Deepak Sahu - PeerSpot reviewer
Consultant at Dell Technologies
Real User
A powerful tool that can perform multiple analyses and reveal hidden insights in datasets to its users
Pros and Cons
  • "MySQL is a scalable tool. Scalability-wise, I rate the solution a nine out of ten...The solution's technical support is good. I rate the technical support a nine out of ten."
  • "There should be an arrangement for end-users to get trained to use the tool...Improvement-wise, a graphical interface could be added for new users, eliminating the need to memorize the complex syntax."

What is most valuable?

MySQL can handle multiple rules of a database within seconds and extract required information for the business case, especially with well-optimized queries.

What needs improvement?

There should be an arrangement for end-users to get trained to use the tool. End-users don't know many things which MySQL offers to its users. So, there is a need for the end-users to upgrade themselves. Also, the tool is already good the way it is currently owing to its features like multithreading which helps with the queries quickly. In short, if one goes for the complex part, if one uses it for a very specialized case, then that person needs to write a very complex query involving multiple tables, multiple joints, and multiple conditions based on whatever scenario one uses.

Improvement-wise, a graphical interface could be added for new users, eliminating the need to memorize the complex syntax.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have used MySQL for five and a half years in my company, but I have used the tool for around ten years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

MySQL is a stable tool. Stability-wise, I rate the solution a nine out of ten.

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February 2024
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What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

MySQL is a scalable tool. Scalability-wise, I rate the solution a nine out of ten. My whole company directly or indirectly uses the tool since we are involved in analytics. My company is an enterprise-sized one.

How are customer service and support?

The solution's technical support is good. I rate the technical support a nine out of ten.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Since everyone in the industry we are a part of uses MySQL servers, we have also used the same.

How was the initial setup?

The solution's initial setup depends upon the use cases. If you're using it for a simple thing, it's a simple process. But, my problems and statements are quite complex, and I use them to get information, like how the customers perform based on cohort analysis. Also, my use cases are complex, so I have to write complex queries. Overall, the setup process depends upon the scenario.

The installation process is not difficult since it gets pre-installed in all the machines after it is done once. Since the installation process is neither very easy nor difficult, I can rate it somewhere around seven out of ten.

The IT Department handled the deployment process in my current company. Based on my experience deploying the solution in my previous company, its deployment was not difficult. Since everything was already deployed in my current company, we are using the tool as front-end users. When planning to start using the solution, we need to launch SQL server before using it. Also, based on whatever datasets are there, we need to get the permissions for those data sets, after which we are good to go.

MySQL requires maintenance, while the IT department handles the maintenance of SQL server. I am not involved in managing the upgrading part of the tool. Every year, MySQL keeps releasing new versions with new functionalities.

What other advice do I have?

My suggestion to those planning to use the solution is to learn about it and utilize it for their specific scenarios. It is a powerful tool that can perform multiple analyses and reveal hidden insights within multi-million or billion-row datasets that may not be immediately visible to the human eye. The tool also offers many use cases for machine learning. I encourage users to plan and explore the tool to discover its full potential. I rate the overall product a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Serge Dahdouh - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at Les Roches International School of Hotel Management
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
An easy and convenient solution with good performance
Pros and Cons
  • "MySQL is easy and convenient for me. I don't need to rely on anyone. I can write the code and extract the information. It is fast if you know how to use it. The solution is not expensive, and most of the developers know how to use it. It is easy to create tables. The solution is stable and has good performance. The connection with AWS gives regular updates, which is manual otherwise and a nightmare."
  • "The tool needs to improve table visualization."

What is most valuable?

MySQL is easy and convenient for me. I don't need to rely on anyone. I can write the code and extract the information. It is fast if you know how to use it. The solution is not expensive, and most of the developers know how to use it. It is easy to create tables. The solution is stable and has good performance. The connection with AWS gives regular updates, which is manual otherwise and a nightmare. 

What needs improvement?

The tool needs to improve table visualization.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using the solution for three years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

MySQL is stable and fast. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The tool is scalable. Around 15-20 developers use the tool in my company. 

How are customer service and support?

MySQL's technical support is good. 

How was the initial setup?

The tool's installation is easy. You must download the app and log in using a password and username. 

What other advice do I have?

I rate the product a ten out of ten. 

