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Eaton UPS OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Eaton UPS is #1 ranked solution in top Data Center Power Solutions. PeerSpot users give Eaton UPS an average rating of 10 out of 10. Eaton UPS is most commonly compared to Schneider Electric-APC Smart-UPS VT: Eaton UPS vs Schneider Electric-APC Smart-UPS VT. Eaton UPS is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 53% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a comms service provider, accounting for 24% of all views.
Eaton UPS Buyer's Guide

Download the Eaton UPS Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: June 2022

What is Eaton UPS?

Eaton UPS is a power management provider that delivers a comprehensive portfolio of uninterruptible power supply, backup power, power distribution, and power management solutions, which protect you from a host of threats, including power outages, surges, and lightning strikes. Eaton’s offerings are designed to deliver superior flexibility, maximum efficiency, and unprecedented reliability for network closets, server rooms, and data centers of all sizes.

Eaton UPS Key Features

Eaton’s power quality portfolio encompasses a comprehensive offering of power management solutions all from a single-source provider.

  • Complete backup solution: Protect against all nine power problems: power failures, power sags, power surges, under-voltage, electrical line noise, over-voltage, frequency variation, switching transients, and harmonic distortion. Minimize the risk for component stress, burned circuit boards, data crashes, and program failures.

  • LCD display: LCD interface for viewing current UPS status, feature adjustments, alarm settings, and servicing lockouts.

  • Central monitoring and event management: Monitor your entire system using Eaton’s web-based dashboard from a single screen to see a real-time picture of power quality and energy usage. From the dashboard you can set up and manage alarms and system events.

  • Comprehensive reporting: Eaton’s reporting feature allows you to see past individual measurements, trend graphs, and events. It analyzes the complex data from multiple sites and automatically consolidates the information into simple graphical reports.

  • Ethernet connectivity: Connect your Eaton UPS directly to your Ethernet network and to the internet and monitor it from your desktop without installing any additional software.

Reviews from Real Users

Eaton UPS stands out among its competitors for a number of reasons. Several major ones are its extensive monitoring and reporting tools, its scalability, and that it is a stable and very reliable product.

Brad G., a technical services manager at a government company, notes, “The fact that they're reliable and that they notify us whenever the line power drops are the only things we really need. All our UPS's have been available and up whenever power outages have happened. So far, the battery life, from my observation, seems better than average. It was one of the features that Eaton had described to us. They have a certain way of charging the batteries and keeping them charged so that they actually last longer.”

Juno C., a radiation oncologist at East Oregon Cancer Center, writes, "The battery life seems to be pretty good. I don't have a lot of experience with other units of its size, but it does a good job of keeping our unit up. There is no active power management. It just keeps the power up. We haven't had any power failures that are long enough to completely drain the battery. It's been good for small power failures. In addition, I can access the built-in webpage on the UPS and use that to look at the status. It's on all the time and monitoring. It gives us an email once a month telling us that our device is working properly. It will also list the power events that happened in that month."

Eaton UPS was previously known as Eaton Powerware, Powerware 9300 Series.

Eaton UPS Customers

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Archived Eaton UPS Reviews (more than two years old)

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Ray Parpart - PeerSpot reviewer
Director of Data Center Strategy & Operations at University of Chicago
Real User
Company value is more than the product. It is their people Eaton's great product and people keep bringing me back
Pros and Cons
  • "The two things that I like are the ESS, its related components, and the bypass sync, which means if there's a problem with the UPS I can mechanically wrap around it without going to static bypass. Eaton has one of the few units on the market that will do that."
  • "VMMS is a good feature. There are multiple charging units inside each UPS. For example, on my 9395 I have three to four charging units and the unit will scale down. Let's say I've got a megawatt of power. If I'm only running 200 Kw I can drop the charging units down and rotate through the charging units to reduce energy. They do all that."
  • "Their service and their relationship with their customers is their biggest value, absolutely, compared to the competitors that I've dealt with... the service organization of Eaton is one of their strongest points."
  • "I want to monitor remotely and that is a complaint I have... The remote monitoring software they have does not provide the same information that the touch screen provides and neither provide me the same information that the field techs can draw out of the unit when they directly connect to them."

What is our primary use case?

Our primary use case is mission-critical: data centers, communication closets, building automation systems, our utility plants. All our critical systems are run on Eaton. Our organization has over 20 three-phase units. We've got the 9395s and a 9355s, the 480V three-phase and the 120V three-phase.  Looking forward to leveraging 93PM and the next generation of products

How has it helped my organization?

Their UPSs do their job. The argument goes that you find out that UPSs fail when you need them. Knowing these units are going to work allows me to sleep at night. I have a proven track record with them. They just always work. I've never had a problem, not power glitches, nothing. That is exactly what they're supposed to do. 

What is most valuable?

The two things that I like are the ESS, its related components, and the bypass sync, which means if there's a problem with the UPS I can mechanically wrap around it without going to static bypass. Eaton has one of the few units on the market that will do that. Because we're running mission-critical loads, in the event I have a failure of the UPS where I can't go to static bypass before I go to maintenance bypass, I'm screwed. I risk losing the entire load. The Eatons allow me to go to maintenance bypass, which means paralleling on an alternate power source, and then take the UPS out without static. So if I have a failure, there is a minimal risk of losing a data center to repair the UPS - and that has saved me at least once. I had an alternate vendor where I wound up spending about $180,000 in mitigation - we had to provide temporary power, staffing, and a great deal of time coupled with risk because the UPS had a fault and I couldn't go to bypass.  The alternate vendor's K13 contactor failure meant I could not go to static bypass safely. There was a 50/50 chance a unit would drop the load. On my Eaton, we had a component failure where it was unclear what the unit was doing. It was still maintaining load. I don't remember specifically what the part was, but it was one of the control systems. We were concerned that going to static bypass would have been problematic and Eaton Field Engineer said, "But it's not an issue, you can go to maintenance bypass and then we can fix it."We learned the issue was resolved with a firmware upgrade It was never an issue. Though concerned if I moved the UPS to static bypass it would drop the load. Because of the way the Eatons work, I simply could have gone to maintenance bypass and never have had an issue. That means I would have had a mission-critical room that I don't lose. One of the other key features that I like is ESS (Energy Saver System) for it's cost avoidance. What it allows the unit to do is run on utility power. The UPS units are smart enough and fast enough that 99 percent of the time, if utility power is clean, the UPSs operate on utility power allowing the batteries to rest.  Because the batteries are resting more than being drained in double conversion, we have seen battery strings operate 8+ years without issue.  Normally UPS batteries are replaced every three to four years. I can now get six to eight years out of the batteries providing for a large cost avoidance. When you're looking at a million-dollar battery replacement, to be able to push that out three years is an enormous saving. That's on the VRLAs.  With Lithium-Ion advances and cost reductions we are looking at a large paradigm shift to this model.  The reason I stay with Eaton is consistency and reliability, and also the service organization. To me, Eaton provides some of the best service. I use the manufacture for my big iron. I do not use third-party maintenance for Critical Load situations. One, Eaton's been very competitive for me. There have really been no cost savings utilizing a third-party.  An advantage of using the manufacturer for service is direct access to engineers. If there is an issue, and everyone will have an issue at sometime, the field techs call the Eaton engineers. By leveraging the manufacturer access to parts is a given!  If there is an issue I don't want to wait for people to show up or argue the issue.   VMMS is a good feature. There are multiple charging units inside each UPS. For example, on my 9395 I have three to four charging units.  The units are at full capacity the charging units will rotate on and offer similar to a lead/lag model.  This saves energy as well stages to meet capacity.    Most of my units are large, 480v, three-phase units.  The industry is working to reduce footprint which is valuable.   Units are getting more dense and feature rich.  Advances in transformerless and Lithium-Ion are game changes.

What needs improvement?

