IT Central Station is now PeerSpot: Here's why
AndreasSemousu - PeerSpot reviewer
Technical Sales Manager at Skhomo Technologies
Real User
Top 5
It's a good tool that helps us manage the work our developers and software engineers do on-site, but it has a few things that tick me off
Pros and Cons
  • "Our technical sales staff and business development people need to know how far the developers are on any product that we're developing. DevOps makes it easier for you to see how far along they are with the work because they have a repository where they store everything. There is a portal where you can see what has been done, what has been tested, what is working, and what isn't. I have a huge dashboard with an overview of what the development team is doing from an executive point of view."
  • "I can't think of any specific things at the moment, but I've run into things that I didn't like. I came across something that I wanted to be changed in DevOps, but I can't remember what it was. It was a particular feature I was looking for that I couldn't find."

What is our primary use case?

We are an application development company, so DevOps helps us manage the work our developers and software engineers do on-site. It's convenient for customers because everybody works from home due to COVID.

DevOps is used within our organization and we also encourage some of our clients who are interested in a development platform to use Azure DevOps, but we have other clients that actually prefer Red Hat or other platforms. We like Azure DevOps, but our cloud environment is AWS. We've done three implementations on AWS without any problem.

How has it helped my organization?

Our technical sales staff and business development people need to know how far the developers are on any product that we're developing. DevOps makes it easier for you to see how far along they are with the work because they have a repository where they store everything. There is a portal where you can see what has been done, what has been tested, what is working, and what isn't. I have a huge dashboard with an overview of what the development team is doing from an executive point of view.

I know exactly what they're working on. If the team is falling behind on a project, there's a project management module where I can see exactly what was supposed to be delivered and what hasn't been. 

What needs improvement?

I can't think of any specific things at the moment, but I've run into things that I didn't like. I came across something that I wanted to be changed in DevOps, but I can't remember what it was. It was a particular feature I was looking for that I couldn't find.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I'm happy with DevOps' stability. I've had problems with the Red Hat environment, but I think it also boils down still to implementation skills. We're a big Microsoft implementer, so we find Azure DevOps to be highly stable.

Buyer's Guide
Microsoft Azure DevOps
July 2022
Learn what your peers think about Microsoft Azure DevOps. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: July 2022.
619,967 professionals have used our research since 2012.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

DevOps is highly scalable. Before one of our clients decided to move to the cloud version of DevOps, they decided to try it in a small environment to see if they liked it. Previously, they had Team Foundation Server running on-premises, and we encouraged them to switch to DevOps. We set up a minimal environment and used it as a typical development environment. It wasn't for testing or anything. It was just a mini development environment that replicated their internal chassis.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before we started using DevOps, we were using Microsoft Team Foundation Server, which allowed the whole team to share work and collaborate. DevOps does that and a little more.

How was the initial setup?

Most of the time we just leave it on the cloud instead of deploying it on-prem, unless a client requests on-prem. In that case, we just replicate the cloud environment in the on-prem environment. There's no real difference, and we've had some clients who change and say they now prefer to have it on the cloud. 

After the subscription, which took about a day, we had our B environment up and running, and everything was transferred from on-prem to the cloud. In the older days, it would take you about a month. But now, to move, it actually took us, I think, almost a week, because the biggest challenge was moving the data more than the environment. Moving the environment, it took about, I think, a day or two. But the data was a bit of a problem.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The cost of Azure DevOps is manageable. You have the option to purchase a license that is per user. You can choose based on the size of your team. For example, you can opt for a volume enterprise license or go for user-based licensing if you don't have a huge number of users. 

You can start with a smaller package and then scale up as needed. Let's say, for instance, you are a smaller company with about only 10 users of the environment. Then, two months later, you win the Powerball, and you get a billion dollars and bring in a thousand developers.

