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What is Planview Spigit?
Activate employee and customer engagement. Spigit's innovation and idea management software helps you tap your best asset (your people).

Planview Spigit was previously known as Spigit.

Planview Spigit Buyer's Guide

Download the Planview Spigit Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: January 2022

Planview Spigit Customers
Pfizer, UnitedHealth Group, Citi, AT&T, Cambia Health, Siemens, Veridian Credit Union, Polaris, UNHCR, CCA Global
Planview Spigit Video

Planview Spigit Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Planview Spigit pricing:
  • "Planview could drop the price for Spigit. I've done two market assessments and I think that they're overpriced pretty considerably right now."
  • "We have a tiered annual licensing fee."
  • "The yearly licensing cost is $55,000."
  • Planview Spigit Reviews

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    Eli Gerson
    Manager of Innovation at Ameren Corporation
    Real User
    Top 10Leaderboard
    Coworkers feel more empowered to suggest solutions to the daily problems they face, seeing how they translate into results
    Pros and Cons
    • "The nice thing is how flexible it is. We can run very small challenges. We can run very large challenges. We haven't had a company-wide challenge but we hope to have one this year. We can run a challenge within a day, with several features, or we can run a challenge over two months or an always-on challenge. We can have different goals, whether they be about culture, workplace improvements, business solutions, or strategic issues."
    • "It has an "Apple" approach where, when you open it, you understand how most of the functionality and features work. With just a little bit of guidance or training, and the videos that we watched, we were up and running really quickly."
    • "There are times when some of the system aspects move a little bit slowly, but that's a pretty minor complaint. For the most part, those are things that we see behind the scenes as administrators or moderators of challenges."

    What is our primary use case?

    The team I'm on within our company does corporate planning and strategy. We're the innovation team within that world. Initially, we thought more of our use cases would be around getting idea submissions that would ultimately lead into our portfolio projects for long-term strategic purposes. What we've found is that it's harder for most coworkers to identify some of those. Unless we're sponsoring a challenge ourselves, the overlap is low for that.

    So instead what we've focused on more are two things. One is cultural impact, and the second one is business segment goals.

    When it comes to cultural issues, we've done challenges around workplace culture, around specific events, or with front-line workers, specifically in our call centers, who've been using Spigit almost as an empowerment tool. They can voice and bring up solutions to challenges that they're facing. So they've run a couple of challenges within these workgroups on how to make it easier to do business with us or increase customer loyalty. So those are business segment challenges, in part.

    But the biggest benefit of it has been that these coworkers, who for the most part are in really difficult, high-turnover positions, are feeling very empowered to offer suggestions and see them implemented by leadership. So it has a dual purpose. We are looking to do more business segment goals in our own segment that would fit us as well.

    The second aspect has been on the business segment goals. We have found that partnering with business segments or department groups on specific challenges that are aligned with their specific strategy or short-, medium-, or long-term goals, is very effective. We help support those, even though the solutions or input aren't things that my team really touches. But if there's good alignment, it can be a very effective tool.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Spigit Planview is a big part of how our company is trying to promote and foster a culture of innovation. It's helping with changing the norms and making coworkers feel more empowered to suggest solutions for all sorts of problems they face day-to-day. When they do it successfully through a challenge, they can see how that can translate into results and into appreciation from their leadership, and they can take that mentality to all aspects of their work.

    At this point we've had hundreds of ideas submitted, largely from the business segments, and they have implemented more than 100 of those ideas. The challenge winners or challenge ideas — sometimes they weren't declared winners — that have been implemented have resulted in customer value, new revenue, or cost savings that are real to our customers and to us as a company.

    We have a portfolio project that we manage, and investments that we manage, and R&D that we manage. This is a little bit different than that, although sometimes it seeds in. The biggest thing is that this is a central part of our cultural goals and objectives. Using crowdsourced ideation and Spigit is a big way for us to achieve the cultural goals we have.

    In terms of increased employee survey scores in our organization as a result of using the solution, we have had improved engagement scores that we can track through it and compare coworkers who have gone through a challenge with those who haven't. There tends to be an increase in both innovation in surveys that we've done and in employee satisfaction in generic components that we're looking at. It's a little bit tough to scientifically declare that type of thing causally, but we do have some good evidence to suggest that it has been a factor in improving metrics. There are several ways we measure it, but the positive satisfaction increase is around five to 10 percent on average. For example, a survey that had a 70 percent positive score might have something like 77 percent in the next year. Some of those small increases actually are pretty meaningful.

    If we take a broader perspective, beyond our immediate team — because we have not done very many challenges ourselves — there has been an increase in innovation in general among our internal customers who are using Spigit. We have seen that the pace of project startup, funding, and completion is much faster for things that are proposed in or are winning these challenges; sometimes four to five times faster.

    What is most valuable?

    I like the flexibility in it. The majority of our challenges are traditional, time-bound challenges, where we do the submission, the crowd-validation component, expert review, and then the pairwise. Each one typically runs a week to two weeks so you have a month to month-and-a-half long challenge. Those tend to work well for us. They're easy to communicate. We can get materials and leverage resources that we've used in the past to make that pretty smooth.

    We really like some of the functionality to have faster-paced challenges or do pairwise-only challenges. It could be something where you have a prioritization list, where you have ideas or solutions and you want a group to prioritize the most important aspects; or you really just want people to submit ideas and then rank them. It's neat to have a tool that can take a group of senior leaders, submit something to a quick challenge that takes them five minutes, and then they rank them and prioritize them and specify the pairwise during a break later on in that meeting and it's done. Whereas some challenges last a month or two months with very high engagement and more time on them. I like that the tool is flexible for that. That is probably the most valuable part for us.

    The solution's dashboards and reporting have two purposes for us. One is for our own group, since we house and support Spigit across Ameren. We do a lot of benchmarking and reporting to see how well our metrics are stacking up. We use the solution's reporting mechanisms for that, and they're automated to easily generate them. That works tremendously well, creating very little work per project for us. Our group uses the standard stuff where we're getting the number of visitors, number of ideas, number of ideators, etc. We just plug and chug that into a metric that we use. And it compares them to past challenges and to benchmarks.

    And then there's how we present the information to the challenge sponsor, to the executive sponsor, or the executive group sponsoring challenges. Typically, they're looking at it from a different perspective. They do like to know how their results compare to other ones we've run, or to Spigit benchmarks. But usually they have their own things that they're looking for. Sometimes the leaders are more interested in how many ideas are generated. Sometimes leaders are interested in how many people engage. I like that we can very easily generate reports, or take results and put them into our own formats if needed, to present them to all the different types of stakeholders very easily.

