customer Service:

    Previous Solutions:

    Initial Setup:

    It was straightforward, thanks to the workbench that pulls together nearly every MySQL task, and puts them into one easy and friendly GUI.

    Cost and Licensing Advice:

    Because MySQL is an open-source , the system is under GNU Licence. The system isn't always free, but it's more affordable. If you intend to sell your software as a proprietary product, you would need to purchase a commercial license, which is quite inexpensive when compared with a Microsoft SQL license.

    Other Advice:

    From my perspective, MySQL is a product that allows you to be efficient, but the decision goes down to the situation and what you're looking to accomplish.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user333624 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user333624Software Developer at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
    Consultant

    also with the new 5.7 edition added some other fixes , update, firewall , etc. You can check the new version on their page.

    PeerSpot user
    Constructor of the computer systems at a security firm with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    I had no problems deploying it but the MyISAM tables need to be more reliable.

    What is most valuable?

    • Reliability
    • Security
    • Flexibility
    • Functionality
    • Availability - controllability anywhere and with different methods

    What needs improvement?

    MyISAM tables could be more reliable.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the Workbench Server for six years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    I have had no problems deploying it.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I have no stability problems.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    I currently do not need to scale on my network.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    I only have the free version, which does not have customer service.

    Technical Support:

    I only have the free version, which does not have technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We use Cisco ASA and Nagios devices alongside the MySQL server as our network infrastructure needs expanding and required more serious hardware solutions.

    What was our ROI?

    I believe it is hard to calculate for hardware.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I only use the free version.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We also looked at PostgreSQL.

    What other advice do I have?

    As a rule, any device upon delivery is obsolete. Pick up the solution for your business, based on your specific needs.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Jr. Production Engineer at a marketing services firm with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    In addition to InnoDB, it also supports full text search, optimizer, performance schema improvements and GTID.

    Valuable Features:

    MySQL 5.6 has a great many new features, including, but certainly not limited to, a number of performance improvements.

    However, besides the widely talked-about features such as InnoDB, there's also support for full text search, optimizer, performance schema improvements and GTID.

    Improvements to My Organization:

    In order to change the size of InnoDB transaction log files, you have to follow this procedure. Beware that if you don’t follow these instructions step-by-step, your server may not restart or rather it will start with InnoDB storage engine disabled and an error in the logs. So, here’s what you want to do:

    1. change (or add) the following variable in my.cnf: innodb_log_file_size = ..
    2. stop MySQL server
    3. make sure you see a successful shutdown of InnoDB in the MySQL error log
    4. move away old log files (at this point I have to double check where they are) by running the following command:
    mv /var/lib/mysql/ib_logfile* /tmp/
    5. start MySQL server – it should take a bit longer to start because it is going to be creating new transaction log files
    6. When you’re positive that MySQL server has started successfully, you can remove the old log files:
    rm /tmp/ib_logfile*

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user285990 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Service Operations Manager at a tech vendor with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Its ability to scale horizontally and transactional functionality features have been valuable to us, but the configuration templates could be improved.

    Valuable Features:

    It depends on the use and implementation, as I prefer to use Galera or XtraDB because of replication and failover functionality. However, the ability to scale horizontally is much better than other vendors. Also, the transactional functionality is good.

    Room for Improvement:

    Configuration templates and reliability both need work.

    Use of Solution:

    I have been using MySQL for over five years.

    Deployment Issues:

    I deploy multiples of these servers now, and it is all managed via a puppet so I/we have not had problems with deployment in a long time.

    Stability Issues:

    An overload of sessions, or long running queries. can cause the servers to be unusable.

    Scalability Issues:

    Currently no, as we use our own load balancer to enable us to scale to any level.

    Customer Service:

    We don't use it.

    Initial Setup:

    It was straightforward, and there are numerous blogs on-line that cover every possible configuration.

    Implementation Team:

    We did it in-house.