The biggest improvement I would like to see is the remote monitoring and management. All the interfaces should match. The unit touch screen, Web interface, and other remote options should provide the same information and it can never be enough!  Presently the touch screens and web based interfaces look and function differently.  I want to know what this unit is doing. I want to be able to track and trend the data. . The only other features I would like to see are technology improvements, which they're doing anyway. At what point do you go to transformerless? At what point do you have better caps?  UPS operate in a simple matter.  improvements in software, contactors, coupled with transformerless and Lithium-Ion are disruptive technologies.  All the vendors are doing it and making it available. From an improvement perspective, they're on the right path. There isn't anything major that I can jump up and say, "I wish you would do this better." On the single-phase units, I'd like to see ESS and Lithium-Ion through the produce line down to the 50k units.  These are coming!
Buyer's Guide
Eaton UPS
June 2022
Learn what your peers think about Eaton UPS. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
607,127 professionals have used our research since 2012.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Eaton UPSs going on 14 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's rock-solid.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The units I have are scalable, to a point.  When putting in large units you spec for what the target capacity is.  In the end one may delay some charging modules but all the core infrastructure, cable, footprint, etc, must be in place day one.  If I'm buying one of these big 9395 units, I'm buying half-a-megawatt plus.  Eaton makes a lot of scalable units. They make the 93PM and the 9395 now has some great options for scalability. The problem with scalability is, while they all do it, you're going to pay for it. If I'm going to go into an environment where I don't know what my load is going to, I don't want to buy two-and-a-half meg on day-one because I don't need it. But you've got to build everything for that on day-one: all the cables, the battery plans, the breakers; the frame has to be there. If you're willing to spend that, then great. Most of the time, even in today's environments, it's the little ones that are scalable. You can start out with 25 Kw and go to 150. But if I want to start out at half-a-meg, and I'm going to scale to two meg, that's a different animal. I can do that with both of them. If I'm willing to pay for it, they have options.  Do I think Eaton has scalable products? Yes, I do. And they met the needs that I have had in the past. Do I see value in scalability? I have yet to realize in my environments.

How are customer service and support?

The Service Plan doesn't result in faster repair time because my repair times are so fast anyway. I've got four-hour response times on my units. If I have a problem with the unit, I get somebody here, 24/7, within four hours.  One of the beauties of their sales team is they build relationships, so I'm not always calling an 800-number saying, "Hey, I need help," where the reply is, "Okay, where are you? What time zone are you in?" I can call my technicians 24/7 and say, "I have a problem" and they are on the way!  Granted there is little concern as I am under contract. Eaton's service team in the Chicago Metro area is a very personable team, all the way up to the VP of Service. They're focused on customer service and it shows in the relationships I've had with them. The last issue we had a technician come down for was a battery issue. Sadly the issue was me not interpreting the alarm appropriately which simply had to be cleared. They came out and took the time to teach me. Another time I got a UPS wet and blew it. That was exciting. We had a leak. It actually leaked through a 12-inch concrete slab above it. It was like a Rube Goldberg puzzle. We had a leak upstairs that traveled 20 feet across the concrete floor, found a crack, slid through the crack in the floor, into a conduit that's been in the concrete for a hundred years, down the concrete and then out of an abandoned electrical box in the concrete ceiling. It dripped on a piece of Unistrut, slid over about three feet, and dropped on a high-voltage energy bus. You can't make these things up. The UPS did what it was supposed to do but we got it wet. The UPS went from ESS to double conversion, to bypass, back to double conversion, back to ESS, in 72 milliseconds. The way a UPSs works is if there's a large in-rush, which means a whole bunch of equipment needs a lot of power at once, the UPSs actually lets the utility handle it.  In an in-rush, my load will peak up, my draw will peak up. The UPSs will watch the inrush and grab the load when the demand stabilizes.  Under normal circumstance all would have been good.  Lesson of the day, keep equipment dry! 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I've have some GE & APC units and I'll tell you the same thing I've told every one of those vendors: When dealing with a product at this caliber, I can't go wrong with any of them. If I buy a Mitsubishi unit or a Liebert unit, they're all good units, bar none. Each vendor will debate why theirs is better bet in the end all will do the job.  The key is what is the right product at the time I'm going to buy which meets my needs. Who's got the best feature set, the richest feature set, the best price, and the best capabilities. What is the best return on my money at the end of the day. Once that's said, it really comes down to the service organization and the reliability of the units. I have had issues with all the products and I am sure everyone out there has as well.  It's just I have had fewer issues with my Eatons than they have had with their other vendors. I also believe in standards. Once I've picked a product line, my first choice for the next unit would be Eaton.  There are economies of scale having so many of them. It comes down to this: When Eaton comes out to service units, they spend two-three days, and can cover them all. I'm not having to multiple vendors and schedule visits which consume my time.  I have one throat to choke, one contract, and one great relationship.  As a corporation, they still have the flexibility to be able to deal with the customer in that manner. Today, their service and customer relationships are their biggest value, absolutely, compared to the competitors I deal with. The Eaton service organization is one of their strongest points.

How was the initial setup?

I'm not an engineer or an electrician. For me, the ease/complexity of the setup is a hard question to answer because the field people do it. My observations are based on watching my electricians install my units and watching and working with the field engineers through the startup. It seems relatively straightforward. Plug component A into component B, run a wire from this terminal to that terminal. It seems very straightforward. When the field techs have to do startups, it takes time to work through the details.  This is all scheduled!  When you're putting one, two, or two-and-a-half megawatts of UPS, there's an enormous amount of potential energy and danger. If they want to take a day or two to put these things in, I'm not going to argue with them, because I want it done right. The installation depends on how fast you can put a 1000's of pounds of equipment.  You've just got to put big, heavy things in place and run big thick, heavy wires. You're running two dozen wires that are as big as your thumb and they're heavy; the wire is two-and-a-half pounds a foot. It's a lot of man-handling but I would say it's been relatively straightforward. Is Eaton any better or different than any other UPS vendors on the market?  From providing backup power not really.  From how they do it, I can only say they have treated me well!

What was our ROI?

ROI is an extremely hard number to quantify. If a data center goes offline, the teaching and learning process at the University, and all the financial systems, hiccup. It would inconvenience an enormous amount of people. Some people would not teach because they can't get to electronic data. The cost of how many people would really go idle is difficult to calculate.  Where the recovery comes in, with the amount of people involved, the numbers could get into the $70,000 s to $100,000 an hour number simply having faculty and staff idle people. It starts to add up. In a previous position we calculated downtime at about $60,000 an hour, depending on the plant. Just idling staff cost that much. In higher-ed, what's more critical to the impact than idling people is the data. I have to protect the data. There are people whose life's work is literally sitting on a computers in one of my data centers. A faculty member who spent his entire life researching a subject may have his data sits on a computer in my data center. If that computer has a problem, he literally can lose his life's work. Granted backups should be in place and normally are. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

When you bid these large units I fin them all within a single-digit percentage point of each other. I can't make a bad decision. It's just what's the right decision at that moment in time? They're all cost-competitive. I do pay for a service contract to Eaton every year. I do it through a third-party, but it's all Eaton paper. We do that because of the Ts and Cs - getting contracts mutually agreed to with all the legal teams is challenging thus I leverage a third party to help with this.  I have the luxury of dealing with Eaton direct or leverage my VAR as needed.  Either way communications between all parties is strong!

What other advice do I have?