    Usually, the sponsors of new challenges don't care for the granularity in the reporting. We provide it to them but they're usually more interested in diving into particular aspects of engagement. Sometimes that means they want to know which types of coworkers participated — whether they're front-line or managers or directors. Sometimes they're more interested in who submitted ideas but not necessarily who voted or ranked. It's really easy within the tool, after listening to what they want to get for feedback on, to generate a report, on the spot very quickly.

    Spigit's functionality helps us to prioritize and select the best ideas. The one caveat with that is that "best" is usually a subjective term. What's neat about the platform is the transparency so everyone can understand. There are clear rules on what it takes to move from phase to phase. Things get communicated through the tool or individually, and that creates a lot of power. What's often tricky for coworkers is when they don't know what happened to the ideas they submitted, in general, or why an idea gets acted on or not. They can say, "Hey, my boss didn't want to do my idea," or, "I'm upset about it." 

    What's neat about using Spigit is that they can see why ideas are doing better. In pairwise, the coworkers themselves are judging them. Some people might still think some aspect of that is unfair, or they don't get it, but it's very clear: This idea had a higher percentage of thumbs-up to thumbs-down than that one did. It was more broadly well-received and that's why it got selected. That type of transparency is really important.

    What needs improvement?

    It's a little tricky to say what can be improved in the solution because a lot has changed recently and we haven't run a challenge recently enough to look at the last iteration of the platform. 

    When we have feedback for them about an issue, what we find is that either there are solutions or easier ways to do it, things that we just need to have explained to us, which Spigit's team is great at doing. 

    Things that are identified either by us or others that end up needing updating, or bug fixes — when we tell them it would be easier or be cleaner if X, Y, or Z happened — they're great at receiving that. We find that those are almost always changed in the next couple of months or within the year.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    This will be our fourth calendar year using it. We've had it for two-and-a-half years. Our team is pretty small, so we don't have a lot of people to manage different aspects. I know a lot of clients of Spigit have somebody who manages it full-time. We don't have that luxury. We've run a couple of larger challenges per year and a handful of smaller ones each year as well.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    There are times when some of the system aspects move a little bit slowly, but that's a pretty minor complaint. For the most part, those are things that we see behind the scenes as administrators or moderators of challenges. Once challenges are going out to customers or being used by coworkers, it's really straightforward and we haven't run into any bugs. 

    There have been a couple of times where, on our end, we've put in the wrong default email settings and things happened that we didn't intend to happen, but that's more on our end.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The nice thing is how flexible it is. We can run very small challenges. We can run very large challenges. We haven't had a company-wide challenge but we hope to have one this year. We can run a challenge within a day, with several features, or we can run a challenge over two months or an always-on challenge. We can have different goals, whether they be about culture, workplace improvements, business solutions, or strategic issues. We're almost always coming up with different ways we can use it. There hasn't been anything that we've thought up, a use case, that we haven't been able to do. We really feel no limitations on how we can scale it.

    We do intend to continue to scale it. This last year we had some of those intentions. The roles and the number of people in our team were in transition last year and that complicated our ability to use it more. We've been very deliberate about it because we wanted to have these initial challenges go well to prove it out. If we had more resources we'd be running many more challenges, but we will definitely scale it and intend that each year there will be more than the preceding one.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Spigit's technical support is really excellent. They are so responsive to us, both in how fast they respond to us and in the completeness of their replies. They're transparent around how long things will take. We've never had an issue where it's taken time to get solutions or made it so that something is not working well. They're really an A-plus across the board for us in their support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We didn't have a tool as such. There were people who used a generic suggestion box or tried to have some sort of business case or ideation-type sessions or goals, but never through a structured software solution. That aspect is definitely new for us. The need and the desire to do these types of things is certainly not new, but we haven't had anything equivalent to this.

    How was the initial setup?

    In terms of Spigit itself, the setup was very straightforward. There were some issues and complexities within our company that were not Spigit's fault. But overall, it was straightforward.

    From the point that we set up the installation and did single sign-on it did take two to four weeks, but most of that was due to issues and processes on our end. Almost everything was instantaneous from the Spigit side. It has an "Apple" approach where, when you open it, you understand how most of the functionality and features work. With just a little bit of guidance or training, and the videos that we watched, we were up and running really quickly.

    We worked with our Spigit team to put together a strategy for how we thought it would best deploy across our organization. We met with other utilities and similar customers and talked about how they use it, to share best practices and put together a list of which segments in our company would be the best clients, initially, for using it. We scaled it from there. We've been a little slower and deliberate in increasing our engagement and in who we're reaching out to and the types of challenges over time.

    Our team is really small so we can't dedicate full-time to any of this. This is a smaller part of what we do. That has slowed us down a little bit internally; it has nothing to do with Spigit itself. Even though we're in our fourth year, we're still thinking about how we're scaling the solution to make it more sustainable and hit more of our coworkers. Spigit has been an awesome partner.

    For deployment and maintenance of Spigit we just use our team of two full-timers and some part-time people here and there. We spend somewhere between 2 and 5 percent of our time on it over the course of the year, meaning a very small percentage of an FTE. That is also why we haven't been able to scale it to more challenges over time.

    Setting up a challenge, depending on the meetings with the sponsors, usually happens within four hours. That's how long it takes to get everything that we typically need to build them, in addition to whatever meeting time is necessary. Even when a challenge is running, usually the moderation is done by a team within the challenge area. Our team supports that but doesn't have to be hands-on or full-time at all. We've been able to use it very well with the limited ability of our team to support it in terms of overall hours. We would like to give it more time, but it's been hard to fit into the structure of our team.

    What about the implementation team?

    We did almost all of it ourselves. We shared the first one and had Spigit go through some of the process with us, to talk through some of the issues or to ask them questions by email.

    They helped to create templates for us. Since we're comfortable at this point creating challenges, we're pretty much self-service and it's easy. The added benefit is that if we run into any issues or are looking for shortcuts or improvements, it's one call or email and they'll talk us through it really quickly. We talk with them more about general solutions and strategy than anything specifically to do with the challenges themselves. It's been really good.

    What was our ROI?

    We haven't made a major attempt to do an ROI calculation, but everyone has agreed that the value that it offers more than makes up for the cost of it. Some of that comes through the business solutions and the scaled projects and challenge suggestions. But the majority have a less tangible, cultural impact. While they're hard to quantify, they're certainly above what we pay for the service.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We did a pretty big search among different solutions. We have probably looked at a half-dozen or so of the large players in this space that have similar offerings. 

