2020-07-16T06:21:04Z
Miriam Tover - PeerSpot reviewer
Service Delivery Manager at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
  • 0
  • 21

What is your experience regarding pricing and costs for NetSuite ERP?

Hi,

We all know it's really hard to get good pricing and cost information.

Please share what you can so you can help your peers.

3
PeerSpot user
3 Answers
VV
Founder & CEO at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 10
2021-05-25T17:22:40Z
May 25, 2021

It is completely on a subscription basis. We pay yearly and, and you do not have to do anything on a monthly basis. Prices depend on the organization's scale and all those things, but they are doing a good job with the pricing.

Search for a product comparison
Gene Hammons - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at ProfitFromERP
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
2021-03-03T20:57:32Z
Mar 3, 2021

NetSuite has developed new approaches to the market in the last few years. When people buy ERP, it's a competitive situation and the pricing is paramount. People don't want to spend a lot of money upfront on that type of thing — as if we blame them. What NetSuite has gone to, is something called the finances first approach. It says, let's come in. Let's have a small footprint in the organization. We can get a company up and running on the core financials and use it in the business office for about $50,000, which compared to a lot of ERP systems, is very low cost. From there, we start to stair-step the project up to increase the functionality that they're using and increase departments that are on the system. What happens is, when people start using the system, they start understanding the system. They began to learn how to roll out these other functions with their own internal people. They learn to adopt the tool, they understand how it works. Now, you're not saying, "We need this new $30,000 module. It's going to be $100,000 in consulting hours to implement it". It's more like, "We need this $30,000 module, and we may spend $10,000 on outside consultants to help us do it ourselves". That type of thing. There are two things that happen. One, you get instant success because you've got the system up and running and people are beginning to adopt it. They like it, it's successful, it's a valuable tool. That's the first win. The second win is if you get to grow the system. Now that you're using it, you understand it. This is how it's going to be easier for these people to do their jobs. This is how we can put efficiency into our inventory area, or we can put efficiency into our supply chain group, or we can help out our field service reps with information on an iPad. This is how we're going to do that — it helps people. Instead of this instant digital transformation, it's this continual rollout of better and better technology. When they see the results that a client likes, the service levels better, it makes a lot more sense. It's so much easier than this big, huge two-year implementation that some of these software providers come at the client with. That's a hard decision for any company to make. "We're going to be doing this, and we're not totally sure that it's going to work for us. But what if our people don't like using it; aren't there are a lot of things that could go wrong?" Then they just sit there with paralysis by analysis. When they can sit there and say, "Okay, we can start this, this NetSuite rollout. We can get the accounting office on it. We'll be up and running in 90 days, we're going to have better reports. We're going to have better financials. We're going to have all this stuff, we're going to have all these instant wins. How do we get 10% more out of the sales this year? How do we get drive costs down next year?" You've got all of these projects that you can expand your company on moving forward.

Douglas Blumhardt - PeerSpot reviewer
Managing Consultant at Business and Technology Consulting, LLC
Real User
2020-07-16T06:21:04Z
Jul 16, 2020

Licensing costs are all over the place. It really depends a lot on the business model. How many seats, what modules they're getting, and what kind of discount you can negotiate all will adjust the cost structure in different ways. The discounting can range, depending on what's compelling to that model. For example, I bought these two stevedoring companies and they're old companies, they're longshoremen. They've been doing longshoremen work since clipper ships. The systems tend to be old. Nobody had ever really put a stevedoring company on NetSuite before. When I went to NetSuite to negotiate for them, I was able to get okay pricing. There's a pretty broad opportunity if we get one or two of these done. NetSuite was willing to get me a very deep discount in that case. It depends on the deal. The numbers are all over the place.

