Oracle Linux OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Oracle Linux is the #5 ranked solution in top Operating Systems for Business. PeerSpot users give Oracle Linux an average rating of 8.2 out of 10. Oracle Linux is most commonly compared to Ubuntu Linux: Oracle Linux vs Ubuntu Linux. Oracle Linux is popular among the large enterprise segment, accounting for 63% of users researching this solution on PeerSpot. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a comms service provider, accounting for 19% of all views.
Oracle Linux Buyer's Guide

Download the Oracle Linux Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2022

What is Oracle Linux?

Oracle Linux is an open-source operating system developed to assist businesses with virtualization, development, and management of cloud-native applications. Users can utilize the platform to automate performance tracking and security management for hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

Oracle Linux can help professionals improve IT infrastructures, inspect source code and binaries, and distribute software updates. Users can use the integrated catalog to learn more about independent software vendors (ISVs) and their operating system apps. Oracle Linux also aids managers in monitoring enterprise workload performance, lowering total cost of ownership (TCO), and keeping track of the latest Linux kernel updates.

Oracle Linux gives customers the ability to use hardware-accelerated memory encryption to protect active data in RAMs, CPU caches, and CPU registers. Oracle Linux helps Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) users with binary code compatibility. Through a tracing framework called DTrace, Oracle Linux allows software developers to track and analyze the activity of the operating system and user programs.

Oracle Linux Features

Oracle Linux has many valuable key features. Some of the most useful ones include:

  • The software is 100% free (no cost) to use, distribute, and update
  • Ksplice allows for zero-downtime kernel and user-space upgrades
  • DTrace provides comprehensive kernel and application tracing
  • For Oracle Linux Support clients, Linux management and high availability are available at no additional cost
  • It's Oracle-optimized and works well with Oracle Database and Oracle Applications
  • New workload optimizations:
    • Enhanced memory performance by attempting to better locate a process near its memory and better placement of tasks that do not fit on a single NUMA node
    • SPECjbb's performance has been improved by up to 3.6 times thanks to optimizations that help reduce lock contention.
    • With bcache, it's simple to employ SSDs as a block cache for slower block devices. A new, scaled block layer subsystem supports many millions of IOps on NVM-Express and high-end PCI-E devices.
  • Oracle Linux has three deployment options:
  • Linux in the cloud: Oracle Linux Premier Support is included in all Oracle Cloud Infrastructure subscriptions at no additional cost.
  • Linux on premises: This is the industry's most comprehensive and open Linux distribution.
  • Embedded Linux design: Embedding a feature-rich Linux distribution is an optimized, cost-effective solution for your business.

 Oracle Linux Benefits

There are many benefits to implementing Oracle Linux. Some of the biggest advantages the solution offers include:

  • Save money by only paying for support for the systems you need
  • Improve security by applying patches faster and spending less time troubleshooting and updating
  • Improve Oracle software and hardware performance

Reviews from Real Users

Oracle Linux stands out among its competitors for a number of reasons. Two major ones are its stability and scalability. PeerSpot users take note of the advantages of these features in their reviews: 

One PeerSpot reviewer, an IT Manager, reports, “I find the virtualization the most valuable.” He adds, “Oracle Linux is the best Linux operating system that I have ever known. It is very stable and strong.”

An Enterprise Architect at a financial services firm writes of the solution, “You also don't have memory issues, especially when it is engineered with platforms like Exadata and Oracle Cluster. These give you the most throughput and performance.” He adds, “It is very scalable, especially on platforms like Oracle Cluster and Exadata.

Oracle Linux was previously known as Oracle Enterprise Linux.

Oracle Linux Customers

See here

Oracle Linux Video

Oracle Linux Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Oracle Linux pricing:
  • "The solution is less expensive than Solaris and allows for use of existing hardware."
  • "The licensing is expensive."
  • Oracle Linux Reviews

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    Technical Presales Consultant/ Engineer at a wholesaler/distributor with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Reliable, with good technical support, but it works well only with Oracle products
    Pros and Cons
    • "Oracle Linux for Oracle databases is the top. There's no doubt whatsoever."
    • "Oracle Linux, needs to support more packages."

    What is our primary use case?

    Oracle Linux is basically Red Hat. It's the same. Oracle took the CentOS project, which is Red Hat, and made its own enhancements. They added something they call 3DBear, which is their proprietary technology. They call it the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK).

