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EDB Postgres Advanced Server OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Buyer's Guide

Download the Open Source Databases Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: September 2022

What is EDB Postgres Advanced Server?

EDB Postgres Advanced Server is EDB’s enhanced Postgres database designed to meet the needs of the digital enterprise. EDB Advanced Server incorporates all of PostgreSQL’s features with additional enterprise-class functionality for enhanced performance and security requirements for enterprise workloads. EDB Advanced Server features improve DBA and developer productivity. Oracle users benefit from EDB Advanced Server’s native database compatibility with Oracle, including PL/SQL, built-in packages, and many DBA tools to accelerate and simplify migrations.

EDB Postgres Advanced Server Customers

Ericsson, Clear Capital, PinkRoccade, ABN Amro, WholeWorldBand, Van Genechten, Gallinat-Bank AG, Mariner, coresystems, Aquent, Contegix, AQA, Genscape, InMobi

EDB Postgres Advanced Server Video

Archived EDB Postgres Advanced Server Reviews (more than two years old)

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Director of IT Maintenance Department at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
This enterprise database solution is practically free but lacks security options that would mke it more useful
Pros and Cons
  • "The low cost and functionality allows us to save money on smaller database projects."
  • "The security is not very robust and the product would be much more useful with more security options."

What is our primary use case?

I am responsible for our database products. We use these solutions only on-premises because our government has placed restrictions on our type of organization. The EDB Postgress Advanced Server is something we use for simple database projects on linux.

How has it helped my organization?

This product has allowed us to reduce costs in some parts of our infrastructure without losing functionality.  

What is most valuable?

The part of the product that I find most valuable is using it only for small tables and databases that are not very complex. That is all we need it for although it is also valuable because of the low cost.  

What needs improvement?

The product comes in two forms. One is the full enterprise version which comes with some type of product support. This is something you have to pay additional for but the cost is not very much. The other version of the product is a completely free database product, but it only comes with community support. The full product with support is not very expensive because this is an open-source product developed by the community.  For a transaction system that only needs to take many requests, it can be a good solution.  

What I would like to see to improve the product in the future are some changes to the security policies. What I mean more specifically is that if we compare Enterprise database products security features and Postgres security features, Postgres is maybe 5 years behind Enterprise database products in development. Enterprise database products has many more security features. For example, Enterprise database products can act as a firewall and it has a stronger buffer policy with many rules. Postgres does not have the capability to have very strong policy rules in place. It has only two or three basic rules for buffer policies and it has some stateless protocol and that is all. There are not enough options for stronger security.  

The lack of additional security features is really the thing that makes the product less useful.  

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For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using the product for between two and three years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I think that the stability of the solution is very good. It is a very stable solution.  

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

For the purposes that we use the product for it has expected scalability. In our situation, we will not use this database, as far as I know, to work in a cluster. For what we use the system for, it just performs like a normal database. It is working on an x86 processor and we don't need it to do more. We do not have any problem with scalability. So we are satisfied with it.  

I am not exactly sure how many users are using this solution through our company and deployments. This solution is used to process some kinds of requests from our customers. I think we have used this solution for some of our internet banking. It is probably as many as one million users registered in the system and probably eight or ten TPS (transactions per second) for the database.  

We have just two DBAs from our side doing the maintenance of this solution.  

How are customer service and support?

We have contacted technical support in the past, but it is mostly if we need some additional information about things we had not done before with the product previously. We ask the question, they give the answers and that is all.  

As far as I know, we have not had any serious issues with the product before which were the reason we contacted support. We just ask questions to get answers.  

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

The products we used most before Postgres were Enterprise database products. Of course, we are still using Enterprise database products, but we started using Postgres because it was cheaper and it could do what we needed it to in certain applications.  

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup for Advanced Server is pretty easy. With our experienced DBAs, our deployment only takes about one day maximum.  

What about the implementation team?

We do not use a vendor or other contractor. We deploy the product with our own team.  

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The cost of the product is not really a question because the open-source product itself is free. The only cost in addition that we pay more for is the support payment because we have the enterprise usage and that is all.

What other advice do I have?

