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Head of Technical Support at a real estate/law firm with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Easy to set up, simple to use, and doesn't drain battery power on laptops
Pros and Cons
  • "It's faster than Windows."
  • "When you talk of some of the flexibility, like you want to install from scratch, Windows is more user-friendly compared to Linux."

What is our primary use case?

We use the solution for our Linux servers.  We use it for file transfer and remote desktop connections.

What is most valuable?

The solution is very simple. I like that it doesn't get corrupted as easily as Windows. When it comes to viruses, it's more secure. Especially on laptops, it doesn't drain much battery. The solution is straightforward to set up. It's faster than Windows.

What needs improvement?

When you talk of some of the flexibility, like you want to install from scratch, Windows is more user-friendly compared to Linux. Linux is more for the more techie people. You have to go through a terminal, a prompt to do some setup, and other things. Windows offers more help for you when you install it.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for more than five years at this point. 
Buyer's Guide
Ubuntu Linux
April 2022
Learn what your peers think about Ubuntu Linux. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: April 2022.
598,116 professionals have used our research since 2012.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I haven't gone through scalability. It's more for an individual setup in my case. However, they're supposed to be much faster than Windows. We only have a couple of people using it in our organization, as most actually use Windows. 

How are customer service and support?

We don't use technical support. We have our own team and we learn as we go on our own.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I've also used Windows. I prefer Linux over Windows. We're doing some testing where we hope that we can put some applications in Linux eventually. We're testing Docker and similar solutions.

How was the initial setup?

It's very similar to Windows 10 in terms of installation. If you're using a desktop, then more or less you can find those commands in Windows Servers as well. However, for Linux, it's a bit more in its own process. Linux is good on its own. The difference with Windows is Windows would require a lot of licensing, and their applications slow down. When you install it, it's easy. However, there are some applications for which you have to look for help online. There are commands that you can use to be able to install them.If you compare it to Windows, Windows is basically straightforward. It's easier to install Windows than Unbuntu Linux. When you talk servers, when you talk of workstations, Windows is a bit faster. The way I see it, we do have to do some settings, however, when you're able to run the installation properly, Linux ends up being much faster to run as the boot time is a few seconds faster, and shutdown time is much, much faster.  

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Unlike Windows, which you have to pay for, this solution is free for the most part. We don't use it too much and therefore do not incur much of a cost. Licensing is basically just for some applications. You get licenses if you want them to support you for Linux. For Ubuntu, you don't pay licenses. You pay for the support if you want them to support you.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We may have evaluated other options, however, it was a long time ago. 

What other advice do I have?

For Linux, we're using Ubuntu. We have set up everything using Ubuntu. We do have some servers with Oracle Enterprise Linux. Those are running inside our HP DL380 servers. And then I do have Linux Mint and Elementary OS on my laptop and in my desktop at home. I use multiple versions of the solution, including 20.04, 18.04, and 16.04. We do have so many players in the Linux field. You do have Canonical, and they have their own Linux. Then, you have others that are based on Ubuntu. Ubuntu is based on the Debian model. You also have, on the other side, Red Hat and the SUSE Linux, which is IBM Linux. There are different providers, however, the core is almost the same. It's more of the setup that is available for you. I'd rate the solution at an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Web Developer at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
Open-source, free of viruses, and easy to set up
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution is free to use and open-source."
  • "In general, Windows is easier to use and friendlier to deal with than Ubuntu."

What is our primary use case?

It's very helpful for development. I'm a software developer. Linux is very easy to install a couple of things from the terminal. We can do most of the things from the terminal. It's very useful, in terms of their application in the cloud server. We can install it in the server, in our community server. If I do something in my local machine in the terminal, I can do the same thing in the cloud server. That's why I'm using Linux Ubuntu.

A few years ago, maybe two years ago, we were affected by some kind of encryption virus, a malware virus. It affected most of the Windows system due to the fact that our system was connected with some LAN connection. However, the Linux-based systems were not affected as it's a different OS. In our office, we just removed the Windows thing and put everything over on the Linux OS. 

What is most valuable?

It's stable.

The solution is free to use and open-source. There is no license needed, which is actually better, even though I like Windows. 