    Oracle took Red Hat, stripped a lot of the software that was not needed for Oracle, which made Red Hat much smaller. They optimized the UEK for their Oracle database applications.

    A customer who is planning to have an Oracle database and is looking to see whether to choose to go with Oracle Linux or SUSE Linux or Red Hat, the best option for them would be to go with Oracle Linux because it's the same vendor.

    What needs improvement?

    Oracle Linux for Oracle databases is the top. There's no doubt whatsoever. However, if you are going to use it for anything else it's going to be a mess, because many packages will not be supported by Oracle.

    For example, I was helping an organization back up various Oracle Linux servers using various kernel versions and various distribution versions. The software that I used for backup requires some packages to be pre-installed into the Oracle Linux machine from the distribution itself, but one of the packages was not available from the Oracle repositories. Because it's a Linux machine, I can manually download this package and install it myself. But the problem with that is that Oracle will void the whole warranty if I install a package from a third-party repository.

    If you are going to use Oracle Linux for anything other than running Oracle databases, you will most definitely run into a bottleneck situation in which some packages that are needed, you will not be able to download. And, if you download and install them, you will void your contract, which nullifies the point of you getting Oracle Linux in the first place.

    Oracle Linux has a particular use case, not like SUSE, or like Red Hat. 

    With SUSE, and Red Hat, you can use them for almost any use case, and you can even install Oracle inside both of them, but you can't do the same with Oracle Linux. 

    Oracle Linux is built for Oracle databases. It doesn't make sense for me to get Oracle Linux and install the MySQL database. Even though MySQL is an Oracle product, it doesn't make sense. If I am not going to using Oracle databases then I shouldn't go with Oracle Linux.

    Oracle Linux needs to support more packages. I understand that they stripped down CentOS and Red Hat, but Oracle is an organization that will be paying the price of Red Hat making CentOS, CentOS-3 as well.

    I understand the idea of making the Linux distribution just optimized for their Oracle database, but I'm not going to get Oracle Linux because it works well only with Oracle products. 

    I will most likely have a diverse infrastructure. So instead of going with Oracle Linux, I will go with SUSE Linux or Red Hat. Why? Because Red Hat, for example, has support for many, many packages. Instead of me going to get Oracle Linux for the Oracle database and Red Hat for the remaining workloads, why not get Red Hat from the beginning.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using Oracle Linux for two years. It is still pretty new to me.

    I have used Oracle Linux versions 6, 7, and 8.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    Oracle Linux is a stable solution. 

    When you take Red Hat and strip several applications off of it and optimize it to work with Oracle databases, Oracle Linux is the most stable Linux.

    Buyer's Guide
    Oracle Linux
    November 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Oracle Linux. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
    655,465 professionals have used our research since 2012.

    How are customer service and support?

    Technical support was great. I didn't deal with them directly. When I had an issue, I was interacting with a team who was administering the Oracle Linux environment, and when we ran into hiccups and we needed support from Oracle, they would initiate a ticket, and Oracle would respond and would provide support.

    How was the initial setup?

    The installation is comparable to Red Hat, and CentOS. It's not difficult.

    In terms of the configuration, it won't take more than 30 minutes to install. 

    However, because it's an Oracle Linux, there are Oracle databases involved, which means there are steering committees. There will be complications in the implementation that are not related to the actual installation of the product itself. This will delay it by several days.

    What other advice do I have?

    In general, I would not recommend this solution, but if you are going to be running Oracle databases, then yes, I would recommend Oracle Linux.

    If you are going to be running Oracle-based solutions, or if your data center mainly is controlled by the Oracle Corporation then yes Oracle Linux would be the best choice.

    You shouldn't go with Oracle Linux if you're not going to be using Oracle products.

    As I am not particularly interested in Oracle, I would rate Oracle Linux a seven out of ten. If however, I was, then I would rate it a ten out of ten.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    LLIEDNO - PeerSpot reviewer
    Sr. NetBackup System Administrator at University of Delaware
    Real User
    An inter-platform solution with excellent documentation and support
    Pros and Cons
    • "The solution runs very well on inter-platform or HPE Intel servers."
    • "The graphic interface could be improved to work better in a desktop environment."

    What is our primary use case?