You have the flexibility to move from a small-team subscription to a big subscription easily. So you don't necessarily have to take the volume. The licensing model covers all three tiers, whereby you can have a volume license, individual users, or groups. 

We are using groups, and we've found it affordable because you cancel their license if someone leaves. When we get a new person, we repurchase the license. We pay a monthly subscription, but the annual licenses are cheaper because of the commitment. 

What other advice do I have?

I rate Azure DevOps seven out of 10. I would give it a higher rating, but there are a couple of things that tick me off.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Hybrid Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Rodrigo Bassani - PeerSpot reviewer
Head Of Technology at Elogroup
Reseller
Top 5
Excellent integration; enables us to see all the steps in the lifecycle of our clients
Pros and Cons
  • "Provides us with user histories."
  • "Templates could be improved."

What is our primary use case?

The first time I used the solution was to create a build for an Oracle application called SOA. We generated all the features in Azure DevOps to create the build and then we created a workflow. We are partners of Microsoft and I'm head of technology.

How has it helped my organization?

We have the histories, and are able to estimate the efforts of each story. It means that I can measure it from each developer and I have the match from each developer. We can also check it from the lead time to see whether there are any problems in storage that may not be mature. It gives us control. 

What is most valuable?

We use Gitch as a version control and the integration is very good. We are also using the features for the product backlog that's released every day so we have the user histories. We can track it from the histories to the code. You can see all the steps in the life cycle we use with our clients. We also like to use the estimate integration feature where you have two or three developers that estimate different efforts for each history. I think Azure is easy to integrate with any other type of solution to improve your delivery.

What needs improvement?

I think the templates could be improved. It's not easy making the jump from one project to another so we're now integrating using a different partner. I believe the price could be improved when scaling. It's a simple calculation, the number of users times $11, which is approximately the cost. But if you have a large number of users you should be able to reduce the per user cost the more you scale. I think it's something Microsoft could do for us. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using this solution for five years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This is a very mature and stable solution. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have about 100 users; developers, engineers and admin. The platform doesn't require any maintenance but we have one DevOps engineer to support the DevOps for the applications that we integrate with the platform. There are two types of scalability, the first is scaling my team, moving from 100 to 200 users, which is easy to do. The second is structure but  I haven't yet tested scalability in terms of increased structure.

How are customer service and technical support?

Actually, we don't have a lot of experience opening tickets with technical support. All tickets that we did open were dealt with quickly. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used IBM where I worked previously but didn't have a lot of experience with it. 

How was the initial setup?

We had some initial difficulties, because the solution is not commonly used here. Jira and Microsoft are the most common solutions but it's not usual to use everything inside the platform. It was a cultural change that we implemented here in our team and to convince them was more difficult than to use the platform itself. We used an integrator for deployment but we don't do that in every case. In some of our deployments, hosting the most popular software development languages, like Java or .NET makes it easy to create the deployment mode. But when you have different platforms on development, it's more difficult to configure. We're on an SaaS platform, so deployment was very easy.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have 100 users and the cost is $11 per user. There's an additional cost if you want to use the integrated test plan. You have the option to just change your license and you can use the automated test integrator.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at Jira Confluence and it was our second option. On Jira, we have our environment in Azure, and it was easier to adopt Azure DevOps instead of Confluence. Because Confluence is specifically for Azure DevOps, we can integrate it with everything that we are already using.

What other advice do I have?

It's very easy to start using this solution because the first five licenses are free. As a result, it's easy to track and compare with other solutions and it's easy to scale. 

I would rate this solution a nine out of 10. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Microsoft Azure
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Microsoft Azure DevOps
July 2022
Learn what your peers think about Microsoft Azure DevOps. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: July 2022.
619,967 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Manager of Information Technology Services at a government with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Has tight integration to project management, development, repository, deployment
Pros and Cons
  • "Most developers and project managers choose the Microsoft tools to begin with because of familiarity, and these new tools are almost an extension of the tools you're already familiar with. There's a lot of knowledge transfer, which helps, rather than bringing in a new product line."
  • "Right now, they tend to have a limit of 1,000 tasks per sprint, and some of their web-based boards, such as the Kanban boards, no longer display tasks. Once you hit over a certain number of task limits, you need to increase those limits."