Our cloud server's a Linux-based operating system. I need to deploy my software on our cloud server. I just use Linux on my local server. Whatever I do for my software in my local server, the same needs to happen in the cloud server. That part is easy. I can replicate that software in my cloud server. If I do it in Microsoft Windows in that local development, that is totally different from our cloud server. It will cause issues in our cloud server. That's why I am using Linux in my system.

Linux is virus-free. 

The GUI in relation to the initial setup is very simple. 

What needs improvement?

If you are in the middle of an update, and things are disrupted, it can cause issues. You need to wait for the update to complete before doing anything. 

Windows we can handle by ourselves when it comes to troubleshooting, however, Ubuntu is a bit difficult. We need some other technical person to troubleshoot things for us. It's kind of difficult to maintain as compared to Windows.

In general, Windows is easier to use and friendlier to deal with than Ubuntu.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using the solution for three years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is stable and does not get infected with viruses. It's very resilient and the performance is good. I haven't dealt with bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have about 150 people using the tool.

We do plan to increase usage in the future.

How are customer service and support?

Ubuntu has some community over the internet. There is an Ask Ubuntu community online. Whenever I have some problems, I can check through the website and get some solutions. Sometimes it can take a little longer to resolve things if the question doesn't have an answer online.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I'm also familiar with Windows. In many ways it is easier to use, however, it is more prone to viruses and malware, which can be an issue.

How was the initial setup?

This is an open tool. It's easy to install. From the GUI, we can just click next, next, next, and then install.

The process is very simple. It's not overly difficult.

In terms of maintenance and troubleshooting, we do require a more technical person.

What about the implementation team?

I can handle the initial setup myself. I do not need the assistance of any integrators or consultants. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution is open-source. It doesn't cost anything to actually use it. You just download it from their website and you can start using it. 

What other advice do I have?

Currently, I'm using Ubuntu 20 LTS, 20.04 long-term support.

I'd rate the solution at a seven out of ten. I tend to prefer Windows and would recommend it over Unbuntu.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Buyer's Guide
Ubuntu Linux
April 2022
Learn what your peers think about Ubuntu Linux. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: April 2022.
598,116 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Director, CTO, Co-Founder at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 10
Stable, scalable and well-priced with an easy and straightforward initial setup and good security
Pros and Cons
  • "We use Ubuntu Linux because it is scalable, stable and developer-friendly."
  • "It would be nice to see more compatibility with certain Microsoft solutions, such as OneDrive."

What is our primary use case?

I have used versions 16, 18 and 20, mainly the first two. 

We mostly use the solution for development purposes and also test it on products before and after their release. 

What is most valuable?

The solution has a unique flavor. It is difficult to hack. It has good security features and, from a developer's point of view, provides greater control, including in respect of the processes, internals, networking and IO and voice usage, everything really. 

What needs improvement?

While there are not many features which need to be added, we sometimes are forced to resort to Google Drive sync or OneDrive sync, owing to the lack of availability of certain Microsoft solutions. The team is disparately comprised nowadays, some of whom may be using Microsoft. This would, in turn, require one to use Microsoft himself and there is some compatibility which is simply lacking. Generally speaking, it's okay. Nowadays, everything is moving to the cloud, making browser-based usage easy. 

It would be nice to see more compatibility with certain Microsoft solutions, such as OneDrive. One would want to sync OneDrive, in which case, when the client makes the data available there, we would have easy access to it. These kind of syncing features are not fast. 

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using Ubuntu Linux for more than three or four years. I have been using it for 20. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

When it comes to the stability of Ubuntu Linux versus that of Windows, the former, in respect of developer machines, is less energy consuming, which translates into a longer shelf life. 

The stability is one of the reasons that we use the solution. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution is scalable and easy when it comes to the storage RAM. There is no need to do anything extra. 

One of the reasons we use the solution is for its scalability. 

How are customer service and support?

We have not required canonical support. There is a good online community for support issues which may arise and, as things are easy and straightforward, I generally rely on Google. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

In the past we used RHC Fuse, SUSE and Unix, as Ubuntu was not an option. 

Nowadays, SUSE is considered antiquaited and Linux Ubuntu new. 

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is straightforward and very quick. 

What about the implementation team?

I do not believe we have required any staff for the deployment and maintenance as of yet. So far, everything has been straightforward and easy. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The main advantage of Unix is that it's free. 