    Our evaluation was based on price on, customer support, and quality of service. We felt, and still do feel, that Spigit is the clear leader in the crowdsource ideation space. It is a leader within our industry for energy and utilities in particular. We have a lot of peers who are using it very effectively. We feel that we benefit from the community of Spigit users who are very cooperative and engage frequently. We've been very pleased with it and feel that the value that we get is excellent and that they are very competitive among their competitors. Spigit continues to be the gold standard in our eyes.

    What other advice do I have?

    Using it, we've confirmed the power that crowdsourcing ideation has to generate ideas and the benefit that has for corporate culture. But the most surprising thing that we've learned is how important it is as an empowerment tool, particularly for front-line workers. I gave the example above of call-center employees who have a very difficult job, relatively lower pay than the majority of their coworkers, and tougher hours and conditions. For coworkers like that, for whom it's hard to bring up concerns or issues, a tool like this creates an equal and clear footing and very clearly asks them to contribute and share their experiences and ideas. It makes them much happier to be a coworker here and more valued as a person. That was the most surprising outcome to us. We knew that it would be culturally important, but we didn't realize how that empowerment, at a personal level, would really translate.

    It's always good to create tools that allow more coworkers to engage in innovation and problem solving. Creating tools that empower coworkers and make it more the norm to share ideas and to think about new solutions, is incredibly valuable. We think that Spigit does it better than its competitors. If you're looking to do it, the service that they offer is tremendous. They have a great staff, great support, a good product, and a great network of peers to collaborate with as well.

    It does take a little bit of moderation, typically, to combine ideas or sometimes remove an idea if it's truly a duplicate. We have talked to other Spigit customers about best practices around how to address that. There are certain challenges where that's more of the issue. For example, one of our challenges — even though we only had around 300 people as our target audience and, of that, we had 60 percent of people participate — we ended up with 127 ideas. And when there are so many ideas, it's really impossible for everyone to read all the ideas before they submit. In challenges with a lot of ideas, we tend to have duplicate ideas.

    Initially, we didn't know what to do with those. But we've used the moderation features to combine, join, or delete ideas. One thing that has been really helpful is that before coworkers submit an idea, they hit a click box indicating that they understand that if the idea, or a similar idea, has already been submitted, it might be merged with another idea or removed. That avoids the issue of, "What happened to my idea?" or, when an idea wins, of "Hey, why did that one win when I submitted the same thing? What happened to mine?" That's been really helpful. There is no way to fully automated that because you do need to use some human moderator judgment to determine how similar ideas are.

    The process of consolidating duplicate responses from employees doesn't affect our administrative overhead very much. It's really just during the idea-submission phase which, typically for us for a fast challenge, is a day, but usually more like a week or two weeks. 

    From our six main challenges we've had, respectively, 30 ideas submitted, 127, 123, 72, 53, and 27 ideas submitted out of an audience that has ranged from 2,000 to 3,500 visitors. So we've had a good ratio of visitors to ideas. But because these are still relatively small groups — we've only done one group larger than 600 people — we have ended up not having a huge number of ideas per challenge. So it's relatively easy for the moderators to check a few times a day, quickly, to see the ideas. And they really just need to look at the new ideas submitted since they've already seen the previous ones. Not all of our challenges had duplicate ideas. It really doesn't take much to manage it.

    Of those visitors, we have around 70 to 75 percent of them being active participants on challenges, on average. It has run the gamut across different business segments for us. We've used it within our transmission company, we've used it within our experience group, we've used it across our whole IT organization. We've used it in our business and corporate services organization. It has been used by everyone from presidents of companies down to the front- line workers, and everyone in between.

    We're particularly looking forward to being able to turn these ideas around and implement them straight into our Planview solution, which is part of the reason why we switched to Projectplace to do that. It's very easy within the tool to manage ideas through the different processes and generate reports. For internal customers who are running a challenge, it's very easy to give them either a PDF or an Excel sheet with the ideas for them to manage in other solutions, if they don't have the Planview solution or don't want to continue using it. Because of the ease of taking those ideas and continuing to use the Planview tracking and resources, or to do so in another setting, we've been very pleased.

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    Innovation Consultant at a healthcare company with 10,001+ employees
    Consultant
    Top 20Leaderboard
    Lack of enhancements and of attention to our needs hamper our use, but crowdsourcing and collaboration features work well
    Pros and Cons
    • "The crowdsourcing feature and having an open, transparent platform where people can submit ideas are among the most important capabilities of Spigit. Collaboration begins immediately upon submission."
    • "Spigit could possibly improve the idea review process or the administrative panel for reviewing ideas. It's not strong. Most of it is done manually by pulling down and reviewing reports. Other platforms are doing it through pipelines and funnels that are all automated."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use it primarily to run what we consider to be focused or open innovation challenges or initiatives. They are innovation/ideas submission contests.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The sharing of ideas among users often helps make the idea-review process for our consultant team much more efficient because we can review ideas even before the end of an innovation initiative or challenge. A lot of the work is done on the platform at the front end.

    Also, a platform like Spigit during COVID times, with the crowdsourcing feature and the engagement, is able to bring people together virtually and to collaborate in a fun and productive way. As organizations look for tools for the "new normal" where people are working remotely all the time, an innovation platform like Spigit can be a tool that makes it easy for people to engage and collaborate.

    It has increased innovation efficiency and has helped cut our time to market for new ideas. The platform is just a platform but there's a whole other layer to it, which is leadership buy-in and funding. But when you have leadership buy-in, Spigit can get you from: "We're going to run an initiative to solve these pain points," to "Here are the top ideas that we're actually going to put on a roadmap," and it can do so much quicker than any other way of doing it within an organization. In that sense, Spigit could save you months or even years. We've run challenges and have found ideas or solutions within six to eight weeks for things that might otherwise have taken a whole year or more. In a company that is built on roadmaps, oftentimes there is not a lot of leeway for innovations and they will put a good idea on next year's roadmap.

    What is most valuable?

    The crowdsourcing feature and having an open, transparent platform where people can submit ideas are among the most important capabilities of Spigit. Collaboration begins immediately upon submission. Users have the ability to bring others in through "@so-and-so" mentions in comments. 

    What needs improvement?

    Spigit helps you to prioritize and select the best ideas, although that is dependent on the organization's criteria for what the best idea is. Spigit could possibly improve the idea review process or the administrative panel for reviewing ideas. It's not strong. Most of it is done manually by pulling down and reviewing reports. Other platforms are doing it through pipelines and funnels that are all automated. 