    I use the solution to host Oracle Database and ACSLS which manages tape libraries. ACSLS used to be owned by StorageTek but was purchased by Oracle. 

    For example, our infrastructure utilizes the solution to run ACSLS and provide commands to the tape library, conduct inventory, provide encryption, and keep track of volumes with their location slots. 

    The solution is not used by thousands but instead provides inter-computer communications and services like DNS, encryption, and management. 

    What is most valuable?

    The solution runs very well on inter-platform or HPE Intel servers. 

    Product documentation and technical support are excellent. 

    What needs improvement?

    The graphic interface could be improved to work better in a desktop environment like Red Hat or Ubuntu.

    Few people use the solution because its marketing is faltering. Unless companies buy other items from Oracle such as ACSLS for managing tape libraries, there is no need to use the solution. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using the solution for two years. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable and has been running for months with no issues. 

    On occasion, we install patches to fix security vulnerabilities. 

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We use the solution for a very specific applications so do not have the need to scale. The solution is connected to another platform to provide encryption or management. For our use, the solution works very well. 

    We do not have thousands of users connected to the solution. 

    How are customer service and support?

    The solution provides the best and most detailed documentation available. Step-by-step instructions are provided for downloading packages and installing operating systems. 

    The response time for technical issues is excellent and second to none. If you have an issue, they will be able and willing to help. 

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Positive

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I am also a system administrator for Solaris and prefer it because it has been on the market longer and I am familiar with it. 

    In my opinion, Solaris is the best operating system available but has limitations because it must operate on a SPARC server. It is a legacy solution that is aging out and being replaced by Red Hat or Linux. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup and deployment is easy.

    Our data center operators racked everything and connected the network. Then our engineering group connected the console, mounted remote DVDs with the software, connected remote ISOs or ICOs, and deployed the operating system. Our security group handled authentication like the LDAP configuration that allows use of the same accounts for all servers. 

    Daily operations include several monitoring services like Netcool or ScienceLogic to keep track of things via SNMP. When something fails, a ticket is received via Remedy and our security group lets us know to patch for vulnerabilities. 

    What about the implementation team?

    The implementation was done in-house with no issues. 

    We downloaded software packages from the website, repurposed some hardware, and installed the operating system. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Overall, the solution is less expensive than Solaris and allows for use of existing hardware.

    I do not have access to actual costs but believe the licensing fees are quite high.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    The Linux solution can run on inter-platform so that puts it in competition with Red Hat which is marketed better and has bandwidth. 

    Red Hat has become the standard since it was purchased by IBM and users are migrating to it. Red Hat was not an option for us because we had specific needs. 

    We chose the solution because it supports our HPE Intel server and ACSLS. 

    What other advice do I have?

    Documentation for the solution is outstanding and support is good. 

    For security, disable things you do not need like Telnet or ports and rely instead on SNMP for great monitoring that alerts you to memory and space utilization. 

    Partition your file system instead of using defaults for root and boot file systems. Separate file systems protect against machine crashes or root file system issues. 

    Ensure that you secure your entire system to prevent hacks. 

    I rate the solution an eight out of ten. 

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Buyer's Guide
    Oracle Linux
    November 2022
    Learn what your peers think about Oracle Linux. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
    655,465 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    Rusi Popov - PeerSpot reviewer
    Senior Software Engineer at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Core functionality is good, stable and can install in an hour
    Pros and Cons
    • "Once installed, the product is good, I like it. The core of the software is really good."
    • "The installation documentation needs to be improved"

    What is our primary use case?

    I am using the solution for a project that I am trying to migrate it to the cloud. My experience with the cloud is at the beginners level. I haven't tested the solution very much yet but according to the published documentation, opinions etc., I see that Oracle Linux is the closest to my needs for future migration to the cloud.

    What is most valuable?

    Once installed, the product is good, I like it. The core of the software is really good.

    What needs improvement?

    The installation documentation needs to be improved, especially the current installation guide. For example it states that it is needed to format and to store the installation ISO on a DVD, but this is not possible to do in 8.0+ versions, as the ISO files are 7-9GB - greater than 4GB and the regular DVDs do not support it. The actual 8.3 version ISO cannot be put on USB either, as a file  as the setup requires the 9GB ISO also as a file, but this imposes the use of exFAT instead of FAT32, which is not supported by the system boot. Therefore I installed 8.1 from USB, which went just fine and upgraded to 8.3 afterwards with YUM.