How has it helped my organization?

All the artifacts are tightly integrated into the repository where you have changed tracking, and you can enforce policies. You can improve the quality of your deliverables. You can actually see the progress you're making towards your goal, and you can even forecast how soon a feature can be completed in the future. So, it's that tight integration of bringing all the parties together right from the project managers to the developers, to the system admin who does the deployment that helps achieve the goal of DevOps. That is, the ease of realization of this DevOps ideal is possible.

What is most valuable?

Most developers and project managers choose the Microsoft tools to begin with because of familiarity, and these new tools are almost an extension of the tools you're already familiar with. There's a lot of knowledge transfer, which helps, rather than bringing in a new product line.

Also, with Azure DevOps there is tight integration to Excel and Office tools so that you can actually even use Excel to do Azure DevOps type tasks. Excel will automatically update the Azure board, your tasks, your company boards, etc. So, there is that condition and familiarity for users.

What I like about it mostly is the tools. You don't need a degree to use them. Also, there's not too heavy a reliance on the CLI.

What needs improvement?

Right now, they tend to have a limit of 1,000 tasks per sprint, and some of their web-based boards, such as the Kanban boards, no longer display tasks. Once you hit over a certain number of task limits, you need to increase those limits. Depending on how big the sprints you're running are, once you hit that 1,000 limit, you now have to start grouping tasks together. It doesn't allow you to track granularly. When you go to the boards and you are rendering the task board, it gets slower to go over that 1,000 limit. If they could improve that to, maybe, 10,000 and still have good performance, that'd be great.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using it for eight years.

The version we use right now is the 2020 version, but usually, we try and keep within the last two versions.

Depending on the organization, it can be deployed on-premises or as a cloud solution, usually with Microsoft Azure as the cloud provider.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very, very stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I've used it in organizations with multiple departments using the same installation, and it's scalable. We have about 20 users in multiple departments.

How are customer service and technical support?

Microsoft support is excellent. Even when you don't have support for some lines, you can call them, and a lot of times, they'll give you what's called a grace case. This means that although you don't have a support contract on a product, they'll help you for free.

Normally, when you call and don't have a support agreement, Microsoft will still charge you an hourly rate to give you an engineer to work with you.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Microsoft Azure DevOps just provides better integration than Jenkins does. I've been in this industry for 27 years. The whole ecosystem and the fact that most of the developers are already using Visual Studio make Microsoft Azure DevOps a good option, along with the entire integration from the project management side, to the development side, to the repository side, and to the deployment side.

How was the initial setup?

Installing Microsoft Azure DevOps is straightforward. You can have everything set up in three or four hours. It's pretty simple.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I've used Jenkins in the past and a group of source repository. I've also used SourceSafe and GitLab.

What other advice do I have?

To run it, to use the tool the way it's designed, you need someone who understands Scrum or Agile project management.

I have used GitLab and other pipeline tools like Jenkins. Azure DevOps combines all of them together, and it beats all of them at everything they do.

On a scale from one to ten, I would rate this solution at nine and advise others to go for it.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Senior .NET Engineer at Advance Storage Products
Real User
Top 20
Helpful in tracking issues and works extremely well in terms of the build time, but it is complicated and should provide the ability to write your own scripts
Pros and Cons
  • "The automated bill feature is most valuable. As with most software developers, I can build code on my machine, but if one of my coworkers can't build the same code on theirs, there are always issues in trying to track it down. The automated bill process makes it a lot easier to track down where the issues are and find out what bugs aren't being included for whatever reason."
  • "They should expand it from just a PC, software, or server development platform to other kinds of software or engineering systems so that it is not necessarily built around a normal PC with a server. I would like to see the ability to write my own scripts in my own compiled program or online. Right now, there are things that you can do in the user interface, but you can't do them programmatically and vice versa. I want to see them both. If I can do it in a script, I should be able to do it from the user interface, and if I can do it in the user interface, I should be able to do it in a script."