    But it does help us get to the best idea within an initiative or a challenge. If we set criteria by saying, for example, "We're looking for the one that has the most votes and comments," we're doing things to motivate employees to get socialized and to get buy-in on their ideas. Prioritizing ideas works on the front end but not as much on the back end.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using Planview Spigit for almost three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We still find bugs in Spigit. We found a bug where the metrics were off. We submit tickets but we haven't gotten clear answers on why the metric on a dashboard is showing something that is different from the metric on the reports that we're pulling. There could be some improvements to the tech support.

    Also, there are commenting bugs. If I comment and push the space bar away from it, it deletes the "@" mention in the comment.

    Overall, in terms of stability, Spigit has stayed up and running. It's pretty stable. User errors are probably the biggest issue.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    When it comes to scalability, if you have it open to as many seats as you can for your whole organization, it works perfectly. I used it at a company with between 4,000 and 6,000 people, and it served my needs well.

    In my current company, Spigit is just being used by our four to five innovation consultants. But the number of active users on the platform can vary between a couple hundred in a group, if we're running a challenge, up to several thousand. We are possibly going to use it for an organization-wide challenge, and our organization has 10,000-plus people. Other than that, there are also moderators whom we pull in on challenges, but they don't do much other than review ideas.

    How are customer service and support?

    The biggest room for improvement for Planview, from a customer relationship standpoint, is to bring more value to customer meetings. They need to be more open to listening to customer ideas because we are the big companies doing innovation and there are a lot of things that we can offer to improve the platform.

    Their technical support is okay. It got complicated when Planview acquired Spigit because of the support product that they used. They've simplified it again. But they could definitely improve their white papers and videos. I haven't used them that much but, at one point, a lot of the self-support was super outdated information or not very comprehensive. 

    The support is there but sometimes it's just indefinite. Sometimes they'll say, "Oh, we don't know if it's our problem or your problem." There have been times where they go back and forth saying, "It's not our problem, we think it's your problem," and our IT folks say, "No, that's a platform problem." As a consultant, I don't have time to troubleshoot a bug. I'm not an IT person and I'm working in a company that's so big that our IT people don't have time for something that might be considered a small bug, if it's not impeding business. When those bugs are submitted to Planview, the company should figure them out and then get back to us and say, "Hey, we've fixed that bug."

    How would you rate customer service and support?

    Neutral

    How was the initial setup?

    I wasn't here for the initial setup of Spigit, but getting trained on the program was straightforward.

    What was our ROI?

    This is the first or second year that we've used Spigit heavily for challenges and we are probably at break-even right now.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The platform is on a per-user basis. Because we are a huge company, if we were to scale, it would be very expensive. Right now we're using a limited number of seats. They could consider looking into a per-admin or some other type of pricing model.

    Specifically for Spigit, I would definitely tell other large companies who are considering it to look at potential partnerships based on the per-user price. I would also tell them to look at what features you are getting at this price. 

    Planview could drop the price for Spigit. I've done two market assessments and I think that they're overpriced pretty considerably right now.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    The last market evaluation I did included more than 10 solutions, in-depth, including demos of all of the systems and meeting multiple times with their sales teams and product people. In the past, I've used Brightidea as well as IdeaScale, and we also have a homegrown platform that we built out of SharePoint.

    A few years ago, Spigit was something of a market leader, but there have been concerns at the companies where I have used Spigit due to the fact that Planview has moved to being a PPM, a project and portfolio management company. Often in our meetings with them, they're trying to sell us other products to supposedly maximize our Spigit solution or our idea management. I've seen their roadmap, I've seen that they're doing an overhaul. Apparently, they do have something coming out in the near future as an enhancement to Spigit, but over the last three or four years it has been pretty stagnant.

    And if they're going to improve their platform, they should try to stick to a timeline. The timeline they gave us for the rollouts to improve Spigit is almost a year late now. They are falling behind a lot of the competitors out there when it comes to improving the idea management platform. If that platform is not where they want to focus, or where they're making their money, I can understand that. But in the idea management space, they are definitely not the number-one platform anymore.

    From a partnership perspective, it seems that Planview is not as open to suggestions, whereas other companies I know not only look for customers for feedback but they'll have an open challenge for their customers to submit ideas. And they actually take those ideas and incorporate them into their products, often on a quarterly basis. We've mentioned a few improvements that could be made to Spigit and the response has been, "Oh, well, great. Why don't you buy our other product?" They seem to take the focus away from Spigit and try to move other products from Planview.

    What other advice do I have?

    My advice is to really know what is most important to you. For my team its idea management: front-end collaboration and transparency for the innovators and, on the back end, being able to manage an idea. We want to go from recognizing an idea that has potential, to tracking it through its life cycle. You have to know what you want the platform to do for you.

    Do you want really good engagement or really good administrative tools that will help you track an idea? Do you want to keep notes on an idea and let people collaborate on it once it's moved from a submission to a graduated phase? Or is it just the crowdsourcing and being able to let people submit ideas that are important to you? If it's the latter, there are things that Spigit can work on, in terms of the administrative functionality, to create a more robust administrative tool. But for the engagement piece, upfront, it works well.

    We use the solution’s Insight analytics platform and since we're only using it for initiatives and challenges, it works fine. We're trying to understand what is a best practice for an innovation organization and what are the best metrics to track. I used it at a prior company to track engagement. We could see, out of X number of employees, how many were active on the platform. That was a good figure to report on to help track innovation culture. In my current organization, we're still figuring it out. But Spigit does track engagement through employee activity.

    Each organization has to figure out which metrics they need to measure. What is innovation within the organization and then look at whether the platform actually measures that.

    We have people on our team who use Spigit's dashboards. But over the last year, Planview took most of the reporting off the platform and moved it, through a plug-in, into other reporting tools such as Power BI and others that I don't know and haven't used. Not being super tech-savvy, I would like to be able to use dashboards and reporting through a simple and easy-to-use tool on the innovation platform itself, rather than going out and learning Power BI. Fortunately, I'm part of a big company and we have somebody who knows those tools, but I'm sure that there are innovation teams with one person who might not know how to use all those tools to run more complex or comprehensive reports through Power BI or the like.

    Spigit enables you to consolidate duplicate responses from employees, but it's a manual process in our use case, not automated. The part that is automated is the actual combining of ideas, but tracking down duplicate ideas is a manual process. If there were a way to make that process more efficient upfront, it would save us the time of doing it on the back end.