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Buyer's Guide
MySQL
February 2024
Learn what your peers think about MySQL. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: February 2024.
757,198 professionals have used our research since 2012.
PeterKrall - PeerSpot reviewer
Freelance Software Engineer + Director of a company at Peter Krall Consulting
Real User
Top 20
Easy to install, easy to handle, and suitable for a limited amount of data
Pros and Cons
  • "My main reason for using MySQL for this small customer database company and for some kinds of scientific projects was that I had to do the installation myself. I didn't have a database administration team behind me. Therefore, I was looking for something very easy to handle. MySQL is easy to install, connect, and do all such things."
  • "Its scalability can be better. It is probably not as scalable as Oracle. I had some issues with connectors. I used it from a C++ program, and it required some work to make it run, but finally, it worked."

What is our primary use case?

I used it for a small customer database company in England with 20 employees. They didn't have that much data, and we needed something easy to install and easy to run. This was my use case for it.

What is most valuable?

My main reason for using MySQL for this small customer database company and for some kinds of scientific projects was that I had to do the installation myself. I didn't have a database administration team behind me. Therefore, I was looking for something very easy to handle. MySQL is easy to install, connect, and do all such things.

What needs improvement?

Its scalability can be better. It is probably not as scalable as Oracle. 

I had some issues with connectors. I used it from a C++ program, and it required some work to make it run, but finally, it worked.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for two or three years.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I used it for a small customer database company in England with 20 employees. There were only two people using it. It was really a small solution. For this purpose, it was perfect, but I'm not sure how it scales. It was just not an issue in this case because we had very little data. 

How are customer service and technical support?

Their technical support is fine.

How was the initial setup?

It is easy to install. It takes just a few hours.

What other advice do I have?

I will probably keep on using this solution. If you have a limited amount of data you want to store in the database, and you don't want to spend a lot of time on administration, it is certainly fine. 

I would rate MySQL a ten out of ten. It was perfect for our use case. 

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
PeerSpot user
Associate Consultant at a computer software company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 10
The best choice for new database management users and smaller data to 60K
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution helps us perform with our databases and extract data."
  • "Clusters are hard to perform so we use no SQL alternates like MongoDB."

What is our primary use case?

Our company uses the solution to extract data from databases. We perform the create, read, write, and operations in databases.  

The number of users depends on the project. If there is a demand, then people good with SQL will jump in on projects. 

What is most valuable?

The solution helps us perform with our databases and extract data. 

The solution is free. 

What needs improvement?

Clusters are hard to perform so we use no SQL alternates like MongoDB. 

The solution should manage large data sets better because data that is around one lakh or two lakh fails to load. In these cases, we use no SQL structures like MongoDB. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using the solution for three years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is stable. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution is decently, but not largely scalable. It works very well and is comfortable with 50K or 60K of data. If you have large-scale data, then the solution is slower and has some errors. 

How are customer service and support?

I have not needed technical support. 

How was the initial setup?

The setup is pretty easy. All resources are available on YouTube so configuration is quite easy. 

What about the implementation team?

We implemented the solution in-house and setup was pretty fast. You just set up the application, create queries, and connect with the front end or whatever you are trying to do. 

If you are handling large data, then it is a good idea to maintain the solution weekly because it will be better. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution is open source so is free. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

The solution is good for smaller data or new users. If you are maintaining large data and want to build a fully-furnished application, then you have to use something else like PostgreSQL. 

What other advice do I have?

If you are new to database management, then the solution will be the best choice. 

I rate the solution an eight out of ten. 

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Real User
Top 5
Good service provider, agile and quick deployment
Pros and Cons
  • "The initial setup was easy. I work in an agile way, which means coding and deploying quickly."
  • "MySQL's performance requires attention. For optimal performance, one should review and sometimes revise the code, particularly when using server-side scripting."

What is our primary use case?

I've used MySQL in the past for a variety of tasks. 

I once used MySQL when I created a PostgreSQL database for club management tasks. This included handling registrations, events, and mailing notifications for payments and event details. It served as a source service provider.

What is most valuable?


What needs improvement?

The response time for support could be faster. 

MySQL's performance requires attention. For optimal performance, one should review and sometimes revise the code, particularly when using server-side scripting. To optimize performance, it's crucial to pay attention to your code. Sometimes, you may need to review your code to ensure it's efficient and doesn't unnecessarily access the database multiple times.