If you're thinking of implementing Eaton, reach out to their customers and then go talk to them. I make myself available to Eaton, nationwide. If they want to see my systems, I'll talk to them. I tell them good and bad. Eaton's not perfect. We've had a couple of bumps in the road, but we worked together and we've solved them, in a very positive. You're going to have problems. The key is you judge character: how do you respond in a crisis. When I went out to bid recently, I even told Eaton: "It's pretty hard to negotiate when I'm telling all my bidders they have to come to you for my big-iron contracts." Eaton could have taken advantage of the situation but did not!  They continue to be competitive.  The biggest lesson I've learned from using these UPSs is that you get what you pay for. The one-sentence summary of the value of the Eaton is that I sleep well at night. Eaton's lithium-ion batteries were not a factor in our decision to go with their UPSs. All the manufacturers are buying the same batteries and cabinets. PredictPulse, in my opinion, is valuable. But I also feel it's overpriced at this time.  We monitor, track and trend our units 24x7. If there's an alarm, I get a text and an email and somebody is responding to it. Where PredictPulse is valuable is that it's looking across 10,000+ units and says, "Hey, you know what? We're seeing this component failure," or "Based on this information, we think you should probably fix your caps or change your fans." Or, "We've got a firmware update and we've seen problems. We're putting a fix on our firmware. Next time we're out we'll put this in." That's where it's valuable.  I do like where PredictPulse notifies Eaton Service team if there is an alarm.  Having Eaton see the alarm in near real time brings peace of mind.  I continue to evaluate PredictPulse.  My guess as more customers utilize the price will come down.   The touch screen functionality is fine but to me it's overrated. I don't know why they have it. Well, I do know why they have it because they need to "keep up with the Jones's." It's fine. It does what I want it to do. It tells me all the information.  From a practicality perspective, it serves one function: It's a showpiece. Most of us don't touch the panels.  I want to monitor remotely and that is a complaint I have.  The remote monitoring software does not provide the same information that the touch screen provides and neither provide me the same information that the field techs can draw out of the unit when they directly connect to them. I use Eaton transformers but I don't use their in-cabinet power strips for one reason. Not because they don't make a good product, but because I use an alternate vendor.  The vendor I use fully assemble the cabinet with a number of components and the PDU's at the factor.    The cabinet shows up, I roll it off a pallet, and I'm done. I do have some Eaton PDUs, but I don't have a lot of them. Most of my big breakers are all Eaton. My big step-down transformers in my data centers are Eaton. I'm Eaton, cradle-to-grave, from the utility switchgear coming all the way into my distribution. I've drunk the "Kool-Aid" of Eaton. What it allows me to do is that if I ever have a problem, I get to go to them and say, "Look, the whole thing is yours." It's cradle-to-grave. It's their product. They're price-competitive and from a technical perspective they're at the top of the game. I could buy Square D, but then I'm buying Square D breakers. I'm buying somebody's UPS and somebody else's distribution and somebody else's paralleling gear. The fact that I can pick up the phone and call one vendor and say, "Here, design this for me end-to-end," and they say, "Okay, not a problem," saves me time and headaches. I did have a problem with one design.  The project fell just short of specifications.  After working with the engineering department a solution was put in place.  In the end the issue was resolve!  It's hard to say how much downtime the solution has saved our organization because, other than the unit getting wet, long story, I haven't had any power outages in ten years now. The Data Center I have has never been down due to a power outage.  We've seen blinks in power transfers from the utility company, but to me it's an unquantifiable number, unless you're seeing really bad power all the time, where you're seeing brownouts and blackouts. I haven't had a power outage in any of the Eaton systems that I have.  In terms of maintenance, somebody comes out twice a year. We do a major/minor PM on all our enterprise UPS units. During the first visit they check the software, the firmware, the alarms. On a "major" they upgrade the firmware. The units have to be shut them down,  everything is checked, make sure all the connections are tight, the caps are tight. They do electrical tests, all the capacitors and the electrical components, making sure everything is solid and tight. The battery comes out twice a year, although for the VRLAs I have them come out quarterly. They check every battery, every connection. They make sure the volts and ohms are right, the right resistance. That's one of the reasons these units work so long, because we do a lot of maintenance.  Other than that, we track and trend all our UPS units every few minutes.  My operations center watches all our system 24/7.  Alarms are reviewed near real time. The care and feeding of these units, to me, is no different than the care and feeding of any other critical system. I would rate Eaton as a corporation, not the Eaton UPS, as a nine out of ten. In a world like mine, I don't build relationships based on products. I build relationships based on the sales and service teams. If I'm buying a lot of product from a company but the salesperson leaves the company, I will evaluate the value of the my relationship.  There is a potential I will follow the sales and service teams.  The relationship is with the person, not the company. The Eaton people that have come to the table nationwide have been stellar. I would rate Eaton UPSs at as a nine as well. There are little things they could do, like fix their interfaces and give me more data.
Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Bill_Johnson - PeerSpot reviewer
VP of Colocation Data Center Operations at H5
Real User
Information from PredictPulse helps us prepare for maintenance and preserve our uptime SLAs
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable feature is the control... we couldn't live life without [PredictPulse]. It does add a level of comfort knowing that PredictPulse is telling us about potential errors before they happen. My preference is to keep it in ESS mode. It saves me a good amount of money."
  • "I do like the ESS mode which I operate with the 9395s. However, I've got an issue with one of my UPS strings here in Denver: That ESS mode is too sensitive to utility noise. So the utility shows no outages but I've got the UPS switching it in and out of ESS mode."

What is our primary use case?

UPSs are supporting critical load for data center colocation, and that is true across our national portfolio. We run real estate, but our real estate is "critical-load real estate." We've got data center floors that we lease space out to for IT companies. Those IT companies can be using a rack - a single equipment cabinet - or they can be 25,000 square feet of a data center hall for their enterprise. It's a mixed environment, although we try to specialize at each of our locations in a certain sweet spot. We also have shelf space that we lease to companies, large companies which come in and bring their own UPSs and run that space themselves. It's a good world to be in. I learned by watching some of our customers doing things that were mistakes. I get to learn from their mistakes.

In Denver, we've got four strings. Each string has four 750 kVA UPS modules. I'm using them in Cleveland as well. I've got three systems there, and each system has three 750 kVA modules.

Our organization has always had UPSs; that's part of the business that we do and we do rely on UPSs. Each of our locations, at some point during the year, switches over to UPS before we transition to generators. They are used actively every year. Our organization functions by supplying UPS.

How has it helped my organization?

I've got a critical-load bill from the utility here in Denver which runs about $130,000 monthly. That critical-load ESS mode moves us from 92 percent efficiency in the UPS to 99 percent efficiency in the UPS. It saves me a seven percent delta between my UPSs which are running pretty much all of that $130,000. It equates to about $11,000 monthly that it saves me if I'm in ESS.

Also, the inherent functionality of a UPS is that you're running your load on batteries. Utilities across the country these days are very dirty, more so on the brownout side than on the spike side, but computer equipment doesn't like unsteady power. So for our customers, it saves them a good amount of money in the failure rate from the equipment that's plugged into the UPSs because they're getting a steady load, steady power.

The way to look at it would be is if we did not have a UPS. If we had to switch over to generators from the utility power, there would be outages. Each one of our contracts with our customers has service level agreements that guarantee 100 percent power availability. Just considering our Denver facility, it has had 100 percent power availability since 1997. It's the integrity that the UPS provides the company that allows us to lease the space that we lease for colocation customers.

We use PredictPulse and the more information I can have from a predictive standpoint, the better I am at preparing my customers. When I talk about 100 percent availability, that is including any maintenance windows. Both our "A" and our "B" power sides are always 100 percent energized. When we do work, we transition from one system and put that load on the surviving system. It is a process. It is not something that can happen quickly, and it takes a lot of planning. In any kind of situation where I can get more information from the machine, telling me that something's going to need to be replaced before it actually fails, the greater the advantage I have in preparing the process for transition.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the control. We started with PredictPulse at the very beginning. Eaton could not get it to function properly. We got to a stage where we said, "We're just going to ignore PredictPulse because we can't get it to operate and you can't get it to operate." Eaton did step up and they got it to operate in our Denver facility, and now we couldn't live life without it. It does add a level of comfort knowing that PredictPulse is telling us about potential errors before they happen.