    If an idea comes up and there are six other ideas that are exactly the same, I'm not going to know that unless I pull a report and look at them all together or I'm able to look at them in a list. It's not like there are platforms out there that have natural language processing, so that if somebody submits an idea, the platform is already scraping the titles and descriptions to start to create a match to help eliminate duplicates within the submission form. Some companies don't believe in using that type of functionality to eliminate duplicates because they think it's a deterrent to somebody when it comes to submitting an idea.

    My six out of 10 rating is based, in part, on knowing what else is out there in the market. It's also due to Spigit not fitting our organizational needs anymore. And when they meet with us once a month, they should actually listen to what we feel are ways that we could use the platform better. Also, there haven't been a ton of product enhancements, although there have been a ton of promises that they're coming. They have been delayed for months and months.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud
    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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    Learn what your peers think about Planview Spigit. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: January 2022.
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    Kori Patrick
    Technical Manager, Innovation R&D at Enbridge Gas
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Provides the ability to collect ideas for people to comment and vote on
    Pros and Cons
    • "The ability to collect ideas for people to be able to comment and vote. We like the pairwise portion of it. It is just a simple way in which people can post ideas and review other ideas. We have used it out-of-the-box, without doing much customization."
    • "It does enable us to consolidate duplicate responses from employees, but it is difficult sometimes. We are running a challenge right now with two ideas that are pretty close and duplicate. Once they're out there and a significant amount of people have voted on them, it's hard to consolidate or merge them. The merge feature is not very clear, so it basically hides one of the ideas, removing and archiving it. I don't know if that's the best way to do it. I would want to make the secondary idea still visible, but put it under as a possible subidea to the parent idea."

    What is our primary use case?

    We are using time challenges at the business unit and department level. Enterprise-wide, we are doing rapid challenges, one- or two-hour type things within department and smaller groups to generate ideas. We are just focusing on the ideation piece and using it to collect, then prioritize top ideas around different challenges.

    It's on the cloud, but we have branded it internally. We call it Accelerate. When it comes up, they have a website for us, accelerate.spigit.com that we use.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We ran our first challenge back in January 2019. The first seven projects that we selected as winning projects have moved forward significantly. Some of those are completed and others are still in progress. In terms of just communicating out, advertising those stories, and talking about them, this has helped build engagement and a culture around innovation. It has created some excitement that there is a new way for people to collaborate.

    The voting is one way in terms of how the solution’s functionality helps us to prioritize and select the best ideas. E.g., we use the number of views on an idea, the number of votes, and the number of comments that an idea gets. We're using this for most for our challenges which are expert reviews. This is where we're gathering experts who do a simple scoring mechanism. The final stage is where we use a pairwise. This is the top ideas, usually 15 ideas, then do a pairwise with the organization. We tend to have lower participation by this point but we still find we're getting enough people to statistically get a good representation. So far, so good with the way ideas are prioritized.

    We are doing well on the front-end of the workflow with the collection and prioritizing of ideas. We are still figuring out how to get the execution of the Okta top ideas more highlighted or focused. This part of the workflow is still something we're working on.

    What is most valuable?

    The ability to collect ideas for people to be able to comment and vote. We like the pairwise portion of it. It is just a simple way in which people can post ideas and review other ideas. We have used it out-of-the-box, without doing much customization.

    Spigit's dashboards and reporting are great. We generate a post challenge report with as much data as possible. E.g., a summary with the number of participants and how the participants contributed. We also get asked questions about users and where they come from, such as, how many people in my department participated in it. We connect our platform to Okta, which integrates single sign-on. Once people are signed into our internal system or their email, they can sign in through Okta to this system. It ports over a bunch of user attributes that we are able to track as part of the data. So far, so good.

    I went into the Spigit Insight analytics platform last week and found a report that I needed for understanding how many active users we have out of the total number of people that are signed in. This helps us gauge our level of participation and where we're at so far.

    What needs improvement?

    It does enable us to consolidate duplicate responses from employees, but it is difficult sometimes. We are running a challenge right now with two ideas that are pretty close and duplicate. Once they're out there and a significant amount of people have voted on them, it's hard to consolidate or merge them. The merge feature is not very clear, so it basically hides one of the ideas, removing and archiving it. I don't know if that's the best way to do it. I would want to make the secondary idea still visible, but put it under as a possible subidea to the parent idea. That is something they need to figure out a bit better.

    I would like it to have the ability to close out ideas a bit more intuitively. On a lot of our challenges, we have ideas that were submitted. With the winning ideas, people can select those as winning, while with the other ideas, all you can do in the tool is close them out and set them as closed, which I haven't done a lot of. So, people have ideas which are sitting there that weren't selected as winners and they often wonder six months later whatever happened to them. Even without going into project management, there should be a better way to close this out better.

    I'm trying to figure out ways to use this tool when doing face-to-face type sessions. E.g., how can we interact with a group of people rather than having them all bring their laptops. Maybe there are mobile solutions or having people sit down as a team. We haven't learned to do this autonomously yet. I know Spigit provides a service where they can come in and do some of this ability. 

    I am just learning about the Insights dashboard. Prior to this, I was struggling to gather data. While I can get a lot of data within an individual challenge, getting data across all the challenges or a certain selected amount of challenges, I'm still learning how to do that. They could have an easier way to do analytics across the entire database.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    A year and a quarter.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability is great. No problems.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Roughly a third of the organization has signed into it at least once. Of that, we have 50 percent active users, which is really good. This is above some of the benchmarks for organizations at year-end. So, we're happy with participation so far and hoping to improve. We will keep working on it. 

    We just launched a new challenge enterprise-wide, and we're almost at 5,000 users. Our organization size is at 13,500. Active users: We are at 2,500.

    Users are people who are coming in as participants, idea submitters, voters, or commenters. In terms of administration of the tool, we are a small three-man, innovation team within Enbridge. Right now, I am doing all the admin for all the challenges. We have done some cross-training for others to do some administration to run their own challenges, but nobody is doing that independently as of yet. So, a sponsor within any area of the company will contact me if they want to run an innovation challenge, then I'll set it up for them.

    We do plan to increase the usage with more broad communication, increasing the number of sponsors and number of challenges within different business units. Eventually, we'll get other administrators in different areas to manage their own programs and keep building up usership.

    We have already scaled up. We launched a challenge with a sponsor the other day, and so far, no problems with anybody. I haven't had one complaint about sign ins. I also figured out how to do a private challenges now, so I don't have any issues there. It's been good.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The technical support has been good. I use the chat feature quite a bit, so I get support right away there. I also use the support at spigit.com where I submit loggable issues and questions. I have gotten good support there.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    Other than SharePoint sites and internal databases, we didn't use other innovation management tools before Spigit. 