What is our primary use case?

We are using it for the source-code repository, automated bill process, very limited automated testing, and tracking trouble tickets or feature requests. We are using its latest version.

What is most valuable?

The automated bill feature is most valuable. As with most software developers, I can build code on my machine, but if one of my coworkers can't build the same code on theirs, there are always issues in trying to track it down. The automated bill process makes it a lot easier to track down where the issues are and find out what bugs aren't being included for whatever reason.

What needs improvement?

They should expand it from just a PC, software, or server development platform to other kinds of software or engineering systems so that it is not necessarily built around a normal PC with a server.

I would like to see the ability to write my own scripts in my own compiled program or online. Right now, there are things that you can do in the user interface, but you can't do them programmatically and vice versa. I want to see them both. If I can do it in a script, I should be able to do it from the user interface, and if I can do it in the user interface, I should be able to do it in a script.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for a total of four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

From what we've used it for so far, I have not seen any problems.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We're using perhaps 10% of what it is capable of doing. It is far more capable than what we are using right now. With further experimentation and training, I'll probably go from 10% utilization of its capabilities to about 50% or 60% in the next couple of months. We'll never use 100% of what it is capable of doing, but it should handle 95% of everything we need to do. We can always write our own plugins to handle the side things that we need.

Scalability is not really applicable with the code that we write, but the build times and things like that typically take under 15 seconds before we get our responses back. So, it works extremely well.

In terms of the number of users, there are six of us who are software developers. Some of the managers might also partially use the reporting capabilities.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't called them up.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I've used JIRA and a number of different systems going back almost 20 years. We were doing our development using Microsoft tools, and it just made sense to use what they integrate with. Azure DevOps is the perfect environment because we're using Microsoft technology for other stuff. It is always going to have slight favoritism towards the other Microsoft tools.

How was the initial setup?

The basic setup works very quickly, but there are so many things and options.

What about the implementation team?

We did it ourselves, which is one of the problems. We don't know what we're doing.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I don't know what we pay, but I do know what I've seen online. If we switched to JIRA, we will basically have to double our costs because we still have to pay for the DevOps licensing. We're probably spending $100 a month on it. It has only standard licensing fees.

What other advice do I have?

It is a really complicated product. All DevOps stuff is complicated. The advice that I would give to anybody doing DevOps is to have a goal in mind of what you want to do. Then the product will do what you wanted it to do. 

I would rate Microsoft Azure DevOps a four out of ten because I don't know it enough to rate it.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Microsoft Azure
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
Wesley De John - PeerSpot reviewer
Group Product Manager – Billing and Payments at MultiChoice Group
Real User
Top 5
Reduces our delivery time for complex projects and is cost-effective and useful for agile delivery
Pros and Cons
  • "It is a really easy way to define all of the features that you need to deliver. You can link those features to epics and break them down into user stories. You can also assign the user stories into sprints for doing your product improvement planning."
  • "The tool has a logical link between epic feature, user story, and task, but when you try to generate a report to show the delivery progress against a feature, it is not easy. To see the percentage completion for a feature or progress of any delivery, it is not easy to draw a report."

What is our primary use case?

We are using it for feature delivery.

How has it helped my organization?

Before we started using Microsoft Azure DevOps, we didn't really have a mechanism for tracking delivery against a feature or feature delivery. It has really helped us in visualizing what we need to deliver and get consensus across cross-functional teams that it is the right thing to deliver.

It allows us to prioritize an organization-wide backlog, which has really reduced our delivery time for complex projects. In fact, we are in the middle of a transformation program. We managed to kick off the program in a month and start the delivery cycle within six weeks of conception. Before adopting this tool, it would have taken us three to six months.