The performance issues I encountered were not due to MySQL itself but were related to my coding approach.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for ten years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I would rate the stability a ten out of ten. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

For my use case, it is okay. Basically, it's just me for development. Previously, all clients or members of the club accessed it. When there was an event, maybe 30 to 40 people would try to access the system simultaneously.

I'm using SiteGround for hosting the website and its servers. I've chosen a package with more than enough CPU and memory to avoid trouble.

How are customer service and support?

I've used technical support for several times. Most of the time, it was quite okay with quick responses. Once, I had performance issues. It took some time to convince them, but they guided me on improving performance by changing some database functions in MySQL. It was a longer process, but it was eventually resolved.

How would you rate customer service and support?

Positive

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was easy. I work in an agile way, which means coding and deploying quickly. We had a few internal users but many external users accessing the website, though not the back office.

The back office was developed over years. It's not just about having an idea and executing it; it's more about testing and adapting the process, unlike the waterfall method, where you end up with something that may not be immediately usable.

What about the implementation team?

As the main user, our deployment process wasn't as strict as in a big company. I conducted tests, had a testing process with use cases to review, and then deployed. It was less rigid than in larger companies, where there are separate testing and development environments.

What was our ROI?

I  have seen value and impact from using MySQL

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I don't pay for a license. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

With my previous employer, we used Oracle.

What other advice do I have?

Don't just use MySQL on its own. Always use it with other software around it. MySQL is very stable, but pay attention to the software you use with it, whether you develop everything from scratch or use open-source systems like CMS.

Overall, I would rate the solution a nine out of ten. I would recommend using the solution. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Maher Shahzalal - PeerSpot reviewer
Backend developer at Alphatraduction
Real User
Dynamic workflows but lacks stability
Pros and Cons
  • "The relations in the database, the dynamic workflow, and the ability to connect with all columns. It's useful for e-commerce."
  • "I would rate the stability a seven out of ten. It does break down a little at times."

What is our primary use case?

My primary use case for MySQL is with my products or websites for clients, and it helps me maintain relations with the best.

What is most valuable?

The relations in the database, the dynamic workflow, and the ability to connect with all columns. It's useful for e-commerce.

What needs improvement?

There is room for improvement in terms of the stability of the solution. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for three years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I would rate the stability a seven out of ten. It does break down a little at times. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I would rate the scalability a seven out of ten. 

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup depends. For example, when working with e-commerce sites, it can be difficult to connect, and there may be failures. However, for other sites, it's easy.

What about the implementation team?

Our organization is using MySQL by having it hosted through a hosting provider.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It is free. It is an open-source platform. 

What other advice do I have?

Overall, I would rate MySQL a six out of ten. I recommend MySQL for small organizations and companies. For bigger organizations, one may need to consider other options.

You can also consider your project, budget, and organization while opting for MySQL. If it's a government or private project and what the product is. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Ahmed-Ramy - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at TMentors
Real User
Leaderboard
Open-source and easy to implement but needs a lot of updating
Pros and Cons
  • "It's a mature solution that's been around for decades."
  • "It isn't as reliable as an SQL Server."

What is our primary use case?

We use the product for database management, as a database engine.

What is most valuable?

We use it for different projects, mainly when we have lots of data and the customer can't afford to pay the license of SQL Server, which is not a cheap one.

That's the main reason you use MySQL or Postgres or other databases. It's less expensive. 

The solution is stable.

The scalability is very good.

It's a mature solution that's been around for decades.

It is very easy to set up the product.

What needs improvement?

The support in MySQL is horrible.

It isn't as reliable as an SQL Server.

I don't see MySQL being improved at all, like in the last 10 years. It has been at the same level for a long time.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Its stability is quite good. There are no bugs or glitches. it doesn't crash or freeze. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution is scalable, however, sometimes you might have issues. You need to have the knowledge to make sure that you can scale. That said, there are a lot of used MySQL implementations all around the world, which shows that it's a proven product. It has been there for more than 20 years or so.

How are customer service and support?

The support is not ideal. It could be better. It runs under Oracle, and Oracle support is not the best company when it comes to supporting - especially since MySQL used to be a free, open-source solution, and remains free. Oracle doesn't have this approach in its DNA. It's an enterprise and they're not into open-source ways of working. That's why sometimes we move from MySQL to Postgres, which is similar yet has the support in the community.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I've also used Postgre and SQL Server.