    Spigit has increased innovation efficiency and helped us to cut our time-to-market for new ideas. We weren't proactively managing ideas and the idea workflow prior to this solution. So, it's been very useful so far. Before we had Spigit, we had people managing ideas within their own departments using their own databases. They would sit down in teams and have meetings to collect ideas. It has sped up areas in which we run challenges. Though, there are a lot of areas where we haven't run challenges or used the tool.

    How was the initial setup?

    I found the initial setup straightforward. 

    We spent about a year with Spigit just learning about the tool. We did a couple of pilots in 2018. We did some tests with some groups, then by the time we sorted out contracts and built it in, our little team had built up a great deal of knowledge about innovation, innovation tools, and how a tool like this can help our organization. 2019 was the year where we officially launched with our first challenge, then subsequently ran other challenges. I found the implementation to be seamless and the tool was successful right off the bat. It's really intuitive, so we didn't have to provide much training for people. We just provided them with the link, and said, "Come here and submit your idea." We haven't really done much customization, so it's been good.

    To prepare that and get ready for the first challenge, it took us awhile because Enbridge is slow moving to bring in new software. We had to get a lot of internal approvals, etc. It was almost a full year before we became a client.

    What about the implementation team?

    We used our internal information systems team members, our IT department, for deployment.

    What was our ROI?

    With each project, we try to calculate/figure out the value. Our organization is fairly large, so our annual revenue is over $12 billion. Therefore, we are seeing some savings in terms of ideas and efficiencies upwards in the hundreds of millions.

    Because it's a new program, we're measuring success through participation, knowledge of engagement, and the ability to submit ideas, then prioritize them. There are wins. The projects and ideas that come out of it are what we expect this year. Next year, we'll start to calculate ROI. From that standpoint of participation, Spigit has proven its value.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We have a tiered annual licensing fee.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We did a market survey. We pulled up five or six different companies. We looked at Planbox and Planview Spigit. I can't remember the some of the names of the other ones, but we had five or six companies that we evaluated, and Planbox was Spigit's strong top contender. We had them all come in and do a demo. We talked to each one of them. We did a pros and cons of each, then selected Spigit at the end of the day.

    I remember at the time that we selected Spigit for the predictions analysis part of the tool, which determines costs and value. However, we haven't used that feature and probably won't use that within Spigit, which is funny at the end of the day.

    What other advice do I have?

    Just go for it and get started. We were at the beginning trying to get all the approvals in from senior leadership and train upwards. At the end of the day, we didn't get a lot of focus. Now that we have created a groundswell with a lot of attention, our senior leadership is seeing the success that we've had and they're now getting onboard. So, it just takes time.

    I would rate the product an eight (out of 10). 

    Biggest lesson learnt: A lot of people have many ideas. There's an untapped collective intelligence which exists within your organization and people want and love to share their ideas. It has been good to tap into that.

    We have gone just with Spigit. We haven't spent much on the Planview side, which brings in more of the project management side. We've built an in-house solution for that, so we're tracking successful projects to completion in a separate tool. For right now, we're just using Spigit for the front-end, ideation, and prioritization of ideas.

    We haven't done surveys yet or benchmarked internally. 

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    Nick Tso
    Sr. Manager of Strategy at Sutter Health
    Real User
    Top 10Leaderboard
    Provides a mechanism for our leadership to understand the pulse of what's happening in our operations
    Pros and Cons
    • "The fully customizable, dynamic platform enables you to get the right feedback earlier on, so in the future you can save real dollars while engaging your employees throughout the entirety of the process."
    • "The backend configuration could be a little bit easier to configure. It was a little bit cumbersome for a layman to understand how to design some of the functionality and programming on the backend. Although they do offer training courses to support building that skillset."

    What is our primary use case?

    We wanted a better way of engaging our 55,000+ employees and 12,000+ clinicians, from all across Northern California, in a very streamlined way. The Spigit platform is very intuitive and has technology built into it that has enabled us to really engage our employees and clinicians on a number of important topics, to get their feedback in real-time in a digestible way, so that we can make decisions.

    Planview has a ton of different tools. We don't use all of them. We just use their Spigit platform, which is a crowdsourcing platform, so that we can engage a broader group of our employees.

    How has it helped my organization?

    As an example, we were able to do a challenge on what affordable housing might look like in Northern California. This is a significant issue for all, but it also impacts our employees ability to find affordable housing near some of our hospitals and care sites, particularly in the Bay Area. We were able to engage a huge subset of our organization and source different ideas on what we might be able to do to address affordable housing. One of the ideas was partnering with an Airbnb or different rental site to enable our nurses to stay closer to where they work, instead of traveling (in extreme cases) maybe three hours a day, one way. Enabling them to stay closer to where they work might improve their work satisfaction, but it could also will make sure that our clinicians are sharp so they can deliver the best possible patient care for the patients we are serving.

    This came all the way to the forefront using Spigit. And then, of course, COVID-19 happened and this is something that was accelerated. We were able to stand this up and pilot it in a very short amount of time. It all began with doing a challenge on the Spigit platform.

    In terms of prioritizing and selecting the best ideas, what is important is that it helps leverage the wisdom of the crowd. From our standpoint, that crowd is our employees. It has given our senior leaders a chance to hear from our employees in a way that wouldn't be as easy to hear without a technology like this. It is a really good mechanism for our leaders to really understand the pulse of what's happening in our operations.

    Finally, it has increased innovation efficiency and helped us to cut our time to market for new ideas. We have learned that the tool is great at giving us real-time, pulse feedback on how ideas may be, or are being, perceived. This has given our teams time back that might have been wasted if we had rolled something out and then realized that there were problems or issues we should have considered. In a sense, we were getting those issues addressed months ahead of time. So it has definitely saved on time to market.

    What is most valuable?

    The thing that has been most valuable is the access, so that people are able to leverage the platform no matter where they are physically located in our system. 

    Also, the backend algorithm helps us filter the ideas or comments that carry the most weight to the top so that management has a more manageable list of focus-items to go through.

    The dashboards and reporting are helpful from an administration standpoint, for us to really know what's going on within a challenge. They help give us a snapshot of what the high-level themes are that are coming out, as well as monitor engagements so that we can push additional communications if need be, if engagement isn't quite where we want it to be. 

    The customized reports really allow us to tailor the use case exactly for individual sponsors. What the platform and the customized reports are getting at is providing one solution where a number of different stakeholders can engage in a very customized way and get the feedback they're looking for. The flexibility that the platform and the reports provide is part of the value that we're seeing in our organization.