    ROI:

    It takes about six months, but this does depend on its associated product and usage.

    Cost and Licensing Advice:

    Chose your database based on traffic type and desired functionality, not on the initial cost.

    Other Advice:

    If you have the in-house knowledge MySQL can be a great product. If you do not I would recommend using MSSQL instead.

    Take a look at the environment you plan to implement including the application and traffic model.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Engineer with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    It provides a low cost and effective SQL DB solution for smaller companies. Replication does need improvement though.

    What is most valuable?

    • Speed
    • Cost

    How has it helped my organization?

    MySQL provides a low cost and effective SQL Database solution for smaller companies that don’t require the overhead and cost associated with RDBMS tools like Oracle

    What needs improvement?

    Replication and HA features, but that is to be expected at this entry point

    For how long have I used the solution?

    10 years.

    What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

    No, the deployment of MySQL is very easy as it is usually a part of Linux distributions and most hosting services provide a MySQL database as a part of their hosting service.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    No, MySQL has always been a stable database. If there are sufficient resources on the server to run the database it will do fine.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    None that I have run into. For really big databases I have always used Oracle.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Customer Service:

    There is plenty of support available on the internet. I have never really needed to use or activate a support contract for MySQL

    Technical Support:

    There is plenty of support available on the internet. I have never really needed to use or activate a support contract for MySQL.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Before using MySQL I used Oracle and Informix for RDBMS.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was easy as there is usually a version distributed as a part of the Linux distribution.

    What about the implementation team?

    I have always implemented MySQL through and in house team.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The initial setup cost and maintenance costs are built into the OS costs for all of my implementations and are insignificant.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I usually look at MySQL, PostgreSQL and Oracle.

    What other advice do I have?

    MySQL is a great RDBMS, but make sure it will integrate with all of the clients you will be using and the rest of your infrastructure. The problems usually have more to do with other products supporting MySQL than MySQL itself.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    PeerSpot user
    Database Manager at a tech company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    A fast and reliable database management system

    Valuable Features:

    • It is inexpensive as compared to other common databases like Microsoft SQL Server or Oracle. • MySQL is an extensible, open storage database engine that integrates seamlessly with a number of programming languages and other web-based technologies. • MYSQL is an open source system under the GNU General Public License. Developers can use it at no cost as long as the associated projects are also open-source. • Having excellent performance, MYSQL is used by many internet powerhouses like yahoo as their back-end database. MYSQL has great performance due to format of its default table, MyISAM. MyISAM databases use little disk space, memory and cpu. The system runs without flaw and perform better on all platforms including windows, Unix and Linux.

    Room for Improvement:

    • MySQL has a limited storage capacity. It doesn’t support large databases. • Database transactions are not handled efficiently. • Unlike Oracle, MySQL doesn't have Tablespace, Role management, snapshots, synonym and packages. • For transferring data, MySQL doesn’t support other languages being executed from within the system, and neither does it supports XML. • Compared to Oracle, MySQL database does not support any feature like Audit Vault on its server • There is a limited scope and earning available for database administrator of MySQL.

    Other Advice:

    MySQL is an open source database management system and is used by most of the most famous networking sites. It is more popular in websites and PHP integration. It can be executed under a number of operating systems like Linux, UNIX, Mac OS and Windows. MySQL supports ODBC interface which allows MySQL to be addressed by all the usual programming languages that run under Microsoft Windows.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user6579 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user6579Engineer at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Consultant

    Nice detailed explanation regarding advantages and disadvantages of MySQL. I agree with author on various points like popular free opensource database. But it doesn't support PL fully.

    See all 3 comments
    it_user1020 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Head of Data Center at a tech company with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    MySQL is undoubtedly one of the best open-source database products available. It's fast, easy to use and very reliable.