Learn what your peers think about NetSuite ERP. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
655,774 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Related Questions
Dominic-Gopal - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Jan 9, 2022
Hi community professionals, My company (a Tech Services one) is looking to tie in with an ERP solution.  Among the solutions, we are looking at is NetSuite. It's a SAAS solution which is one new aspect for us as we have always been selling the traditional on-premise. Another significant point is the fee to be a partner that is enormous relatively (when speaking with other vendors).    I just...
2 out of 4 answers
Evgeny Belenky - PeerSpot reviewer
Director of Community at PeerSpot (formerly IT Central Station)
Nov 16, 2021
Hi @Antonio Lira, @Gene Hammons ​and @RobertWolf .  Maybe you can share any insights or pointers with @Dominic-Gopal?
Gene Hammons - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at ProfitFromERP
Nov 16, 2021
So, as a software selection consulting firm, we work with our clients to evaluate any ERP system deemed applicable to a client's industry or business model. We work hard to maintain a software agnostic approach and never forget that every ERP 'works somewhere' and while our preferences are relevant in any system we might use internally, we don't presume to know what's best for any of our clients.  Given that... About 2014 we began to see a strong client preference to NetSuite - after years of distrust of 'cloud'-based software, it seemed that Salesforce finally showed the market that cloud software was 'safe'.  At first, we heard resellers of traditional ERP dismiss NetSuite saying 'It shows great'. Which implied there was not much under the hood, but the demos were somehow misleading.  By 2018, NetSuite was gaining significant market share in new licenses and every traditional ERP package was coming out with a cloud version so they too could 'show great.'  Remember, many of these traditional ERP offerings had made the jump from DOS to Windows, ported from client-server to thin-client, then fully browser-based - what was one more porting?  Fast forward to 2021 and NetSuite is in a truly dominant position - having pioneered the first significant cloud SaaS ERP and having 20+ years in the cloud space, versus latecomers year 3 anniversary in the cloud.  Without going into too much more detail - the significance of NetSuite is not that it's cloud-based, but that it was created for an internet world and uses modern approaches to business support not conceivable to the original developers of traditional ERP in the pre-internet late 1980s.  What this means for potential partners is NetSuite will win between 60% - 80% of all ERP evaluations that actually result in a licensing purchase (As a software selection consulting group, our clients, by definition are already spending significant consulting dollars and rarely go to the no-decision situation which traditionally plagues the market).  Naturally, NetSuite's high win rate is an attractive situation for potential partners. One of NetSuite's strengths is maintaining a strong partner channel. We tell the story of meeting a dentist around 2008. Upon learning we were in the software business, he announced he too was a Microsoft Reseller - he'd not actually sold a license yet and was mostly involved in his dental practice - but he hoped to one day have a sideline VAR business.  The point being, if you don't maintain certain standards for reseller partners, you end up with a wildly varying level of experience - which we imagined could result in an ERP implementation as painful as pulling teeth - but enough of the dentist jokes.  We do know Microsoft Dynamics partners who've balked at NetSuite's stringent requirements and became Acumatica resellers - Acumatica and Sage Intacct are both solid SaaS options and we have many clients happily using both.  However, NetSuite is growing 30% year after year and already has over 20,000 businesses using the platform. The recent Oracle re-acquisition has put incredible development behind the platform - we're seeing new verticals adopting NetSuite rapidly. A recent Oracle sales training class we attended had people from the EU, Ireland, Southeast Asia, Japan - Oracle has created country localizations worldwide and NetSuite is going global. Hyperion, formerly for Oracle Fusion now has a NetSuite version. Suite People, the HR option is now in a third-generation release for NetSuite - the list goes on and on.  Anyway - NetSuite is super strong in the market and the greater costs associated with becoming a partner are an indicator of how much stronger the product is than other ERP/Accounting software options.  My firm is not a full reseller - but we are a referral partner (of many different ERP platforms) and we staff project managers and system administrators for NetSuite who directly help clients in the implementation and later support process. We were planning to add both Acumatica and Intacct support resources - but the last year we're so busy with NetSuite work our expansion to other platforms has been back burnered. 
MK
User at iParametrics
Jul 7, 2021
Hi,  I'm looking at the following products: Deltek CostPoint and Oracle NetSuite ERP. Can you suggest any side-by-side comparison or anything similar?  This would be very helpful to me. Thanks.
See 2 answers
Gene Hammons - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at ProfitFromERP
Jun 24, 2021