    The insights and analytics capabilities — the dashboard views as well as the reports — are pretty critical for us to be able to measure whether what we were trying to get out of the challenge is actually received. We can track it on an ongoing basis during the challenge to make sure that we're trending in the right direction and, if not, we can make some pivots to improve things. We also look at them to assess the overall success of the challenge.

    In addition, the workflow on the backend is customizable from the beginning. We understood the levers that we could pull in order to adjust the workflow to match exactly what we are trying to do. And it is very flexible. From the very beginning this wasn't a problem because we designed for exactly what we wanted.

    What needs improvement?

    The backend configuration could be a little bit easier. It was a little bit cumbersome to a layman to understand how to design some of the customized functionality on the backend from a programming standpoint. They do offer training courses, so I'm sure that that's where they're trying to build that skillset. 

    Another smaller area of improvement is improving upon different internet browser usage. There was a difference between Google Chrome and Internet Explorer. The more that we can make it streamlined across browser and mobile vs. desktop the better.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We've been using Planview Spigit for the last year.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It has limitless capability to scale. The core setup is something that's applicable to almost any topic as well as any group of people that you're engaging.

    Currently, we have only rolled it out to about a 2,000-person beta test. Before COVID-19 happened, there were plans to continue to scale this. To what size, we weren't sure. One of the options was to go enterprise-wide, which would have been 55,000+ people.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't had a ton of interaction, but when I did use the technical support feature in Spigit they were pretty prompt and I got what I needed.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We had a number of internal programs, none of which we thought were optimal for our use case. This is the first crowdsourcing platform that we have engaged with.

    Spigit seemed like the most polished program that was really focused on taking an idea from an employee throughout the system and getting it in front of the right stakeholder. It uses the strength of its technology to really help bubble up ideas so that our senior leaders have visibility, where they wouldn't necessarily have had visibility before.

    How was the initial setup?

    I was involved with the initial release when my company first worked with Planview and I felt that it was pretty straightforward. Like everything, there was a learning curve, but it was pretty straightforward.

    Once we actually engaged in a contract with Planview and decided that Spigit was the platform that we wanted to use, their team worked quickly with us and we were able to stand up and launch our first challenge within a month. There were learnings along the way. But we had many conversations and a lot of planning within that first four weeks to figure out how we would implement this in the most effective way. The launch went pretty well.

    From my team, which provides guidance for our strategic initiatives, we had five individuals on our core team that was involved in the setup, but for maintenance it takes less than a full FTE.

    What was our ROI?

    Think about why you're considering a product like this. For us, it was really about wanting to get feedback earlier on, and there is a pretty big ROI in terms of mitigating missteps or saving time from rolling something out that was ineffective or not rolled out the right way. Although it's hard to calculate the exact number you might be saving, think about this aspect: how this product can help make sure that you roll things out in the proper way the first time, versus having to iterate. We all know that iteration costs money.

    We have seen that we have a number of system-wide strategies to roll out across our Northern California footprint and we have areas to improve on in terms of engaging a broader set of our employees. We knew that by getting feedback earlier on, it would save us real dollars in the future, and we knew that a technology like this would be a great solution to do that.

    What other advice do I have?

    You have to spend the time upfront and think about what question you're trying to ask your audience, because people will provide you answers but their answers will only be as good as the questions you ask them. The questions you ask them and the answers they provide will directly relate to your ROI. If it's not thought through from the beginning, then you could spin your wheels instead of getting something that's of value.

    Think about how much time, money, and resources you would save if you were able to mitigate a big misstep in something that you might have rolled out. That foresight is really where the power and value of this platform is.

    Spigit definitely increased near-term engagement because people were very excited to be able to engage in this manner. In terms of the timing for employee engagement surveys, our challenges haven't exactly aligned with employee surveys, which only happen on an annual basis. So there hasn't been much of a metric available to know if Spigit has concretely affected employee survey scores.

    The platform has some text analytics built in so that when there are ideas that are somewhat related it will try to match them together. From the admin view you can see those groups and you have the functionality to merge the ideas so that they're only showing up as one on the platform, if you choose to. We have not really played around with this capability a ton, just because it wasn't in line with the goals of our specific challenges.

    Similarly, Spigit does help you with the end-to-end the management of the lifecycle of ideas, but we haven't specifically utilized that. It is trying to offer everything from the inception of how you create a challenge all the way through how you would implement an idea that comes from a challenge.

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    Innovation Manager at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 20Leaderboard
    Increases the omnichannel for communication, but the reporting is difficult and archaic to use
    Pros and Cons
    • "The voting ability is its most valuable feature. Teammates can vote an idea up or down. They can also offer feedback, and that feedback is instantaneous. It is a tool which allows us to gauge the temperature of certain product enhancements. Our system enhancements are potential areas of gaps that we have in our business."
    • "We haven't really leveraged the reports. The reports are sort of difficult and archaic, e.g., how it downloads into Excel. They are not in a usable manner where other people can look at them. I personally will look at them, but the reports are not the easiest to generate from their system."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use it to engage all our teammates. We have about 1,800 teammates who are in 48 different locations. Therefore, we use the solution to engage with our teammates as a crowdsourcing tool where they can submit any of their ideas. Then, we can help validate some of those ideas, because all our teammates have access as soon as they are onboarded as new employees. They have access, so they have the opportunity to comment on any topics that are posted, uploading and downloading those as well. This helps us vet ideas, helps from the very beginning of the problem/solution fit if we feel like this is an issue that we need to look at, or if this is a gap in one of our business areas that we will need to explore a bit further.

    We have an ATI, and that's how we integrated our two systems.

    The solution is not on the cloud.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It increases the omnichannel for communication. Therefore, it is another way for people to interface where they may not do so otherwise. It's a good communication tool within our organization.

    The solution enables us to consolidate duplicate responses from employees. If someone identifies a system enhancement, they'll replace that. For example, if there isn't an established workaround or we haven't been able to write a strong value statement because it isn't something worth pulling resources to fix, we will see the idea posted by other people. I think they are hoping that we will increase its visibility. Therefore, it is really easy to group those ideas, and we can say, "Please refer to this idea that was posted earlier in January. Here's the reason that it is not moving forward." 

    We recently had one of these requests where somebody submitted an idea on a software system that is sunsetting. It's going to be replaced. We responded, "We understand that that's a great idea, but we're not going to implement anything today. However, we will take that input and insight from you and give that to the team who is building out the new platform." If that's not something the new software can solve for, perhaps they can build that into the code or they can look into that, fixing it on a future platform.

    We haven't really had an idea which has come through the platform that has gone full scale to market.

    What is most valuable?