    Valuable Features:

    MySQL has established itself not only as the most popular open-source database, but the most reliable one as well. In my more than six years as system administrator managing various websites and web servers, MySQL has been our server of choice for web applications. It wouldn't be acquired by Oracle if it did not see it that way too.What I like most about MySQL is that it's relatively easy to install, fast, lightweight and reliable. It's available for both Windows and Linux, making it a very good alternative to other open source databases back then, which only runs on Linux. PostgreSQL for example did not have a Windows installer before. This made it very difficult to adopt it for mixed-OS environments and that is why we use MySQL.

    Room for Improvement:

    Back in the days, our only gripe about MySQL was that it was a purely command-line based system. We don't really see it as disadvantage though, as it allowed it to be fast and very reliable. This has been addressed through the years with graphical management systems for MySQL. MySQL is a highly recommended product. I give it five stars as it really gets the job done without much of a hassle. Being available for the many platforms also makes it a very compelling choice for mixed-OS environments, as data migration can just be as easy as backing-up and restoring on another server even on different operating systems.

    Other Advice:

    Just be ready though to work at the command line should you wish to use MySQL in its free form. It may not be the most intuitive user interfaces available, but it also makes MySQL a simple yet very reliable database for most people's needs.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user2652 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user2652Project Manager at a non-tech company with 10,001+ employees
    PopularVendor

    MySQL is platform independent and can be run in mixed OS platform like windows, linux, ubuntu etc. It gives compatibility even over different OS during backup and restore. Data can be backed up from one OS and can be restored on other OS.

    See all 3 comments
    it_user1077 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Developer at a tech company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    MySQL is the most popular Open Source Data Base Management System, developed and supported by Oracle Corporation.

    Valuable Features:

    1) It is freely available under the terms of GNU General Public License.2) MySQL works seamless on various platforms and environments.3) It is mainly used in Client/Server environment and it can be embedded in standalone applications. 4) Support SQL standards, and also provide Multi-thread environment.5) Offers high performance due to its unique storage engine architecture as well as it's core written in powerful languages such as C and C++.

    Room for Improvement:

    1) Does not provide good development and debugging tools, so it’s cumbersome to write large SQL statements.2) MySQL uses temporary tables to execute queries, so it consumes more space.3) MySQL is missing some RDBMS features like stored procedures, foreign keys, transaction, rollback, and subselect. And it also does't support triggers.It is widely used in web applications, and several software stacks includes MySQL as a Data Base Management System like (WAMP, XAMPP) considering its flexibility and simplicity.

    Other Advice:

    And if some one is looking for Database which performs simple processes like storing and displaying data only, then MySQL is the right choice.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user517392 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user517392DBA Manager at a media company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Vendor

    MySQL is great to provide a testing ground for new developers.

    See all 2 comments
    PeerSpot user
    Infrastructure Expert at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Consultant
    MySQL is a database system that is most used, fast, more reliable, cheaper, and better than any other database system.

    Valuable Features:

    It has a relational database system. Client/Server Architecture SQL compatibility (Structured Query Language) .MySQL has the features of the current SQL standard (at the moment SQL: 2003). SubSELECTs: From version 4.1, MySQL is capable of processing a query in the form of SELECT * FROM tablename1 WHERE x IN (SELECT y FROM tablename2). MySQL supports views from MYSQL version 5.0. Stored procedures: Is capable of storing codes: MySQL has supported SPs since version 5.0. Triggers: MySQL has supported triggers in a limited form from version 5.0 Unicode: MySQL has supported all conceivable character sets since version 4.1, including Latin-1, Latin-2, and Unicode (either in the variant UTF8 or UCS2). User interface: There are a number of convenient user interfaces for administering a MySQL server. Full-text search: Full-text search simplifies and accelerates the search for words that are located within a text field. If you employ MySQL for storing text (such as in an Internet discussion group), you can use full-text search to simply implement an efficient search function. Has got statement-based replication. It's one of the simplest ways to create databases.