So you're comparing a solid niche player (Deltek) with a leading generalist ERP (NetSuite). Most of the clients we see using/choosing Deltek have very specific requirements related to their operations - Deltek plays well in government and quasi-government settings and some of the features they have are hard to find in generalist packages.  NetSuite is the first made-for-cloud offering and has been so successful that now every ERP provider has a 'cloud' option. However, be careful mwith some of these cloud options -  because posting your old code in a cloud based server is very different than made-for-cloud and 20 years of cloud experience with NetSuite.    So here's the thing, get a good handle on your requirements - pretty much a business analyst effort but make sure your analyst has some ERP knowledge/background.  Share those Requirements with the vendors. Go through the demo process and if there are things Deltek does that are absolute must haves, that's your answer.  If Deltek and NetSuite both meet all your requirements, you're probably going to be happier with NetSuite in the long run. But there are plenty of companies who are just fine with Deltek. 
Harry A. Paulison - PeerSpot reviewer
Chief Operating Officer at Sonic Packaging Industries Inc
Jul 7, 2021
There are many good answers here, but true the question is a bit too broad.  If you are not playing in the government contractor space NetSuite is an option you will learn to love in the long run.  It is more flexible than most believe, can be customized, powerful reporting tools and is native to the cloud (hosted on the Oracle cloud).  No on premise option. Deltek is a very good option if you are playing in the government contractor space and has a number of tools to track project based costing and comply with most of the government required reporting.  It is not native to the cloud, but can be hosted there (they offer Amazon) or on premise.  Decent report writing which looks a lot like Excel. Having just compared the two along with some others as well, I would say a reasonably close second to NetSuite is Accumatica.  It is built for the cloud, flexible, a bit less pricey, but if you need more chugging on the MRP side NetSuite is better there particularly considering the newer Supply Chain Control Tower and advanced inventory management capabilities.  NetSuite is not elegant when it comes to Stand Cost, however, so understand your needs and its capabilities. You really need to perform a thorough needs analysis that projects into the future and compare that to the capabilities you'll use now and leverage in the future.  Regardless, using an implementation consultant expert in the system you pick is highly recommended.
Related Articles
Dominic-Gopal - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Jan 27, 2022
Hi peers, My company has recently signed on with NetSuite and last week completed the Demo and Delivery Week as they term it.  For 15 years I have been using a particular methodology from another vendor and somehow it just did not work well. I found the methodology to be rigid and outdated.   Then last week when I had a proper understanding of the NetSuite methodology called SuiteSuccess - i...
See 2 comments
Gene Hammons - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at ProfitFromERP
Jan 24, 2022
So when I first encountered the NetSuite Suite Success  - I thought - here we go again - prepackaged, cookie-cutter, do-everything-one-way implementations - saw this over the years by everyone from Microsoft to SAP in an effort to cut implementations from 18 months to a year or so - and I thought - "Not for MY clients you don't"! What I found is that incremental learning on the part of new NetSuite users allows them a base knowledge to better participate in the more complex modules.  NetSuite implementations, being a multi-tenant cloud setup are 90-120 days anyway. Also, by pushing the implementation team to the Learning Center, they can get exposed to how NetSuite works and actually work on certification classes prior to the implementation start. Not finish the classes - but start. It makes a big difference. The stairstep method of Suite Success not only works to implement the software but to sort of implementing an internal team - a team of on-staff NetSuite super-users who realize continual learning and new ways to roll out NetSuite to other areas of the company have big payoffs.  It's a really effective methodology and after getting over my initial stubborn reticence we now measure progress on a NetSuite implementation both by the deliverables in software configuration and the development of users beginning to question things and take actual ownership of their own system. 
Dominic-Gopal - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Jan 27, 2022
Thanks for validating my thoughts @Gene Hammons! Once again a fantastic reply. 
Gene Hammons - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at ProfitFromERP
Mar 1, 2021
What don't they tell you about ERP? Turns out there's plenty left unsaid. There's actually an 80% marketwide failure rate measured by cost overrun, time to go-live and expected functionality - granted, getting the system up a month later isn't the end of the world, but a 2x budget overrun is no laughing matter.  CIO's have also expressed disappointment in having sufficient budget to finish th...
Related Articles
Dominic-Gopal - PeerSpot reviewer
CEO at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Jan 27, 2022
Thoughts about the NetSuite SuiteSuccess methodology
Hi peers, My company has recently signed on with NetSuite and last week completed the Demo and D...
Gene Hammons - PeerSpot reviewer
Director at ProfitFromERP
Mar 1, 2021
What They Don't Tell You About ERP
What don't they tell you about ERP? Turns out there's plenty left unsaid. There's actually an 80...
Download Free Report
Download our free NetSuite ERP Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2022.
DOWNLOAD NOW
655,774 professionals have used our research since 2012.