Windows Unix and Ubuntu provide a free license and one need just pay for the hardware. Mac is costly. Ubuntu provides a cheaper and better option. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

There are those who prefer Windows for its UI features, but I am not one of them. 

When it comes to the stability of Ubuntu Linux versus that of Windows, the former, in respect of developer machines, is less energy consuming, which translates into a longer shelf life. 

We prefer both Mac and Unix. 

The main advantage of Unix is that it's free. 

Windows Unix and Ubuntu provide a free license and one need just pay for the hardware. Mac is costly. Ubuntu provides a cheaper and better option. 

However, the price criteria is not why we use Ubuntu Linux, but because it is scalable, stable and developer-friendly. 

What other advice do I have?

Around 50 to 70 percent of our staff make use of Unix and Mac, because we are all developers and like these solutions. 

The salespeople make use of Recruitment HR. They use Windows, as do some of the junior staff. However, most of the developers and all of the senior ones use Unix, Ubuntu and Linux. 

I cannot think of any particular advice I would impart to others looking into implementing the solution. 

As I cannot think of any issues I have with Ubuntu Linux, I rate it as a ten out of ten. 

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Computer Manager at a university with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Easy to scale and update with good scalability
Pros and Cons
  • "You can scale the solution quite well."
  • "The solution has a bit of a learning curve. It's not too high, however, you do need to understand the solution to deploy it and work with it effectively."

What is our primary use case?

I'm using it for a file server and for MySQL servers. Those are my primary uses.

What is most valuable?

The solution is easy to install and easy to update.

You can scale the solution quite well.

What needs improvement?

The solution has a bit of a learning curve. It's not too high, however, you do need to understand the solution to deploy it and work with it effectively.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used the solution for a while. I've used it extensively in the last 12 months at least, and over the last two years in general.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is mostly pretty good. The only issue with stability was with power knocking out, and therefore I put a UPS on it. That seemed to solve any issues going forward. It doesn't crash or freeze. There are no bugs or glitches. It's quite good now.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Linux offers very good scalability potential. If a company needs to expand it, it can do so.

I just use the solution for personal use. I don't have a big team using it.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've never used technical support in the past. I can't speak to how helpful or responsive they are.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

While I've been a Mac person since the Mac first came out in 1984, I've added Linux for my server items. I didn't really switch to anything else; I've just added onto what I already do.

How was the initial setup?

It's an operating system and when you install an operating system new, there are all sorts of things you have to go do and go read up on such as how do I do this and how do I do this? For me, it went very, very well, however, it's not something I can do in an afternoon. It took several days to get everything proper. However, it went well so there are no complaints at all in terms of the initial setup.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I can't speak to Unbuntu versus Red Hat or other Linux solutions, however, I am aware that some people use them.

What other advice do I have?

I'm using the solution more for myself. I'm just an end-user. I don't have a business relationship with Linux.

I'm using the latest stable version. If they publish a stable version and then they publish an experimental option, I won't use it. I'll stick with the stable option. 

It's not something that you run on the cloud. It's what's behind cloud services. I've got an Ubuntu machine at home that I use regularly, but it is also my MySQL server and a file server, all in one box.

FileMaker, I know very well and MySQL, I'm learning quickly. Linux, I'm a beginner admin on it. I'm not in a position to make any comments pro or con enough, as I don't know enough about it to make a valid comment.

I'd rate the solution nine out of ten. I've been very happy with it.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Mukesh Regmi - PeerSpot reviewer
Co-Founder- Operation & Digital technology transformation at Cloudtreez
Real User
Top 5
Good interface and pretty stable but the initial setup can be difficult
Pros and Cons
  • "They have provided a new interface, which is great."
  • "You need a lot of bandwidth during the initial setup in order to pull from the repository. Without good bandwidth, you'll get cut off and the implementation will fail."

What is our primary use case?

I primarily use it in my day to day work to test my products. There are a lot of open-source tools on the market, and I need this product to have something to deploy them on.

What is most valuable?

I prefer the new organization of Ubuntu. The repository is excellent.

They have provided a new interface, which is great. 

I don't need the UI so much as the CLI, however, both are excellent.

What needs improvement?