This product is not as solid as SQL Server. It's not like it's a lesser quality thing, however, it's not as reliable as SQL Server. The engine is a whole different engine. SQL Server is a full-featured database engine, and MySQL is based on what we call a file-based database. It's like flat files as a database engine, so it's an underdog, if you can call it that, when it comes to database engines. That said, it works fine.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is not that complex. It's simple and straightforward for the most part.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution is open-source. We don't pay for it.

There are options to get professional support from Oracle and, for that, the pricing really comes up, therefore, it's not competitive anymore. For that reason, it might be even wiser to get Oracle Database than get MySQL and pay for the premium support.

What other advice do I have?

We are just end-users. However, we are happy to work with them.

With Microsoft, we are a customer, partner, and vendor. We aren't partners with Oracle. 

I would rate the solution at a six out of ten.

They just need to assign a great team to MySQL, basically, and Oracle should just leave them alone to improve the product as the product hasn't been improved in the last 10 years. Since Oracle acquired it, it has been in decline. They need to do a lot, not in terms of features. In terms of the mindset.

I would recommend Postgres which is similar to MySQL, over this product. Even the clients are coming to us with such requests. They will flat-out tell us: "we hear that MySQL is having issues and we don't want to deal with Oracle and all that kind of stuff, so let's use Postgres." It's easy to migrate over. It's almost seamless, which makes it a very attractive option.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Principal Software Engineer at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Free, stable, and full-featured
Pros and Cons
  • "It is free, which is probably its most valuable feature. It is a pretty full-featured relational database. It really does everything we need it to do."
  • "The availability of tools could be improved in the MySQL open-source platform. They can provide more analytical tools. I haven't had any particularly difficult issues to troubleshoot on MySQL, but in the past, on Microsoft SQL Server, I had to troubleshoot some difficult issues, and better tools were in place to see what was going on in real-time on the server. So, that's the bit that is lacking on the MySQL open-source platform."

What is our primary use case?

We're on a software development team. We develop applications.

We're currently running version 5.7 of MySQL, and we are going to be upgrading to version 8 this year.

MySQL server currently is in a co-location center. We've got a hosting provider that takes care of that for us. We are looking at moving it into AWS, but that won't happen this year. We do have a smaller MySQL RDS instance in AWS right now, but it is pretty minimal. 

What is most valuable?

It is free, which is probably its most valuable feature. It is a pretty full-featured relational database. It really does everything we need it to do. 

What needs improvement?

The availability of tools could be improved in the MySQL open-source platform. They can provide more analytical tools. I haven't had any particularly difficult issues to troubleshoot on MySQL, but in the past, on Microsoft SQL Server, I had to troubleshoot some difficult issues, and better tools were in place to see what was going on in real-time on the server. So, that's the bit that is lacking on the MySQL open-source platform.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for seven years in my current company, and I have probably used it for another two or three years in a previous company.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is very stable.

How are customer service and support?

I haven't dealt with them.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We're using the open-source version right now, which is free. I do see some value in some of the more enterprise functions. We're using the open-source version right now, and I was interested in the MySQL Enterprise version really for the tools that they provide, but we decided not to make the purchase.

What other advice do I have?

There are certain things that it doesn't do as well as SQL Server. There are certain things that you can do to swamp the server, such as it is just not very responsive to more complicated joins and things like that. Unfortunately, you have to try to learn what those things are, but there are certain things like correlated sub-queries and more complicated approaches that it doesn't support, and you can hang the server in doing that. So, even though it has standardized the SQL queries and other things, there are some things that it doesn't perform particularly well, such as more complicated joined scenarios. We join several tables at a time, but we tend to do that on well-known indices, primary keys, and things like that, but if you're doing something more sophisticated than that, it becomes more challenging. These things that I've mentioned are written up by people, and once you learn those things, you develop techniques to work around them. You take different approaches to solve the problem for those things. You have to do that anyway as a developer. You don't just write code and throw it out there on a production server. You certainly need a totally separate test environment and all that.

I would rate MySQL an eight out of 10.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Download our free MySQL Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
Updated: February 2024
Buyer's Guide
Download our free MySQL Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.