What is most valuable?

It is a really easy way to define all of the features that you need to deliver. You can link those features to epics and break them down into user stories. You can also assign the user stories into sprints for doing your product improvement planning.

It is a really simple tool for prioritizing a backlog, assigning that backlog into sprints, and then tracking the delivery by using sprint capacity, points of time, the velocity of the sprint, etc. It is really useful for agile delivery.

What needs improvement?

There are a couple of things. The tool has a logical link between epic feature, user story, and task, but when you try to generate a report to show the delivery progress against a feature, it is not easy. To see the percentage completion for a feature or progress of any delivery, it is not easy to draw a report. 

It doesn't give you a high-level view of your roadmap for planning a roadmap for delivery and identifying how far you are on that delivery path. There should be the ability to create a product roadmap and then based on the delivery of the user stories, link to the features against that product. We should be able to roll up a view to see how have we progressed against our targets.

When you're accessing it via the web, it works nicely, but it doesn't work for a while if you're trying to access the board via a tablet or mobile device. A lot of the time, we just want to quickly update a task or check a delivery against a sprint by using an iPad or phone. It is not really user-friendly on those devices. It works very well on the laptop but not on other devices.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for 18 months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We've had very few issues with Azure DevOps.

How are customer service and technical support?

There were no issues.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We also use Sparx Systems Enterprise Architect. For business process modeling where you are linking different objects in the modeling domains, Sparx is the most appropriate tool. You cannot model business processes in Azure DevOps.

Azure DevOps is more appropriate as a delivery tool for building out the feature roadmap and defining user stories, tasks, features, etc. It is well suited for taking the data and building it into a delivery pipeline. These two tools don't speak well together. A solution was developed to integrate these two, but it doesn't work very well.

How was the initial setup?

It was super simple. We just needed a username and a password. The board was pre-setup by our administrator. In fact, we didn't even have to go through any real training, even though the training was available. It is really intuitive to use.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Its pricing is reasonable for the number of features that you get and the functionality that you can utilize for the agile delivery, which is what we are using it for. I found it extremely cost-effective.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate Microsoft Azure DevOps an eight out of 10. It is the primary tool that we've been using. It works very well.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PeerSpot user
WilsonJose - PeerSpot reviewer
Test Advisory, Management & Implementation at a energy/utilities company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5
A complete package with good stability and scalability
Pros and Cons
  • "In Microsoft Azure DevOps, you have a one shop to get everything."
  • "If they could build up requirement traceability metrics, then it would be great."

What is our primary use case?

The purpose is for development and testing from the vendor side. Our company works as a vendor, client, and implementation partner. The vendor provides the product, and we make sure that it's implemented correctly for the client. The vendor uses it for the development and tracking of the requirement and the test cases, executions, and building storage.

My access to these tools is very limited because the DevOps pipeline and DevOps is mainly used by the engineering team of development, but the QA is also part of it. Once those people are established, then we are the extended hands or extended part of that for usage. Once they have the stories and features, they start the test cases and link on it. From that point, we just take it forward and once they have a code pull, then we would pull it and build it and deploy it into some QA enrollment.

There are around 20 people using DevOps in my company.

What is most valuable?

The best tool would be Azure DevOps. There are other tools with AWS and Google, but since Microsoft has solutions for everything, it's easier because it's all their tools. We may be using different tools in order to achieve all those things because they may not have an operating system or a pipeline, so maybe we are using some of the bill tools. In order to achieve DevOps, you may be using a set of different tools and connecting it. In Microsoft Azure DevOps, you have a one shop to get everything.

What needs improvement?