    The voting ability is its most valuable feature. Teammates can vote an idea up or down. They can also offer feedback, and that feedback is instantaneous. It is a tool which allows us to gauge the temperature of certain product enhancements. Our system enhancements are potential areas of gaps that we have in our business.

    The solution’s functionality helps us to prioritize and select the best ideas. The voting and amount of activity an idea gets in the comments section helps us know how to move a presented solution forward to investigate it further or if it's something that we're not getting good engagement on because people haven't bought into the suggestion or identified it as a problem. This usually helps us to table ideas so we can focus our resources on the most valuable problems to solve. There are also sometimes teammates who say, "Yes, this is a problem. Here is my workaround." This helps with the collaboration as well.

    What needs improvement?

    We haven't really leveraged the reports. The reports are sort of difficult and archaic, e.g., how it downloads into Excel. They are not in a usable manner where other people can look at them. I personally will look at them, but the reports are not the easiest to generate from their system. This is an area for improvement.

    Another area for improvement would be the ability to modify and update. Planview uses templates and forms that are tough to use. You can only input images, so you can't type. When you want to upload anything, you have to type on top of your image. This is a little difficult when you need to do any type of modifications on the aesthetic of the platform. Then, it will get a little complicated.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Our organization has been using it for about four years. I am newer to the organization in the fact that I have used it for about a year and a half.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    We have not had any crashes, which is great. If we have any issues, the technical support has been great.

    We use just one individual, an innovation manager, for deployment and maintenance.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We have the Spigit platform fully scaled throughout our organization and every employee has access to it. As new teammates are onboarded, they have instant access. The engagement is pretty high with new teammates. Typically, when you have a process improvement suggestion, software enhancement, or sometimes questions, new teammates are usually great at engaging with the platform in the innovation space. I think that we have natural organic growth of engagement in the platform.

    Our team isn't fully staffed. Probably when that happens, we will increase usage of additional functions that we're not using today.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We moved single sign-on vendors. The tech support was a wonderful resource helping with that, as we had quite a few problems that were generated on our side. They were fabulous in helping us identify what our problem areas were and working through those so there was minimal impact to our 1,800 users.

    How was the initial setup?

    For implementation, there probably needs to be one more administrator. You probably need to have a team of administrators if you want to fully utilize all the tools which are available on the platform. It's hard for one or two individuals to be the primary administrator(s). While I'm sure this depends on the size of the organization, from our standpoint, this has been a challenge.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We used BrightIdea, who is a competitor of Spigit.

    What other advice do I have?

    This is a great platform that is another communication channel for our teammates.

    We use the solution’s Insight analytics platform. However, our usage on it isn't that great.

    I know that it does have the capability for end-to-end management on the lifecycle of ideas, but we just haven't leveraged that yet.

    We have a robust survey and customer engagement platform. I wouldn't imagine the solution would be tied to that platform or move the needle on it at all.

    I would rate the product as a seven (out of 10).

    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    Lead Intellectual Property Engineer at a manufacturing company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Top 10Leaderboard
    Lets ideas naturally progress; identifying the best ideas
    Pros and Cons
    • "As a global organization, we are able to allow all our associates around the world to contribute and collaborate."
    • "Setting up a challenge timeline is a bit tedious and could be improved. in Spigit, the timeline is done with phases. You have to manually enter the start and stop of each phase. When you change one, all subsequent phases get changed automatically but are not consistent with the way you had it. There is a lot of double checking. This could be simplified to: I want this to start here and go for this many days. It would be a lot easier on the setup."

    What is our primary use case?

    Continuous improvement is the primary use case. We are not using it to develop new products. We use it to take something existing, then improve it, whether it's an improved process or improved way of doing things.

    We are only using it for the front-end.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The organizational improvement is more qualitative. We are able to ask a large number of people for input, easily gather that input, and then make sense of it. We previously didn't have a way to do that. Now, we have it. 

    This is more of a support to an innovation program. It is just a tool. For example, we did some things similar in the past, but it was with smaller groups of people and usually in-person. Or, it just had limited ways for getting, storing, and sharing the information. This solution enables a broader audience to participate. 

    It has increased application efficiency. This solution helps on the front-end, increasing efficiency. We are 200 percent more effective.

    The solution enables us to consolidate duplicate responses from employees. By combining ideas, it minimizes confusion. People are able to group several ideas together. While this doesn't reduce overhead, it eliminates confusion.

    What is most valuable?

    As a global organization, we are able to allow all our associates around the world to contribute and collaborate.

    We use the Spigit's dashboards and reporting. It puts all the information in the hands of the expert role. Therefore, they don't have to page through different ideas on the platform. They can look at a spreadsheet and see everything in one place.

    The solution’s functionality helps us to prioritize and select the best ideas. Many times, we will use an expert team to help pick roles. At the same time, we also rely on the Pairwise to simply go off of the input from the crowd. 

    What needs improvement?

    Setting up a challenge timeline is a bit tedious and could be improved. in Spigit, the timeline is done with phases. You have to manually enter the start and stop of each phase. When you change one, all subsequent phases get changed automatically but are not consistent with the way you had it. There is a lot of double checking. This could be simplified to: I want this to start here and go for this many days. It would be a lot easier on the setup.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Two years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability is very good.

    Just one person is required to manage the deployment and maintenance of Spigit. That is me.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability is very good. We have been very happy with how easy it was to get everybody onto the platform. We have over 10,000 names in the application. All different roles are represented. Everything from the CEO down to technical support and customer support. In addition, the executive team is in it along with sales and marketing, finance, and engineering. 

    We have no plans to increase usage, as everyone is already using the solution.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    The technical support is very good.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    This is our first implementation of this type of solution.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is pretty straightforward.

    What about the implementation team?

    The tech support from Spigit talked with our tech support. Within an hour or two, we had the connections made and everything was talking. It seemed very easy to get set up and running.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The yearly licensing cost is $55,000. 

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We did research and considered Imaginatik, but chose Spigit. With Spigit, there is more automation within the challenge. The crowd can help identify better ideas. There is less manual input in order to help select winners. Spigit does a nice job of enabling the platform to identify the best ideas.

    We chose Spigit because when using it ideas naturally progress. Also, when you compare one company versus another, Spigit was a bit larger and seemed more stable.

    What other advice do I have?

    Ensure you have willing and engaged sponsors. That makes all the difference in the world.

    The biggest lesson learnt is that culture is a big consideration with how well the program will be adopted.

    The solution is a 10 (out of 10). I enjoy using the product.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud
    Disclosure: PeerSpot contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.