The only advice I have for people considering implementing this Postgres Advanced Server solution is that it is cheap and can save money. It was a good lesson to learn that we could save money by working with Postgres. It reduces our costs when we are not implementing some bigger, more demanding software solutions.  

On a scale from one to ten where one is the worst and ten is the best, I would rate this product as an eight.  

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Senior Manager Global Database Services at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
Vendor
Top 20
Provides enhanced functionality but the technology is aging
Pros and Cons
  • "It gives us a solid, less expensive alternative to deploying with Oracle."
  • "The system is aging and not keeping up with the performance of new, enhanced database models."

What is our primary use case?

We have around 170 data centers around the world. We deploy our projects based on the use case and requirements and the projects can vary. Most of those deployments for Postgres are for engineering purposes.

How has it helped my organization?

It gives us a solid, less expensive alternative to deploying with Oracle if it is approved and certified for use with the applications it will be running.

What is most valuable?

Cost/benefit wise Postgres is a great solution. It's a very fast database and — in terms of licensing costs — it also provides a significant TCO reduction compared to Oracle. In terms of specific features, deploying Patroni cluster with PostgreSQL we can achieve full HA capability for mission critical applications.

What needs improvement?

Because of the way Postres g9 / PostgreSQL is using their file system, I think it is not as efficient as it could be. They should start deploying a more effective file system structure to improve efficiency. Let's say we consider Postgres as the database for a solution and the rich machine contains the database and very, very useful solid-state disks to improve the performance and efficiency. That is the hardware is very good and very fast. I think that one of the most effective enhancements at that point is related to a file system rather than just the hardware. The structure of the Postgres file systems they have at the moment in the IT scenario is not very good in comparison to the ASM model from Oracle. Oracle deploys its own file system in order to be more effective. So, I do believe that one of the most important improvements that could be made to Postgres would be to take a step into the future. There are newer database models like MongoDB, NoSQL databases, some people are running on Hadoop. These are newer models and structures. Postgres could benefit from an enhanced file system dedicated to high performance. The next steps that Postgres Azure should just be to improve — to grow up — is to consolidate and enhance the file system. 

The memory management is another place where Postgres can improve. The shell buffer and the effective cache size are not very useful compared with the Oracle SGA. Better efficiency there will also enhance performance.

There are a few things to consider about Postgres monitoring. There are not many queries that can be run to collect information about what is happening in the databases from a file management perspective. They could use more substantial monitoring to help administrative efforts.

There is a group of things that can be improved in this Postgres model. For example the quota on the tablespace, the logging, the query hints, ETC. There are a lot of ways to improve and some are more important.

It would be most important to address the main things first. That would be the file system performance and monitoring. The reason monitoring is important is that sometimes you have don't have a clear idea of what is happening in the database. You can incorrectly blame the hardware. Or you can start blaming the virtual infrastructure. You can blame the storage Because the monitoring is not robust you don't have a clearer picture of what is happening on the database side. There are no statistics for the I/O, no reports for the CPU, there is no information about how the bottlenecks are managed. There should be tracing for the queries to understand what the problems are or if there are slow queries. From a management perspective, these are the most important things that could be improved. Postgres performance is suffering and the product model is not doing enough to keep current.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using this solution for about 10 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Postgres itself is very stable. I can't really say that anything about the stability of the producT is bad. It's our first choice to use after Oracle. If we can avoid to set up Oracle to reduce some costs, we use Postgres. It depends on the application side. I work in the IT department but the company is not an IT company. We approach solutions from a technological perspective. Most of the time we have to deal with the client, the market, the vendors and deploy their applications on different databases. So we look to use Postgres if it's possible. But if the vendor doesn't certify the application on Postgres we need to deploy on a database that is certified for the application and we cannot use it as a solution.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

As far as I know, the only way to scale Postgres is to set up a Patroni cluster. I'm not experienced in adding nodes. That might potentially be another option that can be done without any kind of issue. 

I can say that we have some 2,000 people using the Postgres solution and if we had to scale, I am sure we can find a way to do it.

Right now our architecture is scaled to 12 nodes. Or it is a six-plus-six node setup. The bandwidth is run one-at-a-time and is not maintained at a maximum level so we maintain performance.

How are customer service and technical support?

I do not have any direct contact with technical support.