    Room for Improvement:

    DELETE and UPDATE statements that use a LIMIT clause without an ORDER BY are non deterministic. Statements using any of the following functions cannot be replicated properly using statement-based replication: LOADFILE (), USER ().
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user116742 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user116742Oracle Web Administrator at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Consultant

    It is the easiest to use and simplest to learn. The coding is just simple.

    See all 5 comments
    PeerSpot user
    Infrastructure Expert at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Consultant
    One of the best Databases on the market today.

    Valuable Features:

    MySQL is open source, highly extensible and scalable, and is available from a web interface via PHPMyAdmin, which is excellent because it's platform independent.In almost all instances that I have used MySQL, it has handled whatever I threw at it and hasn't failed me yet.

    Room for Improvement:

    It is a community driven project, which means that support is sometimes scarce and hard to find. Also, it really doesn't have an IDE per-se, like MSSQL does.

    Other Advice:

    I use MySQL on a regular basis, specifically whenever I am managing or installing a Wordpress instance. Combined with PHPMyAdmin, MySQL is an excellent database solution for small to medium sized businesses or installations. I would recommend using a better supported database like Oracle or MSSQL for mission critical tasks on an enterprise level, but MySQL is completely capable of performing the same tasks as those other databases.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user2652 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user2652Project Manager at a non-tech company with 10,001+ employees
    PopularVendor

    MySQL can be integrated with LAMP/WAMP, web applications and number of programming languages. It is widely used for phpadmin and wordpress now a days.

    See all 4 comments
    it_user1044 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Developer at a tech company with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    Most Powerful Open Source Database

    Valuable Features:

    • Free to download and use • Loads of new features over 4.1 version. • Excellent support for a range of platforms. • Performs well in small and medium applications. • Most popular Open Source database engine. • Supports advanced concepts such as replication. • Performs extremely well in the average case.

    Room for Improvement:

    • It doesn't support stored procedures. • You probably wouldn't use it for heavy-duty installation. • There is no active directory for integration with Microsoft SQL Server or other data bases.

    Other Advice:

    As a developer I have used many database engines but MySQL is by far the best known and most popular Open Source database engine.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user2652 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user2652Project Manager at a non-tech company with 10,001+ employees
    PopularVendor

    As of MySQL 5.5.16, commercial distributions of MySQL include an authentication plugin that enables MySQL Server to use PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules) to authenticate MySQL users. PAM enables a system to use a standard interface to access various kinds of authentication methods, such as Unix passwords or an LDAP directory.

    See all 2 comments
    it_user1065 - PeerSpot reviewer
    Senior Manager of Data Center at a integrator with 51-200 employees
    Vendor
    One of the best open source database for web developers and application enthusiasts

    Valuable Features:

    The best features in MySQL, making it one of the most used databases globally, are- 1) Multi-threaded architecture for multiple CPU utilization and kernel threading 2) Use of triggers and crash recovery techniques 3) Indexed Conditional Pushdown 4) Integration with LAMP/WAMP 5) Easy setup with Memcached for increasing performance and scalability

    Room for Improvement:

    Few cons in MySQL are 1) Increased complexity in InnoDB 2) Slower performance when using InnoDB as compared to MyISAM for using simple queries 3) Only identical MyISAM tables can be merged. 4) No active directory integration as in SQL server 5) It does not support check constraints

    Other Advice:

    MySQL is indeed the world's most popular open source database. It has been designed on the hyper threading infrastructure and supports multi-threaded architecture for using multiple CPU's. It works on index compression with B-Tree disk tables popularly known as MyISAM. Its efficiency depends on the implementation of SQL functions with optimization of library classes.
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    it_user2652 - PeerSpot reviewer
    it_user2652Project Manager at a non-tech company with 10,001+ employees
    PopularVendor

    MySQL is platform independent and can be installed on windows, linux and other OS too. It is an open source database under the GNU General Public License, that means developers can use it at no cost as long as the associated projects are also open source.