There isn't a requirement traceability matrix format. In ALM, we have a centralized repository of all the requirements in one place. But in DevOps, it works like a product requirement. In ALM we have the centralized repository of requirements where you can go and see the requirement coverage and discovery and so forth. But in DevOps, it has stories and test cases. Once that project is over, nobody is going back into that requirement. It's a good tool for development activity, tracking and getting all those metrics. If they can build up a requirement traceability matrix, then it would be great.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I haven't seen any issues with stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability of DevOps is good.

How are customer service and support?

We haven't had any issues with technical support. Whatever issues we've had, they were solved.

How was the initial setup?

I didn't see any complexity in the setup because everything is from Microsoft. The development tools and operation tools are coming from one shop, Microsoft, so it's easy to connect, plug in, and establish all those things. For Google Cloud or AWS, it's different because they use different tools in order to achieve what Microsoft is trying to achieve. For example, the CI/CD Pipeline.

Even in ALM or in the DevOps tool, it's initially a one-time setup.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I don't know the pricing of DevOps. It would be much cheaper than ALM because ALM came out as a software product initially. Now they are moving into a cloud and subscription model. In that case, Microsoft is coming from Azure and the cloud and DevOps and software as a service, so it would be much cheaper, but the catch would be that they are trying to get money on all sides, like an operating system, Microsoft Office, or Microsoft Azure DevOps. 

The good part is that it's a complete package, but at the same time, once you've gone with them, you don't have much leverage to split out into some other activities because everything is interconnected and entwined by that time, and it would be like a monopoly. It won't be good if you try to split out at a later point in time because everything is connected—all our Microsoft products like operating systems, OfficeSuite, MS Teams, Azure DevOps, etc.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate this solution 9 out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Project Manager at a government with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Difficult to customize and limited in terms of project management, but is stable and easy to set up
Pros and Cons
  • "I found the Kanban board to be the most useful for my needs."
  • "In comparison to JIRA, I believe DevOps has very poor reporting and metrics support."

What is our primary use case?

We have a number of use cases. One of them is development, which includes several development teams that use source code control and testing support, as well as the entire software development toolset. I only use the front end, which is the project task management part.

How has it helped my organization?

I don't have any metrics on that. I can only give you anecdotal evidence. 

One of the benefits of using a Kanban board is that it keeps track of how long tasks take. People would hold onto tasks for three or four weeks before we started using the Kanban board. However, once we began using the Kanban board, it became more visible. 

We also realized that we needed to divide the tasks into smaller sections, and the tasks lasted an average of a week. As a result, the throughput and velocity increased simply because the Kanban board made them more visible.

What is most valuable?

I found the Kanban board to be the most useful for my needs.

I'm a project manager. I've been working with non-technical teams and training them on agile methodologies. Using a Kanban board is usually the most straightforward way to get a non-technical team started with an online task tracking tool.

What needs improvement?

In comparison to JIRA, I believe DevOps has very poor reporting and metrics support. They've done very little work, and they could benefit greatly from improved reporting and metrics.

Essentially, I would like to see more reporting support.

For how long have I used the solution?

This solution was already in place when I started. I'm not sure when it was first put in place.

I started with the company in May of 2018, and have been using Microsoft Azure DevOps ever since.

We are using the most recent version.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Microsoft Azure DevOps is a stable solution.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is difficult to customize DevOps. It's similar to a product that has had features added to it rather than being completely redesigned. As a result, it has limitations in terms of scalability and customization.

The most successful users are software developers and technical software managers.

How are customer service and support?

I believe it is quite minimal. Microsoft, in my opinion, does not provide adequate support. My solutions are mostly found online. 

With JIRA, you could call someone, and they had a large community of users who could answer your questions. They also had a support department that provided assistance. Microsoft has a lot of information online, but you have to find it, look around its various websites. It is not well supported.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used to work as an engineering manager, a scrum master, and as part of a technical team. JIRA is my preferred tool for this. 