While for the most part, I am quite happy with the new developments on the solution, from my perspective (and as a user or a solutions architect), the product needs to keep on doing enhancements according to the needs sprouting out of recent developments in technology.

There should be a CI/CD process for all software that it is on the market.

Overall, the solution offers me exactly what I need. I'm not really missing any features.

You need a lot of bandwidth during the initial setup in order to pull from the repository. Without good bandwidth, you'll get cut off and the implementation will fail.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for about four or five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is good. Whatever I've needed to maintain, I've been able to on Unbuntu. It doesn't crash or freeze and it's not buggy. I find it to be reliable.

That said, they do have to look at their security measures and maybe tighten those up a bit.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I'm not sure about the scalability of the solution. It may be how you use the solution and how you set it up.

We're just a startup with a small team of maybe ten people. We aren't a big organization.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I'm familiar with many different options, including CentOS, Red Hat, and SUSE. I prefer Unbuntu out of all of these. However, it is a personal preference. Each has its own pros and cons.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is not very complex although I wouldn't exactly describe it as straightforward. You need to have the right people on it. Those that understand the industry will have an easier time. Otherwise, it might not connect to the correct server and will get disconnected, causing the implementation import to fail. 

Countries that lack bandwidth need Unbuntu to offer a CAP server so they can pull off the repository and do updates and upgrades that won't fail if the bandwidth cuts.

Therefore, it's not necessarily the installation itself that gives you trouble. Unbuntu needs to get closer to the countries in order to make it easier to pull from the repository easily.

What other advice do I have?

I highly recommend the solution. It's very popular among developers. It's worked quite well for us.

Of course, solutions like Red Hat and CentOS also have good capabilities. For us, however, Unbuntu is the best.

Overall, I'd rate the solution seven out of ten. It offers me basically everything I need and has worked well for our team.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
IT Manager at a comms service provider with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 20
You get most of the packages you need and all the latest updates very fast
Pros and Cons
  • "Ubuntu is great because you get most of the packages or software you need. You get the latest updates and stuff fairly fast."
  • "We don't have any support, so we search for answers online. However, it can sometimes be a little messy to find the information if you have a highly specific question or a strange problem. It would be nice if finding information were a little simpler. Maybe they could have some portal that could point you to where you can find information."

What is our primary use case?

We use Ubuntu Linux for software development to create a desktop environment for our developers, and we also have some VMs running Ubuntu-based services. 

What is most valuable?

Ubuntu is great because you get most of the packages or software you need. You get the latest updates and stuff fairly fast. 

What needs improvement?

We don't have any support, so we search for answers online. However, it can sometimes be a little messy to find the information if you have a highly specific question or a strange problem. It would be nice if finding information were a little simpler. Maybe they could have some portal that could point you to where you can find information. I think that's more of a general issue with open-source stuff. That's how it works.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using Ubuntu for three or four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

For desktop usage, we find Ubuntu is quite stable. We seldom have a problem with it even running on laptops. I think it's one of the better Linux distributions for running on laptops, and it supports various kinds of laptop hardware. 

How are customer service and support?

We don't have any paid support. We use open-source knowledge bases or forums. We're used to that, so that works fine actually. We haven't tried any professional services for support because we manage the clients ourselves.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We use different Linux distributions depending on our needs. Ubuntu is good for our desktop workstations, but Red Hat is server based, and it's more stable over time, so we use that on the server for backend stuff. It depends on where it's going to run. We use Ubuntu for workstations and Red Hat or CentOS on the server side.

Ubuntu might have some room for improvement on the server side. But then again, we haven't used it much for that use case, so I don't know. It's easier for me to say what Red Hat or CentOS are missing on the desktop side. Nothing comes to mind that Ubuntu is missing in terms of desktop deployments. 

How was the initial setup?

Setting up Ubuntu is fairly simple. It's just a workstation, so that's a relatively straightforward setup. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have special workstations with Ubuntu preloaded because it was the best for artificial intelligence within the hardware. We got the whole system, including the hardware, software, and setup. We have support with the total package, but that's the only thing we have to pay for, and we haven't needed to use that support. In general, we don't have any license costs for Linux systems. Some of the Red Hat systems have license costs, but most are open-source or free versions.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate Ubuntu eight out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Director Lean Infrastructure at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 5
Easy installation without too much configuration; lacking support for graphic drivers
Pros and Cons
  • "Doesn't require significant manual configuration."
  • "Could be better support for graphic drivers and support from the hardware lenders."