My preference is to keep it in ESS mode. It saves me a good amount of money. I've watched it work, flip back and forth with utility outages, and I've got complete comfort that the switching supports our critical load in a timely manner. We do drop out of ESS if there are severe storms in the area, or the utility is proving to be a little unreliable. That's simply because it concerns us when the UPS is switching back and forth so often. But it has been good.

The footprint is also good. I always want it smaller, but I always want to be able to have more room to do things inside it, so I definitely understand that give and take. The good thing is that it fits in the same space as my old UPSs. It is a little bit smaller, but it's a little bit larger than the Toshiba that we have. But size is not an issue in size, at least in my implementation.

What needs improvement?

I do like the ESS mode which I operate with the 9395s. However, I've got an issue with one of my UPS strings here in Denver: That ESS mode is too sensitive to utility noise. The utility shows no outages but I've got the UPS switching it in and out of ESS mode. That's a little bit aggravating and it's a concern that Eaton hasn't been able to remedy that yet. I don't know if that's Eaton or my manager who is dragging their feet.

I like the touch screen. I don't like the fact that they've decreased the size of the touch screen. I'm actively installing a new 9395 system right now. It's operating, but the commission is in two weeks. These new modules came in, and I found that they had moved from a larger ten-inch screen to a seven-inch screen, which is a big reduction in size. I didn't like the fact that they said, "Well, we can give you the larger screen, but it's going to cost you more money because these are being phased out." This was at the time that a company was saying, "Let's partner," and we had been partnered together for four or five years. There were two issues: Number one is that I don't like that we found it out once the piece of equipment was delivered to us, that we weren't told beforehand that that change had taken place. And number two is that they then wanted to charge me $27,000 to go to the screen that's on all my other UPSs. I voiced my frustration about that and their response was, "Yeah, they're being phased out."

Regarding the integration between the UPS and the batteries, I would say the same thing about any UPS manufacturer right now. I'm not sure if Eaton has started using lithium-ion, but it's almost like you have a UPS sitting there which feeds a string of UPS batteries, and then you get a battery monitoring system, which is another item. Although right now it doesn't hamper our operation, I would like for Eaton to figure out a way to integrate the batteries more seamlessly into a UPS system.

I definitely selected the Eaton UPS based on the features and their capabilities. They're continuing down the road with that. They produced a Unity system and there's no power factor within the system, so that's a plus. I know they've gone to a one-megawatt system. I would like for them to get a larger system in the future and I know they're working on that. I would like the system to be able to support maybe 1.5 to 1.8 megawatts per UPS string. I don't know what interval they're working on. They've moved up, I think, to a 1.1 meg from the 750s. There's a very small market for that, but we've got facilities where we used to operate at one or two megawatts and now they're operating at five or ten megawatts. The power requirements for the new IT systems are a lot higher.

For how long have I used the solution?

In our Denver facility, we installed them in 2014 - 2015.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

My impressions of the stability of Eaton UPSs has been good. 

I've installed six Eaton 9395s. Three of them had failures when they were one week old. The good part about that is all three of them happened before we had critical load on them. It does seem like they need to be tested a little bit more at the factory. 

When I did a factory witness test in Raleigh for this last one, the problem was that they were getting fan alarms on the maintenance panels. When I asked about the fan alarms, the factory engineer told me, "Well yeah, that's because they've gone with cheaper fans, and the cheaper fans don't have a high enough speed to keep from having a fan alarm." I said, "Well, this test has failed, and I won't accept this unless you replace all the fans." They did. But the thought of them waiting for a customer to catch that just aggravated me.

I'm a proponent of Eaton. I like their technology, but I think they're trying to cut corners now and they need to stop it.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

They scale well. We use the 750 interval. 

I do have considerable information for the smaller modular systems which are great systems. I haven't found an application for them, but when I do I would love to have the opportunity to implement one. That's a valuable aspect, where you can actually do plug-and-play. You could expand a UPS system without taking down your primary load.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've contacted first- second-, and third-tier, tech support - all of them. I have had some issues with their first tier. I've actually had facilities managers contact them to put in four-hour-response service calls and they've been asked for a credit card so that they could charge the $800 service fee upfront. I didn't take it very well and I did escalate that and it did get taken care of. But that's a little bit of a slap in the face when you're spending, five or six million dollars a year with a company, even though we're a little fish.

There all those kinds of issues. We've got 13 locations and I've got facilities managers who may call in for support and in normal situations, their tech support is very good. 

I'm having a little bit of issue because there's a little gap between warranty and annual support. I've got systems that are coming off of a three-year warranty and I'm trying to get Eaton to start putting us in a rotation for annual maintenance. Eaton doesn't do that on their own, which seems odd to me because that's money for them. So we're still trying to get those transitions to happen. It's a little quirky thing, but moving from a warranty period over to putting the machines on regular, paid, annual maintenance is not smooth.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I still have two Toshiba 9000 series UPSs in our Phoenix data center.

Eaton UPSs are inherently efficient. I replaced Liebert 500 and 600 series UPSs with these. The Liebert UPSs were about 40 percent efficient at the load level that we were at. These Eatons, even worst case, moved it to 90 percent. Toshiba would have saved me money. Any of the newer UPSs would have saved similar amounts. Just moving to a newer UPS saved me lots of money.

How was the initial setup?

The setup is complicated, more than it needs to be, by electricians who are charging you more than they need to charge you.

However, from a manufacturing standpoint, the actual setup and install of the UPS is fairly simplistic. It's a box you need to plug into power, and then you plug critical load into it, and you plug batteries into it. When I install a UPS, I judge by the cost to install versus the product cost. That's kind of a double-edge sword because I try to get my product costs down real low. But when the cost to install starts ballooning over the cost of the product, then to me, the install is too complicated. In a greenfield situation with an Eaton UPS, it's probably 25 to 30 percent of the cost of the UPS. But where I'm installing and retrofitting existing data centers, it's probably 100 percent to 125 percent of the UPS. And that's because I'm mandating that, in the process of installing a UPS, they have to keep my critical-load up on something. So that does increase the cost. I don't think Eaton has much control over that, unless you're buying - and we do - the installation from Eaton. Even in that instance, it's still back to the electricians. They're just passing through the electrician's cost.

Deployment generally takes three to four months from the order to installation, if no additional switchgear is required. Switchgear has something like a ten-month waiting period. Once we have the Eaton unit it can usually be installed over a two- to three-week period, if the prep work has been done beforehand.

Our deployment strategy is specific to each location. Looking at Denver, each time we've replaced one in Denver we put the unit on order and we then sit down and design the way the load will be actively switched over to a different UPS. We may or may not require reconfiguration of switchgear. Then, when the units arrive, we use Eaton CSEs who come out and unpack and install the unit itself. At the same time, we've got electricians replacing or building the battery distribution breakers. Once Eaton does a field-start on the unit, then we will plan a third-party commissioner to come out and commission the unit under load.

In terms of the number of people involved in a setup, I've seen groups of eight to ten electricians at the peaks. Then it drops down and you're going to have one controls-person, Eaton, and four to six electricians. And there is the H5 person watching over them, whether they're an electrical manager, a facilities manager, or a project manager. It will just be one body from an H5 standpoint, usually, who's controlling what's happening.

Once it's deployed, it will usually be one person taking care of and scheduling maintenance. A number of our buildings have building engineering staff, so these are fed into a BMS (building management system). So the UPS would actually be feeding signals to a BMS, whether it be JCI, Metasys, or Honeywell EBI. The building engineers will get alarms based on that and, usually, we run a staff of one to two building engineers, 24/7 at our facilities. Those building engineers are not dedicated to the UPS, they're dedicated to the whole building. The mechanical portions of the building take some 80 percent of their time. If we get an alarm from a UPS it's usually a failure of the UPS or the utility.

What about the implementation team?

Our third-party commissioner for Denver is called Primary Integration. We've used a couple of other services but only one time. Primary Integration is the only one that we continue to use, that we're happy with their performance.