    My network card is supported by 5.3 kernel (UEK), but not supported by the 4.x RedHat kernel used too, which I had to realize by chance. My video and network cards are not completely supported in the 8.1-8.3 versions, better compatibility with up-to-date hardware is needed. When looking for compatible drivers, there was no clear statement which drivers are supported. Better directions are needed regarding hardware drivers and how to obtain them.

    From my experience with Oracle, I completely rely on its documentation and its presence, completeness and reliability was one of the reasons to choose Oracle Linux. The documentation I see worked for 8.1 or 8.2 setups, but not for 8.3. It needs update - Oracle Linux  8.3 changed the installation procedure and doesn't match the documentation. My experience with Oracle is that what is written in the documentation just works. This time it did not help.

    The ability to update the look-and-feel of the Desktop UI would be beneficial - the current one is pale to my taste, it is black, grey and white.

    They could provide more repositories of tested software, or at least refer to them and comment on their use.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using the solution for less than two weeks.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is stable.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I used CentOS for an year and a half. Now I had the chance to choose my OS considering my plans for cloud development and also the resent concerns about the future support of CentOS, I chose Oracle Linux 8.3

    How was the initial setup?

    In the 8.1 version, the setup works fine but it is when trying to install from an USB instead of DVD as it is written in the documentation. There were issues with the 8.3 installation - see above.

    The installation of version 8.1, however, was good and worked fine. Some my attempts to install compatible drivers for my hardware failed and I had to reinstall the whole OS. The third time doing the install, it only took me one hour, it was easy. I achieved some compromise between up to date video (nouveau instead of Nvidia) and wifi (iwlwifi of Intel) drives and the system now works really fine.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I decided based on my experience with CentOS, Ubuntu, Kali Linux.

    What other advice do I have?

    I rate Oracle Linux an eight out of ten.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Manager, IT at a renewables & environment company with 5,001-10,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 5
    Dependable, easy to use, and scales very well
    Pros and Cons
    • "It has a good amount of mount points."
    • "Occasionally, we might get an alert to restart our database, and if we don't do it on our own, the system will do it automatically. That can cause downtime issues if your clients aren't expecting it."

    What is our primary use case?

    We're using Oracle Linux to run virtual machines for their database solutions in the cloud. We're also using Oracle Linux to run an SFTP server.

    We have several Oracle Linux 7s that support the databases. We have about ten of those. We have one SFTP server as well. That is the extent of it.

    What is most valuable?

    We do a lot of mounts so we can use shared storage. It has a good amount of mount points. I'm just getting very comfortable with it as far as the ACLs and the users go.

    What needs improvement?

    I cannot recall any areas that require improvement, or any missing features I have come across. 

    Occasionally, we might get an alert to restart our database, and if we don't do it on our own, the system will do it automatically. That can cause downtime issues if your clients aren't expecting it.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used the solution for about a year and a half at this point. It hasn't been too long. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability is very good. The databases are all VMs. Sometimes the database might have an underlying condition, hardware condition, and Oracle will send us an alert to tell us to please restart our databases so that they can be moved to another piece of hardware by a certain date. If we don't do it on our own, they will do it. That, however, leaves room for corruption. Also, you run the risk of not telling our customers ahead of time that there might be a little bit of downtime.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution can scale up or down easily. You can always scale up, scale down, add more storage, add more memory, that kind of stuff.

    How are customer service and support?

    Since we have an Oracle cloud subscription and a tenancy, our service requests are answered by tech support from OCI tech support. It's pretty much whatever we need. However, I must say, their tech support usually addresses OCI problems, such as infrastructure problems. When it comes to the Oracle support, you really have to dig and you really have to get on them to actually get it down to the Oracle support. That said, I want to say, so far, so good. I'm happy with the support so far.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Before I worked on Oracle Linux 7, we were on-prem with Red Hat 6 or 7. It might have been Red Hat 6. Everything really just transfers very well as far as the commands and all of that. Oracle Linux 7 is basically Red Hat 7.

    How was the initial setup?

    When it is in the could, the initial setup is very easy. When it's in the cloud, you just pick a shape and say, "Make me a machine."

    What makes each shape different is the number of CPUs. The amount of storage comes with it. 

    What other advice do I have?

    I'm just an Oracle customer and an end-user.