What is our primary use case?

I'm a customer of Ubuntu Linux and work as director lead infrastructure. 

What is most valuable?

I love the way that they introduced the Linux system by making a lot of user adjustments for beginners who'd never used Linux before. It makes the solution much more feasible for people who have never used this operating system before to start using it without too much manual configuration. The way that they included third-party drivers for easy installation is great, for example, as are drivers for the video drivers Nvidia and ATI. The operating system is customizable which is also an excellent feature. Basically, you can do almost anything you can imagine from a user interface perspective.

They also do a lot of interesting investment and they make their operating system really usable and adjustable for server systems as well. They have their own Kubernetes offering, which can be used within their operating system. It's great for IT pros.

What needs improvement?

What I think could be improved greatly is the support for the majority of hardware vendors like ATI, Nvidia, and all the other vendors producing hardware and supplying perfect drivers for Windows operating system, but they don't care much for Linux. Canonical are doing a great job, but the third-party support and the vendors should be paying more attention to the Linux operating system, not only with Microsoft drivers and so on.

I'd like to see better support for graphic drivers and support from the hardware lenders when they next provide an update. I believe the third-party vendors are putting their efforts in development for the operating system that has better penetration among users. Unfortunately, they're not paying too much attention because not so many people are using Linux at the moment. It's not their priority. Another aspect might be that the vendors don't like to put a lot of effort into their support and drivers for Linux, because the community that uses Linux is geared towards open source software, and the vendors are rarely happy about that. Still, most of the vendors put their major efforts into the Microsoft ecosystem. I believe it's all due to the market penetration, but it would be great if we could see improvement in this area. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using this solution since it came on the market. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I think it's very stable. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I think it's very scalable due to the nature of the architecture. It's a reliable operating system.

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't had any need to contact technical support. 

What other advice do I have?

I recommend Ubuntu for any user looking to try Linux for the first time. And I believe that most of the things they need would be just working out of the box.

I would rate this solution a seven out of 10. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Operations Manager at a retailer with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 10
Good user interface and a straightforward setup but have not used it long enough to really gauge its usefulness
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution has a very good graphical user interface."
  • "After only a week of using the solution, we haven't really found any limitations or missing features."

What is most valuable?

We're still in the learning phase. However, from what I have seen in the short time I've used it, it's been rather user-friendly.

The installation is pretty straightforward.

The solution has a very good graphical user interface.

What needs improvement?

After only a week of using the solution, we haven't really found any limitations or missing features. The experience has been pretty good so far.

For how long have I used the solution?

We're very new to the solution. We're still learning about the product. It's only been a week or so, so far.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability, so far, has been good. We haven't had any issues with bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze on us. It's been very reliable so far.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have about 20 users on the solution currently. However, I've mostly restricted the usage to just myself as I explore the solution. It's still early days. We haven't done any scaling.

While the solution is still new to us, we'll continue to use it so long as the solution itself proves to be useful to the company.

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't yet dealt with technical support in any way. Therefore, I can't speak to their level of knowledge or responsiveness.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I did previously use a different solution, however this was recommended to us by colleagues and we're trying it out.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is not complex. It's pretty straightforward. We didn't have any issues implementing the product.

The deployment was pretty fast as well. We had it set up within an hour.

What about the implementation team?

I handled the implementation myself. I didn't need the assistance of an integrator or consultant.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution isn't really expensive at this time. So far the version we are using goes, it is being used on the virtual machine. That was a free download.

What other advice do I have?

We've just installed Ubuntu very recently. I'm just trying to see how it is right now. We have it installed on Windows 10 Pro. While we use the on-premises version, we're very interested in exploring the cloud.

I'm not sure just yet if I would recommend the product to others simply due to the fact that I've basically just started using it. I need at least a month of working on it in order to be able to tell if it works how we hope it will and if I would recommend it to others.

Right now, I would recommend the solution at a six out of ten. I need more time to really analyze it properly.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Buyer's Guide
Download our free Ubuntu Linux Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.
Updated: April 2022
Buyer's Guide
Download our free Ubuntu Linux Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.