What was our ROI?

The UPSs are an expense that I've got to have, but I'm gaining the return in the revenue for colocation.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The cost per unit, as a rough estimate, is $300,000 per UPS 750-block.

The only additional services would be the maintenance we do. I don't know the exact costs of that at each location, but at Cleveland or Denver I believe we're paying about 35,000 a year per maintenance contract.


Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We actually looked at the market and we liked the Eaton UPS from an efficiency standpoint. They were really close to the Mitsubishi or Toshiba UPSs. We talked with both manufacturers' support teams and we like the closeness of Eaton's manufacturing to their technical team - the way they're entwined - so that they experience lessons-learned a lot quicker than an outside, third-party team that would be doing the support and feeding back to the factory. Eaton's service and engineers were one of the deciding factors for us.

I believe that Eaton is starting to lose some of its expert field-team components, so I am a little concerned currently, but that's just been in the last year. All of their key, field support team engineers and technicians are leaving. When they leave, it's kind of a big gap.

Toshiba was a little less expensive. The Toshiba had, I thought, a little better meantime between failure but, again, my concern was in maintenance and keeping the Toshiba current. That is a con, but on the other side is the fact that the Toshiba could readily be supported by a third-party, so maintenance going forward had a tendency to be a little cheaper.

Quality of maintenance is always a concern. With a third-party, it's a larger concern. Eaton really took care of all my concerns early on with the quality of their maintenance. That was good since I couldn't go anywhere else for maintenance.

The fact that I'm now seeing some of their field engineering diminish in quality - and don't get me wrong, I've not experienced any impact, but I'm seeing that there's a risk - creates a concern because there is no third-party I can go to. Where, with Toshiba, if I don't like what's happening to a third-party maintenance vendor, I can go to another third-party maintenance vendor who's supporting Toshiba.

What other advice do I have?

You've got to design it well into your system, as with any UPS. The UPS can't do things that the switchgear doesn't give it the availability to do. Also, it's only as good as the last maintenance that was performed on it.

The biggest thing, as far as the UPS units themselves goes, is that people have a tendency to forget about the UPS units. They're always on standby and nobody thinks about them until there's actually an outage. The good part about the UPS is it's an active component in the data center stream, in what we deliver to our colocation customers. The big component is the flexibility of a UPS to switch load from module to module; seamlessly is the biggest positive. We forget that sometimes when it's just sitting there humming.

The lessons I've learned are around attention to detail. Make sure, when you open your door to let somebody in to work on batteries for you, that you know who that person is, that the person has not been working on batteries for only six months and before that they were working at the McDonald's. Most of the issues are caused by lack of process, which is aggravated by lack of expertise in people.

I'm not using Eaton's lithium-ion batteries. I'm waiting for the next battery model. I'm concerned on a number of levels with lithium-ion, more from a regulatory standpoint. I believe that once lithium-ion proliferates within the industry, that the fire code is going to change terribly. Unfortunately, I believe it's going to affect me whether I go with lithium-ion or not. But if we slow the distribution of lithium-ion, it'll at least slow down the regulatory requirements for all batteries in data centers. I always try to make a five-year investment in batteries. The battery technology is changing quickly and in another five years there'll be something that either rivals lithium-ion, at least, or that is a lot better. Lithium-ion is going to be a lot more controlled in the future. Thermal runaway has always been a problem in data centers, even though lead-acid combatted it a lot better. Lithium-ion still has the problems, and that's what causes them to burn up.

Eaton has a product called Foreseer. Foreseer is a wonderful product that can be purchased as an add-on. Eaton doesn't communicate about or advertise that product very well. That product does supply an unlimited amount of information about the electrical systems tied into the UPS. That information is vital to me, but you don't know about any of that information when you purchase an Eaton UPS. I found out more about it from a third-party distributor. You buy Foreseer from Eaton and then they integrate Foreseer into your system. At that time I thought, "That's a wonderful system and it's probably one of the top two in the market," but Eaton doesn't sell it well.

As a data center operator, my highest efficiency is running the UPS as heavily loaded as I can get it. The problem today is that I've got an A and a B side, and I need 100 percent failover capability. So the best I can achieve is about 50 percent load, if I don't oversubscribe. Am I thinking about oversubscribing my UPS? The answer would be is "yes," I always think about it, but customers don't like me to do that. We're looking to implement DSM over the portfolio. Right now it's spotty. With the implementation of DSM, we can comfortably oversubscribe and monitor that utilization more closely. With that implementation, I would increase the percentage of critical load on my UPS or the percentage of utilization. I would take it up to about 70 percent, but I wouldn't be comfortable taking it any higher than that.

I would rate Eaton UPSs at eight out of ten. A couple of items that I spoke about above are what brings it back to an eight. I would probably rate Eaton, as a whole, a little bit lower.

I'm rating it at eight because of the fact that none of the "infant mortality" happened under critical load. If it had happened under critical load, I probably would have rated it lower, but they've been lucky - or we've been lucky - so it gets an eight right now.

I do believe that the folks within Eaton all work extremely well in supporting me in servicing our company. That's what keeps me with Eaton. All UPSs are advancing now at about the same rate. An Eaton or a Toshiba or a Mitsubishi or even Schneider all offer similar qualities. It's really the Eaton teams that keep me with Eaton right now.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Buyer's Guide
Eaton UPS
June 2022
Learn what your peers think about Eaton UPS. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2022.
607,127 professionals have used our research since 2012.
VP Computer Operations at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
It has kept us from having any outages or downtime
Pros and Cons
  • "We have not had any outages or downtime using this UPS. It has kept us from having any outages."
  • "I would like to see there is a little more clarity on what the issue is on the notifications that we receive. This would make it easier for us. What we have to do now is sometimes go to the UPS to figure out exactly what the issue is, because it's not always clear."

What is our primary use case?

It is for data center support to keep our equipment powered up. It is for backup power.

It is a redundant UPS. We have an A and B for power.

How has it helped my organization?

We have not had any outages or downtime using this UPS. It has kept us from having any outages.

What is most valuable?

It lets us know about any issues with the power. It is very sensitive to any surges or sags in power. We receive those messages and know when they are happening.

What needs improvement?

I would like to see there is a little more clarity on what the issue is on the notifications that we receive. This would make it easier for us. What we have to do now is sometimes go to the UPS to figure out exactly what the issue is, because it's not always clear.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using the solution for at least five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is a quality product. As far as I know, we have had no failures that I can think of. It has been very stable and reliable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Some of the models are much more scalable. Our module has an option where I can add a module to it, so it is pretty flexible.

We currently have two Eaton UPSs on two different floors. One is a Powerware product, then Eaton purchased Powerware. We don't have any plans to purchase another right now, as there isn't a need.

How are customer service and technical support?

When I think about who I have used, technical support has been very good. We talked at different times about battery replacement and some of the reports. I got clarity on what reports would say, for example.

The service side is very good at what they do, and because of that, we have had no issues.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We previously used GE. We switched to Eaton because we didn't have the best experience with GE. We had issues with their equipment, such as a failure.

How was the initial setup?

It was simple to get it installed. We had it up and online quickly. It didn't take us very long to get it up and running. The process was seamless and easy to do.

What about the implementation team?

We used Eaton's consultant for the deployment. My electrician worked directly with them.

For deployment and maintenance, there is usually one technician who we have come onsite. Then, there is just a computer operator in my group who gets them access to it.

What was our ROI?

It saves our company money. Because if there is an outage, it is approximately $1 million a minute for an outage. Since we are a very large credit union, outages would be very expensive for us.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I have a maintenance contract with Eaton, which has been very good. The notifications that we receive, we use email to my team, and they work well. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We also evaluated Liebert, Schneider, and APC.

Liebert was a good alternative. Back when I started my career, we had a Liebert UPS in one of our data centers. It was very reliable. They were definitely a consideration. 