    For those considering the solution, I would say, if you're familiar with Red Hat, there's very little change and the users should just go for it.

    As far as dependability and ease of use go, I would rate the solution at an eight out of ten. 

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Project Manager at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Has a more stable kernel than Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    Pros and Cons
    • "We use Oracle Linux to test our software, and we also recommend Oracle Linux to our customers."
    • "The download speed is not good. Oracle can improve their servers capacity, especially in Asia."

    What is our primary use case?

    We used Oracle Enterprise Linux to replace a Red Hat Enterprise Linux environment because Oracle Linux rolled out a new kernel. We thought it might be more stable than our previous edition.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We have maybe 10 to 15 engineers using Oracle Linux to test the software environment. It has a more stable kernel than Red Hat Enterprise Linux. 

    What needs improvement?

    Oracle Linux is almost the same as Red Hat, but it takes a long time to download, in comparison. The download speed is not good. Oracle can improve their servers capacity, especially in Asia.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have been using Oracle Linux for three years. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It's stable. We use Oracle Linux because it has a stable kernel, perhaps, more so than other vendors.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It is a scalable product.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    It's not easy to obtain Oracle Linux support from emails or telephone support. We tend to look at the Knowledge Base. Oracle's Knowledge Base is excellent.

    How was the initial setup?

    It is easy to install and only took about 30 minutes.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We use Oracle Linux to test our software, and we also recommend Oracle Linux to our customers. We also recommend the purchasing of a license to activate the product. If our customers want to install Oracle Linux on multiple servers, perhaps Oracle could offer some good discounts, but these would need to be negotiated.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We used several kinds of Linux. Something like SUSE Linux, Red Hat Linux, Ubuntu Linux, and Oracle Linux but especially those with stable kernels. In some software environments, we do not need a stable kernel's performance level, but the machine may be stable in most cases. Before this year, we used Ubuntu. Ubuntu is speedy but not very stable. Its development is very quickly rolled out, and they change it every half year.

    What other advice do I have?

    I would rate Oracle Linux an eight out of 10. Linux Enterprise is used in our customer's data center. The users may use a lot of server resources, so we recommend they buy a license. Sometimes they need to buy hundreds of server licenses, so the price consideration is important as the licensing is expensive. Our customers tend to use other editions such as CentOS, and other free editions. However, the free editions are not stable. Indeed, the free version provided by Oracle is not stable.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Other
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Integrator
    PeerSpot user
    Noor Parkar - PeerSpot reviewer
    Sr. System and Storage Administrator at a government with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Useful for hosting other Oracle products
    Pros and Cons
    • "It's very useful for hosting other Oracle products."
    • "We'd like it if it was a bit more secure."

    What is our primary use case?

    We are primarily using the solution for our Oracle Database.

    What is most valuable?

    The solution is very, very stable. The performance is reliable. 

    It's very useful for hosting other Oracle products.

    The solution is very scalable. You can expand it if needed.

    Technical support is very good. They have been responsive and they understand the product.

    The initial setup is quick and easy. It doesn't take too long.

    The pricing of the solution is not too high. It's reasonable. 

    What needs improvement?

    The security could always be slightly improved on the product. We'd like it if it was a bit more secure.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for a couple of years at this point. It's been a while. I have some experience with it at this point.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable. There are no bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze. It's very reliable in terms of performance.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution is very scalable. If a company needs to expand it, it can do so with relative ease. It's not a problem.

    We currently have about 50 people on the solution.

    We do plan to increase the usage in the future.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Technical support is good. They are helpful and responsive. We are quite happy with the level of support we have received from them so far. They are available when we need them.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Previously, we had a mixed environment and we were using all sorts of operating systems. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is not overly difficult or complex. We found the process to be very straightforward. The deployment itself was fast.

    We have two members of the technical team that can handle any maintenance required. 

    What about the implementation team?

    We handled the implementation ourselves. We did not need the assistance of a consultant or implementor. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We pay for a license on a yearly basis. It's not an overly expensive product. It's affordable.

    What other advice do I have?

    We're using the latest version of the solution at this time.

    I'd rate the solution at an eight out of ten. We're quite happy with the capabilities of the solution so far. It works as expected and does what we need it to do.

    I would recommend the solution to other users and organizations. 