How was the initial setup?

The setup for the product is very easy. I didn't run the setup myself as we have a technology department that does that. I never heard through them that they had any problems.

What about the implementation team?

We have around 170 data centers around the world and we do the installations.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The price difference compared to more expensive solutions like Oracle is significant. It is a solid, less expensive choice.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We are still a big Oracle user with maybe 500 Oracle servers. Postgres was an option we selected as another opportunity for deployment because, money-wise, the savings on licensing made it a good choice. It's a very reliable database. The licenses are very cheap compared with Oracle, but then again, the problem is always the same. If the application is supported by the database, we can consider using Postgres as a solution. Otherwise, we can't choose it for deployment.

What other advice do I have?

Even with all the improvements that could be made to the model and the functionality, I would give Postgres a seven out of ten. Obviously, it does not score higher because the technology is aging a little and it is not keeping up with other products.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Open Source Databases
September 2022
Find out what your peers are saying about EnterpriseDB, PostgreSQL, MariaDB and others in Open Source Databases. Updated: September 2022.
635,162 professionals have used our research since 2012.
it_user525360 - PeerSpot reviewer
Enterprise Programmes Architect at a logistics company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Effectively allowing us to be far more flexible from architecture to production

What is our primary use case?

As a replacement for Oracle RAC where there's need:

  • More than four servers
  • Dynamically deployable servers
  • Split access between the transnational and reporting on the same data store.

How has it helped my organization?

  • Major reduction in run cost, and a quantum leap in the flexibility of deployment models
  • Elimination of replication of transaction from reporting systems
  • Able to do rolling upgrades with zero production downtime.

What is most valuable?

  • Variant server configuration: not requiring the same release on all.
  • Effectively allowing us to be far more flexible from architecture to production, and the overall support model improves drastically.

What needs improvement?

  • Lighter integration model for containerized deployment.

Effectively, there still remain some issues with a containerized deployment, so we have opted for a non-containerized deployment. This makes pack distribution a little more time-consuming.

For how long have I used the solution?

More than five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This is an extremely robust, enterprise-grade solution that inherits all of the same reliability aspects of Ingress.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

This is a very scalable environment both linear, horizontally and vertically.

How are customer service and technical support?

We are one of the largest corporations in the world so our exectation and support given was extremely high. Would this be so with smaller company's I am not sure.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Oracle RAC and Informix. The single reason for moving off Oracle was the hard limit of four servers in a RAC and the degradation of performance at that. Meaning Oracle really is not scalable across servers, but requires massive increase in individual server specs.

Oracle and Informix are more costly deployments and support models, from a pure licensing perspective.

How was the initial setup?

This was a straightforward one-to-one activity, and both Oracle and Informix database were fully able to be completely comfortable within a day.

What about the implementation team?

In-house team with advice from the vendor.

What was our ROI?

Recovery of investment was less than four months.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I believe this is a negotiation issue with any organization that is based on the size of footprint looked at. Hence our experience would not be applicable. But negotiate, negotiate, and negotiate.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Yes numerous options, include HANA, MongoDB, MySQL, and MS SQL. None of which were sufficiently scalable or at our size, cost effective.

What other advice do I have?

There will be a 10% pure play performance hit against ORacle and about 12% against Informix but the deployment and cost model more than compensate for the additional hardware requirements.
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
PeerSpot user
Database Administrator at a consultancy with 501-1,000 employees
Consultant
It has issues such as data corruption. The database has been able to support about three million taxpayers.

Valuable Features:

The backup utility tools such as pg_restore and pg_dump are really convenient and efficient tools to handle backup and recovery.

Improvements to My Organization:

We have deployed the database to support our tax management system. 

Room for Improvement:

It suffers issues ranging from data corruption to failing to delete temporary files which then necessitate us having to perform server restarts.

Deployment Issues:

We have had no issues with the deployment.

Stability Issues:

The database has had stability issues.

Scalability Issues:

The database has been able to support about three million taxpayers.

Initial Setup:

It's very easy and straightforward to deploy.

Other Advice:

I would encourage any organization to adopt the solution as long as they are ready to invest in training and research. Supporting a PostgreSQL database requires highly skilled personnel.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
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