Part of what we looked at was Eaton service models in the area where we are located. They had plenty of technicians available. The product is made here in this area, so parts are readily available. 

There were quite a few reasons that we leaned toward Eaton, and it also had good recommendations from others.

What other advice do I have?

Take a good hard look at it. I don't think you will find another UPS that is more reliable than theirs.

I have been very happy with it. It is an improvement over the other UPS that we use. I like what they have brought to us for a solution.

It's about average size compared to others. It might be a bit smaller, but it's about what I would expect, size-wise.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Jim Hicks - PeerSpot reviewer
Chief Building Engineer at a computer software company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Touch-screen functionality is easy to read, helps make sure our input and output meters are good
Pros and Cons
  • "The touch-screen functionality is easy to read. There are tabs at the top and there are statuses at the top, graphics that give you a quick glance. We use the touch-screen for metering, to make sure the input and output meters are good. We also check alarm events and system history. Those are the things we usually check the most."
  • "Outside of a full-service contract, my only concern is technician availability for repairs. Where we don't have a full-service contract with them, which unfortunately is the larger portion of our equipment from them, we're just like anybody else, waiting for a slot for a technician to arrive."

What is our primary use case?

We use them for network backup or lab backup. These are critical environments for us, environments that we want to keep up in case of loss of power. They have high business impact. We have about 100 Eaton UPSs deployed.

The versions we are currently using that are the new standard are the 93PMs. But we have used all the other ones, the 9390s, the 95s, the 9350s, the 9355s - almost their whole product line.

How has it helped my organization?

They provide us reliable battery backup. They also provide energy savings that other units may not provide.

We have instances all the time where we are glad that we have UPSs. There are usually utility problems here or there. We're a pretty large campus and we're pretty spread out throughout the Puget Sound area. Whenever there's a utility event, we're glad we have battery backup through Eaton's units. In the last two months, we've had three utility power events where we had to go to battery. All 100 of the Eaton UPSs did their job and kept the equipment online that we want online. If the UPSs weren't in place, we would've lost power to revenue-generating spaces or to critical environments that need to stay up. That would impact the business and impact our ability to do our jobs.

The savings, by not being down, in terms of impact on revenue, is probably in the millions of dollars a year. It's a tough number to pin down for us. There are some places where it's a network location and there isn't much of an impact on anybody; just the network goes down and there's an issue of productivity for an entire building. But then you have a lab that is being backed up, a lab that generates $1,000,000 every five minutes and that's kind of hard to equate. So the actual savings could go back and forth. I would feel comfortable saying millions a year in savings or in business-impact avoidance.

What is most valuable?

We like the ESS, the Energy Saver System. It saves us on our electrical bill. That's a good feature. There's are two parts to that. By using the ESS, we get a rebate from the local utility of about half-a-million dollars. The actual savings over the year are probably only about $4,000, but I don't know if that is per unit or for the room where we did the study. It provides us a moderate amount of electrical savings throughout the lifetime of the unit.

We also like the modular system and the easy-to-read display. 

The touch-screen functionality is easy to read. There are tabs at the top and there are statuses at the top, graphics that give you a quick glance. We use the touch-screen for metering, to make sure the input and output meters are good. We also check alarm events and system history. Those are the things we usually check the most.

In addition to the display, there's a color methodology to the front display on the front cabinet. There are green, red, or amber. They provide quick graphics to understand if we have a real problem or a minor problem. The Eaton UPSs are user-friendly.

What needs improvement?

From a functional standpoint, I don't have any issues. From a communication standpoint, I don't have any issues. Outside of a full-service contract, my only concern is technician availability for repairs. Where we don't have a full-service contract with them, which unfortunately is the larger portion of our equipment from them, we're just like anybody else, waiting for a slot for a technician to arrive.

It is a risk, but when you're a big client like we are, they move other people around to get us serviced. If I was a smaller client, I would be at the bottom of the barrel and that would probably be annoying.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Eaton UPSs for 20 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability has been perfect. I don't have any real issues with them except that they recently put out a service bulletin. They're here fixing that issue. That's kind of like a recall on a car. I almost don't want to mention that because it's not that big of a deal, but it's one of the more recent issues that has become something of a problem.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is great. You usually just swap in another power module. If we put in a 50 kVA unit and we want to upsize, or the customer wants to upsize, typically we can either just throw in one more power module to bring them up to double, or we just add another power module cabinet and then we add more capacity.

How are customer service and technical support?

Tech support is good. I don't have any issues. I usually reach out to someone via email. Usually, when I call, I get forwarded to an engineer or I have to wait until somebody to call me back. Normally, what I end up doing is that if I have a problem that I think impacts us or our customer, I'll just send an email to one of their service managers or one of their sales managers. The response time is usually good. I get a pretty immediate response, definitely within the day.

We use a T&M contract with them in general, but for one of our offsite locations we do have a full-service contract with them. The latter, in terms of battery/parts replacement, remote monitoring, and prevention of UPS failures is fine. I don't have any issues with it. Once they're under full contract, they're pretty responsive and able to dispatch somebody immediately. I believe we have parts coverage with that full-service contract and they usually have the parts fairly quickly.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

The other UPSs we're using are from Eaton's direct competitors, which is Vertiv or Liebert.

How was the initial setup?

I do not do the setups, but I have spoken to the electrical vendors who do them and they don't have any real issues with them. It's pretty straightforward. They've probably installed 50 of them over the last couple of years. It takes about a day for them to get one all set up and then we bring Eaton in for the factory start-up. It's usually done over the course of a weekend.

We just did an install and we had two to three electricians from our staff involved because we have to run conduit and new pipe and bending. It's usually two to three of our electricians and one to two of the Eaton technicians who show up for start-up.

What about the implementation team?

We use a third-party electrician, Valley or Cochran. Our technicians are more on the maintenance side. They don't do installs.

Our experience with both third-parties has been good. They're direct competitors and they each get about 50/50 of the work here. We're fine with either one.


What was our ROI?

The ROI is mostly in saving us from losing money, which would be in the millions of dollars. The return on investment would also be captured through the ESS program. However, even if that is $4,000 a year, it's going to be quite a while before we get to ROI. To get to ROI, we have to have the machine set in place for its full life cycle, which is 20 years.

That means a lot of the new ones are still 20 years out, but we've got some machines that are 20 years old and still in service. Over their lifetimes we've probably gotten back our money.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I usually get the pricing of the overall project when it's complete. I want to say they are around $50,000 to $70,000 depending on the options and the modules that we get.

With Eaton - and this is something of a detractor - I have to give them a PO with a minimum dollar amount. With Vertiv, I just have to call them out. I don't have to give them a PO upfront. They know we're going to pay so they don't need that. It gets them on campus quicker. With Eaton, I have to go through the entire payment process and I don't understand that, given that we're as large as we are as a company and do so much business with them. That's something to flag as our biggest gripe.

As for services costs, I don't know what they are. Their full-service contract is pretty expensive, but we normally don't buy that, so I don't know if they're competitive within the market itself. We only have a service contract like that with Eaton at one site. That site with the full-service has 50 UPSs and it's more expensive than the site where I have 100 UPSs which are only on a T&M contract. For us, the full-service is on the expensive end, but I don't have any comparison. I don't know what Vertiv's price would be on that.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We try to be fair to both of our vendors that are competitors. We do a 50/50 split. If we do Eaton on one job, maybe we'll do Vertiv on the next job. I don't really have a preference. If I can keep it to those two, we're pretty good. I don't have any issues that would make one worse or better than the other.

What other advice do I have?

We're fairly happy with using Eaton products. I'm confident that if someone says they're going to install Eaton, they're getting a good product, that it's reliable and they won't have too many issues with it. And if they don't know anything about UPSs, they should get the service plan. If they're moderately knowledgeable about the UPSs they should just stick with a T&M.