JIRA is a more robust and mature tool. However, as you are aware, JIRA is more modular and requires integration with other parts. DevOps, on the other hand, has everything in one, it combines source code control, release management, and task tracking.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is fairly straightforward. It's one of its advantages over JIRA. It is easier to set up because it is a simple product, whereas JIRA is more complex, more mature and complete, and more difficult to set up.

We have two or three technicians who deploy and maintain this solution.

What other advice do I have?

You would really have to do a comparison, and you would need some training. 

It really depends on your project management and reporting requirements. DevOps is simple to use, but it is severely limited in terms of project management. JIRA is complete, but it's a lot more complicated.

I only use it for project management and the tools associated with project management. I know it's popular among those who use it for source code control and release management. It appears to be more satisfactory for that purpose.

I would rate Microsoft Azure DevOps a five out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Chief Operating Officer Executive at a cloud provider with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 10
Allows you to create a bridge for maintenance and support, directly to the client
Pros and Cons
  • "We can forecast tasks and the number of hours a task will take and can compare it with how long a task actually takes."
  • "The communication could work better, especially for the development team."

What is our primary use case?

We use it to manage the project. We create the product backlog, and we put our tasks into the DevOps schedule.

How has it helped my organization?

Azure DevOps allow you to create a bridge for maintenance and support, directly to the client. We can forecast tasks and the number of hours a task will take and can compare it with how long a task actually takes. The Timetracker function allows us to put all this together. Before Azure DevOps, we had difficulty predicting how long tasks would take, considering all the parts that must work together.

What is most valuable?

We have a component server, which is basically a tracker. This is very useful for us to itemise the start and end of tasks to evaluate the resources required, based on price. So it's very valuable. It is important to be able to inspect the items required in a project.

What needs improvement?

The communication could work better, especially for the development team. The important thing is that the tracker tools provide adequate communication, as do other tools. It seems to be lacking in DevOps and is an area which could be improved. We also need to improve publishing in production. In the future, we would like Azure DevOps to work with automated tasks regarding publishing. Better integration with existing source code is another area, which would benefit from improvement. The search repository could be more comprehensive, and visualisations could be optimised, further.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using Azure DevOps for around two years. We are a Microsoft partner, so we use Azure DevOps as part of that partnership.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Stability is excellent. Initially, we had some problems with performance, but nowadays it's okay. Maybe they improved the server.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's good scalability, but we need to improve the process by understanding it a lot more.

How are customer service and technical support?

We never actually contacted support. The best plan is to read through all the documentation, but getting the right documentation for your specific project is not always easy to find, as there is so much to go through.

How was the initial setup?

It's average, because we need to research what we are trying to achieve, and the platform has rich functionality. This is a good thing, but it can also mean setup is very complicated. However, we usually find that after testing more, we find our way around what we are trying to achieve.

What about the implementation team?

Our deployment took about three months, as we tracked it. Following that period, we needed another month to integrate a new component into the setup. We implemented it ourselves, with one of our team. We have about 10 users using Azure DevOps, but we have 2 people to provide the deployment out of those. These are developers. We have a small team for DevOps, including the manager. We need our staff to be flexible and agile in our team to take on various DevOps tasks.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

As a Microsoft Partner, you get a discount on the pricing. Licensing costs are around $80 a month for DevOps, but for Azure, it is about $200 a month.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We tried other tools, but Azure DevOps has a richer toolset, and it fits in better with our process. To some extent, as we are a Microsoft partner, we didn't seriously consider other options. However, we did look at Jira and Gitlab as potential alternatives.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate Azure DevOps as an 8 out of 10. I would ensure that DevOps' use is planned, in detail, including the implementation before using the software. I would also ensure you have a thorough knowledge of the main components of the system. This will ultimately save hours of work.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Microsoft Azure
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
PeerSpot user
Buyer's Guide
Download our free Microsoft Azure DevOps Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
Updated: July 2022
Buyer's Guide
Download our free Microsoft Azure DevOps Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.