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    PeerSpot user
    Thomas Waltair - PeerSpot reviewer
    Regional Head AND Director Product Development at Neptune Software Group
    Real User
    Top 20
    The vendor releases regular hot patches, so we don't have many difficulties.
    Pros and Cons
    • "We don't have any failing cases. Oracle releases regular hot patches, so we don't have many difficulties."
    • "It could be easier to reach a higher support level."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use Oracle Linux to deploy our core banking product. Our client has nearly 1,000 concurrent users. 

    How has it helped my organization?

    We have an Oracle-based platform. For example, we use Oracle WebLogic for our application server and Oracle's enterprise database. We previously used SUSE Linux, but we were exposed to some vulnerabilities in SUSE Linux 9.10. Switching to the Oracle UX platform cut down on some of these vulnerability issues. All our Oracle applications like WebLogic and Oracle database sit perfectly on top of Oracle Linux. 

    What is most valuable?

    We don't have any failing cases. Oracle releases regular hot patches, so we don't have many difficulties. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used Oracle Linux for four years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We are in live banking production servers using Oracle Linux. 

    Yes.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We are running in clusters, so Oracle Linux is scalable.

    How are customer service and support?

    We have a dedicated ticketing system based on severity. As an ISV partner for Oracle, we are okay with the support system. It could be easier to reach a higher support level. 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    In the past, all our deployments were running on SUSE Linux. When Oracle Linux come into play, we took 90 percent of our deployment off of SUSE Linux because of the license cost and the vulnerability issues in the old versions. I hear that the latest SUSE Linux is doing well, but we stopped using it. The bottom line is that we believe that an Oracle operating system is better for Oracle products.

    How was the initial setup?

    Setting up Oracle Linux is straightforward. One person could handle it, and it took two or three days to deploy.

    What about the implementation team?

    We did everything in-house. 

    What was our ROI?

    The ROI is what we expected at the end of the day.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It's free to do development on Oracle Linux, but you need to pay a license for dedicated support. I think it's relatively cheap. 

    What other advice do I have?

    I rate Oracle Linux eight out of 10. On the surface, there isn't much difference between SUSE Linux and Oracle Linux, but Oracle's kernel is a little more powerful, and the operating system performs better when you are running their products. My advice to new users is to explore enterprise deployments on top of Oracle Linux that will give you the best result.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Gold Partners
    Flag as inappropriate
    PeerSpot user
    Manager at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Easy to handle with good performance and reasonable pricing
    Pros and Cons
    • "The product can scale."
    • "They could introduce the same level of remote capabilities, which are available with VMware applications to build distant environments."

    What is most valuable?

    The product offers improved performance and it is easy to handle. 

    It's very stable.

    They offer an improved hypervisor based on KBM.

    When we compare it to Oracle Virtual Manager, the IO definitely improved. The way it handles disaster recovery and high availability is great.

    According Oracle's license restriction, so it's a good alternative to VMware.

    The product can scale. 

    What needs improvement?

    There's always room for improvement in the product. 

    They could introduce the same level of remote capabilities, which are available with VMware applications to build distant environments. There's still some room for improvement over there.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've used the solution for two years. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is stable. There are no bugs or glitches and it doesn't crash or freeze. It is reliable. 

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    This is a scalable option. It's in the same leave as VMware. it expands well and quite easily.

    How are customer service and support?

    We didn't really need the help of technical support. We had our own people build it up. If we had a deep crisis, we could handle it. 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We switched when Oracle announced the end of Oracle Virtual Manager. We switched to Oracle Linux Virtual Manager and don't regret it.

    I'm also familiar with VMware and would consider these both in the same category. However, this is a less expensive option. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is very straightforward. It's not overly complex or difficult. 

    We had a cluster of two times four machines and split it across two data center locations and it was quite easy.

    What was our ROI?

    We have witnessed a positive ROI. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    While I don't have the exact costs in front of me, it is much, much less than VMware. 

    What other advice do I have?

    I'd advise anyone looking to implement the solution to just do it. 

    If there's someone around dealing with Oracle and VMware, my advice is just to try it as it's really straightforward. With Oracle, you don't have to care about the nitty gritty things. There are ways of partitioning it or isolating machines so that you have costs related to specific machines very easily. It's a good way to save license costs and have good performance.

    I'd rate the solution eight out of ten. 

    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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    Updated: November 2022
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