The footprint is good. It's definitely in line with their competitors. They've all gone to a modular system across the entire industry. So instead of having one big cabinet for the IO and then one big cabinet for all the power modules, DC caps, etc., they've modularized them. They're in separate modules which lets them reduce the footprint. The footprint is fine for both IT and lab applications.

We have one installation on campus with their lithium-ion batteries. We are piloting them. We will play with them for about a year before we move forward with them in a bigger footprint on campus. The lithium-ion batteries were not a factor in our decision to go with this solution. We already use Eaton no matter what.

The Eaton UPSs do require maintenance. They have an OEM suggested maintenance, which we perform. We have to touch them four times a year. On my staff I've got three technicians. We also bring in one technician from a third-party vendor, MC Dean, for the annual services. In total, within one year, we're talking a team of four. For normal, run-through-the-year maintenance, when we to have to do this or that with a unit, there are five people on staff, including me. Three of them are PM techs. They do the battery PMs and the semi-annual services, and then we have the one technician from MC Dean who does the annual services. I've also got one technician who does all the communications side of the UPSs, who makes sure they are up and running, that they stay connected to our monitoring system, and he reviews and accepts alarms.

I would give Eaton products a ten out of ten, but overall, including service and everything, I'd give them an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Director of Engineering at Children's of Alabama
Real User
Prevented us from having downtime through blinks and power outages
Pros and Cons
  • "Scalability has been pretty good. We were able to increase the battery. We only installed one battery cabinet, then we added a second one for additional capacity later on. That was a nice feature that others haven't been able to do."
  • "In our data center, we have redundancy in all of our racks. When UPS feeds one half of the rack, the other feeds the other half of the rack. We have dual power supplies to everything. We have a lot of redundancies because of that. Luckily, with Eaton dual Battery Cabinets, we can maintain the systems at all times (short of a transformer issue), even while we're doing the maintenance on them. Our IT department loves this, because we don't shut them down at all."
  • "The battery life of the older batteries is the only thing that has been our issue up to this point. Luckily, the Cellwatch system that is on there identifies it and notifies us ahead of time when we should get them changed pretty quickly. This may be addressed with the lithium-ion batteries, but it is too early in our ownership of a UPS with a lithium-ion battery to know."

What is our primary use case?

We use them for our data center backup and our telecommunications equipment room (TER) and our TER backups for our data systems. We use Centralized UPS for all of our telecom rooms and in our data centers and TERs, as well as throughout our facility and hospitals buildings.

We currently have four units and are getting ready to swap out a GE unit, putting an Eaton in, then we will have five units in total.

We are using both the 9395 and 93PM versions.

How has it helped my organization?

In our new hospital building, the compressors went bad in one of our MRI units. The vendor who is under maintenance contract for those claimed that the compressor failures were due to power surges into the facility, but we didn't have any data logs of this anywhere else except for in the UPS. The log data for the UPS is fed from the same branch system as the compressors for the MRIs, so we were able to go back and look at all the Eaton data logs of whenever they said that this event occurred. It did not show any information there. We were able to use that information to argue against the vendor that we did not have any bad power coming into the building. We also had our power company provide documentation saying that they did not report any bad power coming to us, as well. We have a direct circuit from our substations, so they are able to monitor from the substation. Between the two of them, we were able to save our facility $40,000 in service costs that the vendor was trying to make us pay for.

What is most valuable?

We have been able to get the data logs from them, which has helped us in dispelling some rumors (or accusations) that we have bad power by different vendors throughout the hospital. This has occurred several times for us. The logs have helped us a lot. 

The product is reliable. We previously used individual UPSs in every telecom room. By moving to Centralized UPSs, it is lower maintenance. We have just one guy (one of our supervisors) who oversees all the UPSs. He is the system supervisor. Through our Cellwatch system, which is connected to all of them, he is able to see what the status of all those UPSs are. Then, he is able to monitor the battery conditions. Because they are all the same, it limits the training and everything that you have to know between the different systems. This has helped us on the manpower side of things by lowering the manpower needed to maintain them.

We like the touch screen functionality. I have not personally had a lot of experience with it, though my supervisor has. He likes to be able to navigate through it, while our older GE system does not have this functionality. The GE system is very plain with just a few buttons, and it's very difficult to get information out of it. Eaton's touch screen functionality was something that was very quick to impress everybody with its ability to get to everything.

We use the touch screen functionality to monitor for battery life, the amount of usage that the UPS is being supplied, and how much energy is being supplied through it for our backup time period. We even look at the incoming power to see what the condition of our incoming power is. Therefore, we are using it more as a tool to monitor feeding power, not just the power that of what it's feeding. We use it to see how we're balancing our loads across circuits, because we're using 240 UPSs. Thus, we are trying to balance the loads when splitting the power down to 120 volt circuits, keeping it balanced across the legs of the power.

We run dual battery bank systems. Therefore, if we are doing maintenance on one side, then we can maintain the other side and still have the battery backed up. In our data center, we have redundancy in all of our racks. When UPS feeds one half of the rack, the other feeds the other half of the rack. We have dual power supplies to everything. We have a lot of redundancies because of that. Luckily, with Eaton dual Battery Cabinets, we can maintain the systems at all times (short of a transformer issue), even while we're doing the maintenance on them. Our IT department loves this, because we don't shut them down at all.

What needs improvement?

The battery life of the older batteries is the only thing that has been our issue up to this point. Luckily, the Cellwatch system that is on there identifies it and notifies us ahead of time when we should get them changed pretty quickly. This may be addressed with the lithium-ion batteries, but it is too early in our ownership of a UPS with a lithium-ion battery to know.

For how long have I used the solution?

Our first installation was in 2008.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The UPSs are very stable. 

It has prevented us from having downtime because we have UPSs to get us through blinks and power outages. It prevented us from having downtime with all of our medical record systems and other data systems, which would include our telephone system since it is voice over IP. If we didn't have UPS in place during a downtime incident, it would have crippled our organization pretty quickly. We would have had to go to our downtime procedures, which would have slowed everything down. Most of our clinic visits and other outpatient functions would have been shutdown because they would not have had access to all the electronic medical files. Based on our downtime procedures, for every hour down, it usually takes around three days worth of time to recoup the backlog of information and get it back into the system. Eaton UPSs have saved us a lot of potential headaches.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability has been pretty good. We were able to increase the battery. We only installed one battery cabinet, then we added a second one for additional capacity later on. That was a nice feature that others haven't been able to do.

As of right now, we don't plans to purchase additional UPSs. However, that can change in the company depending on many factors. We have a Centralized UPS in all of our buildings.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have used tech support from time to time. My supervisor has called them. I have not had any direct dealings with tech support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

The only other UPS solution that we were using was our GE UPS, which is still in place right now.

What about the implementation team?

Blackmon Agency helped with the deployment. Our experience with them has been excellent. It's been a great relationship.

They typically have two technicians here when we deploy and hook it all up. Then, we have several of our folks who are our subcontractors there, just to make sure everything goes smoothly in the connections over there.

What was our ROI?

It is by far the best investment that we have made.

The UPSs are saving us approximately $50,000 a year.

It has been more of a cost of doing business and maintaining our systems. We use it more as an insurance policy to ensure that our medical records stay up and running. The loss of revenue would have a bigger impact to our organization if our systems were not up and operating. An outage over a 24-hour period could easily be in the $300,000 range, which would be pretty substantial. We are a three million square foot hospital with 380 beds, so it would impact us quickly.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have a service plan through Eaton. A local vendor, Blackmon Agency, who is a third-party, helps manage it for us. I don't get into it everyday. Our supervisor manages it with the local reps. I just helped orchestrate their initial agreement, then they have managed it since then.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

The design of GE system was the biggest difference, specifically the maintenance bypass system. The way it was designed was very poor. In order to take the UPS off the system to do the main work for anything on it, you still have to have a blink on all your systems in order to do that. Whereas, the Eaton UPS has an ability to not blink, even though you bring it offline.

With the Eaton UPS, we are able to do the service work and not have to maintain them, but yet we can keep the systems up and operational. However, with the GE system, that was our first UPS that we put in. We realized quickly that we can't maintain them and keep the systems up and operating. We've had to do some other modifications just to be able to do maintenance to that unit.

What other advice do I have?

I would strongly encourage you to evaluate the Eaton UPS just because of its reliability and ease of maintenance. It has been very reliable for us. The relationship and reliability of the unit made it a great purchase and selection for us. The service has been great too.

The unit's footprint is a bit larger than some of the others, but it is nothing that we haven't been able to manage. Most of the areas that we have installed them have been in new areas which have been renovated. We just designed around that size footprint and filled it, building the room to allow for the size of a footprint. Because of the footprint and cabinets sizes, it seems to be easier to maintain, even though it is a slightly larger footprint, as they are a GE unit. It is also easier to maintain because the cabinets are designed differently.

Only one of the units has lithium-ion batteries, the others currently do not. However, they are looking at changing this when our battery replacements come due. We will be replacing the GE product with an Eaton that has a lithium-ion battery.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Robby Vann - PeerSpot reviewer
Facility Manager at a comms service provider with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
They don't go down and have saved our organization from costly downtime
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable feature is that they don't go down. We haven't had any other UPSs in this location, but we've had Chloride UPSs at other places and they didn't do so well."
  • "One time, a feedback breaker in a system-bypass module, or something like that, was tripped. We brought them in to see what caused it. They figured it out and we haven't had an issue like that again, since."

What is our primary use case?

We have two of the 9395s and eight of the 9315s. They support our data center and the call center. We have them in place to ride through any power blips or outages. They're part of the critical systems for the business. The UPSs have to be in place and keep our data center running and call center running without any kind of interruption.

How has it helped my organization?

They have saved our organization from downtime. At one point we lost both utility feeds and the UPSs rode us through until the generators kicked on. We then ran on generator for 30 minutes and, after 30 minutes, the power came back. The UPS was only active for seven seconds. It had to maintain power in the data center until the generators came on. But if we didn't have the UPSs in place, we would have lost power to the data center and that would have shut our business down. We can't do business without our data center. Although it can get back up and working fairly quickly, it would still impact customers for days.

I don't know how much money having the UPSs saved, but I would say it was a substantial amount.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is that they don't go down. We haven't had any other UPSs in this location, but we've had Chloride UPSs at other places and they didn't do so well.

The touchscreen functionality, being able to go to the UPS and look at readings, etc., is pretty intuitive. It's user-friendly. It's useful to know where you're at.

In terms of the unit's footprint, it fits well, considering its functions.

We also use the UPS Service Plan. We have a contract with them for that. It's very good. We use it all the time. We have to do PMs (preventive maintenance) on the UPSs throughout the year, as well as on the batteries. We've got enough units that they'll bring an extra tech in. I, myself, don't do anything with them, other than monitor them onsite. They are pretty much a fixture, like a piece of the building. They're in, they run, they do their thing. And if we get an alarm we call a tech and he comes out and he takes care of it.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using Eaton for 11 years now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We haven't had any issues with stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is good. With the 9395s you can buy extra pieces that connect up to the UPS which will expand the capacity of the UPS. Then you have to buy extra batteries. But you can scale it from 250 all the way up to 1.1 megawatts.

How are customer service and technical support?

When we call a ticket in, we usually get somebody out here within an hour or two. In general, their tech support is really good.

We have had to contact them for issues. One time, a feedback breaker in a system-bypass module, or something like that, was tripped. We brought them in to see what caused it. They figured it out and we haven't had an issue like that again since.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were using an older style, the 9315s from Eaton. But we've always been using Eaton UPSs for backup power.

How was the initial setup?

We have to bring an Eaton tech out to do the initial setup. It's a specialized piece of equipment with proprietary information, programming, and all of that. You've got to make sure that all the parameters are right, so it's not something you can just do yourself.

Once it gets powered up and everything's wired up, it takes about an hour. There are no preparations that we need to do on our end before they implement.

Once they're up and running we need one person to maintain all the UPSs.

What was our ROI?

I don't know how to put a number to ROI, because I don't know, if we went down, how that would impact the business from a cost perspective.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The Service Plan we have is on a three-year contract.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at Liebert, but we liked the Eaton better. They were comparable when it comes to cost. The difference was efficiencies.

What other advice do I have?

If you absolutely do not want to lose power to your computers, your data center, or any piece of your business - if your business has to be running 100 percent of the time - you have to have a UPS in place and a generator. For us, it's just a part of the process of keeping the data center up. It's a piece of equipment that does a specific job so that we don't see any kind of power hiccups or outages.

We don't have any issues with the Eaton UPSs, they do really well. We seem to be pleased with everything, the way they're functioning now.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Smart Infrastructure Consultant BAS at Kaiser Permanente
Consultant
PredictPulse reporting shows trends in improvement or where availability/performance are decreasing
Pros and Cons
  • "The visibility the PredictPulse service provides into our UPS equipment through the reporting is very good. It gives us very high visibility. We can go into the card and look at every parameter, all the settings, all the values. There are several tabs we can look at. We get a very good understanding of what the unit is doing, all remotely. It's very good."
  • "Deployment of the product is typical. It's usually a six-week lead-time, which is typical of most equipment. It's not good, but it's just what is expected in the industry."

What is our primary use case?

The UPSs back up our critical IT infrastructure. And PredictPulse allows us to manage and reduce downtime of the UPSs. PredictPulse monitors the UPS. It's a cloud service. 

How has it helped my organization?

We had an air conditioning problem, and we had no monitoring on that equipment. The PredictPulse alerted us that the room was too hot and we were able to solve the problem before it damaged our UPS. It saved our company from having downtime. The UPS has also saved us money, although I know what those numbers would be.

What is most valuable?

The monthly reporting is one of the most valuable features. It gives us an overview of the last month of its operation and we can see trends that are showing improvements or where availability and performance are decreasing. 

The visibility the PredictPulse service provides into our UPS equipment through the reporting is very good. It gives us very high visibility. We can go into the card and look at every parameter, all the settings, all the values. There are several tabs we can look at. We get a very good understanding of what the unit is doing, all remotely. It's very good.

I like the UPS touch-screen functionality as well. It's good.

For how long have I used the solution?

In our organization, we've been using Eaton UPS products for ten to 15 years. Our new buildings get the newest 9355 UPS. We started using PredictPulse in the last year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability of the UPS is very good. There have been no issues.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is comparable. You can go very small or very big, so it's very good.

How are customer service and technical support?

Eaton's technical support is good. When we call them, they're knowledgeable. They listen to our questions, they walk us through the steps to go through the process to fix it ourselves. And if not, then they pass it on to have someone come out or to someone else to call us back.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We have different vendors for UPS. We have three or four. But Eaton is our standard, currently, because of the reliability and the reputation of the company and the product.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. It's very step-oriented. You just follow along; it's a simple process to follow.

Deployment of the product is typical. It's usually a six-week lead-time, which is typical of most equipment. It's not good, but it's just what is expected in the industry.

Our path is to use them in new buildings and new remodels.

What about the implementation team?

We usually use our own mechanical engineer consultant. Eaton is our preferred vendor. Our engineer chooses the product based on our standards and then works with the project team from our company.

For deployment, we usually require one technician from Eaton and our own engineer.

What was our ROI?

We have seen ROI by going with Eaton, but I don't know what the numbers would be.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated Schneider and Liebert. 

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to have a good consultant who understands your power needs and the amount of downtime that is acceptable.

The biggest lesson we've learned from using Eaton products is their reliability. It's there when you need it.

I don't have a problem with the footprint of the UPS units. They're big, but they have a lot of stuff. They are pretty versatile. You can put them close to things. They're good.

Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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